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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 08, 1880, Image 1

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AWB^^m
NEW-YORK, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 1880.
PRICE FOUR CENTa
KO NOMINATION AT CHICAGO
TWENTY-EIGHT BALLOT**! AND NO CHOICE.
THE CONVKNTION HOLDS TWO 81 SMON9 AND A?*
JO I'USS tnmt, TO-DAY?GRANT AND BLAINE
FAR AHEaD IN TIIK BALLOTING?THE FLUCTUA?
TIONS IN KACII BALLOT IrXTIHMII.Y 6MA1.I
The Chicago Convention held two sessions,
nnd balloted twenty-eight times for a nominee
for President, yesterday, without niakiug a
choice.
The Convention was called to order at
10:40 a. m. Prayer waa offered by the Rev.
Dr. Everest. Ballot in*.* began without delay.
On the first ballot, when the Shite of New
\ork was reached Mr. Conkling refused to
announce the vote of the delegation. The
sec rotary of tho Convention therefore called
the roll ot thc delegation, and. New-York
voted as follows: Giant 51, Blaine 17, Sher?
man 2. Tho following waa tbe result ol the
Hist ballot:
Whole number of votes.TSd
Necessary tu a choice.371s*
GrnDt.301
Blaine.a***
Shcriiiiiii. B'A
Kdtiiit,i? is. Uh
Washburtie. BO
Win dom. IO
There being no choice balloting was re
Biuiied after a brief discussion. Tho Conven?
tion remained in continuous session for five
boure, and took eighteen ballots, without niak?
iug a nomination. There was no important
change in the ballotiug during this ses?
sion of the Convention. Tiie vote for Giant
remained almost steadily at .'$05. It rose to
300 on thc eighth ballot, but till back on the
next. It became 30G again on the eleventh
ballot, was 304 on the twelfth and 3(>5 there?
after, except on the fifteenth ballot when it
rose to 300. It fell to 306 on the next bal?
lot, was 303 on the next two, and was again
305 on the eighteenth and last ballot before
adjournment for dinner.
The vote for Mr. Blaine during these
eighteen ballots remained almost steadily
at about 2.S4. It fell to 2S2, then rose to 285,
anti nuctunted between 285 and 280, until
the eighteenth ballot when it ended at 2S3.
The changes in the voting for the. oilier j
candidates was of the same slight character,
except tbat once Mr. Sherman's vote fell to
88. At 3:38 p. tu. a recess for dinner was
taken.
The Convention reassembled at 7:15 p. m.
Ballotiug was resumed at once. The first call
of the delegates showed that there waa no
break whatever in the ranks of the support
en of any of tho caudialatcs. The ballot
stood ns follows:
Whole number of votes.7 ."S3
Necessary tt. a choice.It 7***
Graut.SO.'.
Blaiue.??!?
Stierniau. Oft
Edmunds. Ul
Windibin ne. BU
Wind .in. H>
Garfield. 1
?"?catteriug. 1
Niue more ballots were then taken without
a bieak anywhere. Small fluctuations took
place similar to those of the day session, but
every line remained substantially unbroken.
On the 28th and last ballot of the day
Grunt had 307'votes; Blaine, 278; Sherronn,
Ol; Edmonds, 31 ; Washburne, 35 ; Windoni,
io ? and Garfield, 2.
On motion of a. Massachusetts delegate, the
Convention adjourned until 10 a. m. to-day.
The vote on this motton waa 440 to 303, tho
anti-Grant men voting aye, aud tlio Grant
men nay.
At midnight several caucuses were in ws*
sion. The leaders were holding earnest eounscl.
SUMMARY OF THK BALLOTING.
A STATEMENT OF THK NUMBER OF VOTES BECKI V IO
BY EACH CANDIDATE OS TIIK BETEBAL CALLS.
The tablo given below will show thc reader at a
single glance the strength of thc several candidate!
and tue fluctuations in the votes cast for them at
each step of the balloting. There wero few scatter*
ini. votes?not moro than one on any ballot. The
absence of members caused many of the small
chutigos. The tablo is ns follows :
B-llot.
1...
2...
3..
4...
5...
C..
7...
8...
9..
10...
ll....
12....
13....
ll...
15....
16...
17....
18....
19 ...
20...
21...
82....
13....
AA....
?5.
26.
27.
28.
304
305
305
305
305
305
305
3U6
?308
305
305
304
305
303
309
30G
303
305
i
294
282
282
281
281
281
282
294
292
282
281
283
285
285
281
283
284
ita
305 279
308 276
305
305
304
805
302
303
306
307
276
275
275
279
281
280
277
273
M
WA
M
or.
?9
N
M
O')
M
03
92
89
M
88
88
O'.
Bl
M
M
M
1.7
07
03
Ol
03
03
Ol
i'll
32
'At
32
?,2
::?_?
32
ni
81
32
31
Ol
31
31
3C
31
ail
31
31
81
31
81
81
ttl
ll
31
81
ll
M
31
31
.'il
31
31
31
sa
32
81
32
33
33
35
31
86
SC
36
32
3.*.
M
35
3.;
37
rr.
N
M
'Ai
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
IO
10
10
IO
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
IO
10
10
10
111
la|
lt
lc
lc
lc
111
16
le
le
le
a Hanlin u. b Davis, eILi-.<-..
?salt
?i M-.Cr.iry. ? Hurt*
THE BALLOTING BEGUN.
ORArnic dktails ob ni totixobbom idk fihst
BALLOT TO THB EIGHTEENTH. WIBI A Iti;.
CUSS WAS TAKEN?lill- COLUMNS UBBBOKRM
TnBOl'QHOCT?A WONDKIlFLL DISPLAY OF
TKKACITY.
lur TBLEORAra to rna tribi-si-.i
Chicago, June 7.?Chicago bas undergone a great
ibunge in tho past forty-eight hours. Tbe Con?
vention ie here, but tbe floating crowd bas mainly
di sh p* wared. The brass banda and tbe dabs have
gone 1 the hotels have resumed almost a civilised
?aped. There are no more fierce debates in crowded
sorridors; no more procea-doi.g j no more, in short,
of that froth that doaU tai ii*e vexed sea ci a Na?
tional Convention. The process of hunting
?rotas with n htneg band hsd come to
an end this morning, and tito Convention
wai ready to po quietly to work. Wben the Con?
vention assembled it was with tho knowledge
lhat all tie presentation speeches had been
nada and balloting would at once begin.
Immediately alter prayer. Mr. Hale, of Maine,
rose and moved that lbs Convention should now
proceed to a ballot for candidate for President. Mr.
Conkling inquired of the chairman with his
most ornate titleranco whether tbat was not tbe
order of business already determined upon,
to which tho Convention should pro, ted with?
out n motion. Senator Hoar replied that be did not
so understand it. *' Then,'' Maid Mr. Conkling. with
significance, " I second the mot ton." and the return
of the challenge from Mame was loudly applauded.
Senator Hoar then demanded the attention ol Ibe
great gathering, and spoke a few well-chosen words
on thc necessity of silence and decorum in tho per
fm malice of so argent and important a duty oh the
nomination of a candidate for the Presidency. The
.fleet of his remarks was plainly seen in thc bear?
ing of tho audience. They created a pub?
lic sentiment against interruption! of anv
kind; and the same crowd that on Friday
nighl gave itself np to a saturnalia of cheering for
nearly the space of an hoar, now hushed any
presumptnons man who applauded a vote for Grant,
or Blame. Probably no such orderly ballots were
ever taken at .any Presidential Convention. Senator
Hoar, who is an absolute martinet in the chair,
would not even allow the chairmen of delcgal ions to
throw in to tlieir announcements any of those stir?
ring phrases that serve aa a safety-valve for their
own enthusiasm, and at tho samo time liro tho
hearts of the galleries,
Mr- Pizley,fnr thc ofTenee of saying that thc twelve
votes of California were first, lust and all the lime
for Janies G. Blaine, was summarily rapped to order
by Senator Hoar, and jiu: down in his scat in dis*
grace. Tho audience wa-j cpi.illy z-alone in pre*
serving order, and winn Colorado's six votes were
cast for Grant aud a spontaneous (.rant man mad:' a
cheer, ho was hushed and hissed into silence. Every
subsequent symptom of ppplauso was reprised just
as sternly. The roll-call showed the forces of all the
candidates stauding firmly by their men.
The first announcement in which extra interest
was taken w.is that of tho vote of Indiana. Tin-re
had been many rumors concerning changes in tho
delegation, circulated chiefly hy thu Grant men.
'Iho ballot showed _!t; men stauding by Blain**,
which was thc whole number expected with only
otit* tole for Grant, while Sherman received ll and
Washburne 1. Tbe vote of Alabama allowed a
loss of four votes for Grant from llie estimate made
by Tiik'1 it mi" nh some weeks ago. which gave the
full UH. Thc Is anti-Grant voles of Illinois wcio
divided between Blaine and Washburne in ihe
proportion of IH Ins, The voto of Kansas waa ol
course divided filter the admission ni ilu* four (irani
delegates, and stood G fur lllaine, I foi Grunt. Ken?
tucky divided i \.i'ily. as iii the I'kiiu sk's climate
before tho Convention met?Granl ~o Blaine I,
Sherman :>. The sam.' wm also imo ol the
Louisiana vote, except thal Blame gained uud Sher?
man l<"*t one vote, making llie lotal (irani **,
lllaine '.', Sherman ti. Maryland gave lllaine |7,
(inuit 7. Sin lilian *.'. MilHS.'lehllssettS lowered its
Kdmuiids ling a little, giving him only UH v .itt??*. and
bestowing '> voles upon (traill, tl h|mhi Sherman,
and one upon Washburne : Blaine had ii. Min?
nesota casi its lo vol.-s fur Windi.m. Mississippi,
which i.-,.nfihe .inn!.M Southern delegations.
gave.lSruiit H. lilaiin I, Sherman t?. The solidity of
the Mi-* mi; i tit legal i?a|i was broken hy om \ ot.-' fur
Washburn**, (irani getting lb*' remaiuiiiH -i'.
Nebraska, Nevada ami Nen-llaiii|-*hire eiist their
votes solidly ior Biaiiie. Two votes Irom New
Jersey vu-ft* i a-t for NV ash bu rue, but thc remaining
10 were for Blaine.
Tin; RMPIHI ptah, vi Ti s.
Whttt New-York nos called all eyes were turned
upon Mr. Conkling. He said thal h.* would pi. 1 i.
lor* reasons which he would state il necessary, that
thc roll of the New-York delegation I*** called and
euell delegate answer tobis Hume. Senator Hoar
rep)bil that the rules provided for the calling <>f the
mil only v, hen a delegate disputed the correct*
ness of the vote as reported l*y tbe chair?
man. Senator Conkling tben said that the chair?
man of the New-York delegation was Instructed to
cast the vote of tbe "-tate, hut it was understood
that there were members who preferred to casi
their votes themselves. Senator Hoar ruled that le*
would tnat the refusal of tbe chairman as coming
under th.- provision in the rales if there were no ob?
jection Hut the roll be called. Judge Itolt-ertsoD
whose appearance, in spite of the martial law that
had Leen proclaimed against all demonstrations,
was greeted wltb a ripple of applause, stated that
two New-York delegates vere, absent, find asked
the chairman whether their alternates wbo were
present could vote. Tho Cliairman ruled that
they could. Mr. Conkling who voted first, re*
sponded ** Ulysses S. ('rant,' in a clear voice, lt
happened that after the four delegatea-at-largu
had voled for Grant, tho first names on tho list
were those of Senator Hirds:.ll and his colleague
from the 1st District, wbo voted for Hlalne. Their
votes wiro applauded in that faint and timorous
way tofwhich Senator Hoar had reduced tho gal?
leries. Senator.Srhroeder voted for.Orant ; ex-Sheiifl
Daggelt iiml Wells S. Dickinson, of tbe St. Law
renie District, for Sherman, and Henry ii. James, of
the St. Lawrence District,*"* bo, ii had lieen t lioucbt,
would possibly vote tor Shcniiati, voted for Ul.tine.
Senator Wagner did tho sam.'. Leander Fitts,
Senator Wondin's alternate, appeared in his place
nmi voted for Blaine. The (nial showed lil votes
for Grant, 1" for Blaine, and - tor Sherman and
the lilill.'iineeiiielit V\;ts well dueled ill spile ol
Senator Hoar.
North Carolina gave Oran! c. voles, which wm one
inure than had l-ecu looked for, mid Sherman l-l,
Ohio was lo vote* short of a solid voto for Sher?
man. Kdmuiids received 1, Ulai lie '?>, ami Sherman
Ul Votes.
'IIii: keystone state's vote.
The vote of Pennsylvania was encourngiug to the
Blaine men. There wera 23 votes for Ulai oe, ll for
Sherman, and 32 for Grant. General Beaver made
the announcement as t'liietly as it a una nih: bad
never beeu known ia Pennsylvania,
Tin: sot*iin:u\ v-uTB,
lt was evident that work of soon sort had been
done fur Grant over Sunday in tbe Southern d"le
gatious. The Si,mb Carolina delegation, which bad
been considerably divided, voted 13 for Granl to l
for Sher.nan. Tennessee showed ll! for Grant,
where no moro thar, ll had been expected.
Texas, owing to the destruction of tue unit
mle, ga' b Grant only ll oat ol 1"'., Uluiue aad
Sherman stetting 2 each and Washburne 1. The
must marked chair-to was teen in tho Virginia
deb cation, tbs only Southern delegation which
accepted the oller of Fled Grant's -Hollier*
in-law for fr?s board in the rainier Hone. The
delegation originally st.tod Giant 10, Blaine I,
Sherman 8. 'ibo first ballot to-dav showed 19 for
Grant. A. W. Cam ..hell, Editor ol J hr Wheeling In?
telligencer, and-hannan nf the West Virginia d' le?
gation, who -ji.ido tho protest tho other
day auaiitr-t .Mr. Conkling*! resolution to
d is fra t?h iso tho tinco West Virginia delegates,
tried to get tho lloor, bnt as ho could not say
that be rose to question the correctness of bis own
announcement of West Virginia's vote, Senator
Hoar ruled him out of order. The point was that
one of tbe West Virginia delegates nnd his alter?
nate had both departed for home, leaving a proxy.
This was a vote for Sherman, winch tho Sherman
men were anxious to get of course. Congressman
Butterworth, of Ohio, rose to a question of privi?
lege, but Senator Hear ruled him out of order. Tho
point was subsequently raised again, and
Senator Hoar ruled that only the. delegate
or bis alternate could vote. A murmur of
approval was beard in the Convent ion, nnd
Mr. Conkling said, in an audible voice,
"'that's right." So West Virginia continues
until tbe end of the Convention with only 0
votes. Vermotit voted for Edmunds, of course.
Tbe only further woik in tbe roll-call was that one
of the two votes of Utah, which had It-en admitted
over tho Blaine delegates to help Grant, was niven
to Hlaine.
It was evident loni*- before tho roll-call was
completed that the Grant eolnmn was standing very
(inn and that tbe Ulallie men would bf disap?
pointed in their hope that they would lead tho
Oran! men on tho first ballot by io to 15 Totes.
Ur. Blaine's closest Iriendsdid not share tbo san?
guine expectations of some of the Blaine
men concerning the first ballot. William E. (?hand?
ler was reported last night .'is expecting
not moro than 288 for lllaine at the sturt, while
other lllaine men, hss experienced and shrewd,
were confidently predicting aim or 310.
THK FIl'.sT ANNOINCI-Mll.NT.
The announcement showed 284 for lllaine and
304 for ('rant, D3 for Sherman, 34 for Kdmuiids, Kt
lor Windon* and 30 for Washburne, The Grant men
were elated, and sent up a prout cheer, while Mr.
Conkling swum* his hand above his head and
laughed with delight.
The second ballot began at once, soon nfter ll
o'clock, lt proceeded without change until Florida
was cailcd, nnd reported as before for Grant.
A colored delegate declared.thal tbo vote was not
correctly repotted, and the roll of the detention
was called. This colored delegate voted for Hlaine.
and one of his fellows of tho same hue mado no
audible response, while bis lips worked nervously.
Tho secretary reported the vote ns six for Grant
timi one for Blaine, and W. W. Hicks, willi a great
show of indignation, declared that the vote for
Grant waa seven. This was not true, fbi* secre?
tary called the voil again, and when tho
mime of tho colored delegate who had not
voted was called he stood hesitating and
stammering ni full sight of tin* Convrntiou.
At I,st his lips formed the word "Grant," and bis
vote was counted. The changes on th's ballot wi re
only (niling, 'If followers of almost every candidate
gtandin!*solidly by him. Granl losl 1 vote in Florida,
1 tn North Carolina and 2 in Virginia, and Karn. .1 1
each in Massachusetts, Mississippi, Pennsylvania
and Wyniiiintr. General Garlield received his malden
volt: as a Presidential candidate from some delegate
(ruin Pennsylvania, Ibo announcement mado a
visible stir in the audience. The total of tbe ballot
showed a loss of 2 votes to Blaine, and a nun of 1
Hu* Grant, the (Inures st, 111111111* r<espectively 282
and :i(?r.. Again the Grant men cheered, and again
Mr. Conkling lunched with delight.
Tin* tl.h.I hallol was almost an exact repetition of
the second, lhere were a lew changes of votes
both in Blaine's and (Jinni's eohitnii*, but 'hey
ofi'scl each olhcr and blt lin* totals of tbe two Irad
inir candidates tin* same as on the second ballot.
Pennsylvania produced another new candidate on
this ballot?Benjamin Harrison, of Indiana, who
icc iv cd one vote. Senator Logan stepped back to
Mi. Harrison's place and laughingly congratulated
bun. Thoeierk immediately recommenced ihe roll
call tor tin* touith ballot.
Mit. c..Mii is<; (>i iiii.v nitt'Kin.
Bythis time il bad begun to bi* noticed that Mr.
Conking used a peculiar formula lu reporting tbe
v.iteot New-York. Contentins himself with hav*
ing bad the roll ol the delegation culled mi th" lirst
ballot, he announced the vote himself on the i*iil*
sei'ii.-iit ballots, ami dui sn tn thu manner : " I wo
?>f the New-York delegates, Mr. Chairman.
are said to bo for Mr. (Sher,nan, 17 for
Mr. Hlaine, ."I nr- for Grant"?with sn
emphasis on the word " are," <>r In* would say, "I
om informed tint 'J delegates arc tor Sheri
17 atc tor lllaine," and so 0:1: but Mr.
('? ulalu.-'s bad link in tips Convention still fol?
lowed him, and for several ballots Mr. Campbell,
chairman of tie- Uf.' Vinnni 1 delegation, ea-t ile
vote of tliat Mate in ? almost exact lei
of Mr. Conk lin a'" method, and crenffH tx
ten.ral laugh at tho Senator's ??nie!,-'. Aft.,
Mr.Campbell bad two or lliree hims auiioiiueed
that "li" was informed" that 1 Wesl Virginia
deh-gato was tor Grant, and hid staled positively
that thc other 8 were for Blame, ami had each
time exeited 11 lanai*, Mr. Conkling abandoned
bis formula and annoiineed the vote of New-York
in n plain ami business-like way. This wss Mt.
Campbell's lillie playful revenge for Mr. Conk
linit's Stteinpl to thrust him out of Ihe Coi *? -
lion, with iii-ii of Ins colleagues in the West
Virginia delegntion, because lie would not swear
beforehand to support the nominee of the Conven?
tion. On Ibis billot Minute lost 1 vol.* m Mai. land,
whirhleft Ins total 'J***!, with/'rant's vote still stand?
ing Hi in al 305, When tho vote was announced
there was another cluer of exultation from (he
Grant men, nnd Mr, Conkling rai-K**l his hands
above his bead ami lcd in the applause.
The fifth ballot was au exact reproduction of the
fourth, oven to the ono vote for General (larli**ld.
ami was entirely without Incident, except that the
unfortunate Mr. Joy, who nominated James G.
Blaine on Saturday night, cast on this ballot "210
Votes" fruin Michigan for "John'' (!. Ulallie. In the
dearth of anything else to take an interest in, the
audience made a _'nod deal of such slips of the tongue.
Consrossman Butterworth furnished them with
somo innocent amusement bv casting the Sherman
votes of Ohio by mistake for Grant, sud om: or two
deb gates stood up in the New-York section to con
gratulato bim on baviug como over even sooner
th an tbey expected. On th. sixth ballot Blaine's
v..ti dropped to the lowes! ik-uro of the day*?280.
The highest figure that he icu bcd mi anv of tho
eighteen ballots taken before tho recess was 'J*.;,.
The highest fit-Hire of Grant's vole at any timo wai
309, and tuc Uiwesl 3(13; so thal for Seventeen bal*
lois lilaine's vote vibrated within the narrvwspace
ot live votes, and Grant's of six.
1111: cou mns i'M'.k.iki:..-.
The seventh balkt showed Grant's total -hil at
308 ; Blaine's at 281. Winn the (ighth hallol was
..i.i.ntl. Mr. Harrison, of Indiana, moved a recess,
Inlt it '.vu-, voled dow ?'. '1 'bete vt clo (-allis aud
ol .1 viii.* hem ami there on bulb rides in tho Mary?
land, North Carolina, I'ennsylvania nnri Virginia
delegations, but the totals vvere of a monotonous
mihi.ness mn; bu (.'rant, *-*si tut Blaine. Bach
nillo was holding its vote so steadily that the gain
merely of two votes in Indiana for lllaine Was
received uliban much cheering as thu chango ol a
delegation inn/lit have rausod in ordinary tune*,
ami tho i i-e of one vote in tiie Grant total was re?
ceived with a prolonged cheer, Mr. Conkling again
lending tho applause. On the ninth ballot lhere
was nm.ih.r slight fain in the (irani vole. Mi- i -
sippi giving one anti North Carolina i.therj Hlaine
I0-.1 a vote iii Mari hind ami one in Vi rion ia, and the
total stood 3US for Grunt, 283 for Blaine, Attain
tie* Grant men cheered, and again Mr. Conk*
Img led Hie applanse. On the tenth hallol
Grant h. t ,. vote in Mississippi mul
two in North Carolina, all of which sheratan (-ot,
and ono vote was coal in t lu: Virginia delegation
fm I'resideul Haye*. The clerk's announcement of
ir was received with applause in tin* galleries.
Grant's total was now down toils old (kure, ao.",,
wlure it remained on tim eleventh ballot. Mr.
Blaine's total vote being 281.
Through all theso ballots Mr. Sherman's vote had
not varied any moro thau that of Hm nt ?.r Hlaine.
Du the twelfth ballot, Grant Inst one v.ili. in
Maryland and one vote in Mississippi, which Blaine
got, aiid Blaine gained one yule in Virginia, Tlc
scnic stoud at tho close?Orant, HOI ; Hlaine, 283.
On the thirteenth ballot George \V. McCrary, of
Iowa, appeared tn a candidate, receiving ono nf
sherman's votes lu the Maryland delegation. Blaine
lost a vote in Mississippi) which went to Sherman,
ami gained oao in Texas, which Sherman lost.
Blaine gained two in tbe Virginia delegation, oue
from Bbetman uml one from Ila* i a, while Granl
gained one in thc North Carolina delegation, wbieh
Sherman lost. This ballot brought Gran! and lllaino
within exactly twenty votes of each other? Blaine,
I.**.*.; Grant, 303.
The fourteenth ballot WM aa exact repetition of
the thirteenth so fnr ns the leading candidates wars
concerned. In both Mr. Sherman's vote was as low
as 80, its lowest except on the sixteenth ballot,
wheu it loll to 88. Ou the iifteeuth ballot Giaut's
vote reached ita highest figure, noo, aid Blaine's
fell oft'to 281. Mr. Shciman's, as bcforo stated,
Stood at 88. Tbe spectacle of Grant not only hold?
ing his own, but actually faining in
votes, was ono for which his friends were
not prepared, and the announcement of this voto
was received with a long cheer, in which Mr. Conk*
liner, as usual. Joined, There was the promise of a
break i.n lllaine in tho opening of the sixteenth
ballot, which was not fulfilled. Otic, voto for Hlaine
appeared in tbe Alabama delegation, and somo of
his friends had hopes that tbero would bo other
gains all along tho line, but each section of thc
Convention stood Immovable and Grant's vote was
..()<;? Blaine's vole, _:,*.:'? Sherman's, 88, the
lowest figure of the day. The Convention had been
balloting for four honrs, and iiuto was a general
feeling that t hot e n mild soon bc a break either for
nomination or for dinner.
NEW-TOBK ADDS OKI TO nf.AiNr.
When the vote ol'New-York was called the Blaine
""on. who had already boen encouraged by an addi?
tional volo from Alabama, wero cheered by an
lon of a New-Yorker, making tho voto
for Blaino in that delegation 18 and tho
volo for Grant 50. There was prolonged ap?
plause, but this time Mr. Conkling did not lead it.
The Texas delegation took its lum in changing,
taking a voto fniin Blaine and giving it to Edmonds.
Ih.* total stood: Grant, 303: Blaine, 284: Sher?
man, DO. On tbe eighteenth ballot Blaine lost '2 of
bis Indiana votes, ami Grant gained a vote from
Maryland. When the vote of New-York was an?
nounced, Gon**ral Sharpe questioned tho accuracy of
tho vote as stated, timi Senator Hoar ordered a
recall of delegates. This was watched with interest,
because it would necessarily disclose who it was
who had gone from Grant to Hlaine on tbe lest bal?
lot. Almost everv vote, whether for Ulallie or
Grant, was applauded i and when Senator Dennis
McCarthy, who hail voted tor ('rant on the
fir-t roll-call, voted for James 0. Blaine,
there was great cheetina. The totals on
flus ballot were as follows: ("rant. 30S"
lllaine. '-.'*-:{; Sherman, Ol; Edmunds, ."1: Wind.un,
lo*, Washburne.3.*"?practically a reproduction of
the ('mures of tin- lirst ballot.
Tbere has been uo example, in recent years, at
least, of any ?.neb steadfast adherence tn a whole
list of candidates by t heir Iriends. lin- Convention
theil took a recess till 7 in the evening,
AN1 ANXIOUS RKCESS.
lilt* tilt WT MIN RLATKII AT TIIKIIl rNKXPlTI I*D
f-Tltl. Milli ? BXAIXF.'fl -il 1*P(H: 11 KS ANXIlifi BUT
com inr.vr-iiii- ill RU MAM min ext'noes.
iuv rsi.i.muru n* Tint mint sk.]
CniCAHO, June 7.?The moment the Convention
took a ic, eas there was au immediate stampede for
hotels and for dinner, alter which there remained
about nu hour and a half, durum which there were
many anxiousi.-inflationsamong fiiends of all tho
( itiilid.ite*. The friends of ('rani were the best sat
i-iicd with tho result of the balloting at the-day
?' sion. I hen vote at the nt in t had been larger
tlinn they had any ii-_r.it to expect that it
would I"-, ainl had been remarkably steady
from tlio begluuing to the end. For days
they have b, ti sorel*r afraid tbat it wonld be
impossible for them to prevent the nomination of
Mr. lliauie on one of the early ballots, and they
w< re na*.nhi-r surprised when they found their
Vnte a little i Acceded Illili. Dilling the recess t hey
were everywhere admonishing tin ir Iriends to
stand tiri", and assuring them they Ind only to hold
the vote of tii<> afternoon solid In order to win in tlte
end.
I ? Blaine and Sherman p opie were a llttlo
ular tiieil, though mt In the bast discouraged. Ino
ti,, i hui expected lo receive considerable ra*
inf >n a inonu alter the roll bail be >n called four or
five limes, and the steadiness of the lines,
which they hiped wonld break, not a
httlo < ed them, 'lhere wns a report
about the hotels that the votes upon which
th" Blaine men were depending were to
c..in ? to tli--in on condition their candidate led nil
others, anil that h's failure to take Hrst place rc*
I them from that obligation. Whether tin-, be
true or not, it ls certain that tho lllaine managers
bad no idea Inst night that eighteen ballots could
bu taken without the nomination of the Senator
Iiini Miine. I he prnl.iible events of the nllfbt wen*
fully dist nsseil at the lllaine headquarters bv men
Who were nilen-ely anxious about them, but who
ha*! no very dellnito Information niton
which to base opinions, The instuigers
thittii-elves were so bnsy that they wero not tobo
seen. The general feeling was thal ? very critical
pelt.id lor l.l.iitn- hud arrived. 'Ibo men who bad
voted for bim In tho afternoon, with a law anim*
portnnt except ions, could bo expected to stand by
him Indi finitely, but that would not be anouilh.
To win the battle he mutt begiu to gain, and must
imt Granl in the second place. Until be di 1 this, it
waa sa:.I, it could hardly bs expected that tho
wavering volet which go to the wiuuing side could
be brought over. How to K.'i twi-ut v-tive or thirty
votes more, ami gol I hem e:u ly after tbe recess, was
a problem over wliioh tho Blaine meu were muob
perplex**!.
Tilt: PIIKUMIN BT-UTROT.
The Sherman men were, if nnvthing, more disap?
pointed at the le-ailll of the dav's balloting Ullin the
supporters of Senator Blaine. In tho lirst place,
they, like the lllaine men, were disappointed that
th**y did not Kel iiinie roles on the lirst ballot, und ut
the obstinate refusal of their strength t-> grow. At
tilt* faille lillie thev t on ld see no re.i-ton, so thev said,
tor withdrawing the name of their candidate or
transferring any of lils support to lllaine, even if
tli v were tempted to do so. "The way to pre?
vent (oin ral liraut's nomination,"amd an active
Sin mian man, " i. to keep Mr. (.herman tn the Held.
As long :ih he rt mains a candidate, supported hy
Ohio, thc Southern Votes tbat were east for him
this afternoon will be kept from Grant, But if
Sherman's friends in Ohio were to attempt to
transfer their vole tn any ono elsi ? Hlaine, for lu?
st mee thu Southern votes wonld Immediately be
bet omi control and tho ('rant people would
gobbloup the greater portion of them."
Whatever force tin ic uuir-lit he in this, the Sherman
in ii held on niue steadfastly than it was generally
expected the* would, and during tho reeoss no in?
timation enid ba obtained that any of tlit.ni in*
tended todesert their leader. Tho Sherman canvass
has been a remarkable one ever since tbe KepubU"
cans lirst began to gather at Chicago in preparation
for the Convention. Though he is the third uandi*
date ni the wee, and without those personal quali?
ties which Blaine possesses, and winch attract and
bimi men to the Senator from Maine, Mr. Sherman's
friends have made a persistent canvass that has
. halli n." tl the admiration *>f all lookers-on, and yet
il has seemed to muko very little headway iii moro
th.in a week that it has boen in progress in Chicago.
lill MIMIi: Vul is.
The votes secured by Edmunds, Washburne and
Windon! were looked am in ull estimates mado
dui un.' the ia cc is aa sure in the en.! to go to one ol
tho three loading candidates.
Among tbo many rumors afloat about tbo hotels
during Ibe recess of the Convention tins afternoon
was one that th re wera six delegates from Louis!
ana who were inclined to vole for Blaine during the
afternoon session, bnt that when Senator Conkling
bearii ol' it. lie had a consultation with Senator
Kellog.-, chairman ?>i (he delegation, who afterward
requested the delegatel not to ko over to Blaine.
Tbs rumor is given only for w hat it is worth.
Mn. cii.Nki.tMi riQUgo.
There is fin amusing explanation of Senator
Conklinc's peculiar method of announcing the volo
of New-York this morning. When Mr. Joy, of
Michigan, was casting the voto of his Stato tho
oilier day on some qaesl ion,he stated that ono mem?
ber of tbe delegation was absent on tho Committee
ou Credentials, and nsked permission to cast his
Vote, saying they knew bow ho would voto.
This wus refused. Tho New-York member of
the Committee on Credentials was also absent from
thuCOii.-cutiou, but when Mr. Conkling announced
I
tue voto or Aow-rorl. he evtoenny mviuucu ?uw
voto of this member. Judge Robertson said in a
perfectly good-humored way tbat he thought the
Senator bad mado a mistake, and probablv didn't
observe that Now-York was getting a privilege
which had just been refused to Michigan. Mr. Conk?
ling repl ed, with something like auger, that every
delegate of New-York was present either iu his
own person or by Ins alternate. By this means, by
the way, Mr. Conkling obtained the services ot
three delegates in thc Convention from one district
?two In the Convention and ono in the committee.
Mr. Conkling chose to regard this attempted cor*
rec tion as an imputation on bim, so to-day. when?
ever tho vote of thc minority in the New-York dele?
gation was handed to Mr. Conkling by Henry R.
James from Judge Robertson, who made it up for
eaoh ballot, the Senator would say: " It is said," or
" I am informed," or " It ls reported" that so many
votes had been given for Blain? or Sherman. This
was kept un till Mr. Campbell, of West Virginia, set
tho Con* ntion and the galleries to laughing at the
Senator, when, as before stated, he desisted.
W HR RIC THE ORANT VOTK8 COME FROM.
Tho analysis of Graut's vote on the first ballot
shows that of his 304 votes, 177, or three-fifths, come
from hopelessly Democratic States, 52 from doubt?
ful States, including New-York, and ouly 61 fiom
Ke i'i lid ic a ti States.
A CCRIOUS RUMOR.
An interesting rumor was current during the dav
that General Grant was in tho oity at the houso of
his son, Fred Grant, and the strength of tbe Grant
party was duo in part to thc fact, that a number
of Southern delegates had been taken to seo the Gen?
eral. This is the statement of a prominent und mnst
reputable citizen of Chicago, whose residence is closo
by that of Fred Grant. It is impossible, from
the nature of tho case, to verify this report.
Senator Conkling said during tho recess in tha
Convention this afternoon, tbat there wero 300
votes for Grant that would stav in Chicago all Sum
mer before they would desert General Grant.
RESULT OF THE BALLOTING.
DETAILS OE THK TWKNTY-EIGHT HALLOrS?A RE?
CKS-I AND AX ADJOl'R*tMliST WITHOUT AST
COOICI BKINO ItKACII) 1),
[OF.NEHAL PRKSS DISFATCH.l
CntCACO. June 7.?The .National Republican Con?
vention reassembled on the fifth day in the Ex?
hibition Hall at about 10 o'clock. At 10:40 Sen?
ator Hoar, the chairman, called the Convention to
onier. Prayer was offered by the Kev. Charles Hall
Everest, of the Plymouth Congregational Church
of Chicago. At the request of several delegate**, tho
titth and sixth resolutions of the platform were
read for information, there having been a mioapprc
bonsion in regard to them in the public mind.
Mr. Hale moved to proceed under tho rules to
ballot fur candidates for President.
Mr. Conkling Inquired whether under the niles it
wss not a matter of course* to proceed to ballot
without a motion.
The chairman said he did not so understand IL
Mr. Conkling then seconded tho motion.
The chairman, addresunig the Convention, said t
Tue Cinivfiitl.tn now proposes to proceed to a most lui
poitiiiit iii't In the si'let'tien t.f tli** Chief Magistrate of
tin* K pilli be. lu t-ct-rccly any oilier country on turill
-vmi ii such an act tako pince without strife and biood
?iiieil. N.iibniM: will no lead to raise thc American people
lu Uh. respect ol uuiiikinit uno to attract uiuukiu.1 to
mir borders as the h|k> tu le uf such a proi-eeiling eon*
ducted with peace, with dignity, wltb deooruu., wita
quiet. [Applause. 1 Tiie Ct.iiir therefore trusts tbat
everv genti'Miiiiti present, whether s tiieiuher ot the C>o
vi'tii lim ur lure us a witness of its pr,*c(>.'il;n?n, will feel
Hutt the churicter of his country is affected br Hie pro*
piiuty aod order of his own conduct, j Applause.)
TIIE FltiSr IIAI.I.OT.
The roll of States was then called, aod votes were
cast ai follow* t
A' il'liii-i.
Arkansas.
i .eitel i,; i.
(ol.traito.
Connecticut
livia** tue.
Klxi iou.
Gt'orjria.
Illinois.
Iiittlanu.
[ewe.
K.111*4.1*.
Kentucky.
I. ,iii-l mu.
Miiitu*.
Mary land.
Mil?at liusntts
Michigan.
Miniie-o'u.
.Mi-h;?4||i|iI ....
Missouri.
Nebraska.
Mi v.ulf*.
New-Huliliealille.
New-Ji'rs?'F.
New-York.
North Carolina.
Ohio.
Oregwu.
I'eiiusyl-rauia?i
Kinnie island....1
-..nilli (.taieluut...
Tennessee.I
Texas.
Vermont.<
Virgo,la.
West Virginia...
Wi-iiiiii-au.
l.
10
Vi
'i
-? b
SHUS
. ga \
lo\"m'
Ki 7
'Jd A
?:?: l
li .
i*. tl
tin 21)
it.
0 ....
lo.
1".
To Kl
jo; ?J
41 .
tl.
.*>-, AA
JO 1
Territories.
Ail/nii-i.
Dakolu...
Dint, of i uluinlii.i
IilthO.
Montana.
New Mexici.
Utah.
"?*. UfllllU'lOtl.
*A yomlng.
ii ia
24 ic
ie ii
io.
HS
1
1
It
2\ 1
J.
J 1
Grand total..,7.">?i|30l |'_!U4
*<3
H
M
lu
SO
io
Whole number of votes casi.7M
Necessary to a eholee.*.878
ii-,,,,1 .*J04 1 hdinunds. 34
Blaine.....OAA I Wu-huurtie. 80
Sherman... -W I 'A'mdoni. 10
Tbo announcenieut of the result was received
with appians ?.
When New-York was called for the foregoing bal?
lot. Mr. Conkling said:
The irue way to ascertain ths vote of New-York ls to
call the roll of iiidiviiiu.il delczutes.
The chairman responded :
Under tho rule ti.e vote of each Ft.ite must be an?
nounced br the chairman of cacb delegation, unless
aaointt i|i;c**tti)t) be rals.'d bj* a dolegate respecting the
correctuet- of the announcement, In which case the roll
of tbe State ls io ii ? called. Tba ('hair will treat tbe fi-.il
iiieof I tie ehiiirtiiuii of Hu* delegation to iiiinouuofl the
vile or the ***uie on tho cull a* a " t_ne*tilou " within the
meaning of the rule.
Mr. Conkling replied as follows :
I will State fr.itikly that the chairman of this delega?
tion ls lii-truct. .1 .i?'t<> how to east the vote of the Htnie,
but lt ls understood ihal there aro wernher* ot the del**
gatiouvtho prefer to Vote each for himself. Therefore
tue ciiuliunui prefers to allow thu loll ol delegate* to be
sailed.
Tbe chairman said:
The Chair will treat the refusal of the chairman of the
deiegutiou to announce the vote us a " qiiention " under
thc ride, und will Ulreot tue roll ol delegates lo he
ca,Icu
Tho roll of delegates for New-York was accord?
ingly calb-d.
Mr. ('(inkling's coll for an individual roll-call
apparently was for the purpose of getting ar. cord
ot Mr Woodiii's tote, whir*., however, was cast by
bis alternate for Hlaine.
Oue vote was shirr in >A est Virginia! it is un?
derstood tobo because of the absouee of one dele
Mr. Campbell, West Virginia, attempted to make
n statement iiunug roll-call us to the lute of that
Mute, but it was ruled to bo out of order, aud be
then cast the vote.
Immediately atterward Mr. Butterworth, of Ohio,
attempted t<? uiuko a qitestimi of privilege of it, and
to state thut Mr. Campbell's object was to prescut
the vote of au ulteruutc, but he too was ruled out
of order.
Alter the announcement of the first ballot Mr.
Campbell, of West Virgtuia, again addrtwsed tbe
chairman, but was interrupted by tbe Chairman,
who stuted that under the rules tho Chairman of
each delegation must announce the voto of tho del?
egation, aud ii any delegate, whether for the State
or otherwise, questioned tbe corine tues, of the au
nouucciueut, the roll would be culled. If any ques?
tions arose as to the right of any person to answer
to that call, the chairman would rule upou it lu the
nrst instance, and direct the secretary to proceed
with tbo roll-call. If after the result was uuuouuced
inmnu\u*A enPntAAinge,
Ul_iiN___KAL FOKKltjrJN xNEWS.
m ??
PEACE IN 80UTH AMERICA.
London. Mundar, Jane 7,1880.
Relative to the Buenos Ajres dispatch of
June 3, received in Paris reeentlr, In whleh the tear
was expressed tbat the differences between the National
and Provincial governments regarding the contest for
tbe Presidency mljrbt lead to dl?t*tf-*eoeee.
The Times, la Hi financial srttete this morning, says 1 .
"Those persons who know tbe eonntry best say thau
Buenos Ayres was never In arnoreprot.per'.u* eonalttoe.
and eunseqiiently there ls little cause tn fear political
Ola torbane** and every reason tn believe tbat tbe Pre*_
Uential nomluallons on June ll will pass off quietly."
THE LATE FRENCH ELECTIONS.
London. Monday, June 7.1880.
A Paris dispatch to Th* Timed says: " Partial*
returns of tbe supplementary elections yesterday, for
members of the Chamber of Deputies, have been re?
ceived. At Brest, Moo id eneur Piippel received 6MS ?
votes, and M. Glasiot ..,761. At L'Orle-tt, M. Mathieu
received 2.248 votes, and M. Jonrnanlt 918. M. Blanqnl
only obtained the majority in one of the electoral *eo*
tlous of tue district of Lynns yesterday." The Bepubll
ctii-i returned their candidates without opposition at
Limoges sud Rochecbovart.
?*?
THE AfcCOT STAKES.
Lohooi, Monday, Juno 7. 1880.
The following is a list of the probable start
en* for tbo Ascot stakes to-morrow: Prince Silty koli'*
Thurlo, P. Gool Urn's Westbourne, R. Jardine'* Tevlot
itale, J. Hav-hoe's Tue Star, Lord Boseberry's Moorfoot,
J. H. Ifould* wort a's, At talus: Count P. de Ltgrange's,'
lYologue* P. Lorillard'*, Wallenstein: W. 8. Crawford'*.
Hehuol Buy. The following ts tbe latest bettine on the
event t Otu 1 snain-u Mnrio, 5 tn l avalon Westbonrutv
2 to 1 aifainst Tevlotdale, and 10 to 1 against Ths Star.
TURKEY AND THE GREEK FRONTIER.
London, Monday, Jnne 7,1880.
A dispatch dated Constantinople, Sunday,
I to lieu tei -s Tulgeratn Compauy state* tbat Mr. <Qo*ch*a
had not yet communicated the English programme to
the Porte or to tbe foreign ambassadors. A Berlin dis?
patch to The St. Jomet' Gazette says: The establishment
of a military cordon around tbe Greek frontier dist-lets
ls expected to Insure Hie saft-ty of the Boundary Corn
iiiifsiouers. The question of asking Belgium or 8 wi tier*
lund to furnish the necessary contingent ls mooted,
PARTITION OF AFGHANISTAN.
London, Monday, June 7,1880.
In the House of Coin mons to-day, the
Mitrt'iii* uf Hartington, Secretary for India, staled that
ilic Viceroy of India In settling ths Afghan frontier
would not be Influenced bv tbe provisions of the Treat"".
of Gundamnk, which must bo considered aa liavlni**/
ceased to exiitt. Ile also said be favored tho ostabliab
meat of a .operate government for Cindabar nuder
British protection, but %ltbout a Billian garrison.
FUNERAL OF THE EMPKE88.
St. PKTKRSBtTRO. Monday, June 7,1880.
The remains of the K inpress weie removed
to the Petropaulovak Fortre** at noon today. An Im?
mense orowl witnessed the proeeulon, wnioh consisted
of vp rion* military detachments, court officials, stand
uni bearers, clergv, deputations nf orders of knight*
bond and charitanle and oth*<r societies. The Emperor
aud the Grand Dukes followed the hearse ou hoiseoaek.
THE EMPRESS DIES ALONE.
London, Monday. June 7,1880. *
A St. Petersburg dispatch to Tht lintot
says: " The Emnress nf Russia died when asleep, and
none of tbe member* of the Imperial family were pres?
ent, as they were not aware tbat her death was 10 near.
On Saturday tbe remains of ber Imperial Majeiaty were
cotivcved to the Palace Chapel In an open 00"flu,
borne by ike Czar aud eigntei-o grand dukes."
PRINCE BISMARCK'S NEW POLICY.
London. Monda*-, June 7,1880.
The Colo_me Uazetto publishes an interview
with Prince Bismarck on the Parliamentary situation.
He said bs would resign the Obauoellomblp after tba
lute defeats but for the personal desire ef the Emperor,
und tliat henceforth be would leave Parliamentary
fighting to others and devote lilianelf entirely to the
furcigu affair* of the Empire.
THE SPANISH CABINET.
MAoaiD, Monday, Juno 7.1880.
In the Senate to-day, Sefior Canovaa del
Ca* til lo. In reply to the attack* of tbs opposition, said
li ? w,,ni I ever defend Catbollo unity. He wnaldered
tbat the triumph of his Cabinet had mainly led to the
fi.iii.atiou of the coalition between the Hy o a* ito* ana
Liberals.
? 0
THU MOUNT VKSl'VIUS RAILWAY.
Mount Vesuvius, Monday, June 7,1880.
The opening of the Mount Vesuvius Kail
way toot pise* on Sunday, and was celebrated by n
splendid fete. Several suooessful asceuts were made.
The tim.' occupied in Hie tourney fr?m tbe foot of the
mountain to the terminus of tbe raliway wa* 8 minutes.
KING HUMBERT'S POLICY.
Ko****. Monday, June 7, 1880.
King Humbert to-day received deputations
from the senate and Chamber of Deputies, wbo pre
lenie.i the address** lo reply to tbe Speecu from the
Thi om*. The King warmly urge, npon the delegations
the* necessity of ooooord in tueir deliberations.
RUS81A AND CHINA.
Lom*ok, Mouday, June 7,1880.
The StanihtriTs Bellin dispatch says intclli
genee bat* readied St. Petersuurg thal the Chinese are
mns-dug large bodies of troon* on the Russian frontier,
and that an attack ia expected without me formality of
a declaration of war.
SIR BARTLE FRERE TO RESIGN.
London, Monday, Juue 8.1880.
'Pie Standard says there is a widespread
belief tbat Hiv Bartle Frere will railers tbs Oovernment
of the iliftleuitv In which they are placed, by tendering
bis resignation. Some of hu family are already about te
sad for Eugland.
GREAT BRITAIN AND 8LAVERY.
London. Monday, June 7,1880.
Earl Granville, the Foreign Secretary, re?
ceiving an anti-slavery deputation to-day, promised aa
liru>rov<*tiien* lo tbe convention wttb Egypt, and aaid
that t-cht'ine* for Increased consular ooatrol were under
iwnslderatiou.
GREECE ARMING.
Athkns, Mouday, June 7,1880.
The Greek Government ls collecting war
material aud making active pieparatlons to occupy ths
n.>w territory claimed by Greece when tbs righi moment
MR. LORILLARD'S HORSES.
London, Monday, Juna 7,1880.
Mr. Lorillard's horses Parole, Sly Dance,
Falsetto, iroquois and Boreas hays arrived at Ascot
Heath.
THE ATALAYA'd CARGO.
Mont ri: ..I., June 7.?P. Rafferty, foreman
for Hall A Co.. lumber dealers, on whose behalf tbe
Atalaya was leaded with lumber, say* 1 " I stowed tbe
?hip with lumber j there 1* no grain In tier. I objected
t<> putting the lumber Into her, ss the ship wss damp
from molasses. Tbe captain said tbat aa he took ths
lumber ou the ship's account lt wa* nouo of my busi ?
ned*. Nothing of a suspicious oharaeter was put ou
board ; auy cartridge* stowed away would be uselets on
account ot the dainpne**. In the poop we left a *pace of
four teet, wbleb they told me wa* for tbo ablp's -.tore*.
lu th's mile snd tn the catlin are the only place* I think
lt possible for any arm* or other material to be put."
BURGLARS WITH CHLOROFORM.
Rhinebeck, N. Y., June 7.?The houses of
tbe Hon. Ambrose Wager aud Juan O'Brien were robbed
by burglars last night. Tbs ron of Mr. Wager ws* (tupi
fled with chloroform by tbe robber*, and to sueh
an extent that be ls very 111 to-day. The robbers took
from tbo house a valu tole a*oid watch and chain, aa
heirloom or t_e fawny, aud #IOU In money and a quan?
tity of silver ware.
TELEGRAPHIC NOTES.
SUICIDE THOM MNA-VCIAL LOSHES.
Moist 1'lkasant. ST. J., June 7.?lu a flt of
t?i-iuorary Insanity, c*c_*ed. lt ls sapoceed. br nnfortoaate
JmaculaUon* In W.ll street, Itnn Creedwell bogsdhlta*
^L-y.-.terday to a rafter in hi* Urn. fbi dead mah was ia
-*^c_**cam*tanc*>* sad moch nsyntei. Ho naen e Inge
______**.
THK OLD COfiONY BMTAIBB9.
Newpobt. R. 1.. June 7.-^esteajner OM Colony.
whii-h wa* uilured on 8?tur*_ay by a eoinsiM, aa* ona re.
paliea "-Slr w pe?nk .? l___l____*_?*t_Wa*
to-Ssht. -iTi*?iot4ldsmM?don*h*r-?**?S-at4*datS700.
A MASONIC BJ*0?_*nO-<".
Trot N. Y.. Juue 7.-Alwut 1.000 Masons of this
-ni ricefvedat the devol to-tlay. with a ban-llof ouUilfS**)
^AXuTS?""^u^****to** UU Mile aaa
Lr^md ?m t^* Mawulo TeiuBle. ubete ana*dreaTol_eL
SsssMiMtftifai ^ ?? Hon.Ua?U W. BheUes. Mr. an.
u?^ mn Utnueidtrtenadad.

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