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New-York daily tribune. [volume] (New-York [N.Y.]) 1842-1866, March 17, 1843, Image 1

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THE NEW-YORK TRIBUNE
is toblished svrur morminc,
At 160 ffasuncsL, (opposite the City Hall,) New Fork
And delivered ta City Subscribers for Nine Cents per week.
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SET THE WEEKLY TRIBUNE, a very large naoer
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THE TR1B U N E.
IvCbtttD.
THE NOCTES AM BROSI AN.*". OF " BLACKWOOD "
Complete in Four Volumes. Philadelphia: Carey _
Hart; New-York: Wiley _ Putnam.
SECOND NOTICE
'The Shepherd,' as he is represented in these
pages, is a glorious character, surpassed by few in
the range of fiction?for the skill, we mean, with
which he is sketched, and the distinct individuali?
ty, the truth, which marks the portrayal. Pre?
tending to scorn classical learning and the accom?
plishments of the schools?not as worthies* or un?
desirable, but merely because he knftws little or
nothing of them, he exhibits the most marked
keenness of insight, a delicate senskivenl'sa to
every thing that is beautiful?in the words he
hears from the lips of his friends, in the sounds
which meet his eurs from the world around, in the
flower* of the fields, in art and nature, reaching
his heart from tbe glance of an eye, spread out
upon the calm face of the Earth, or wherever eise
it mny exist : and the finest, richest words that
man could utter seem to flow from his lips like their
native music, rough but not harsh, full and swel?
ling, tw give utterance to the feelings awakened
within. Tradition tells us that Hogg often became
?very angry, and hud many a quarrel with his friend
Wilson for the strange things he sometimes made
him utter; but surely he might have been appeased
by the fine flashes of eloquence and poetry which
so often made amends for the awkward sayings
the jibes against friends whom Hogg for the
world would not have offended, which North so
often put into his mouth; for could the Ettrick
Shepherd claim these as truly his own words bid
fame would be still brighter than his delightful
Tales have made it. Hogg is decidedly the Hero
of the book : we like him better even than North ;
though this seems an absurdity, for North made
him, and is certainly entitled to whatever credit
attache* to his handiwork. But looking at both
as poetic cteations, (and in this character they are
among the finest in our recent literature.) there is
a bold burliness, a-hearty, whole-souled honesty in
the Suepherd's character, which, joined to the
splendid genius and grace that shine upon them,
give him greater favor La our eyes than even the
Mwnarch Christopher enjoys.
But leaving the talkers let us go on with what
they said ; for wide as is the wilderness of choice
things spread out in the fjur volumes, the first of
which we have not yet finished, we are determined
not to leave it without bringing forth at least some
few more clusters of the grapes wherewith the land
abounds. We are not attempting to criticise the
book?for we bear in mind this saying of Tickler?
worth remembering, if wc mistake not:
' I care not a single curse,' said he, on the
twenty first Ambrosian Night, ' for all the criricism
that ever was canted, or decanted, er recanted.
Neither does the world. The world Uikes a poet
as it finds him, and seats him accordingly above or
below the suit. The world is as obstinate as a
million mules, and will not turn its head on one
side or anotker for all the shouting of the criticnl
population that ever was shouted. It is very pos?
sible that the world is a bad judge. Well then
?appeal to posterity, and bo hanged to you?and
posterity will arlirm the judgement with costs.'
* Did you ever meet any of the Lake Poels in
private society V asks North?and many a reader,
we doubt net, would be most glad to learn his an?
swer. Hear it first of the sole survivor?one spo?
ken of now contemptuously nowhere, but venera?
ted by the world:
' Five or six times. Wordsworth has a grave,
soiemn, pedantic, awkward, out-of-the-worldish
look about him that rather puzzles you as to his
probable profession, till he begins to speak?and
then to be sure, you set him down at once for a
Methodist preacher.'
Unsatisfactory after nil?and yet it gives a good
hint of Wordsworth's personct. Hear Tickler yet
aguin :
' Chantry's bust flatters his head, which is not
intellectual. The forehead is narrow, and the skull
ol together too scanty. Yet the baldae??, the grav?
ity, and the composure, are impressive, and, on
the whole, not unpoetical. The eyes are dim and
thoughtful, und a certain sweetness of smile occa
sionally lightens up the strong lines of his coun?
tenance with an expression ol courtcousness and
philanthropy.'
And what will they say of COLERIDGE?of whom
a dignified Professor of Moral Philosophy in Co
lumbia College once complained tbat he would not
allow him, in a conversation which he reported,
to edge in a word (though by his published report
he managed to get in three to Coleridge's two);
whom the Editors ef our own monthly Knicker?
bocker, under the advice of a 4 distinguished gen?
tleman from abroad,' once solemnly voted a "por?
tentous bore " ; Coleridge?of whom the gentle
EttA, waxing enthusiastic, exclaimed, " By
Heaven! his talk is as ?ne as an an?cVs!"
whom Hazlitt, as he boasts, once walked ten
miles through mud and sleet to hear preach?and
then wished that he would never stop ? Of him
we have this short but expressive sentence:
4 North. 1 have heard Coieridge. That man
is entitled to speak on till Doomsday?or rattier
the Geiiius within him, for he is inspired. Wind
him up, and away he goes, discoursing most ex?
cellent music?without a discoid?full, ample, in?
exhaustible, serious, and divine.'
Here is a bit of Table-Talk about a man at this
day of great fame, of unquestionable and high
ability. Christopher North's rampant Toryis m j
evidently lends vigor to his eloquent and sturdy vi?
tuperation :
4 Tickler. Brougham is a volcano?an erup?
tion?a devouring ilame?a storm?a whirlwind
?a cataract?a torrent?a sea?thunder and earth?
quake. You might apply the same terms, with
the same truth, to u Billingsgate fishwife.
4 North. Brougham's invectivo is formidable
chiefly for its vulgarity. One hates, loathes, fears
to be "pelted with the mud and missiles of an ud'u
riated demagogue?just as a gentleman declines
tbe pre tie ted combat with a carman, although con?
scious that in thieo rounds he would leave the ruf?
fian senseless in the rug.
4 Tickler. Tbat sometimes occurs?as in the
case of Canning.
' North. The straight bitting of tbe Foreign
Secretary soon dorses your round-about hand-over
bead miiieri, like Harry Brougham.
'Tickler. Yet how.- the outrageous violence
and fury, arms aloft, eyes agog, cheeks convulsed,
and lip* quivering, pa? with the multitude for
demonstration of strength and science-.'
' Nortu. Brougham never lights at poiats?ho
BY GREELEY & McELRATH.
TOIL. II. WO. 29*>.
throws away bis blows?and beyond all other men,
lays himself open to fatal punishment, although
he has weight, length, and reach, and generally
enters the ring in good condition, and after long
and severe training, yet has he lost every battle.?
His backers are never confident?jet is a casual
turn-up, it must be allowed that he is an ugly cus?
tomer.
' Tickler. Notwithstanding the truth of all this,
lam a great admirer of Brougham. He is un?
questionably a man of great and versatile talents.
1 North. Yes?and to hear his lickspittles
speak, you would think that a man of great and
versatile talents was a miracle; whereas there are
pome thousands of them publicly acknowledged in
England ar. this day. We bear of his wonderful
literary- talents?wherein exhibited ?
* Tickler. The Edinburgh Review.
1 North. Very well?many able papers in tbe
Edinburgh Review no doubt?which are his? Let
us suppose ail of thvm, and that the trash is Jef?
frey's, Smith's. Mackintosh's, ?tc. J are the best of
those papers astounding, prodigious, miraculs-us.
prophetic of the Millennium 1 I read them with?
out awe?my hair does not rise?my knees do not
tremble. No cold sweat overspreads my nged
frame?I read on?on?on?am pleased to see in?
tuitively the fallacy of all he writes?and fall
asleep with a calm conscience.'
Here's a touch of Philosophy about Libels from
Christopher North. Mayhap it will do no harm
to copy it in these days; many a luckless ' dog' there
is who stands sorely in need of some sound advice
like that conveyed in the allegory that followeth:
' Tickler. The newspapurs have been lately
filled with contemptible libel-actions, 1 observe,
North. How does .Maga escape 7
'North. A dog of any sense, finding a kettle
tied to his tail, sneaks into a close in town, or lane
in the country, and sitting down on his encum?
bered and jingling rump, whines on some benevo?
lent Howard to untie the tin. It is done, and the
cur repairs^ to his kennel, without Amber yelp to
the public. A dog of no sense scarrpers along tht*
street, himself a whole band of instrumental music,
knocking the kettle against every abio that meets
him,till his master.a greuter foul than biwse]f,insist?
on reparation, and summons the impugner of the
cynic system to a court of justice, savage for dam?
ages. It has so happened, that the curs I have oc?
casionally so treated have been of the former class,
and have found their advantage in such conduct,
for I thenceforth spared them ; and they all know
me when they meet me on the street, some of them
even wagging their tails in approbation of my past
severity, and gratitudefor my present forbearance.'
But. let us listen to the Shepherd?the inimita?
ble Shepherd?again as he sits, as he would say,
' 8oliliqueer.in' ' solus in the fine Southeast Draw?
ing Room of Picardy Place. How finely he moral?
izes about everything he sees?the coals in the
grate, the figures on the clock, &c. Thus he be?
gins :
' Perfec' enchantment.' Ac single material coal
fire multiplied by min ors into a score o' unsubstan?
tial reflections, ilkti image burriin' awa' as bricht ly
up its ain shadowy chioley, as the original proto
Leep! Only, ye dinna hear th^ phantom-fires mur?
muring about the bars?their flickering tongues
are a' silent?they might seem to reek at a puff o'
the prototeep,?but sic seemin' wadna dim the at?
mosphere o' this splendid saloon. The refraction
and reflection o' light's a beautifu' mystery, and
I wu8 I understood the sceeneo o' optics. And yet
aiblins it's better no?I mightna then wi' sic. h
shudder o' instantawneous delicht, nacthing shun
o' religion, glower upon the rainbow, the appari?
tion o' the storm. Let pheelosophers ken cau-es?
poets efiecks. Ye canna ca' him an ignorawmus
that kens efiecks?and then in the moral world,
which belongs to men o' genius like me and Burns,
there's for the maist part a confused but no an ob?
scure notion o' cause accompanying the knowledge
o' eiFer.ks?difficult to express formally, like a
preacher in his poopit, or a professor in his chair,
but coloring the poetry o' efi'ccks wi' the tinge o
the phcelosophy o' causes, sue tbat the reader al
loos that reason ar.d imagination are ane. and that
there 's nac truth like fiction. 0, ye bit bonny
bricht burniu' fires there's only ane among ye a' that
gies u>ny heat! A'the rest's but delusion?just
as whew the evening star lets loose her locks to the
dews high up in heaven, every pool among the
raountui-is has its Eidolon, sae that the eart h seems
strewn with stars, yet a' the while there's in reali?
ty but ae star, and her name is Venus, the deiie.ht
o' gods and men and universal natur. Ma faith,
you 're a maist magnificent time-piece, towerin'
there on the mantel, mair like a palace wi' tbae
ivoty pillars, or the verra temple o' Solomon! To
what n heichtman has carried the mechanical airts
?till they become imaginative! There's poetry
in that portal?mercy on us, twa figures cumin' out.
haun in hnun, frue the interior o' the building intill
the open air, apparalled like wee bit Christians,
yet nne bigger than fairies. Weel, that beats a'
?first the tane and then the tirher, wi' its tiny sil?
ler rod, seemin' to strike the chimes on a sheet o'
tinsel?nsd then atV and awa in amang the ticks o'
the clock wark ! l'uir creturs, with a' their fantas?
tic friskinrss, they maun lead a slavish life, up and
out to their work, every hour o' the day und nicht.
Sabbaths and a', snc that they haena lime even to
finish a dream. Tbat's waur than human life it
sell; for the wee midshipman in a man-o'-war is
aye allooed four hours' sleep at a streatch, and
mair than that is the lot o' the puirest herd callant.
wha, hacin nat- pawrents, is glad to suir a Imrrl
master, wilbouten ony wage?a plaid, parritch,
and a cauff-bed. Monyv certes, is the curious con?
trivance for notin' time ! The hour-glass?to my
mind, the maiit impressive, perhaps, o' them a'?
as ye sec the sand perpetually dteep-dreepin' awa
momentarily?and then u' dune just like life.
Then, wi1 a touch o' the haun, or whawmle in
which there's aye something baith o' feelin' and o'
thocht, there begins anither era, or epoch of an
hour, during which ane o' your ain bairns, wha has
been lang in a decline, and visited by the doctor
only when he's been at ony rate passin1 by, gies a
groanlike sich, und ye ken in a moment that he's
dead?or an earthquake tumbles down Lisbon, or
some city in Calabria, while a' the folk, men, wo?
men, and children, fail down on their knees, or are
crushed aiblins by falling churches.'
And so he rambles on for three pages farther,
stopping only to sing a song to a cracked fiddle he
finds on the mantel, and then launching off again
into moralities aijd poetics till he finds he's 'get
tin' as hoarse an a craw,' and thinks he had better
' ring the boil for a jug.' This is the way he al
ways talks when, as he says, ' Nature lets him
low-so, like a water that has been gettin' itscll fed
a' nicht far afT at its source amang the mountains,
and that a' ut ance, when-bits o' callanu and clas?
sics are piouteriti' about fishin' for mennows wi'
thread and r.ruckitpins, comes doon red and roarin',
in spate, and gin the bairns hadna heard the weed
kenned tbunner, up aboon the linn, as it approached,
wad hae aweepit them in twa, three huurs free
Mingan to the Main,?na, broken at ae charge a'
the squadrons o' cavalry that ever nickered, frae
queerassears to Cossacks, and made parks o ar?
tillery play spin like sae many straes 1
But we are neglecting Christopher, and must
make amends;?let ua havo, then, this fine paa
OFFICE NO. 160 3N
_2VEW-YORK, FRIDAY UK
1 sage from Night the Twenty-Second in which
truths are nobly, strongly toid, which it will J'
this especial age no special harm to tVar. They,
(The Shepherd and Christopher,) talk for a time
about Shakspeare and Othello; Nonh asks bim
if he 'sees his driftJames candidlv confesses
he does not, whereupon he is exhorted thus :
'North. Well, then, mark my drift, James.
We idolize Genius, to the neglect of the worship
of Virtue. To our thoughts. Genius is all in all?
Virtue absolutely nothin;. Human nature seems
to be glorified in Shakspeare. because his intellect
was various and va-t, and because it comprehend?
ed a knowledge of all the workings, perhaps, of
human being. But if there be truth in that faith
to which the Christian world is bound, how dare
we, on that ground, to look on Shakspeare as nl
most greater and better than Man I Why, to crit?
icise one of his works poorly, cr badly, or inso?
lently, is it held to be blasphemy ? Why ? Is
Genius so sacred, so holy a thing, perse, and apart
from Virtue ? Folly all 1 One truly good iicti"u
performed is worth all that ever Shak-pcare wrote.
Who is the Swan of Avon in compan.-yn to the
humblest being that ever purified his spirit in the
waters of eternal life ?
'Shepherd. Speak awa! I '11 no interrupt you
?but whether 1 agree wi' you or no 'a an it he r ques?
tion.
' North. Only listen, James, to our eulogies on
Genius, flow Virtue must veil her radiant fore?
head before that idol! How the whole world
speaks out her ceaseless sympathy with the woes
of Genius! How silent as trosr., when Virtue
pines ! Let a young poet poison himself in wrath?
ful despair?and ail the .\Iuses weep over his un?
hallowed b:er. Let a young Christian die under
the visitation of God, who weeps .' No eve but
his mother's. We know that such deaths arc every
day?every hour?but the thought affects us not?
we have no thought?and henp after henp is ad?
ded, unbewailed, to city or country churchyard.
Bur. let a poet, forsooth, die in youth?pay the debt
of nature early?and natura herself, throughout her
elements, mu.-t in turn pay tribute to his shade.
'Shepherd. Dinna mak me unhappy, sit ?
dirina rr.uk me sao very unhappy,sir, 1 beseech you
?try and explain awn what you hae said, to the
satisfaction o' our hearts and understanding.
' North. Impossible. We are base idolaters.
'T is infatuation?not religion. Ii it Genius, or is |
it Virtue, that ?hall send a soul to Heaven '
' Shepherd. Virtue ; thero 's nac denying that;
Virtue, sir, Virtue.
'North. Let us then feel, think, speak, and
act, us if we so believed, [s jmetry necessary to
our salvation ? Is Paradise Lost better than the
New Testament7
'SHEPHERD; Oh.' dinna mak me unhappy. Say
again that poetry is religion.
' North. Religi in has in it. the finest truest
spirit of poetry, and the finest and truest spirit of
poetry has in it the spirit nf religion. But?
' Shepherd. Say nae rriair, say no? mair. 1' m
satisfied wi' that?
'North. Oh! James, it makes my very soul
sick within mo to hear the puny winnings p:>ured
by philosophical sentimentalists over the failings,
the errors, the vices of Genius! There has been,
1 fear, too much of that traitorous dereliction of
tho only true faith, even in some eloquent eulogies
on the dead, which I have been the means of giv?
ing to the world. Have you not often felt that,
when reading what has been said about our own
immortal Burns ?
' shepherd. I have in my calmer momenta.
' NwRTH. While tho hypocritical and the base
exaggerated all that illustrious man's aberrations
from the right path, nor had the heart to acknow?
ledge the manifold temptations strewed around his
feet,?the enthusiastic and tho generous ran into
the other extreme, and weakly?L must cot say
wickedly?strove to extenuate them into mere tri?
fles?in too many instances to deny them altogeth?
er; and when too flagrant to be denied, dared to
declare that we were bound to forget and forgive
them on the score of the poet's genius?as if gen?
ius, the guardian of virtue, could ever be regarded j
as the pander to vice, and the slave of sin. Thus
they were willing to sacrifice morality, rather than
the idol set up before their imagination should be
degraded ; and did far worse injury, and offered
far worse insult to virtue and religion, by thus
slurring over the offences of Burns against bolh,
than ever was done by those offences themselves ;
for Burns bitterly repented whit they almost can?
onized ; and the evil practice of one mat! cun never
do so much evil to society as the evil theory of
a thousand. Burns erred greutly and grievously ;
and since the world knows that he did, as well
from friends as from fi. es, let us be lenient and mer?
ciful to him, whose worth was great; hut just and
faithful to that law of right, w hich must on no con?
sideration be violated by our judgements, but
which must maintain and exercise its severe and
-overcign power over all transgressions, and more
especially over the transgressions of those to whom
nature has granted endowments that might have
been, had their possessors willed it, the ministers
of unrningled good to themselves anslthe whole hu?
man race.'
We ara making but slow progress?but wc can?
not pass over this splendid passage by 1 The Opium
Eater, De QrjLNCET, who, after a time found ad?
mittance into the magic circle, and put the Shep?
herd to sleep with his logic, and roused him again
to an ecstacy of delight by his fine bursts of elo?
quent imagining. The Stepherd asks him how
many children he has, and receives this line an?
swer?after being told 'Soven';?
' Opium Eater. It seemeth strange the time
when as yet those seven spirits were m>t in the
body?and the air which I breathed partook notwf
that blessedness which now to me is my life. Ano?
ther sun, another mo?n, other stars, since the lace
of my fitit-borw. Another earth, another heaven!
I loved, methought?before that face smiled?the
lights and the shadows, the flowers and the dews,
the rivulets thai 3ing to pilgrims in the wild; the
mountain wells, where all alone the ' book-bo?
somed' pilgrim sitteth down; and lo! far below
the many rivered vales sweeping each to its own
lake?how dearly did I loveye all! Yet was that
luve fantastical?and verily not of thedeeper soul.
Imagination over this'"'visible diurnal sphere,'
spread out her own spiritual qualities, and made
the beauty that beamed back upon her dreams.
Nor wonted tenderest touches of humanity?as my
heart remembered some living flower by the door
of far-up cottage, where the river is but a rilL
But in my inner spirit, there was then a dearth
which Providence hath since amply, and richly,
and prodigally furnished with celestialfooi?which
is also music to the ears, and light to the eyes, and
the essence of silken softness to the touch?a fam?
ily of immortal spirits, who but for me never had
been brought into the mystery of accountable aad
responsible being! Of old I used to study the
spring ; but now its sweet sadness steals unawares
into ray heart?when among the joyous lambs I
see my* own children at play. The shallow nest of
the cushat seems now to me a more sacred thing
in the obscurity of the pine-tree. The instincts of
all the inferior creatures are now holy in my eyes;
fur, like reason's self, they have their origin ia love.
Affection for my own children has enabled me to
sound the depths of gratitude. Gazing on them at
their prayers, in their sleep, I have had revelations
of the nature of peace, and trouble, and innocence,
and sin, and sorrow, which, till they had smiled
iASSAU-STREET.
OK?TOG, !?1ARCU 17, iS13.
and wept, offended and been reconciled. I knew
not?how ccuid I ??to be within the range of the
far-Hying and far-fetching fpirit r.f love, which is
the Hfe-of-Iife of all things beneath the sun. moon,
and stars.7
Do y. kei, sir.' very naturally asks the poet,
when De Quincy stop?, ' that I love to hear ye
speak far best ava' when you lav aside your logic V
But we have exhausted our utmost limits, and
.must conclude our Extracts. The book is full of j
passages of equal power and boauty with those, wc
have quoted almost at random; introduced, too,
inrocasua! conversation, uhich lends them sprijht
liness and vivacity, which are quite lost by their
detached citation. The colloquial style is pre?
served throughwut, and the dialogue is maintained
with unsurpassed brilliancy and ability fro::: the
first volume to the last. Each man speaks in his
own proper character, and throughout the wb.Ae
no-one seems to say that which might more prop?
erly have been uttered by another. The lefty im?
agination and nervous strength of the OrtiTM Eat?
er, die discursive and ungraceful, but most bril?
liant and exuberant genius of the shepherd, the
pointed and keen-sighted bitterness of Tickler,
the learned and didactic criticism of Odohkrtt
the snappish and sharp wit of Jeffrey, and the
magisterial dignity of North himself, ar-: carri .1
into every chapter of the Nodes, and wrought out
with the ability and skill of the most successful
dramatist We are sorry we are unable to cite
some of the Songs which were sung, and the I'oems
recued ir. thut goodly company, for many of them
are of rare brilliancy and polish.
Among the criticisms scattered throughout the
work, otir eye fell upon the name of Macaolay,
which frequently occurs, and the admirers of this
brilliant writer will be interested in witnessing the
blows he now and then receives. Macaulay's Re?
view of Croker's Edition of Boswelfs L'fe of
Johnson, is one of his most celebrated papers?
mat ked apparently by the most diligent research
into the viinulics of dates and names, whereby
he seems to convict Croker of the most unpardon?
able ignorance, and by a vigor of vituperation un?
usual even with him. 1 Johnson,' says he, was a
man ' of whom the best biography ever written
in any age, ur in any country, has been written by
the greatest fool who ever wrote a biography ; and
which same biography has now again been edited
by the ne.rt greatest fool of however distinguished
name in letters and in the affairs of State.' [Those,
by the way, who complain of the personalities of
the ' Noctcs ' should call moit vociferously fur an
? Expurgated Edition ' uf Macaulay's Miscellanies
?for nu wiiter of English has ever been more
malignantly or brutaly personal lima he.] Near
the opening of the fourth volume of the ' Noctcs '
is an extended conversation upon this article, in
which North outdoes Macaulay in the nicety and
j diligence of his investigations, and coavicts him
of complete as well as most impudent ignorance
with regard to almost every one of thuse minute
points for which he ao bitterly maligns Croker. It
is a capital reply ond will well .repay attention.
The whole book is a feast of the choicest sort?
whereat men of ail tastes m?y be gratified, and
none need go away uriplensed, save those who have
no taste at all. Portions of it have lost rnncb o:
the interest they had when first written ; but even
these will be read for the vivacity and sturdy sense
they manifest, and at all events will most readily
be pardoned for the sake, of the rest. Tito publi?
cation i3 an enterprise eminently deserving public
support; and this, we doubt not, it will receive,
fur notwithstanding the vast amount of literary mat?
ter continually issued from the press, general read?
ers of taste and discernment?to adopt a puti cited
by the buok itseif,
4 No.\ rossu.iT sine NOCTJBU5 tlacere.'
Social Science.
The article upon Association prepared for this
day's paper will appeur to-morrow. It will con?
tain a .-.ketch of Fourier's character.
WARRANTED Pi RK Curled Uiir
MATTR\J55E-s.?Southern and Western eeutle
men, and alt otbers in want of lue above article, wouhl 'in
' well before purchasing elsewhere to cat! at our Warehouse
and examine our ?tock, ??s we are confident that atier anex
j tene.ee in th?r Upholstery Bu-inrssol upwards ot tweniy
!??" years, we can Furnish th-'m with Beddingot tin- nr-t
quality a* low. it not. lower than any < ther responsible house
in or out of (be city. G P. 4: J. GRATACAP,
Upholstery. Paper Hangings, Wim.ow Sb-ide au-i Btidd Ug
; mh!6 2w- Warehouse, No. til .Maiden-lane.
FAMILIES wishing to obtain pure old
JC fasbiooffd BROWN 01 PALE FELLOW SOAP, can
do to b. applying to the subscribers, who mannfact ire il
from the b^st materials, and warrant il tree from fish od, or
Other injurious substances so much us?-d in making Soap,
and by *hicu il is rer.dr-red offensive, and frequently bas a
sticky qnaiity by wbi:h it may be deteeted.
A'so, Patent Miuld and Margarine Candles. White and
vjrirgated scented Soap, in t>?rs or cakes, manu'Hc ored by
W. HL'L'. it SON. 103 Clifi-at
nrbSi*
GUS HEN MILK.?Pure and whole
tome Milk,from the choicest D*;ri<-s in Orange coun?
ty, may be obtained every day at 133 Reade-street, near
W-..t; a!>y at 1 Hi lienry-s'.rfet, near Pilte, at Four 'Tt-1,1-.
per quart Als), a supply ol frrsb Creameverv day. Ti*ov
who want a pare article wiil please make a trial,
mis 2*? _T. SKLLKCK.
DR. JAYN K' ri E X l;E C TOR ANT.?
La.mhertsville. N.J. April 27, 1342.
Dr. Jayn*-?Dear Sir: By the blessing of G xl your Ei
pectorant has effected a cure in m<* of a most distressing
complaini. In December last 1 was se.zed with rrt ;)1 ? i
riiv by a paroxysm of ibe Asthma; a disease with which I
bad bee:: atuicted for many ye irs past, L w.xsaiterjdrd with
n hoar-nne-s and soreness of ibe lungs and threat, together
with a laborious cougb.and complete prostration ot strength,
and worn out wiib sutTocation, a bottle of your Expector?
ant was sent io my house. Ai first I thought it was n..ihing
but quackery, but seeing it so highly recommended by Dr.
Goii.g. wirb wh>mi 1 was well acquainted, I was induced to
iry it. and in a few days it compieif lr cured me, n;>r b ;?"? I
ever bad any return ot the disease sioce. I have now I Mined
so bigb an op ni?n of your aiedicme thai if I had hui a few
boules of it, and could obtaia no more, I wou.d not pirl
with them for ten dollars each.
Yours, most respectfully,
J"H\ SEGER,
Pastor of the Biptisi Church at Lnmbcrtsville, N J.
Prepared only bv Dr. D. JAYNE, CO Soaih Tbird-sirett, [
Ph Udeiphia, and 305 Broadway, New-York.
. Price, $1 per botUe. mhi6 5t
TOOLS : TuOLSTT"Tll?LSTU
ALBERTSON'S, CONGER'S. HOR
TON'S and GIPFORD'S warranted Cast SieH
Coopers. Carpenter sind Ship Carpenters' EDGE TOOLS,
can oe had ai wholesale and retaii, or" OSBORN St LIT?
TLE.. 33 Fulton street, flea York, (10 per cent, allowed
to merchants); and who steep on hand a fall assortment ol
Coopers' Tojls. Iron Rivets, Trass Hoops, Stave Jointers,
Stock Howelis and Crozes.
Also, a foil assortment of Hardware, Culler/. Nails, Sac
Lc. CHARLES OSBORN,
j23 3m- CHARLES S. LITTLK
FINAL DIVIDEND?The Trustees of
ths Hope Insurance Company hereby give notice that
a final Dividend of the assets of slid Company ot 56 cents
per shore will be paid to tb* Stockhol 'ers on ?r alter the
JSUi day of March at the orB'e of JOHN R. TRACY, No,
75 Merchants'Exchange, tf. Y.
3D* State paper copy. _n2Sw?
HAYDEN'S Preinium Pens.?A Silver
Medal was awarded J. Hayden for his '* very supe?
rior Pens" by the American Institute at its last Fair. The
Gorernment bare given them the Preference, and the best
accountants and many of the public instiunions will ose nc
other Pens. They havejestiy obtained the highest reputa?
tion, and are not surpassed if ecualed by any in the country.
The trade are ?applied at the Manufacturer's prices by the
agesa J. k. P. HAYDEN, 5 flaa-street.
Agentssiso for SIHngara School and CoanUng-hoasa Ink
Stands. ray3 U*
FIVE DOLLARS A YEAR.
V?HOLE IVO. 603.
Cheap Pnhlicaiions.
CT The rolIoTri^s? 2>ubiicalione are for sale
at the office of The Tribune, Nassaa-itreet, opposite the
> City Hall:
LIPS OP JOHN a CALHOUN. 12j
FORES1 DAYS, a Romance of Did Tunes, by <i.
P. tl James. (Uarptr-). 12J
THE LAS f OP 1 HE BARONS?by E. L. Bulwer 23
ADAM BROWN, ibe Merchant, by.Horace Smith,
Harpers'edition. 12J
COOLER'S AMERICAN IN EGYPT, 10 be coo>
pteteO in 6 Nik. No. 1.2 and 3 n~n. ready. 25
ALISON'S HISTORY OP EUROPE si.ice I?:?; a
magnificent work of the highest chancier; to be
Co-.Uj.lnrd in 16 iiunil?er>. No. 5 now ready, each 25
URE'S DICTIONARY o: Arts, Maiia acturrs..Mi3?s,
kc., io r>?< completed in five parts, of S20 doable
colama p.\s;es each. Each pert. 1 on
D'AUBIGN'K'S HISTORY of THE REFORMA?
TION". Svol?.1 00
THE BOOK of THE NAVY, to be completed in
Fou<: Part?Nos. 1 and 2 bow ready. 25
ILLUSTRATED COMMON PRAY ER BOOK, No*.
I and 2, each.51 i
FARMER'S ENCYCLOPEDIA, Nos. 1 fc 2 ready... 25
M \C.ULEYS MIS GR LL AN I ES, No. 1. 25
Hi >W 1 I'T'S RURAL LIFE OP GERMANY, No*. 1
a?d2. 25
HANDY ANDY. 50
POM JONES. ftn
ROMANCE OP BORDER LIFE..'. 371
OUR MESS?-Jack Hinton tue Guardsman. Sli
fc N C Y (: LO Pi-: ? IA, (B rande's) No>. J 2, ati? 3. 25
LIFE OF sir: WALTER SCOTT, in S ?dl?, each 25
JL- >. u ; of Ac ounis of Irish He rs. No. 1 a.,d 2. each
EPECURI **?'. ;>v Thomas Moor--. 25
la LLvROOKH. by Thomas Mo m. S7j
'MEMOIRS OP QUEENS OF FRANCE. 25
I KTTERS ri, MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS.5
LIEBIG'S ANIMAL CHEMISTRY. 25
?LIEBIG'S tGRKtlJLTUKAL CHEMISTRY. 2a
LIFE OF THE DUKE OP WELLINGTON. 25
i HE BIBLE IN SPAIN .25 and 50
ENCYCLOPEDIA OP GEOGRAPHY;No.2..
DOCTOR LARDNBR'S L8CTUKBS-^2d edition.
This contains ih-- ? ight celebrated Doable Lectures
delivered at Niblo's Garden. Tne nn?t edi?on met
with a rapid >u.'e. 25
ELEMENTS OP NATURAL PHI LOSOPHY:
Embracing Ibe genera) principles of Mechanics,
Hydrostatics, Hydraulics, Pneumatics, Acccstics.
Optics, Electricity, Galvanism, Magnetism, and
Astronomy. Illustrated bv several hundred en
eravines. By Leonard D. Gale; M. D. 50
SALATHlElr-astorj ol thf P.i-t, the Present, and
the Fu'.a;e. 31
." On til IJ .'? !?;;/.ilHi,
LADIES' COM PA N > ON, for March. 25
DKMOCKATIC risv1kw. ?
SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER. Feb'v 50
?S ARG EN PS MONTHLY M VGAZINE ol Lite?
rs ure, F;;-iii"n and Hie Fine Aru?Edited by
Ep'-s S.ir-e:it. This richly eti!b?-iii->hed work wiil
be furnished jo agents at the pub lube r's prices or
mailed at |S00a >? car?Single Nos.. 25
?GODEVS LADY'S BOOK torM.trcb. 25
'GRAHAM'S MAGAZINE lor March. 25
?THE LADY'S WORLD OF FASHION for March 16
PARLEY'S MAGAZINE. Jim. Feh. und Maich.... 10
?NEW-YORK VT8I f OR,for March. I2J
?THE R\i.\'"OA. AND Oi)t> FELLOWS senil
monthly Magazine, the 1st,2d 3d and 4th numbers,
with beantifnl. steel engravings. 124
?Till?: LADIES COMPANION?Plates, Str.?Feb
raary No.?? 25
?THE ARTIST, n MosTTtLV Lauv's Book. 25
MISS LESLIE'S MAGAZINE.15
WORKING-MAN^ MISCELLANY, No. 1. 6j
AMERICAN FAMILY MAGAZINE, or General
Abstract ofTJseml Knowledge?Ulostrated with
encrn*ings. 25
THE PIERI *N. or Youth's Fountain of Literature 10
ANGLO-AM E RIO AN MAGAZINE?TA< Cream of
all r.*e British Magazines rolled into one. No. 1. 124
Buhvcr's Works?Beautiful Uniform Edition.
PELHAM. 25
DISOWNED. 25
DEVEREAUX . 25
PAUL CLIPFORD. 25
EUGENE VRAM. 25
LAST D \YS OF POMPEII. 25
THE CZAIMNK. 25
It I ENZ I, The Last of the Tribunes. 25
SELF- DEVOTION, or Katharine Randolph. 25
NABOB AT HO M E or The Re turn to England. 25
ERNEST MALTRAVERS. 25
ALICE; or, Tits Mystkries: Sequel lo Mallravers 25
ISoz'a V/orba.
NICHOLAS NICKLKUV. 50
OL1VKit TWIST. 25
IMERICAN NOTES.
PICKWICK PAPERS. 50
old CURIOSITY SHOE. 5"
SKETCHES OF EVERY DAY LIFE. 37*
ooper's Works?Uniform Edition.
THE TWO ADMIRALS,2viS. 5"
PRE SPY-2vls. 50
VYING AND WING, 2vls. 5n
THE PATH FIND H it, by Cooper. 5tl
RED ROVER hy trooper. w?
L'UEDEERSLaYER. 5o
Scoti'ts Works-Deautilul nniform Edition.
(VANHOE. 25
GUY MANNERING. 25
THE ANTIQUARli. 25
it it ::oy. 25
HEART OF MID-LOTHIAN,. 25
BRIDE OF LAMMERMOOR. 25
OL? MORTALITY?TUE BL.VCK DWARF. 25
KENILWORTH. 25
WAVER LEY . -5
THE MONASTERY. 2
t ilE ABBOlT. 25
LEGEND OP MONT ROSE. 25
THE I'll!ATE. 25
FORTUNES OF NIGEL. 25
PKVERtL O? I HE PtfcAK. ^5
QUIN i 1 N DURWARD. 25
Btuutij'ul Uniform Edition of Scutl's Poems.
LAY OP i'HE LA?T MINSTREL, 2vols. eacu. 25
vi ARM I ON, -' voK each. 25
ROKEBY-BRIDAL Ol Tr.ecu.-ioa, 2 vols. each. 25
LORD OF THE l>LES, Waterloo, i.e. 2vois. each.. 25
HAROLD- DRAM VI 1C I'IKCfcS. ivol". each .... 55
ANGELA, or l^ove ?nd Guilt. 12J
NEWGA'I?C CALLENDKK. 12j
ROSIN \ MKADOW.-s 'J'ti*. Viila-e Maid,or i'empt
II I ? ? . 12j
LIGHTs tND SHADOWS OF FACTORY LIFE l^j
b'.'t VNClS OF YALOIS, "r Ui Curse <;t au Vahiar 12j
CONTAR1NI FLEMING. 25
PETER SIMPLi. 25
tlKNRIE I ? A TEMPLE, b^ U'hraelii. 25
CUUZZLEWITrb> D.ckem.
TOM oUiCKE oF OCRS. /
L. S. U or Accounts ol lr?,h JK-irs. ,Allforl2{
WiNDSoRCAs'lLE.,?? V
A D VENTU RES OF ARTH ? K O' LEAR Y.. /
UUMPtUt?lt CLIXK-ER, by Smolleu. 25
RODERICE RANDOM,. 25
JOSEPH ANDREWS*?, by Fielding. 25
AMELIA, by Fielding. 25
?? iV IAN l.Kr.i. *0
i'HA \ "L OL'KE.
RO ?! 1NCE .\S'J REALITY, By L. E. L.. 25
i H ! NCESCA CARRARA) hy L. E. L.. 25
V'h.-.E TI \. by D'Jsraeli. ^
WONDROUS TALE OF .\LUOY,by D'hraeli. 25J
1 HE '1 v> 0 BIt!Ufc.s, or Elbe' Cnurcbiil.hy L.E. L. 25
GEORGE ST. GEORGE JULIAN The Prmc-,
Nos. 1,2. 3 and 1. 25
SP iKKS*S LIFE OF WASHINGTON 3 Nos.,each 25
BEAUTIES OF REV; Joit-w WESLEY; conwtn
torf the most interesting P^ssag--?, selected from
bi? wnote v?t/rh<, with a Meruolr of bis Life, kc
Tlis iia beamifal Inu-i volume, very neatly done
up Pr;ce. 18J
THIERSES HISTORY OF THE FRENCH RU.VO
LUTION. irorn No. 1 to No. 13. 25
GOOD THINGS IN A CHEAP SHAPE. Lenerof
Aoste?Translated ftom the Fr?*nctj ot Xavier de
Maistre: Y> ?t? other Tales and Sketches. lf^
BIANCA CAPPELLO, by Lady Lytton Balwer... 18j
PHANTOM SHif, Tales?! Ibe S?-a, hy Marryatt.... 25
FIT/. HENRY,or OARrriAOE IN HIGH LIFE... 124
BLACK WOOD'S MAGAZINE lor February. 13*
?TUE NEIGHBORS, a Taie of Bverv-day Lite. IH
?vv ESTERN ( VP I'iVE.orTir.jesof Tecornseh.... l?i
INQUIRY INTO THE SOMiRS MUTINY. 12J
?XHE WHIG ALMANAC AND U. STATES
REGISTER for UJ-3. ccarainirff a Life Of Mr.
Clay and a iarpe amount of u^e'ui rea/hny matter.. 12J
-CAREER OF PUFFER HOPKINS, hy C.Ma thews I2j
?\DVENTURES OF OEAOIAH OLDBUCK.12* I
'SISTER ANNE. 12i ?
HECTOR O'HALLORAN and His Mao Antony |
O'Toole?10 numbers now ready, each No. 12J '
?FRANKLIN EVANS,or the Inebriate. Price. 12*
PAULINE, a Ta> ot Norma/Hhe. 12}
LSh E OF HENRY CLAY. Si
SPEECH OF Mr. CLAY at the Lexington Festival,
ae.d on his Retiring fjom the U. S. Senate. Also,
the Speech ot Jsdsre Robinson in reiaii-n to Mr.
Cluy. Tuese Soeeches contain a succinct and
jcentral histsry of the public career of this emia
enl .-tate*man, and oufrbt to be as generally circu?
lated and read as pos- ble.# 6J
MARSHALL'S TEMPERANCE SPEECHES..... <H
COOPERAGE OP THE TRIBUNE. &i
RICHARD ADAMS LOCKE'S LECTURE ON
MAGNETISM AND ASTRONOMY. 6$
?BRAITHWAI PE"S RETROSPECT OP PRAC?
TICAL MEDICINE and SURGERY, Parts
1,2,3.4 and 5. Pric oer *<o. GO
ROBERT MERRY'S MUSEUM, January and Feb?
ruary NnroVen?embe lisbed with namerocs es?
envi- Zi? ShiL'le number*. W
THE DAILY TElBUN* , Vol. I. boand. *5 ov
THE WEEKLY TRIBUNE. VoL I., boand. 2
T?E NEW-YORKER. VoKXaHXl. &
?THE AMERICAN LABORER?VoL cotaplew...- 75
THE LOG CASLV, complete, both series.
Those marked thus ? are subject to Newspaper or
P^&MUto;A^eeali,Peridi?Ti and others on sii the abova
THE NEW MIRROR?Every number
.. ?o Or^nai aad ?qJu.;* Design
ocsteW-hoiied by GLOHGfi P. MORlU<~llla?irated
by J. b iHifius, wa,? u engaged cxcius.veiy for th*
work.?Ter-ns, iuree Dollar p?r acaum: Single Nuru
btnSi cents.
lu ihn eoerte of a few wreks the coderslgned wii; com
tnea.-e. ok *u mm ocemavf, u> porWicais. n of 3 new sesje?
01 tbeNivw-Yoa?; MuBoK. m ihe OCiar-? /mk,,?*??.
rtrrijp w.W a;m ?, trirw.' pirn, Mrbb * Susi XntnrrinT m
?.*r> wntftcr, u ,: llieredaced priee at Three Doiutrs
: Jx-r aausalD, 0:312 jmiii quarter per Copy.
Ti;e New Mikkcr anil appear %?>.: ioaav ttrik ag .u '.
auraruve lealares, du :i**;?i wAia/ ir jfr s? every i,ittr ym
"*?c.u. It wll be uubj^ro v.:,h new t roe, on fine paper,
a.n! wurn?er will contain a beautiful original Eo.cnn
tnf 'tTttZZl1 t,M^uJ ? cfci?i oy c'.Vip^A. nlustrtttmg
?tihSf* wl,i,-"b it accompanies, ami ?biet? u ??&] b>
... ^**-;ar lata*?*?, ges?tes the Contributions of
^.kr,.\ ,:V'T^i,vs COKrs ?f coaar>ro\Dt:>t>? *b:cn
?- ?? : 1 -* * amry-we i^rmad
ibTb^ writers" ' - v noisome.,
r .k Wn;^ * ' * 'Ntj.*. ?jm lor proof sheets from x?er*i
we b>>p- to presei 11; Use .Wr.,-.t-. ^ ? a ^j,^!
nal ot great ?ata* ami aassajaWrtience. The paraur of
me:e oaaacs wtll be^ulou iy aY*^,, n.e .Miiaoa will
: be remarkable, ?f bope. rattier for Kwxi *,Vxln without
I names tb.sut"?r poor a: i des <* Kb disttogujvfcr,* mmies. It
' wilt enibr.u. I <~. rry deyar'me+t of elegant litera?
ture, comprising tales ot roasance, sk<-urbr? ?i soc.etv and
manners, sei tinxot, a.:d every-day hte, piq asna essay*, do?
rn; >;.o and ??reign c rresj ietice, literary tut.-iiigeace,
wit and bntnor tasbloaand K "s?ip. pcetry, uc r-.ne arts,ami
literary.maseal ami dnaiauc c^tucbina. 1^ rvvtev??ot
c->r uotkj wi 1 be car-iu. d >c.-.r(iiaiU?g aud impaniaL
It will aim !c? !*.>-i? r a .tenure <ait< u> the taste and rte.
sires of ibe age aad coanury. its teodeacy wUl Ui cb-artuS
and enlive?;:ig.a.s wcii a> i ;i nivi.-g. It will -eek totrauty
every refim-d tastei bit! a* ver to orienn ibe nnxsi fastidkms ;
and it will ever teri iu duty to be, to " tcra tbe sunny sMe
of Utiags> to.huaaan eye?-"
The work wilt be published rc**y Saturday, in number*
ot'sixteen large octavo >upe.'-roy?| pages, wan uoahle co<
nmcs, and enclenxl in a i;eai ornamental c??rer, I; wul
farm, at tb- end nl the year two superb fOlDtnes, each ol
four :r:i>die.l a.??.i w.ttee i pages, rilicd w.i? trie *ems?f l\i.
erattm and ihr Jin ?? arts.
l !)- ver>" tow-p ce at eli cit it will be issu<\l readers it
the ch?spe?i peejodlcaJ tu lb s or any oiher c-.unt. y, e?n
stdermat the coat a-^c. t>eauiy o; iu KIFl'YTv*0 K?N
GRAYtNGStand.ube.ini uslc value o it titenuy enpteots.
Those ?lesirous <.?: rev iv.ug the paper from the comoieuce
meat,will tiave it puoctunltj seat to tm?k* smWpwi ttpea
their ..>rn at-tug t? the underitgued, at 4 Anu-au ihre??
dotbUTs, irre Oi ?.xp?'.;m!
Lt*:ters enclosing t.ie amount rabacrtpUOQ may br
frinaed bv aii postmastera. Agents carrtew aad m'wrner
will be supplied on the u*u.il terms. XT The Cosa !>y*
.'fifi xtrill be rtrfvi/y idHered to, without any deviation xrAut*
erer. JZS
Such bditors as copy the above will ot?! ge me by tor
warding ^maik d paper and bv resuming ih?> rkchauae
which was iuterrupted, Diacb to my regret, by cJituoa
stanc<*s "v? r wti'oh 1 h id no ctintrol *
Q?OKGJS i'. MOKKlS,K?Utor nnd Proprietor,
mhl S*' {So. 4 Ann?si. r?? t?r Broadway.
I/ INDU\y ?HAUE? i?wUNJ?OW
SHADES!?The rohjcHbers respectfully inti>rm
?ielr friends tir.d the patdjc tltat.havm^ tue ?pactOtM
store, Spruce sire* .aie.?- doors Ironj ^av?au. they
are now prepare?l to ejrecute all o.-Vtr.s i-ir l':iint:og ul ?very
description, wird nearness, economy and d?-spj(cb.
Ail kindaof Sbro Patnihnjf'done m a style uottobasur
passed by any nther esiald^hment. Gold Si^-us, Marxante<1
nut to fade. A large asior.meiit of *ei! seasoned Sign
Boards always on band.
Bannen, Interior Decoration*and TraH-piireiteiesdone t<i
irdrr. Destgru? ihm seed and ?'xecuteu in a sooertor style.
>ptciroeiui ol work can a.wjys ue iiat d r?. :< reticesgivcu
by caUutK at the above plai >.
Trey have on band Rthl ait constantly manuincturing
rransparent DecoraUve Window Shades. Siranger? in the
' ity, keepers oi hotel:., saioona'i pubuc places ot re?>>rt, and
tam it let, can alwayi i>.- su;i.>lt-'il ?sit.'i Smulea ol ibebestde
?crip?oit, ami warranted rue assortment coitsktu of spies
did Italian Lands<ap*s, Wild X i^m-Ues. Kreuch Sci>?'.l.*,
V"iguettts ami Koseue Ct-mres, 6k:r:pmr*l Views. Fancy
Ske'ch and Gotliii" Landscape Centres. Tiatern Abbey*.?
Ali kmos oi >n Ki'-s, ii.? ma tier how ouheul;, are pamted it?
< superior *t,!e at this esublisbmenL
They would likewise cail the ntienlioa of tb?* public to a
ami splendid Goibic Shade,yot up iu tjwxi ?i> ;e,aad
ranted to plf??-.
The trade generally ?applied'?u liberal terms.
T. Immings furnished and Shades lixed if required.
?AKTOL !c DE MAUN1
SsMcrx K. liaaruL.
Lkwis P. De Maunv. .'11 u
OfUBElYWlCn CM>T~ITERV,
^bl West EtGHTeahTH-sTaitatT,
et: jr;t> j//iun/f tOttA A-enues.
THE Subscriber respectfully cnlls iho at
tentioui of the public to ibe great variety.ofarticlM
rnanufacuared at tbb e i iblisbment??ach as STONB-Waac,
BakTHK^.VvaKE. Portable Kep.sMcr.s, Ciiimnkv Pots,
Qrbrn-Uovse PixtwjRR 1'ovs, Gve.n i'lLE, Backs
and Jams, Piac Brick, tic *ic.
AsUiis islhe only establishment of the kind in the city,
where the at.- ivi ui tu .rs an- marutartured, the public nro
assured that all onlers will be .on- ded to with promptues
Wit punctuality, and on the most iibe'al term*.
N. U. A great improvtuncai ba> been made in Poxtsbi.*
-VcaNACCs ami the sixes enlarged, ?.nd warranteit superios
w any stdd in Una city. WASHINGTON SMITH.
mS Im*_
lliLlA?a UEAUN, 204BoweryJ be?
tween Priii'-e and Stirin? >.is offers lor side bis slock
of Dry G* o Is ui pti-es muchbi low iln* u.-ual rates, for oask,
tor the pat pose i>i rntlrely rio-iut; it?on" ring
Bdplttb aad Domo?: n Calicoes irom 6d lo Is fid per yard.
4 4 Prencli do 1* ti l "
4-4 Pine Scoleb and English Ginghams, Is Hi "
4 4 Figured Ta?doatf. 5s
?J 4 Fr- ueh ?i"i Engliih Printed .Muslim, Is 6d and 2s
Kicb Foclard Silks, Js and -I*
Fine hl'ii-h, v. lute ?n t s'ate Cctton Hose, I? .d and 1* ft I.
Lldirs' Kid Glov:s, i'? Iii ; oeil quality, 3s tfj and 4t per
pa:r.
Oeritlemen'a do 4s to Us
While Flannel?all wool?is 6d, Superfine, Imported, 3a
ti l and 4.
' nir>- I.'-"** 2-, Colored Bonnet Lawnv2* per yard
U it silks, 3s and SaSd, Tarlatan Silks, 5- per > ard
Ftench Monssellae ?e Ldnfs, pi in, printed and rlch??n*
broidered, 'Js U I i?? 4s u? r yard.
Rich Watered UatlltbbooH, Is til pt yard.
Fine blick and blue-h|ack Bohibnzines, 7s and 9? per yd
Crocs Barred and oiberMu linr, S awls. Scarfs, Cravat?,
Prrnsols and Sun Mia'.e.s, i:c at nry low prl <*s.
S lawls, Mei i.me?, Cloaksand ot.'ter Fall Goods, at very
reduced pricts.
The whole stork fur ?lie wholesale. ml?15 ^?v*
J_ ?No. 0, is
ODD-FELLOWS* MA?iAZlN E
and eoniains a great variety Ol matter of peculiar ini<-resl to
Odd-Fallows, and to the general reader. Price 12J centt.
CONTSMTS:
The Primitive Odd F- il .w, an KnftTaviniZ, wllbillostra
livecontribaifons frdroJ. T. i5ayo, F. j. Olteraon, and N.
W. Cbitlei i. Esq'k
A Pan i ?Fe it- rnlii ?cence.
Kil infir, No Murder, a cm pi.-ce, by ,*j ,
Toe Music of Nature, by w ? n ha, .j new coatrfbntor.
The i?. d-re low and his Sloop?a True Cbapt?-r, by an
Odd-Fe low, (cot eluded )
Odd Felm wship and its ? eh ?als, an able Lecture before
Haw.ird Loi'ge No. 6 i.
Claims of O Id-Fellowship, by Brb. B B. Hailoek.
The ? id Nurtk tl urial Gr&u'd. by Wm. B. Tappau.
The New England Cii.ir.i<-trr.
Editor's Table, embracing much matter of interest to tbn
On irr.
Clipping, a pieriiiful quantity.
?.<>.??! O.F Directory, Fl".D - ths. Stc. ml
It. FiS KD SUGAR,
aT TIIE LOWEST RfcDCCtO CASH prices.
WOOLS?Y &. WOOLSEY contiuuo
ro sell ih-lr star.ilard quality Double R?tiaed Su?
gar a; their lowest ea h p.'iirrs, uarjit-ly?
L> if, IOC>niS p*rpOOnd YWbeii les^tban five packages are
i.ra?ueo. ItJilo du do S p.jrc?n,?ed baR a cent p?r peund
Powdered, lOj do do d . j additional.
i he above are p'tck.-o as loilow-:
leaves in lynes of ao? p?,uudj)
Crasheu in hbl. of 2"J do , No charge for packages.
Powdrreo in do < f il?u do )
Apply to ibe N^-w-V rk Patent Sogar Refinery corner ->t
South and A1<?gi m-ry sis. or a' kO W<;| ?ti-ei.
t\. B. order* oui ot the City mu?t be accumparied by a
remiilar.ee. _mlfl I in*
P"~E?..K*S MISETTm and PICTURE
GALLERY?C. Hi Devob, M^uager.-Every day
and evening i is ?n',i, thesubi:me and beautiful exhibition
of lie TRI \LfJK ( UBISTfR erouo of 23 f.gmes in St?' j
nry. The Norwood GI P>Y W OMAN can he amsalied lace
to lace in a private apartment -sl>e d?>rs nm pretend t? be
a Portone-Tefter,but pra^mesby t;?<r knowledge ofPbysl
ologv, Poystogi >i':iy. rbitoaoppy, Pbrenolojty, Mesnxeiiam
and tie hidden Sciences, to be nMe to m.irurt otberaof
god nuellecL >!.?- will Infbrm them if ihev are married or
not. g:vi )g i?iem a history of pas' li.nes, the present and the
future, as it t're kn-w them from hi?h. She has noconno ?
tim) wltk or hno viedge of Madame Adolpbe, an account ol
whose In position und runaway (mm Ul?i?-r appeared in the
New-York pap-r. lece-itly.?Aorwssi^n vo the Museum 26
cen?<; children half price. i 20
"P UROPi-AN HOTEL, ?^shingtoo
_f_J f it ? in consequeoce df freqter.t m stake?, by gen- -
tiemen wi,li:rg o, ?top at the Eurt'p'-.vn Jio<ei, ihe undrr
sigt.ed has to inform nit friends and the public, bis bouse
is tf:e same lor met ly k--pf oy Mr. F.ii er, a lew doors west
of ti.e Uou 1 not* kept by dial gen;.e;wa3, and n-arlbe
Treasury Buildings.
This Hotel baa beeilnewly fitted up and furnish* d?bas
a great number of parlor? wiih !ied-ro .ms auacfoed, and is
well ca eclated (or families ai.d smule ^entteoieo. Board
by the day, month and year may be bad at prices >uiu-d to
tbeltmes; aad ihe sut>*c<iber pledges bunself that every
possible auemi in fhall be shown bis gue-o i? make their
residi-nc- wi.li himascomfonableami agretrable**Pt*ffl?'c'
ml4 2meod*_ LOUIS GALA SKUA.
AYN?'S5 HAlK^fC^iC^Hear
the words of tn*? Preacher : . . ' . ,?to
HADOOIfriUA ft.J., Feb. 12, 1843.
Dr. D.Jiyne: Sir?I like great p>a*ore in miormlnjr
you that ihe l>au> of Hiir Tou* ?bicb. 1 obtained y< n
htst October, bas orovett mo?t saWactory and successful.
My hair bad for a tau t** been exceedingly tbm. But
for two er three year* 't b^ds* fallen out ?,a. my head
bad become alnv*t ewti'e.'y Oxid. I ua, under the neces?
sity of conccailag.tfi< baWnraa by comb ag the bair on the
sides over i' ?at now, afu-r u?-?K a bottle of the "Tonic,"
! have ? luxa/Unt growth of hair as I e?*r bjJR^
mi? 2r Pastor Baptist Church at Haddoafield. S. J.
P?MNO fc"0RTt:S Tuned for Fifty
CENTS? W. C. RAYNER tcoes Pann-Fortes m
aoy part ot the City for 6? cen'o^ Al o. gi?ea lnsiruciioo on
tb<? P.ano and ?ingtrg on roodrrau- terms. Apply ihrongh
the Dnpaleb peal or personaiiy at his residence No. 22 First
Avenue. m61m*
QAAA BARRELS OF LiME, of tbe
?\J V V7 besi quality, will be contracted lor, or any
part of it, daring die coming: season, and sreod city bonds
and mongages recetTed in pajmecL Addre? ' ?*.!ne,
Tribune OrScs. ?? "

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