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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 09, 1880, Image 1

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V??-XL..N?-12.260.
NEW-YORK, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, I880.-WITH SUPPLEMENT.
PRICE FOUR CENTS.
.a_t/.inM nf Ml A Prim
GARFIELD FOR PRESIDENT.
ARTHUR FOR VICFa-PRESIDENT.
A CBU8HINO DEFEAT OF TIIE THIED-TFRM
IDEA IN AMEUICAN POLITICS.
TTIB NATIONAL CONVENTION COMPLETES ITS LA
DORS AND ADJOURNS SINK DIK?OAKFIELD NOM?
INATED ON THK RICHI I'll BALLOT OF TIIK DAY
ARTHUR ON TUB FIRST BALLOT FOR VICE
PR E81 DUN T.
General J.imes A. Garfield, of Ohio, was
nominated for President of the United States
at Chicago yesterday. Geueral Chester A.
Arthur, of New-York, was nominated for Vice
president. Tho supporters of General Grant
stood by him to the last. The defeat of the
third-term project was due to action of the
friends of Senator Blaine and Secretary Sher?
man.
The Convention was called to order at 10:30
a. ni., a conference having just previously been
held at the Grand Pacitlc Hotel hy the friends
of Mr. Blaine and Mr. Sherman. Balloting was
resumed at otice. The first ballot (tho twenty
niuth of the Convention) showed that each
candidate had substantially tho same strength
as when the voting ended tho night before.
Graut had 305 votes, and Blaine 278. Sher?
man, however, hud HG. The coutest, then
went forward without the dianne of more
than a dozen votes, until the thirty-fourth
ballot was reached. On the thirty-fourth bal?
lot, Garfield, who had had one vote, suddenly
received 17. On the next ho received 50.
When the roll was called for tho thirty
sixth ballot, the Blaine and Sherman States
began to cast their votes for General Garfield
from the beginuing of the call. It soon be?
came plain that the contest was between Grant
aud Garfield. A feeling of iutenso excite?
ment soon reigned, and the crowd broke
out repeatedly into tremendous cheering,
interrupting tho call. Tho band began to
play " Hail to the Chief," and caution began
to tire a salute before the call was finished.
Geueral Garfield once rose to a point of order,
and said his name should not be used without
his consent, but the call went on regardlessly.
The ballot resulted as follows:
Whole number of votes. 7HS
Necessary to a choice. lil**
Grant. "JOG
Blame. S'S
Sherman. il
Wash bi.rue.,. 5
Gititi.lil. SOU
A scene of great enthusiasm followed. Con?
gratulatory speeches were made by Coukling,
Logan, Beaver, Hale, Pleasnnts and others,
and the nomination was made unanimous.
After singing " Itally round the ting,*' a re?
cess until 5 o'clock was taken.
The Convention was called to order at 5:20
p. m. Mr. Frye, of Maine, was called to the
chair. Nominations were made for Vice-Presi
deut, the namp of Chester A. Arthur being
presented by General Woodford. Ono ballot
Was takeu, resulting as follows t
Whole number of votes. 7-1.1
Necessary to a choice. S7II
Wasbburne. lftll
Jewell. kg
Mu vu ard. no
Arthur. 46*
Bruce. h
The nomination was mado unanimous. At
7:25 p. m. the Convention adjourned sine
die.
Expressions made in all parts of the coun?
try show that the nominations are favorably
received. There was much excitement in Con?
gress and tho Republicans of that body held
a mass meeting._
SUMMARY OF THE BALLOTING.
A COMPLETE STATEMENT OP THE TWO DAYS' VOTING
FOtl PRESIDENT.
The table printed below affords a complete view
of tue balloting at Chicago, which ended in the
iiAininatinn of General Garfield for Preside"* It
will be noticed that the Grant men stood by tntir
candidate to the end. tbe nomination being effee.ed
by the other delegates. The table is as folio******
Bnllot.
1_
?._
8
i....?
t.
6.
7.
r.
0.
10..
ll.
12.
13.
14...
15....
16....
m....
18....
io....
20...
C.
3HA
30.1
294
282
305 j 282
305
305
305
305
306
308
305
291
281
281
282
284
282
282
3d5 291
304
:to5
:;o:>
wu
wa
303
305
2S3
285
285
281
283
284
288
305 278
308 270
21...j 3U5
rc
22..
23..
24..
25..
se..
87..
28..
29..
30..
31..
32..
33..
34...
Si..,
80...
305 j 275
304 j 273
3o.*) 878
302 281
3o3
800
307
305
300
308
3)9
309
312
313
306
280
377
278
278
270
270
270
278
275
267
-42
ot
Pl
fl"!
95
BS
95
M
91
80
88
88
'JS
89
89
88
88
BO
91
DO
03
96
97
07
93
94
93
93
91
116
120
ne
117
no
107
09
8
M
88
ta
.TJ
89
88
rt 2
31
31
sa
31
81
31
81
36
31
31
81
31
111
81
31
111
81
81
81
81
31
ia
ii
u
n
n
n
ii
BO
31
Bl
Bl
iu
31
Bl
BS
32
31
82
33
33
35
81
36
88
ur,
sa
sa
85
85
36
.17
BO
38
3.1
BS
35
88
37
41
44
30
23
6
10
io
10
10
io
io
10
10
io
io
io
IO
io
10
10
10
10
10
ll)
io
io
1"
io
io
io
io
10
io
7
?1
3
3
4
1
3
B
i
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
17
60
899
If.
ia
ll
lC
lc
ld
V
uHarrumn. b Davis, e Hayes, d McCrurj. ? Hurt?
ful) It. /Bliei 1(1*11. g Conkling.
APPROACHING A NOMINATION.
TIV8 BALLOTS WITHOUT MATKR1AL CHANGE?
VOTES FOR OAKFIELD ON THR 6IXTH?GRANT'S
INCREASED VOTE OK TIIE SEVENTH BALLOT Ol
TIIE DAT.
1ST TELEGRAPH TO THC TRIBUNE "I
Obicaoo, Jone 8.?The Couvention resumed, ni
lbs opeuioc ot tu sixth day of actual session, tin
-work of balloting -without preface or preparation o
any kind. Immediately upon the last words of tbi
prayer bi the Rev. Dr. Thomas followed the voict
I tho secretary calling tho name of Alabama for
le-twenty-ninth ballot. Tho event of thc ballot
roved to bc the transft-r of tho 10 Edmunds Totes
i the Massachusetts delegation to Sherman. Their
itention to mako tho chance had been rumored
bout before, thc Convention met, and created no
irprise : and the announcement was received with
pplanse. This was hailed at tho lirst important
renk in the vote of any candidate, and s:>me sun
nine ones regarded lt as the possible indication of
general dianne.
An interesting question was raised npon thc vote
f tho Alabama delegation. Tho chairman au
ounced 10 votes for (Irant, 3 fur Sherman andi
ur Blaine. Ex-Senator Willard Warner challenged
he correctness of the vote, and the roll was called.
Vh.n fJeorgo Turner, tho chan niau, attempted to
ole for a delegate who was absent from tho hall
nd who he said bad authorized him to do ko, Setin
or Hoar ruled that only the delegate himself or
ithei of th. two alternates from his district, or in
be case of delcgatee-at-large any ono of the four
lternatesat-large, could vote. General Garfield
hen raised the question that the correctness ol the
-otc ufa State could only be questioned hy a ineiii
?er of the delegation, being under tbo impression
bat the question in this instance was raised
.y a delegate outside tho State of Alabama. The
liiestion afterward carno up again, and Senator
Ioar ruled that any delegate could question'the
directness of tho vote of any State ; hut an cxam
nation of tho rules showed that he had boco misled
iy the wording of tlie nile tis adopted four years ago,
md that only a delegato from the disputed State
?ould question the correctness of the vote.
Tliere is obvious danger In this rule for future
National Conventions. As it now stands it would
"ender it possible for a delegation having only a
mit of its members present, hut all In favor of one
?andidatc, to cast tho whole vote of their State for
hat candidate without Interference from tho rest
>f the Convention.
There were a number of changes back and forth
ipon this, the first ballot of the day. In the [??*{.
itia delegation Blaino lost 1, and 1 in Kentucky,
he latter going to Sherman. In Maryland Grant
lost 1 and Blaine 2. Sherman get ting all'three. The
Windom vote, as well as tlie Edmunds vote, broke
its this ballot; Blaine getting three rotes from Min?
nesota. In Mississippi Grant gamed 'z votes from
Sherman. The Tote of New-York wis unchanged?
">0 for Grant. 18 for Blaino andi, for Sherman. In
1'ennessee Blaine lost 1 vote to Sherman. The l-'.d
tntinds i otc outside of Massachusetts stood pretty
timi, hut his total vote dropped to Iii. Sherman
rose to UH, his highest figure thus far. Blaine
received 278, one less than his vote on the last bal?
lot last night; and Grant lost 2 as compared with
tho same ballot, hid vote standing 305. The Sher?
man gain from the last ballot last night was 'Zo.
A VOXK IOU GKXIIi.W. SHERIDAN.
The ebief incident of the next ballot was the tin
expected appearance of General Philip ll. Sheridan
as a Presidential candidate. A delegate from Wyn
ming cast one vote for Sln-ridim, which wns loudly
applauded, lt ho happened that General Sheri?
dan was on tho platform at tbe
time, nnd heard tho announce**' nt it:'li gnat
amusement. There were prolonged ami good-hu?
mored cheers ns Senator Hoar and Major Harrison
went over and jokingly congratulated General
Sheridan. A moment afterward tlie audience were
surprised to seo Gin. ral Sheridan appear at the
chairman's desk, evidently about, to ad?
dress the Convention. When Senator Hoar
had commanded the nttention of tho au?
dience General Sheridan said he was vi it
much obliged to the gentleman who had mentioned
his name, but it wonld bo impossible for him t>>
receive such a nomination, unless In some way be
could turn it over to his lu-st friend. This was taken
as an allusion to Grant, and was received with
evident pleasure by the Grant men. General Sher?
idan's reason for not being .ihle to accept the nomi?
nation was. of course, known to be thnt the Cn ..ti
tution of tho United States places an obstacle in the
way of tho election of a native-born Irishman lc
the Presidency.
There was a slight break in the Wasbburne vote
in Illinois in this ballot; Blaine got 12 votes, 2
of which carno from Washbnrne. In lndiant
and Maryland, erich, Blaine lost 1 to Sherman.
At this point Mr. W. W, Hick*, of Florida, aro-sr
and demanded tbe protection ol tbe ebairman, in ai
excited manner, from emissaries wbo sough I tn com?
pel tbe members of the delegation to violate tbcii
oaths and tlieir honor. This was supposed to be ai
allusion to a colored Sherman delegate in the neigh?
borhood, but it was observed that Mr. Hicks burr
tbe visits of the (irant emissaries from tbe New
Vork delegation with great equanimity.
Blaine received ll votes in the Minnesota del eg*
tion ; Windora got 4. In New-Jersey llhnno lust 2,
which went to Wasbburne. In Smith ('; rolim
Grant lost 1, which went to Sherman, and the 1
Iv iimi inls vote in Tennessee also went to Sherman
Sherman's totul vote was I'ZO, Blames 27'J. Gran t'l
300.
TBIKTY-FIP.ST BALLOT.
On the next ballot Alabama announced lf> void
for (irant. F.x-Setiator Wurner ngain .halli ngoi
the vote, which had been increased for Grant by 1,
bv casting tho vote of a delegate who WM no ii
the hall. Senator Hoar ruled against this, ami tin
volo for (irant was reduced to IS. Mr. Conklinf
had a little boom on this ballot, which amused bm
greatly ; one delegate in New-Mexico casting a rofl
for him. At thc announcement Mr. Conkling threw
Ins bead back and laughed heartily.
Blaine h st 2 votes in Indiana, which proved H
bea very doubtful delegation indeed, and alum
i\ inch the Hlaino men lind been apprehensive frou
thc fir-tt. Wasbburne got tbe 2 votes which Blaini
lust in Indiana and 1 from Windom in Minnesota
linn of General Garfield's 2 votes in Pi-uiisylvanii
left him on tbis ballot. 'Ibo totals stuud rcspee
lively: Grant, ao*-, Blaine,270; Sherman, Uti
There was a heaity cheer from thc Graul lin n. till
vote being withiu ono of their highest vote las
night.
ALTERNATE ROPES AND TEARS.
In tho thirty-second ballot there was anntbc
break in tho Indiana delegation, Blaine's vot
falling to Kl nnd Washhurne's rising to 12. (iran
Lad 'A votes, and Sherman 3. This mus
loss fur Illunie of 5 votes, which went to Wash
burne. Thal oscillating delegate in North Carolin
who voted yesterday alternately lor (irani and Shel
man had now stayed by Grant through tbeday.Tber
wasanother loss of 2 forB nine in tbe Wisconsin deli
gatton, which went to Wasbburne, 'ibis raise,
Wnshburnc's vote to its highest figuro, 41. Shel
nan stood at 117. Blaine at 270?his very Iowm
vote?and (irani rose to [{HO, wliich was ns high a
his highest vole of last night. Tho showing put th
Grant men in excellent spirits.
The vote of Alabama, in tho thirty-tint
ballot, gavo Blaine's friends hope i
ii little break in his favor, but i
was a snort one. Four votes were given hun in th
delegation. 3 of which cunio from Sherman. 1
Georgie, Blaine and Grant each gained 1; but I
Illinois Blaine lost 2. which neut back to Was!
buruc. In Indiana Blaine gained 1, but Sherma
dropped 7 votes on tho ballot, standing at 111
Grant's vote remained immovable at 3011, win
Blame brisked up a little to 27(1.
AN INDICATION" ol" THE RESULT.
The thirty-fourth ballot Contained the germ (
tho nomination that was finally made. Tho roi
call was almost without incident, except that l
Indiana Blaine gained hack 0 of his votes, um
the applause of the Blaino meu ; but when Wisco
eiu was called, und J. B. Cassidy east 10 of its '.
votes for Jurats A. Garfield, of Ohio, there was
stir of surprise all throng li the crowd, nud mut
applause in tbe galleries, which havo jireeti
General Garfield's entrance to the Conventu
at every session with tho most enthusiast
demonstrations. On this ballot tim (iiaiit struan
roso to 312 votes?its higliesr nguri* tuna ..?>.
Blaine was almost constantly at 'Zi:>. Sherman fell
to 107. Washbnrne had 30 votes. Edmunds ll,
Windom-I. and (icm ral Garfield 17. There was a
great cheerily tho Grant men, Senator Conkling
standing up in the centre of the house and leading
the applause.
Oeneral Garfield arose on his chair, pale
with excitement. Senator Hoar said: "For
what purpose dots the gentleman risef?evi?
dently preparing to rulo out any personal ex?
planation or declination. A strict construction of
the rules required tbis; but probably no chairman
but Senator Hoar would have enforced it in tlu*
same situation. His ability and sbsolute Impar?
tiality have attracted equally the admiration of all
spectators, whether ill tho Convention or in the
galleries,
General (iarfield said, " I rise to a question ot or?
der," which lie thin proceeded to state by saying
that he questioned ihe correctness of Um vote. The
secretary had reported 17 votos aa being cast for
him. Noone had any right to cast votes for a gen?
tleman in this Convention without his consent;
"and that consent," said General Garfield, "I re?
fuse."
Sen;-.tor IToar promptly ruled that this was not a
uuest ion of order, which General Garfield, of course.
knew ns well ns tho Senator himself; hut
he had ingeniously managed tt? decline ibo nom?
ination before being shut off by the chair, and sat
down satisfied, Utile thinking, perhaps, Unit in two
more ballots be would become tbo nominee of thc
Republican party for Preaident of the Dnited
States.
The thirty-fifth ballot was called amid some excite?
ment, but vet without any general expectation that
the Convention was approaching a nomination.
General Harrison, ot Indiana, however, sn*
noun.'od thai that .-stale i ist 27 Votes for Garfield,
2 for Blaine and 1 fm (inuit, r here was a loud cheer
trom the niiti-OraiH men, and Ibo whole vn*x audi?
ence wns atonce thrown Into ustateof intense excite
ii.t. though lln-re was at the same t nut. no disor?
der. Tin- reinaiiiilet-of the ballot, however, proceeded
much as usual, tin- (irant nnii standing li rm ly
together anti even gaminga lillie: while illaine lost
a number of voles here ami there. Tliere were
no more rallies for Garfield, only scattering sh..ls.
Maryland gave him i v.iles, Mississippi 1. Ninth
Carolina I. Ohio cast us rote exactly
as it had donn since the lli-t ballot. 3 I for Sherman,
0 for Illaine, nud 1 tor Edmund*. The
announcement of the vote was received
as a boom for Grant rather than int- Garfield,
Garfield hal 50 votes, Sherman '?>'.?
Illaine onlv 'Z'il, while (inuit rose lo 'AVA,
Un- very highest figure reached. rici'- was a
prolonged (inuit cheer, with much waving of hand?
kerchiefs ami general exultation.
TIIK DKCIH1VK BALLOT.
THR GENERAL Blt F AK Ol' 1 Iti: ANll l-t Ht INT Dil ff
QATIONS ON THE 1 Illili Y-SIX I ll HA I l.e il?GEN
KIHI, (l.lltl HUD'S COOLNESS?Hilo KU INlii lill
l-lU'slDKNiv-- WILD ENTHUSIASM IN HIE CON?
VENTION.
I ur muon i ru to tiik rnuiDN*** I
CniCAOO, Jun.- s ? It was evident after the
thirtv-litth ballot that Mr. Illaine could
imt be nominated, Beginning at 284 bis
vote hail dropped to 257, and success waa hope
hss. li sit any time Ins vtite could have been raised
to SOO, then' would instantly lmve been acces-tinns
[rom all sides which had been mado cool iugeiit on
bisvoten-acbiugtb.il Qgure; but the sudden Intro?
duction <-l Ihe popular n.une ni (jarflcld had drawn
away from Blaine a number <>i semi-attached sup?
porters. The Itlame column was hopelessly brul.cn,
and it univ remained now for tiie opponents of a
third-term to do that Hung which would h.- most
certain to defeal Granta
1 lure is no reason to I bink that (Jenora! Carlb-ld's
nomination was th", result of anv combination]
nor was lin- voting on thc thirty-sixth ballot, which
all sew would lu* critical, Imi fi-w supposed
would lu- actually decisive, in scconlance willi nov
arranged plan by which thu solid vole of
Illaine or of any other candidate was turned over
lo Garfield, rbere was that thrill in the air which
told tbat tbe keynote had been struck. The ballot
showed I bose who wi re moie anxious (tor thu defeat
of a thud tinu th.iii tor tin- nomination of
any particular candidate casi mg their Tot?*a
together for Garfield with little consultation or
Caucusing. Imbi tl Un- impulse thal decided the
battle was not given till th., ballot had proceeded
Im a few moments. Alabama casi its volo tn in li as
usual, Hi for (irant ami I fur blaine. Arkansas
gave lier l'J rotes, of course, tn Grant, Calilnruia
gave her 12 solidly to Blaine, as on all IlictlHity
five preceding bsillots.
Till'. I INA!. Hlltltltlll-.
Thc first sign of the impending revolution was in
the Vote of Connecticut. On the last ballot this
iltltc.ilit.il lind stn.id A for Blum' and 'A
fur Washbnrne. Mr. Brandngee, the chair?
man of the Connecticut delegation, who
was known to be- oin. ol tim most
sincere uiui carnes! opponents of lin- third-term
In the Convention, casi ll >.f Hu- 12 volts ol Ins
."-tate for James A. Garfield, sud 1 f"r Illaine.
I hen it was clear enough the gnni, and tin.il strng
glo was coming. Flotilla's H votes stood linnlv hy
Grant. In Georgia Bluine actually ros* I rote lo Kl,
tho remainder being casi about bs before: s fu
(.'rant .'I for Shi nunn j with the slight eoncct-siou
to Gai field of 1 vote.
From this time ou lhere w:is a fever of excite?
ment in the liall, I hon gh tin* naileries and (Inn yen
(i-iii n isi n aged fur their own sakes to ir. rvc onler.
'Ihe next impulse In the Garfield vote came from
Illinois, where lu- had 7 votes, lil,lim- holding ii,
and Washburn!- fi, aud Grant's faithful 24, with
Logan at Un- head Ht il linn.
A Si INH III-' Will) I xi I ll.Ml NI.
When General lian ison mounted tm his chair and
callcil out timi Indiana, ont of thirty votes, gave
twenty-nine for Garfield, neither tin- Convention
nor th.- galleries cou hi ct ml mn theinHclvcs any
longer. There was a universal iiproni ; half the
( oiivi'iilioii rose to its feel. Leaders of all factions
run hurriedly hither and thither Ibr-ngb thet i
veiition; and, while lin- building was resounding
willi I.uni cheers for Garfield, there was a fluster rn'
excited deb galts about tim General himself,
wlio sat quiet and c.ml in his ordinary
place sit the . ml nf one of the rows nf Minis in Hf
Ohio ili-leiratioii, having bis own seat on the middle
isle mar the very roar of the Convent ion.
Ile wore the white badge of un Ghin dele-rate on
his coil, and held his massive bead steadily im?
movable. Bul tm un appi annice of extra resolute-'
ness on his face, as that nf a man '.vb..was r.-pi. li?
ing internal excitement, he might have been sup
ptisetl tn havo as lillie interest iii the
? lings as any other delegate on thi?
ll.mr of the Convention. He was in
fact going through one of the most extraordinary
experiences ever given to an American ritiren. Ile
was being struck by Presidential lightning while
slttlnfMn the body which was to nominate him.
Ho was being nominated for * President at, hair
past 1 o'clock in the afternoon, winn ho could
hardly have dreamed of such a thing at '.) o'clock
in thc morning.
A DltAMATiC INCIDENT.
'Ibero has been no such dramatic incident in
politic*, for a great many years ut least, ex?
cept possibly tba Domination of Horatio Seymour
in i8(iH. Entirely apart from ali political con?
siderations, it was au extraordinary and im?
pressive Incident io seo this quiet man sud?
denly wheeled hy a popnlar sentiment
into the position of standard-bearer to tim great
Republican parly, and in all probability Into the
Presidency Itself, with its gnat power nmi world?
wide fame. All Ibis while tho crowd had been
sheering, and tbe elements of the Convention nero
dissolving and (rystallizing in an instant of tun.-.
Where the Sherman vote, was going, whether
simply hy force of drifting or not, was apparent
enough when a North Carolina delegate seized thc
banner of his State and waved it toward tbe Ohio
delegation, all of whom were on their feet. Thc
iiiiuatiou w.is Indeed peculiar. G. i.e.ni (jjii_t-.li]
had entered tho Convention as the loyal repre?
sentative of Secretary Sherman, who waa
still a candidate. Tho Ohio delegation, most
of whom wore iv aim friends of both men, wero in
honor bound to support Mr. Sherman bo long as
Ibero was any possibility of his nomination. General
Garfield had, like a truthful and honorable gentle?
man, set his fao from tho first against
nil suggestions that he should he?
roine ii candidate, feeling that any yielding
to such suggestions would bo rankly disloyal to the
fri.-nd ho had como to support. Now ho was being
forced into tho field in spite of himself, nnd
the Indications were that his own vote would
MOO surpass that of his candidate. Tho Ohio
delegation were seen to l>o in anxious, flurried con?
sultation about General Garfield's chair, ex-Gov?
ernor Dennison, Congressman Butterworth and
Major Bickham being prominent in tho group.
iowa's break roa aaamctn.
Nothing seemed to como of it, bowever, and when
the crowd had been quieted down tho secretary was
again iu his nlaco, ready to resiimo tho roll-call,
Winn he called " Iowa" every ear was strained to
hear tho reply, which had to travel from the
furl lust limit of tho body of delegates.
Thi* 22 votes of that State had been cast on every
ballot for James 0. Illaine, and if these votes should
lm cast for Garfield it would provo that
tho Instantaneous fusion of tho anti-Grant
clements or the Convention was com?
plete. When the chairman of tho delegation called
out that Iowa casi 22 votes tor James ... Garfield a
wild storm of cheering broke ont, which after a few
moments died away, while thero was a
renewal of tho hasty and whispered con?
sultation among tha Ohio delegates about
General Garfield's chair. Su.ldenly tho Ohio
delegation broke out in cries und applause, and an
electric cheer spread from them as a oentre in an
iiistsint all over the Convent mn, telling without any
tit ed ni winds thal (Hun's new candidate had re?
placed tho old; thal Secretary Sherman had been
withdrawn, and that, with tim full consent of his
friends, Garfield waa a candidate.
From tliis time tho votes split ..IT between Grant
and Garfield almost without exception, the roll
call proceeding amid tbo growing exulta?
tion of tho anti-Grant men, who thought
they saw viet orv beforo them. Kansas gavo
iti six. Illaine votes to Garfield, Grant's four
votes .standing linn. lu Kentucky, tho Blaino votes
carno to Garfield. Every Garfield vote now was
applauded, while Mr. (.'.inkling watched the se? rc
tary with u cold eye. Senator Kellogg
cast the rote of Louisiana, 8 for Garfield, h for
Grant. When Maine was called, Mr. Hale
arose, looking sad, to ho sure, hut still
with his accustomed air of (pilot reso?
lution, and cast those it votes, tbat rep?
resented sn much loyal affection for .lames
G. Blaine, for James A. Garfield, of Ohio. There
was a gnat cheer at this Inr Hu- men from Maine,
with many expressions of sympathy for their keen
disappointmentnassinu throimti tb.- throng,
nun in.n in mr. li ad.
Garfield hail now UH) votes, (inuit l(?7.Mr. Cany,
thi- scholarly-looking cb,nun,tn of the Maryland
delegation, eaat io votes from that State for Gar?
field ami il for Grant, Bx-Postmaster-Gcnersl
Cresswell questioned the correctness ol the vote,
ami tbe roil of tim delegation was called, showing
that the vate inul been correctly reported. Ibis
pian was adopted bv thc Grant tuen In a num?
il i of delegations afterward with two designs?
of canning d* lay and uivliig the Convention time to
t-tiii ...Vii I..--ibi.-. aisil ol frightening tbe min who
bul tho courage to break away, but would hardly
be ready, perhaps, to gu mi record hy name.
All ot tin' Massachusetts delegation except the
four (inuit men Voted foi li mi Ul, adding ZZ to hts
column. This brough! Garfield', vote up
to in*-, nnd be now- actually led Grant,
who lind 117. As Ihe race went on lie drew
further ahead. Mr. Joy cast all the 21 Ulaino votes
ol Michigan for hun. giving to Grant hts Invariable
one. Tim lillie Wi lit lt un vote in ell eil out ni night Ul
the fierce heat of this contest, Right of the
Ki Mun.ta votes went to Garfield and "J to (irant.
.-.cunio. Bruce announced the roto of Mississippi as
H for liiriienl and 8 for Grant. A (inuit m.tu made
tue usual quest lon of tho Correctness of the
vote ; the roll w.is sailed, and his reward was
the lo-s of 1 vote fe>r (inuit, (isirli.-hl now
felling 0. 1 hat. lonely Wa-ltlniri.e vote in Mis?
souri, that had siontl out un every ballot against
the 2*.) for Grant, wus now given to Garfield, Uv
hruska, sn unwavering H.uni..- Stato, gave its 0
votes to Garfield, while Nevada, likewise
a Blaine stu io. divided its vote, giving Garfield il
Giant2 and Blaine la Tins was ibo first break of
ans Blaine men to Grant, and, if I am not mis?
taken, tin* only Instance, though the
(inuit int-ii have always been full of
prediction* that many Blaine men would
go toGrant when thero was a break. New-Hamp?
shire, tim State of William I.'. Chandler, Blaine's
devoted fiii-nl, gave al! li--r-K> voles lo Garfield.
Mr. .lewcll. the chairman ol' the New-Jersey dele?
on).now gave b solid 18 to Garfield.
At this pol ii I Garfield's vole st.-od at IH7 : (inuit's
al 1.18. Ibo vote of New-York brought them ahiiosl
even, but onlv for xi time, Garfield having217;
Grant, 208. In North Carol Ina Ibe ir. Sherman votes
weill lo Garfield. When tho vole of Ohio, Hie State
which ran always produce a Picsidctit at fifteen
min ut en' notice, was called, the announce?
ment was eagerly listened lo. Congress?
man Bul t cr worth gave 43 roten for Garfield,
General Garfield having evidently declined to
i i-l ih<> llth for himself, Oregon gave Garfield
(I, while in Pennsylvania (inuit, in tim stress ami
tension <>i thu snuggle, gained a vote. Garfield uet
tun/ 21. Kinnie Inland voted for Garfield, and
Suit h Ca roi inn Rave bun ll out ol ll, the lest going
to (inuit.
II. it- the roll of Hie delegation was called on a
quest ion of Hu-vole. Tbe ehairmau of the delega?
tion, who bud felt himself bound by Graul Instruc?
tions, hut sympathized with Illaine, voted forGnr
lleltl. Tim Vote of South Carolina put Carlie ld up
tn 'MU, tim highest lirrure yet reaehe-l by any can?
dida le, and Cn.nt, at 258,
lin: RESULT AFWRED.
Garfield's nomination had fur somo time been in?
evitable, the onlv question being whether it, would
come on this ballot. All this time the General re?
mained quietly iu ins seat, apparently
unmoved, timi ono of tho last men
in tbe World to be suspected ol' beilul
ou lin. verge of a sudden Presidential nomination,
Senator Conkling and Senator Logan wen. in anx?
ious consultation In the middle aisle. I heir only
ho|ii< now was tn prevent a nomination on I Ins bal?
lot iu the forlorn hope that something might turn
np in tb. lr favor on the next. To tliis
end Mr. Conkling went over to labor wuh tin
Vermont delegates, to hold them back from Gai
fit-KI. lim ballot, a few moments later, showci
whal success be bad. Tennessee gavo Garfield 1
votes, with (irant'.-i votes standing firm, as, indeed
all ol (inuit's votes did. His 13 votfi
in lexis stuck by him. It waa fell thal
tim v >t ? ot Vermont would decide the question of i
nomination on thia ballot, though tho reen li
showed tbst Oeneral Garfield would havo beet
nominated wjlluuit it. When those ld orig!
mil Edmunds votes were cast for Garfield
their was a loud cheer, and ex-Governor Gregor]
Smith, who casi, them !kis-i tl his hand gleefully ti
a friend ou the platform. Virginia even ralina
a little for Grant, giving him 19 ""(.vole
to il for Osrfield. Wh. u West Virginii
was called Mr. Campbell, whose canst* General Gai
field championeujthe other dav, mud, before Senate
Hour, with his rigid etiquette, could stop him, thu
West Virginia remembered her friend and gave hit
0 votes.
Tbe vote of Wisconsin was watched for on ti
tins. There weto tho votes theu t
ju_t collimate Qa rlield if they wei
?l
called out 20 votes for Garfield, the whole house
flashed into a great cheer. The gallories were on their
feet in an instant,cheering and wavingbandkerchiefs
Almost tho whole body of the Convention was up
hurrahing at tho rate of three times three a minute.
Garfield was nominated, and just nominated.
APTHUR FGR VICE-PRESIDENT.
THK CONVENTION ANXIOUS TO CONCILIATE THE
CONKLING INTERESTS IN NEW YORK?EFFORTS
TO MAUI THE NOMINAUON UNANIMOUS.
|DY TKLEGRAPH TO THB TRIHUNf.l
Cuicaoo, Juno 8.?The Convention, which had
been so deliberate in tho selection of a candidate for
tho Presidency, went about completing the ticket
this evening without plan or organization. The
only thought in thu Liinds of tho delegates seemed
to lie to put the business through in tho greatest
possible baste; and, as it would tako less time to
finish tho work bv letting Mr. Conkling .have his
own way than by opposing him, that course wss
pursued without much apparent thought about the
consequences.
Tho overshadowing influence of tho great State
of New-York, also, with its thirty-live electoral
votes, tho fact that if thoso votes are cast for the
Republican candidate next November they will en?
sure his election, and tho fear that unless Mr.
Conkling left Chicago carrying with him somo evi?
dence of his power in the Convention ho would go
back to New-York and let tho Stato bo carried hy
the Democrats?all these considerations, and others
probably had their influence upon the Convention,
ami caused delegates to vote in tho faco of excite?
ment as they would not have voted upon sober
second thought.
Tbe conduct of a majority of tho New-York dele?
gation, when General Garfield was nominated this
afternoon, also made an impression. When every?
body cleo In the Convention was cheering for the
nominee, and seemed for a moment to have forgot?
ten the differences that had existed, the majority of
the New-York delegation sat still in their seats with
glum faces, making no eliott to conceal their disap?
pointment. If they had carried tho same spirit into
the campaign it would not havo been well for
success in the Empire State.
Thc talk of Mr. Conkling's friends during the re?
cess also contributed to tho demoralization of tho
delegates. They threatened all sorts of disasters if
a majority of the Convention (land to pile insults
upon the Senator from New-York; and they mado
no set nt of tho fact that they felt very ugly over
their defeat iii the afternoon.
Boon after tho adjournment for a recess, a caucus
was lu ld in the parlors ol' the New-York delegation,
fm-the purpose of arranging somo programme for
tin- light for the Vii (-Presidency. Most of thc New
Vork delegation wero present, and other (irant men
joined them. Sumo of tho Sherman managers wets
also (ailed in.
Mr. I.t vi P. Morton had been prominently men
ttoned as a probable candidate for tho Vice-Presi?
dency on the ticket with Grant, if the latter had
been successful; and it has generally boen sup
pnM*d that Senator Conkling had given tho New
Vork City Representative in Congress reason to ex
pi' I his support. Tnis nomination would have
been generally acceptable to Republicans from all
pints ol' the country, although it wniilil not have
beni tho lirst choito of many. Hut Mr. Con?
kling was soon found to havo other plans, and
Mr. Morton declined to allow tho uso of his name as
a candidate.
Mil. CONK! INC'S PURPOSE.
Mr. Conkllng's purpose wns not to bp misunder?
stood; lu- wished to mako tho Republican party
vindicate ex-Collector Arthur, whoso cause ho had
championed when Secretary Sherman removed him
from iitiice.'iind to humiliate iMr. Sherman by mak
Ing the immediate friends ot the Secretary of tho
In .i.siny iii Kio Convention assist in this vindica?
tion. At tho same time ho would secure upon the
ticket his own personal representative and friend.
lieforetbe Convention met in tho evening, it was
reported about the hotels that .Mr. Conkling had
com limed to present General Arthur's nano; but
no oim went to tbo Exposition Building expecting
him H. lu- nominated except after sflong struggle.
The delegates and spectators were slow in gath?
ering at thu Exposition Hall after the recess ; and
at no time wen- the galleries more than half full of I
people. On tbe table of the presiding officer there
had been placed a dural ship resting npon a bcd
of bright dowers. Its rigging was of smilax, .and
upon |tho sith- |of .the |hiill was wrought (iii crimson
blo-Souis the word Garfield. Many of the delegates
ami spectators St the evening session appealed with
Garfield badges, which wen-for sale on the streets
within sn hour aft.-r tho nomination was made.
They were of crimson ribbon, ami boro in golden
letters the-.lcgrud: '-For President, General James
A. Garfield, of Ohio."
Wlule tho sudience were waiting for the Conven?
tion to assemble, a local glee club entertained them
with some cornie songs, which wen- not particularly
well sung, but which served to amass the people,
MK, WASH1H"ltMl NOMINATED.
At half past live Senator Hoar called the Conven?
tion to order, and tho call of Slates for tho purpose
ol' putt mit candidates for tho Vice-Presidency in
nomination bogan. Tue call only proceeded as far as
California, wli.-n Mr. Pix ley, one of the delegation
fiom that State ami tho chairman of it, put in
nomination tho Hon. E. ll. Wtishbitriic. This was
expected and was received with a good deal of
enthusiasm,especially by the people in the galleries,
who from the lirst mention of his name applauded
if. uitb great heartiness, if tho audience had
selected tho candidate they would have chosen Mr.
Wasbburne ; aud their selection would not have
been a bad ono for the place, Mr. Pixloy mado a
good lillie five minutes speech in presenting Mr.
Washburn!'s name, referring to his sixteen years
?ervicu in Congress, and the honorable resold ho
made in Paris during the Franoo-Pruseian war. For
a few minutes it seemed as though tho Washburno
men win-to be it-warded for tho work thev had
done in tho morning in sfiirtunr tho current to Gar
iiohl, ami thus securing his nomination. Rut there
were arrangements going on upon the floor of tito
Convention that wero te prevent it. Prominent
New-York delegates were going about tho hall amt
holding hurried consultations with tho men from
other States, and it was apparent that, althou?h tho
|ilaii for tho nomination of General Art bur had not
been entirely arranged belum tho Convention mot.
it was rapidly being perfected. Tho nomination of
Mr. Washbnrne was seconded by Senator McCarthy,
of New-York, who was tho list to break away
trom tho Grant instructions yesterday, and
vote for illaine. His speech was brief an
pointed, and hia appearance as tho advocate
of Washbiiriio was supposed to indicate
that tho bolters in the New-York delegation Intend?
ed to stand together, and that General Arthur was
to receive only the (airant strength.
OrilIR CANDIDATES,
Tho other candidates wero presented in
quick succession. Ex-Govornor Jewell, of
C nneetieul. who was voted for for tho
sumo position in 1870, and who would
certainly make a very popular candidate, was pre?
sented by Connecticut, whoso delegation desired to
give their distinguished fellow-citizen the compli?
ment of tlieir vote. Mr. Hicks, tbo chairman of the
Florida delegation, nominated Judge Thomas Settle
as a representative Southern Republican, and in his
speech spoke in eb quent and forcible terms of
tho persecution which tho Republicans of the
South havo had to endure. North Carolina,
tho State in which Judge Settle formerly re?
sided, seconded his nomination through oue
of its colored delegates. Wheu Michigan was
roached Mr. Conger said that tho Republican
Conventiou in that State had instructed its
delegates to vote for their distinguished Senator,
Thomas W. Ferry, bul tbat bs had received a letter
Item Mr. Ferry declining to be a candidate.
Ile asked that the Iciti-r might bo printed with his
lon.
At tbis point Congressman Frye, who was
amporarily in the chair, read a dispatch
rora Oregon announcing tbst tbs Republicans'
ad carried that State by not less than.
,000 majority, and that there was great enthusiasm
ter Geueral Garfield's nomination. New-York wse
iilled, and. to the surprise of everybody, no
esponse was made. Ihe managers trom that
tate were too busy in making their combiaa
:ou3 to notice the oall of tbe State,,
r they were determined not to put General Arthur
i nomination unless tbey were sure of
sufficient number of votes in advance to
ominate him. Tennessee wss the next
late, at which tbe call halted, and Coo grossman
muck, of that State, presented tbe name of Horace
wynard, in accordance with the instructions of
uo Tennessee State Convention.
OF.NKRAL ARTHUR PRESKNTRD.
After Mr. Houck'e speech ex-Lieutenant-Governor
Woodford rose iu the New-York delega
ion, and standing upon bia seat, and
Her a brief reference to tbs loyal rapport
rhicb New-York bad given to General Grant, said
hat New-York, could not be behind any in support
f tho candidate nominated to-day, be presented the
ame of General C. A. Arthur for tbe second
lace on tbo ticket. The nomination was received
nth a good deal of applause in tbe New-York dele*
at ion, but tbe galleries and tbe body of tbe Con*
ention were silent.
I'n sent ly tbe tall, slim form of ex Governor Den*
ison of Ohio, was seen rising above the beads of
he delegates from that State. This wss tbe
nt ical uoi nt in tho contest. Governor Dennison,
-vitb Governor Foster-and General Garfield
lad been Secretary Sherman's nearest friends
ti tho whola contest j and Secretary
-herman was probably tbe one candidate of all who
tad made tho canvas tbat Conkling aod Arthur
vould bave least desired to bave nomi
lated. Now the one man wbo bsd been
he catir-o of the bitter enmity between the Adminis
nition aud tbe Senator from New-Tork
bo man whose removal from ofllce hy
.lr, Sherman had been made the occasion
>y Mr. Conkling for tho most savage attacks
iii the Secretary, of tbo Treasury and the
est, was a candidate before the Conven?
tion ; and it seemed hardly possible
hat Governor Dennison was ready to offer
he vote of bis State for that man;
mt he did it. and the action of Oblo
urned the scale. Governor Dennison, in
cconding tho nomination, pledged the vote of Ohio
or tbe ticket in November by a majority ot 30,000.
Then came the flood. General Kilpatrick followed
>vith one of his florid speeches for Arthur. Mr.
'.inkling, who bad arranged all this, sat In his seat
inmediately under General Kilpatrick, wearing
mon his face tbe most comical look ot
liicoiicein that was ever seen. It
,vas such a strong contrast with
ihe intensely interested appearance of his counte
lance during tue whole previous proceedings se to
ie one of the most striking foatnres of the conven
ion as seen from the platform.
Illinois was the next to wheel into line,
dr. Emory A. Storm loading up that State
md ranging it by tho side of New-York and
lino. Tlie nomination of General Arthur
trashy this time assursd, for it was evident that
he Convention had been stampeded, completely
thrown oil its balance.
After a Maryland delegate bad bronght op tbe
roto of tbat State, or at least promised
t, Mr. Fi I ley, of St. Louis, was ani?
ons to bave the nomination made bv
icclauiat ion. The chairman of the Convention ruled
that it would be out ot order, but suggested that
it would be in onler by a two-thirds vote to
suspend the rules ami* declare auy one nomi?
nated. Mr. Filler demanded a suspen?
sion of the rules, but the motion waa
lost ami the call of tho States proceeded. Delegate
Chambers, of Texa**, presented tbe name
of tue candidate iroui the Lone Star
State, F-x-Goveruor E. J. Davis, bot tbe
Convention was too impatient to listen to bim.
Florida was the next State to be swept away
by the flood, and Mr. Hicks, the chairman
of the delegation, withdrew tbe name of
.Judge Settle and seconded the nomination of
Arthur. New-York. Illinois and Ohio had joined
hands for this most unexpected nomina?
tion. Pennsylvania was the last of tho great
States to swing into line. .Mr. Cessna
aid that the Kevstone State was once more wi timi
two of a um te, and that union was for General Arthur
by this time tiie Couxeution had completely loss
coutrol of itself, and the enthusiasm on tbo fl. or
was wild, though not intellighur. For ouce tho gal?
leries were in a more judicial frame ot mind.
A colored man from North Carolina translerred the
vote of Little to Arthur. All oppos-tion to Arthur by
this tune had gone to pieces. The New-Yotk bolters
also went over, aud Senator McCarthy withdrew
their support from Washbnrne and gave it
tn Arthur. Tho last speech wns mado bv
Mr. Campbell, of Wost Virginia, who in
tended to have nominated General Nathan
liott, of that State, but wbo, amid much confusion,
declared the intention of ti.e delegates from West
Virginia to support Mr. Washbnrne.
Even Mr. Conkling forgot his dignity
i-nough in his impatience cnll ont
" tune ' while Mr. Campbell was speaking,
rim voting was uot attended with much excite?
ment. When Hie roll-call was completed and tbe
result was announced there was very general ap?
plause.
?
HOW THE RESULT WAS REACHED.
DKTAHeS Off TIIK B.VLLOUXOS?KIOIIT HOM ROIL
CALLI VOB rilKSIDRNT AND ONR FOR VICE
PUKMDKN.?AN ADJOURN.MK ST 8INK HIE.
IUHNHItAI. CRESS DISPATCH. I
Chicago, Juno 8.?Tho chairman called the Con?
vention to order at 10:33 a. m., at which hour tha
lelcgates wore nearly all in their scuts and the
galleries wero three-fourths tilled. Prayer was
tiered hy tho Rev. Dr. Thomas, of the Cen?
tenary Methodist Church of Chicago.
Tho ehairtiiau ordorod tho roll-call for tho twenty
ninth ballot, and it was proceeded with. When tbe
Stato of Alabama was called and tho vote an?
nounced, its correctness was questioned hy a mem?
ber of tho delegation, and the chairman ordered ths
roll of delegates to be called. Then oue of the dele?
gates stated that a colleague was absent, sick, aud
hud authorized him to cast his vote for him, aud he
asked whether he could do sn. To tliis the chair?
man replied that tim roll-call must not be inter?
rupted, aud that the ques tion would be decided
when it arose.
'J ho roll-call went on, and wben tho nanni of Alex?
ander was called and responded to. tho question was
raised as to whether the response li ad been made
by Alexauder. It was admitted that it had not
been. A seeond delegate from Alumaba also failed
to respond, aud then when the delegates were sil
called, tho names of tbo alternates for the absent
delegates were called. Thero was a response, how?
ever, from only ono of them.
Th.i chairman stated, as bis mode of executing tha
mle on the subject, that in tbe case of a failure of a
delegate to respond, the name of the alternate
standing opposite on tbo roll would bo called, aud
if ho did uot respond tben the name of tho otber al?
ternate from tbat district would be called, aud ia
the case of delegates-at-large tbe names of tbe
other alternates of that class would be called.
Tho volo of Alabama was tben annouueed aa
Grant 10, Blaine 1, Sherman 3. The result of tha
decision was to lose Grant one vote.
When Virginia was called, the chairman an?
nounced 10 votes for Grant, 3 for Blaiue, 3 for Sher?
man. A colored delegate challenged the vote, and
tho roll was called in detail, when 4 responded for
Sherman instead of 3, as previously announced.
Carter, a delegate-at-large, was absent, aud an al?
ternate responded for him. Subsequently the dele*
gate who had changed from Blaine to Sherman
chan ged his vote back to Blaiue, which left Virginia
recorded as originally?Grant 10,,Blaine 3, Sher?
ill an 3.
The following was tbe result of the vote in de?
tail:
Wnule number of votes east.< .7M
Necessary to a choice.?7|
Grant.30ft | Wssatmm*.. Sd
Blame.219 I Windom. J
Hiiormaii.118 Garfield.?., %
Edmunds. 18 I
Till UTI STU BALLOT.
The thirtieth ballot was tben taken. Wheo
Florida voted, a delegate questioned the sesame?
of its announcement. A Kentucky delegate mada
__ .?
0*nl4*xs***l on fourth Peas.

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