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The evening world. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, February 21, 1922, Final Edition, Image 1

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TO.NIQHT8 WEATHER
"IF IT HAPPENS IN
NEW YORK
rrs in
THE EVENING WORLD"
VOL. LXII. NO. 21,978
ONE DEAD. EIGHT SHOT.
TEXTILE STRIKERS FIRED ON
WITH RIOT GUNS: ONE DEAD
SEVEN SHOT AT PAWTUCKET
Strikers Hear Riot ct Read,
Then Attack Police While
Arrests Are LLmv; Wade1
Crowd Again Attacks.
Little Children Parade With
Small American Flags in
Natick, R. I., Where Macline
Guns Are in Readiness.
Two Corporations Will Not
Arbitrate Questions of Wage
Reduction and Lengthened
Hours With Workmen
PAWTUCKET, R. I.. Fell. 21.-0nt
man was killed, two wore seriously
wounded, and six persons were Uurt
when the police used riot Runs to
day on a crowd of 1,000 person who
Kathered at the plant of the .lenckcs
Spinning Company, where a strike is
in progress. The guns were hrought
into play when several patrolmen
had been knocked down after (he
arrest of three strike sympathizers
The dead man is J mm D'Asfump
cau of Valley Falls. Tony Regoss
and Joseph Dlas of this city wero
taken to hospitals in a critical con
dition. Mayor Robert A. Kenyon witnessed
the shooting. He had artlved at the
Kates of the plant eiAly in the morn
ing to observe the crowd that lias
customarily (fathered to watch winking-
operatives enter the mill. The
Mnvor. believing that there was
danger in the crowd, read the riot
net. Up then told the patrolmen 'o
be careful and calm but to do thu'r
duty and to "shoot if necessary. "
POLICEMAN KNOCKED DOWN BY
CROWD OF STRIKERS.
Meanwhile, smaller knots of L-trikv
sympathizers had gathered In the
vicinity. Women weie pulling and
hauling nt the girls who were at
tempting to enter the mill and several
of the workers were knocked to the.
pavement. The police put their
shoulders to the crowd and wio
countered with (1st and club blows.
Thrco patrolmen wore knocked down.
A passing furniture van was com
mandeered by the police to servo as
a. patrol wagon, but when the patrol
men attempted to bustlo their pris
oners aboard it they were met with
a 'bombardment of stones. Then riot
(runs swept tho crowd. Eight persons
fell, all but two of whom got -up nnd
made away. Tho crowd dispersed.
The Sth Coast Artillery Company,
which was mobilized in the state
Armory last night for possible duty
(Continued on Second Page.)
HYLAN "PUT AND TAKE"
WAYS IN CITY BUDGET
Parr f'liarll) iiroirliitlnii mnl
Turn It In Police Pensions.
Tho Board of Estimate to-day exe
cuted another feat in the financial game
of "put and take," which has been In
progress since the 1922 budget began
10 ussumo definite bulk. After an cxe
mtive session at which tho advieo of
Corporation Counsel O'Hricn was taken,
tho board lifted $190,152 from the charit
able Institutions appropriations and paid
It back to the police pension fund from
which It is alleged It was extracted or
borrowed to keep tho budget down or
make It appear to bo not quite as big
as It really was.
Comptroller Craig objected strenuous
ly to the transfer of funds from tho
charities appropriations. I said that
no tction which would Jeopardize the
ltys obligations to tho helpless thou
sands depertdlng upon It should bo taken
hjr the Hoard of Estimate.
Acting Mayor Murray Hulbert snid
he fund for charitable institutions con
mined over $6,000,000, and that the most
he transfer could accomplish would ho
i lie depletion of the fund for Decemher,
'322. This could be made up from ac
crual or through a. special icvcnuc bond
AIRSHIP ROMA BLOWS UP
Cloudy.
DAILY.
Copj-rlcht (New
PublMilor
BEER TAX ALONE,
20 GENTS A GALLON,
sCoS.ooo.uoo a Year, Treasury
Experts Agree, Could
Easily Be Obtained.-
By David Lawrence. J
tjpaf!y Correspondent of -The Eve-1
ninu uriu.j (
WASHINGTON. Feb. 21 (Copy-j
light. 1922.) Bootlegger or bonus '
that's the question which now Is
being pi opounded here.
Shall the t'.overnment put a tux on
light wines and licer, or even m beer
only, nnd get more than enough
money with which to pay the soldier
bonus, or shall the bootlegger con
tinue to get enormous profits which
the Government is unable to reach
ei'her through the income, tax oi
through Prohibition enforcement?
In desperation, Congress Is seeking
a method to raise $350,000,000 a year
to pay a soldier bonus. Practically'
every new method of taxation sug
gested has enough foes to prevent
adoption by both Houses of Congress.
The bond Issue has been rejected
by President Harding, the revival of
the excess profits tax and nuisance
taxes have also been tabooed by Mr.
Harding. t
And now the agricultural bloo is
lighting the sales tax on the ground
that it will Increase coat of living to
everybody.
Under these circumstances Repre
sentative John Phillips Hill of Mary
land, author of a bill to tax light
wines nnd beer, asks why not gather,
in at least $000,000,000 a year by such
taxes and buve more than eno-.gh to
pay the soldier bonus?
"The American Legion has no ob
jection to any method thut may be
proposed for raising revenue," said
John Thomas Taylor, Chairman of tho
National Legislative Committee of the
American Legion, who is conducting
tho fight for the bonus. "We believe
tho Senato and House commltees are
sufficiently competent to find ways to
finance the bonus."
Speaking of tho amounts which
could bo raised by taxing light wines
und beer, Representative Hill told this
correspondent to-day that taking the
figures of 1914 on beer alone and Im
posing a tax of 20 cents a gallon tho
total amount that would bo raiseJ
would bo $408,000,000. If that was
the consumption of beer in tho face
of competition with distilled spirits,
how much more beer would bo con
sumed if distilled spirits are abso
lutely prohibited? At least $200,000,
000 more tnxes would be available
answered Mr. Hill. This grand total
of $608,000,000 that might be available
out of beer taxes Is confirmed by
Treasury Department experts.
Most officials have no doubt that
(Continued on Second Page.)
HARDING SELECTS
DEBT COMMISSION
Three of Cibinet, Senator and Con
gressman Named to Arrange
Funding.
WASHINGTON. Feb. 21. Nomination
of Secretary Mellon. Secretary Hughes.
Secretary Hoover, Senator Hmoot and
Representative Jlurton to ba members
of the Allied Debt Funding Commission
win iic soni 10 me senate to-day, Jt
wan announced at tha White Houm,
WOULD PAY BONUS
wbt
"Circnlntion Books Open to All."
York World I br Vrtn
Company, 10'2'J.
NEW
oomstoficiit
T
Mostly All Men This Time,
Only Ten Women Turning
Out for SI 08,000 Suit.
EVEN BLOCK TRAFFIC
Mrs. Wilkenning Testifies
Zukor Contract Was Due
to Her Efforts.
Heroine worshippers und some hero
worshippers to-iky again erowikd
outside the doors of Judge Mack's
court In the Federal Ilulldlng wherein
sat Mary Plckford, defendant In a
ruit for $108,000 for alleged breach
of contract, and her husband, Douglas
Fairbanks.
Doug hlniscir had to.rdd twit Jfiputy
marshals to' clear a path ..hioiiSh the
corridor so Mary could make her en
trance, followed by her mother an.l
a train of lawyers. The crowd surged
so hard then against tho doors that
the deputy marshals had to use foico
to drive It back.
Most of tho spectators, strangely
enough, were men. Only ten women
wero in the court room to admire
Mary's squirrel coat, her blue turban
trimmed with gray wool, her "little"
blue dress with its low white collar
and her white spats and gloves.
Doug's yellow overcoat and need of
a haircut didn't attract much
attention.
Mis. Cora Clara Wilkenning, tho
play broker, who alleges Mary owes
her 10 per cent, of a million-dollar
contract made with Adolph Zukor in
1916, entered quietly nnd alone.
Mrs. Wilkenning, who testified yes
terday that Mary had como to her In
1915 haying she thought she ought to
have a million-dollat contract, 03
Charlie Chaplin had. and arranged
with her to get offois from other
companies so Mr. Zukor would be
fotced to increase Mary's $2,000-'.-week
salary, resumed the stand.
She identified a letter written by
Denjamln H. Hampton in which ho
inclosed a $1,000 check to bind a con
tract between Ilamp'on and Miss
Pickford, which she says sho secured,
whereby Mary was to leceivo $3o0,G,'O
a year. Mr. Hampton, the continued,
withdrew when Mr 7ukor threat
ened suit because the actress was
under contract to him until March,
191ti.
She testified that when sho dis
cussed with Mr. Zukor whether Mary
had signed a contract with another
pcison, Zukor said:
"If Miss Pickford leaves me, I'm
going out of the moving plcturo busi
ness; and I don't Intend to do that."
She then related that sho obtained
an agreement for Miss Pickford with
John R. Freulcr, giving the actress B0
per cent, of stock In the proposed
company and a guarantee of $10,000 a
week for elghty-fivo weeks. Sho Bald
Miss Pickford and her mother were In
her office when Freuler mado the offer.
"They hesitntcd," she testified, "and
Mr. Freulcr said: 'I suppose you're
disappointed because It isn't a million
dollars. Well, I'll add a bonus of
$150,000. That makes a million."
Miss Pickford seemed satisfied with
(Continued on Second Page.)
BALFOUR REFUSES
HIGHEST HONORS
FROM KING GEORGE
Arms Delegate Declines Title for
Fourth Time To Remain
Commoner.
LONDON, Feb. 21.
Tho highest honors which King
George can confer have been for
tho fourth time refused by Arthur
J. Balfour, upon his return from
tho Washington conference.
A peerago was offered to Mr.
Balfour, and when It -was declined
King George offered to make his
Minister n high officer of the
Order of the Garter, something
unprecedented, for It has seldom
been conferred below the rank
of Earl. This also Mr. Balfour
declined.
A H OK m IN
HRONG AT COURT
YORK, TUESDAY,
Largest Semi-Rigid Dirigible in World
Which Exploded Crossing Hampton Roads
DE VALERA URGES
SPLIT IN SINN FEIN
Better That Than One Force
Divided, He Pleads for j
Republic.
DUBLIN, Feb. 21 (Associated
Press). Eamon Do Valora, appar
ently regarding a split of tho Sinn
Fein party as Inevitable, openly ad
vocated such a division in address
ing the Ard Fheis. the National Sinn
Fein Convention, at its extraordinary
session to-day, saying it would be
better for Ireland to have two ar
mies each ready to assist the other
if the country wore Imperilled
rather than ono army divided In It
self. Mr. De Valera's speech was the
outstanding featuro of the morning
session of the Ard Fhels, which had
only begun the discussion of the
party's future policy for or against
the Anglo-Irish Treaty when tho
luncheon adjournment was taken at
1.40 P. M. until 3 o'clock.
When Mr. Griffith roso at the be
ginning of the afternoon session to
move his amendment to Mr. Do Va
lera's resolution, he was given an ova
tion. Mr. Griffith's amendment af
firmed that the peace treaty was fully
Justified by the Sinn Fein Constitu
tion. He Bald he stood by the treaty
because he firmly believed It was in
the best interests of Ireland. Ho then
launched Into a vigorous defense -jt
the agreement.
Mr. Griffith said he was detei mined
that the people should decide the
question of ncceptlng or rejecting the
treaty. Their verdict would bo suffi
cient for him, nnd he would not at
tempt then to obstruct others wotking
for other alms. In the same way, he
would expect. If the Free State sup
porters won, that there would be no
obstruction to It from its opponents
Regarding Ulster, he said be wanted
to win the present l.'nionists fur Ire
land, but wns never In favor of co
ercing them. He closed with an ap peal
for Irish unity nnd pcarc with
honor with Englnnd.
Long before the convention opened
(Continued on Second Page.)
WITH TWO ARMIES
'FEBRUARY 21,
IN TEXTILE STRIKE
BRITISH ROYAL
FESTIVITIES LEADING UP TO
NUPTIALS OF PRINCESS MARY
King and Queen to Receive
1,500 Guests at Bucking
ham Palace.
LONDON, Feb. 21 (United Ptcss).
Festivities connected witli the wed
ding of Princess Mary and Viscount
Ijascelles begin this afternoon, when
King George and Queen Mary receive
1,500 guests at Buckingham Palace.
Tim I'rinco of Wales' present to
his sister will bo a motor car, It was
learned to-day. Tho Iloyal family Is
giving the Princess an antique clock,
wliilu King George nlieady has given
bis daughter a piece of jewelry.
LONDON, Feb. 21 (Associated
Press). Preparations for the wed
ding of Princess Mary and Viscount
Luscelles aro nearlng completion, and
early ficquonters of London's streets
will seo some morning this week
empty carriages being drawn along
tho route, escorted by cavalry, In re
hearsal of the procession from tho
Palaco to Westminster Abbey, ho that
nothing may go awry on tho all-Important
day.
In reality there will Iki two proces
sions on Feb. 28, tho day of the wed
ding. Queen Mary and Queen Mother
Alexandra with their escort nnd at
tendants will form the first, the King
following shortly afterward with the
lirldo and an escort.
Tho route will be thiough Tho Mall,
(Continued on Second Pago.)
FLAPPERS' STYLES
CALLED DISPLAY OF
WEAK-MINDEDNESS
July Furs and Winter Undress
Assailed by Doctor in
Philadelphia.
PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 21.
July furs and winter undress
wero hold as signs or a weak
mind by Dr. Chuilcs Grayson in
an address to tho Medical School
i.f the University of Pennsylvania.
"Feeblemindedness may dis
play Itself In a variety of way.i,"
Dr. Grayson explained, "but
piobably In none more convinc
ingly than by such follies as
wearing furs In July nd light
weight silk stockings and .nj
shoes In January."
The fad of flapping golshei
did not escape without a Jab
from tho doctor.
! "Circulation Books Open
1922.
COUPLE BEGIN
ALLOWED TO LAPSE
cJ0-Day Treaty Provision Ex
pires Hundreds of Millions
Are Involved.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 51 (Asso
ciated Press), Treaty provisions for
tho settlement of claims of American
citizens against Germany, aggregat
ing hundreds of millions of dollars,
lapsed more than a fortnight ago, It
was learned to-day, and entirely new
diplomatic negotiations with Ger
many may bo necessary to pave the
way for a settlement.
I)y tho terms of the separate, peaco
treaty with Germany the United
States reserved the right to Initiate,
within ninety days after the exchango
of ratifications, 'the creation of a
mixed arbitral committee to consider
claims arising out of the World 'ar.
Tho ninety. day period expired on
Feb. 9 without the American Govern
ment having exercised Its irscrved
right.
On March 8, 1921. President Wilson
transmitted to tho, henate data pre
Iarcd by Secretary Colby regarding
claims filed with the State Depart
ment by American citizens, which
shelved a total of 1.253 claims, filed
or In process of filing, with an ag
gregate value of $221,211, 165. Depart
ment officials to-day said those figures
hod remained virtually unchanged.
In addition to rlnlms by American
citizens there aro various pre-war and
wartime losses sustained by the Gov
ernment of the United States, aggre-
'ing $80,534, 311: claims for Arnerl-
property sequestered In Germany
nountlng to $11,H7.3. nnd claims
for losses sustained by American cor
porations operating In Houmanln
when that country wnfl Invaded by the
Gorman Army In 118 The latter
claims aggregate 8T2.fll.7H let. nt a
U.S.DAWIAGE CLAIMS
AGAINST GERMANY
rate of exchange not yet detetmlned.
TO-MOnnOW'8
MEMf
EDITION
to AIL"
I.ntrrfil Srroml-CUM MaMr
Pt Office, .t York, N. t.
;4 AIRMEN DEAD, 1 4 MISSING
: AS ARMY DIRIGIBLE ROMA
EXPLODES AT HAMPTON ROADS
I H
Rudder of Largest Semi-Rigid Air
ship in World Breaks and Forced
Landing Causes Blast That En
velopes Ship in Flames.
' NORFOLK, Jan. 21. The dirigible Roma exploded 'at 2 l M.
to-day with the loss of at least four-Ws. Fourteen are reported missing,
but reports as to the exact number stfTar are unconfirmed. The ship
carried a crew of thirty as it left l-artglett Field. Tliejruder broke as it
circled over the army base and the l?3g!cen(J'slgwly to earth.
As its nose plowed' Into the groli'rtd.'a IrcWndrjids explosion slv.iiA
the frame and the bag1 was enveloped in flames. Four bodies were picked
up. The intense heat of the flames rendered rescue work impossible, and
until the fire is extinguished it will not be known as to the number
of dead.
MARY GARDEN OUT
AS OPERA DIRECTOR
AFTER THIS SEASON
May Remain in Chicago Com
pany as Singer; Not Com
ing to Metropolitan.
Announcement that Mis Mnry
Garden Intends resigning her position
as dliector of the Chicago Opera
Company nt the close of this season,
if some ono can be found to replace
her, was made to-day by Howard K.
Potter, her secretary. He added that
Miss Garden cvpects to remain with
the organization as a singer.
Definite decision will be withheld
Mr. Potter went on, until Miss
Garden shall have had a conference
next month in Chicago with HutnuO
Instill, tho new President of the opera
company. If Mr. Instill Insists that
she shall remain ns tho artistic head
of tho organization.- she will do so,
but Just now Miss Garden fcds it to
be more worth her while to retlro
from that office.
"Miss Garden has received n $250,
000 offer for a concert tour from a
Now York manager," Mr. Potter said.
"and she has many other Interests
which she has found Impossible to
carry out, owing to the demands upon
her time exacted by her directnrMbip
and the attending responsibilities, an
noyances, troubles and hnrassmcnts of
tho position."
Luclcn Muratore, leading tenor of
the Chicago company, stated posi
tively that unless Miss Garden to
f.'.gns us director he will not sign a
contract to Blng with tho organiza
tion next ycur.
A representative of the Metropoli
tan Opera Company said to-day Unit
no negotiations wero pending witu
Miss Garden, lookin,; to her joining
that rompany.
CHICAGO, Feb. 21 (Associated
Press). Samuel Insull, President of
the Chicago Civic Opera Association,
which has charge of tho Chicago Op
era Company, declared he was not
surprised when Informed to. day that
Mary Garden planned to resign us
Director at the end of tho present
season.
"I havo known for some tlmo that
sho planned a reorganization of hir
personal affairs," he said, "nnd It Is
only natural sho should tire of the
arduous duties of directing a company
of grand opera singers.
"I sincerely trust Miss Garden Is
not In nny way considering severing
herself enUrely from the Chicago
Company."
WEATHER Rain) Wrmr.
PRICE THREE CENTS
RIOTS
? The Koma was put chased by the
United Slntcs from tho Italian Gov
ernment. It was brought to this country
aboard ship, after the disaster to th"
Dirigible Zlt-2, purchased from Great
llrllaln, over the City of Hull, ling
laud. The hugo nirslilp was making a
icrieu of test lllghts. It had been
planned to take It on a tour of the
whole United States.
Tho Itoma was the largest dlrlgllil
owned by tho United -States Govern
ment and was purchased from Ital?
Her mammoth gas bag had p. capacity
of more than a million cubic feet. A
numlier of passengers were said to
have been aboard.
Four men were rescued, but we.,
badly burned.
An attempt was to be mado by the
Itoma to smash the world's record for
speed with a dirigible. I-nngley Field
olllces confidently cxpectd the ship to
make nlucty miles an hour ci the
trip. The accident took place two
hours after the ship left her bangai .
WASHINGTON. Feb. 21. Tie
Itoma, queen of the American arm't
dirigible, was one of the largest craft
of Its kind In the world. It was the
greatest dirigible In tbiscountry.
Tho big ship, only recently chr.s
tcnxl hero with elaborate ceremonies,
wns built for tho United States in
Italy.
BAD CONSTRUCTION
REPORTED CAUSE OF
FATAL ZR-2 WRECK
Sensational Disclosures Promised
When Air Ministry Makes
Its Report.
LONDON, Feb. 21. What are char
acterized as "sensational disclosures"
are made in the Air Ministry's report
into the U-38 disaster at Hull last
summer, says tho Air correspondent
of the Kvenlng Star to-day. The re
port has not yet been made public.
Tho R-JS, renamed tho ZH-2
when it was purchased by the United
States from the British Government,
collapsed over Hull while on a test
trip, with tho loss of more than forty
lives, Including nearly a pcore o'
Americans who wero to have formed
part of her crew.
The correspondent, who sayi no de
cision has been yot reached in ie
gnrd to making public the report, j -serfs
that much of the Air Mlnisti .
Inquiry will be found to contain find
ings to all intents and purposes d.:i -metrically
opposed to those of Me
naval airship experts, and ho aaus
that "the whole system under whici
tho ship was constructed Is strong!
condemned."
s.

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