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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, August 27, 1888, Image 1

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V"'XI-V11L....N0-1.5,261.
NEW-YORK, MONDAY, AUGUST 27, 188*.
PRICE THREE CENTS.
r /, ?f Ar\ft 19
A HIGH LICENSE PLANK.
FROMINENT REPUBLICANS WOULD NAIL A
STOUT ONE TO THE STATE PLATFORM.
TIKWS OP WARXKR MILLAR. SPKAKKR COI.K AND
?THKBS?OKTTINi. RFADY KIR THK CONVBN
glOW AND A GRAND RKPCBL1CAH RALLY
AT BARATOGA?SENATOR SLOAN
TO NOMINATK Mit. MII.l.V.Il
FOR OOVF.RNOR.
r 1st Tiru or sen to mr. ?tntRtma.l
Saratloga, Aug. Ml? High License was the chief
theme of conversation to-day among surh of tbe
delegates to thc Republican State Convention as
have strived in Saratoga. It superseded for thc
moment _.ll talk about candidates for Slate offices.
The question debated WM whether or not a plank
should be put in the Republican platform com?
mending the action of thc Republican legislature
in passing a High-License bill, denouncing Gov?
ernor Hill for vetoing the measure, and pledging
that, the Republican party will pass a High-License
law If a Republican Governor is elected. Ex-Sen?
ator Warner Miller sat in n shady corner of the
broad piazza of the United States Hotel most of
the day, conversing with a circle of his friends,
the debate upon thc proposed plank meanwhile
going on around him and elsewhere in the hotel.
Thle evening when Mr. Miller was asked what his
opinion of tho suggested plank was, he said:
In my oDlnion. we should adopt s radical Usn license
Blank. Ordinarily, a mun named as possibly the candidate
ef his party for Governor does not feel at liberty to dis?
ease the platform In advance of Its adoption by a conven?
tion, but as I hsve not ?mcht the position of candidate,
I de not consider that I sm bound by any such rule
On the centrary. I feel free to express my beliefs lu regard
to whit should be thc platform on surh an Important sub?
ject ss this one. I think we should be giving up the
_sbt in advanco If we should refrain from adopting a High
Incense plank of the roost pronounced description. The
Democrata have taken the side of the. liquor
dealers. They Intend to nominate Governor Hill as
the champion of the llqu*r Interest. They
say they prefer the supper; of tho saloons
In pelitlcs to that of the churches. We must accept the
-hailengee. Hill bis just as much as forced us to take
the aide of temperance by hla acts as Cleveland hy his
free trade message forced us to take the side, of prouse
Usn te American industry.
ATTITUDE OF STEAKER COLE
Other Republican leaders were equally frank
and decided in favoring a High License plank. Ap?
parently the rural Republicans will be unani?
mously In favor of such a plank, and tho only
opposition that will be made to it in thc con?
vention will come from the cities. It was from
the cities mainly that the few votes came lust*
winter that were cast by Republicans in the
Legialature against the High License bill. If
any earnest opposition to such a plank is made
thia year in the Republican State Convention, it
will come Irom the cities, especially from New
York, Brooklyn and Rochester. But there will be
division on this subject even in thc cities. Charles
L. Mitchell, a delegate from the Vllth Assembly
District of New-York, said to-day:
" I shall earnestly support a High License plank
We must adopt one. The temperance sentiment
of the State will back it."
Tbe opinions held on High License by rural
Republican.*, who, it may be observed, cast nine
tenths of the Republican vote in this State, were
well expressed tio-day here by Fremont Cole,
apeaker of the Assembly. He s;iid:
I sm for Indorsing the action taken by the Republiean
(Senate and the Republican Assembly in passing the
High License bill, snd I say a failure to do so would
bs aa Insult to the Republicans of the State, who ap.
proved of the action ot the I/cgiMature. This ls no time
to bolt. We have lost the liquor vote and I am glad of
lt, for we lost lt in a good cause. We can afford to be
beaten on lhe Issue of rest.letica liquor -oiling, but I
lo not believe we will be. In my speeches this {all
1 hare dwelt especially npon tho temperance leglsiatbn
of tbe last Republican Legislature, and have told the
voters that the Republicans have burned their bridges
behind them on this question, and that we mean to keep
?n along the asm* path. This statement hss always
awakened great enthusiasm I think the farmer Repub?
licans gristly desire the passage of a High License plank.
The liquor dealers are on tbe defensive. They wsnt
David B. Hill as a bulwark against any temperance legis
Uti on. We must adopt a High License plank, and we
shall be sustained by the temperance sentiment of the
State.
ARRIVAL OF DELEGATES.
There was a little shower of delegates this even?
ing. Congressman John 15. Weber, of Buff-rlo,
a candidate for Lieutenant-Governor, arrived in
company with O. G. Warren, proprietor of " The
Buffalo Commercial Advertiser,"and ex-Senator
Daniel H. McMillan, of Buffalo. Mr. Weber's
friends .tated that ho would have the support of
every delegate from the counties of Erie and
Oswego. Mx. Weber engigod parlor No. 40 of
Congress Hall as his headquarters during thc Con?
vention. Assemblyman Robert Ray Hamilton and
Hamilton Fish, jr., arrived from New-York and
expressed themselves as strongly favoring a High
License plank. Mr. Fish, who is a delegate from
Putnam County, said:
We cannot afford to hare my straddle on the liquor ques?
tion. Tha liquor-dealers have all gone over to the Demo?
cratic party and we could gain noUiing by a noncommittal
Blank on the temperance question. I believe we should
come oul flat-footed for high-license.
Among thc other delegates who arrived wero
Senator George B. Sloan, of Oswego; ex-Congress?
man John M. Bailey, of Albany; John W. Vroo- |
man, of Herkimer, former clerk of the Senate;
Arthur E. Bateman, of New-York, a delegate to
the National 1.. publican Convention; ex-Assem?
blyman Wheeler, of Pawling; ex-Senator James
Otis, of Heliport, who, it is said, is a " dark
horse" candidate for Lieutenant-Governor; S. V.
H. Crugcr and Robert G. M .Cord, of New-York;
George B. Beatty, of Poughkeepsie; John A.
Nichols, ol Brooklyn: General Henry A. Barnum,
of New-York; ex-Assemblyman Mann, of Troy ;
General Joseph B. Carr, of Troy, former Secretan
of State; John W. Jacobus of New-York. There
also came. ex-Congressman Edwin Kinsteiu, of
New-York, one of the candidates for Lieutenant
Governor. The proprietors of thc United States
Hotel received a dispatch from Senator William
M. Evarta engaging a parlor ana bedroom trom
to-morrow. Similar dispatches were received Ly?
the proprietors of Congress Hall from Senator
Frank Hiacock and ex-Senator Thomas C. 1'lutt.
It ia clear from the engagements that Congress
Hall will be the heado Hinters of the Republican
leaders. Ex-Senator Miller has engaged l'arlor A
of that hotel. Senator Hiaooek l'arlor No. lot.,
ex-Senator Platt Parlor E, Newman __. Allon, of
Dayton, a candidate for Licuteiuint-Governor,
l'arlor G, and E. A. McAlpin. of Ne w-York,
another candidate for Lieutenant-Governor,
Parlor No. 124. The Republican State Commit?
tee will use a large parlor in the same hotel os
their headquarters, and will hold their lirst meet?
ing in it to-morrow.
A GRAND REPUBLICAN RALLY.
It ia stated that there will be a grand Republi?
can rally herc on Wednesday evening, at which
ipeeches will be made by ex-Senator Miller aud
Senators Evarte and Hiscock. The tide in favor
of nominating Warner Miller for Governor was as
strung as ever to-day, and there is no reason to
doubt that he will bo nominated by acclamation
on Tuesday. Ile has no opponent. The contest
over the Lieutenant-Governorship prom ist rs to be
n warm one. There are many candidates with
no one having a decisive lead. Robert G. M< -
Cord said to-day that he thought E. A. M* Alpin
would have the support of the Assembly districts
in New-York City, randing from the bl to the
?AV'th. If so, McAlpin has the strongest support.
It will be the pleasant task of Senator George
P- Sloan, of Oswego, to make the speech nomi?
nating warner Miller for Governor. No better
choice could be made. Mr. Sloan is a good
Speaker, and be may be said to love his subject,
lor he baa been Mr. Miller's intimate p-rsonni
friend for many years. They first met as blot her
Assemblymen, In 1874, when Mr. Miller and Mr.
Sloan were con6pic_om as leaders in th-- it tack
upon the Canal Ring. In lb.., when Mr. Sloan
*ae a candidate for junstol, tbs manager of his
luccei" ful canvass was Wanter Miller. This *l"'it
of gratitude was paid by Mr. Sloan in I' -<1, winn
ha "landed" Mr. Miller, by -skilful manu gen tent,
? the office of United States Senator. Winn
fit- Miller sought a rc-electioi in 1887, Mr. Sloan
one of hla chief supporters, aud no one was
grieved by his defeat.
CANDIDATES IOR VARIOUS OFFICES.
Bs siore dialog'u^cd Republican, wets mg*
gestcd today for thc oflice of Presidential olector
at-large. 'Hie new names were those of General
William H. Seward, of Auburn; ex-Congressman
Thomas Cornell, of Kingston; nnd General George
S. Batclicller, of Saratoga. To these must he
added the names of Chauncey M. Depew and Henry
W. Sage.
The Brooklyn Republicans say that they desire
thc election of General B. F. Tracy as temporary
chairman of the convention. No man is yet named
for i-'rmaticnt chairman. It is possible that Sen?
ator Evarts may bs elected to this position. Thc
lawyers among the delegates are still undecided
what man to select as a candidate for Judge of the
Court of Ai innis. The jurists mentioned for the
position nre Judge Charles Daniels, of Buffalo, and
Judge WiTlinm Rumsey, of Hath. 0. G. Warren,
of Buffalo, when asked aliout the position of Judge
Daniel's said to-night:
Judge Danie's informed me over ten days ago that he
was net a candidate for Judge of the Court of Appeals and
did not desire the position. I told him that If he was a
?audldat. Mr. Weber would not be a candida.*
for Lieutenant-Governor; thst I considered his
(Judge Danlels's) nomination a certainty if be should be
a candidate and that hla election was equally certain; but
he told me that he was not a candidate and that, moreover,
as I have said, he did not desire the nomtnstton. Some
Kew-Tork delegstes I havo met think that the candidate
should he taken from that city, as that place has now no
representative on thc bench of the Court of Appeals. Wc
of Erle County have come here, therefore, to press tho nomi?
nation of John B. Wahn for Lieutenant-Governor. We
think he would bring a great many votes to the State ticket
In Erle County if he were nominated.
REPUBLICAN RALLIES IN VERMONT.
ENTHUSIASTIC MEETINGS THROUGH THE STATE
?Till*. ISSUE A FLAIN ONE.
St Albans, Vt., Aug. 26 (Special).?Last week was
a red-letter week for Vermont Republicans, more than
forty Harrison and Morton rallies having been held
in fhe Stale under de direction of the Republican
State Committee. The meetings were all large and
enthusiastic. The rallies at White River Junction,
Roxhury, Mnrrisville, Fnosburgli talla, H gligafe and
St. Johnsbury wore the largest held In those towns
since 188-1. Everywhere In the State the Republicans
seem to realize the Importance of the coming Septem?
ber election, and are showing an enthusiasm fur tbe
National and State tickets such a- has not been wit?
nessed since 1800. The Democrats have been aroused
from their state of " Innocuous desuetude" by tho
activity of tho Republicans, and aro making a lively
canvass during the closing days of the campaign.
Until recently the Democrats have BOOB on a " still
hunt" In Vermont, but lt will avail the party nothing,
a. tho free trade policy of the Administration has
turned large numbers of protecilon Democrats Into ihe
Republican fold, and discouraged hundreds ol others
who will be numbered among tbe absentees from ihe
polls on election day.
The Fisheries rn* i of President Cleveland will
have little effect on . * miva - In Vermont, as lt ls
generally regarded a* an electioneering document.
Tho Issue between the two parties of protection or
free trade ls so clearly and strongly denned in this
campaign that lt cannot be changed by a piece of
demagoglsm or a political trick on the part of Pres?
ident Cleveland. Velmont would bo as seriously
affected as any other State by the enforcement of tbe
retaliatory acts against Canada, but the people of tho
Stato take little* stork In Presidential claptrap. Tru.t
worthy report* from a large number oi towns are to
the effect that Ole political Prohibitionists are lo .lng
ground, and that tho third party will poll a smallc.
vole in the S.at. than In 1880.
The Senatorial nominations have all been made
and the BSXi Senate, promises to be solidly Republican.
Tlie Franklin County Republicans are working Uko
beavers to elect the straight county ticket and the out?
look ls decidedly favorable lo their success. The
Democrats and bolting Republicans have nominated a
fusion ticket, with ono Republican and two Democratic
Senators. Rousing Republican rallies were held In
Franklin County last week at Eno-burg Falls, Georgia,
Fletcher, East Fairfield and Highgate. The .peaker*
were 0. M. Dewey, of Michigan; Judge A. __, Mor?
rison, of New-York; William P. Dlllingham, James K.
Barchelder, Colonel 0. A. Woodbury, Georg. A. Bal?
lard Albert Griffin, of Kansas, and Juugo A. I).
Tenney, of New-Yor't.
During tho coming week some thirty rallies have
been arranged. County meetings will be held as fol?
lows : Middlebury. Monday. August, 27, Albert Griffin
and George M. Dewey speakers; at Bennington,
August 80. A. \V. Beard, of Roston, A. L. Morrison
and W. P. Dlllingham speakers; al Montpelier, August
HO, A. Vf. Bcairi speaker; at Rutland, August 31,
William McKinley, Jr., of Ohio. A. W. Tenney aud
William P. Dlllingham. Mr. Dlllingham also speaks
at Windsor on Monday and at Manchester Centre on
Tuesday.
?
DOINGS OF THE "REFORM CLUB."
ENCOURAGED BT THE ADMINISTRATION?AC?
TIVITY OF ENGLAND* ALLIES.
Washington, Aug. 26 (Special).?There are Indications
that the " Reform dab,* with headquarters In New
York, and which seems to bo a son of adjunct of tho
Cobden Club, has established the most cordial relations
with Mr. Cleveland's Administration. Indeed, thero
ls a pretty strong suspicion that It ls receiving
material aid as well as words of encouragement from
Washington In Hs guerilla raid upon American In?
dustries. Not long ago an official of the Administra?
tion received from Jason Hinman, l; Secretary of the
Subcommittee on New-York State, at large," a letter
from which the following ls an extract:
In reply lo yours, would say that your uame hss been
added to our special list. We have been giving our
attention, as you havo probably already discovered from
the natur* of the documents you have received from us,
to the circulation of speeches recently delivered in Con
' :ss on this question. We have circulated over a half a
mlUlon of copies of the President's mesrago. Nelson's
speech, Colqultt's speech, the majority report of the Way*
and Means Committee of thc House, cu.., in tin* State.
I also send yon copies of Everett F. Wheeler's speech on
W8ge,> and the tariff, and shnl! send you from limo to
time copies of the " Tariff Reformer.''
If the sub-committees on the other States "at
large" are doing as well as tho New-York Sub-Com?
mittee, the " Reform Club" certainly deserves wei!
at the hands or the Administration. Tho circulation,
in a single State, within tbe short space of five or
six weeks, of " over a half a million copies'" of freo
tni'le documents Implies not only a large degree of
energy, but also the possession of a fair supply of
the '? sinews of war."
"Reform Club" is a high-sounding lille, and lt
probably ls expeeted that documents purporting to
emanate from that source will bo received with less
caution and mote respect by some persons than If
received direct from the headquarters of the Demo
crave National Committee. Beside-, lt may be
hoped thus to reach thousands of voters not ac?
cessible to tbe latter. Rut why In the name of com?
mon sense should the " Refoim Club" need pecuniary
aid save from tho friends of ?? freedom of trade" in
Great Britain and New-York City, who belong to the
samo brotherhood and who aro alike. If nol equally,
Intomted in brushing down tho protective system 1
Probably no such necessity exists. The EngBsfa
Frec-Tradei- and their Dotiioetatlc and Mugwump
allic* In the United State* must have learned from
experience that tho circulation among American
voters of free-trade documents or " tracts" emanating
from tie CobdOB Clnb direct I* more likely to bann
than help "the cause.** aud the reform they have
determined to light from cover.
DEMOCRATS FOR PROTECTION.
TnE BEGINNING OF ANOTHER SPLIT IN THE
PARTY OF FREE TRADE.
6aratoga, Aug. 20 (Special).?A large number of
prominent Democrats met at the home of ex Congress?
man James O'Brien this evening. Letters were re?
ceived from many others who were unable.to attend.
It was decided tbat an organization of all Democrats
who are In favor of protection to American Indu-Hi's
and wiio aro opposed to all legislation leaning toward
flee trade should at once bo i?rfectcil lu the city of
New-York. Resolutions wero adapted ilenouuclng free
trade aud the action of Iho Administration. Among
those who look par! In Hu* meeting "ere John Huniv,
Orlando L. Stewart, Edward Eckel, "Tim" Shea, Dennis
M' .Mal.on. M. F. Raymond, F. Kalleubcig, Thomas
Brady, Francis Hamilton, Henry Miller. T. Eastman,
(karin Golding. C. C. Shayne, stephon McCormick. Jr.,
Henry C. Dunlap. Nicholas Haughton, John Kelly,
Bernard Wilson, William Brady. Andrew Cai sou. Henry
Morrison, John A. Dcich&nty. William J. Boylan, John
A. Marks, James Riley. John Johnston, Edward M
Cue. John Rollinson. Arther Abort, __ A. Bf Berna!?,
Andrew Uelser. J. Graham Hyatt, John Malloy, I*. M.
Blxtiy, George B. McBnlyn, Henry Donovan and e\
C'ongressman James O'Brien.
THE DK.MK KATI'' POLL SHORT IN INDIANA^""
Indianapolis, Ang* '-'! (-pe* lali- In previous years
the Demociutlc Male Committee has BBtnr hesitated
to give to tba public Information about 111 polls of ti.e
Slate, but thc chairman and secretary havo refused io
say anything whatever about tho poll tbat wan taken
during Julr. It has Just leaked oul, however, that
the poll shows that the party's vote ls 10,000 short of
the number In the State two year* ago. Jesse D
Wnks. of UiMacMtie. claims to have received thlt i
Information from an Intimate Democratic friend who
ls on the " Inside."
-?
WIRE-PCLLLNG ON SUNDAY.
THK GOVERNOR PLYING niS TRADE IN ELMIRA
WITH MULLER'S HELP.
Elmira, Aug. 2d (Special).-Governor Hill's visit
to Elmira was followed to-day by Iho arrival of hs
political partner, Judge W. L Muller. They wero
here, they said, merely for rest, but the wires pulled
to day (Sunday bas always boen Hill's best political
work day) note an activity that proves conclusively
that tho Governor ls hard at work for a renomination.
This morning the Governor attended Beecher's church,
and later was called upon by an almost unbroken col
umn of political admirers, not only from this c ty, but
from country towns of Chcmung 83 well as from neigh?
boring counties. The calls were generally brief, but
In the evening the confidential lieutenants were In
consultation until 9 o'clock, when the oovernor took
a train for Albany. During the last ten days S. S.
Taylor, of this city, has been through thc southern
and western counties of the state fixing ih tigs for
HUI delegates, and the consultation hero was to hear
Taylor's reports and get the views of I>cmocratlc
leaders from oilier places. Governor HUI departed In
good humor, the report evidently pleas ng him His
Elmira friends say that ho will be nominated by accla?
mation.
STRIFE OS THE MACKEY RAILROADS
ALL TRAINS ON Tnr. SY8T..M STOPPKD?ENGINEERS,
FIREMEN AND SWITCHMEN QCIT WOPK.
Chicago, Aug. 2fi.?An Evansville, Ind., dispatch to
"Tlio Times" ls to Ihe effect that all trains have been
slopped on the Mackey s>sfem of railroads owing lo a
strike deela-ivl against the roads therein embraced by
Chiefs Arthur and Sargent today. The system In?
cludes the peoria, Decatur and Evansville, the Brans*
ville and Indianapolis, and Iho Evansville and Terre
Uaute roads, having a total length of Too miles. Tito
trouble began some weeks apo out of Hie discrimina?
tion* laid to bave been maxie by Master Mechanic
I:nlth against Brotherhood men. The strike inch"!'te
all 'he engineers, fl?;ir.en and switchmen. Ihe man
seen, -ii' has telegraphed to the Chicago, Burlington and
Vlulncy Hoad In Chlrasn for aid In securing them men.
TUE CITY Ol'?' S-AC-YORK SIGHTED ATLAST,
TWELVE HOURS LOST BY STOPPAGE OE TnK EN?
GINE-IT WASN'T A RACE, ANYWAY.
Queens to- ri, Aug. 20.?The Inman Lino steamer
City of No* York, captain Watkins, was signalled off
Brow Head at 7:10 a. m., to-day. She left Now-York
list saturday. Ihe starboard engine of the steamer
was stopjleg for four hours on August 20, and then
wer* several other stoppagoa afterward, making a total
of twelve iionrs. Tue captain repudiates the ld*-a
that a race was Intended.
THE SHAH TO MAKE A TOUR OF EUROPF
Ixindon, Aug- IB.?The Shah of Persia Intends to
reach Baku on September 20 and thence to make a
tour of Europe.
?
SIGNOR CRISPI CONFERS WITH KING HUMBERT.
Rome, Aug. 26 ?Signor Crispi arrived at Milan to?
day ,-;nd proceeded to Monza to confer with King Hum?
bert.
COLLAPSE Ot A MEW RAILWAY BRIDGE,
TnE FALS- WORK WASH EH AWAY AND THE STRUCT?
URE LOST IN THK OHIO RIVER.
Cincinnati, Aug. 2<J (Special).?At 10 o'clock sharp
this morning, iho false work of (lie main span of tho
Huntington railw-ay bridge over tbe Ohio a' tl*ls point
gave vvay, owing to tho pressure of high water. Eve
vvitne. sos saw the traveller, or hugo den-irk on nilen,
at that moment topple and fall over up sti-esin.
Immediately the ire. tle-llko woodwork In the centre
panel was swept down stream, followed fiist by that
Bl tho Ohio end ti thc span and the, by the panel
nearer Kentucky. With a crash and a splash that
was heard all over Covington, the truss from th*
southward nearly to the northward pier, which ll
was within sixty feet of roaching, fell to tho bottom
of tho river. 112 feet, carrying with lt nine freight
cars?three walled with rall- and *lx erith piling?
whioh had been run ont upon tho work to give lt sta?
bility. The Ina will fall upon Un- Phoenix Bridge
Company, of PhoenixvUte, fenn., and ls cf (mated
roughly at $200,000. This will Include the clearing
of the channel, now blocked by the debris, the n.ov
ery or duplication of the ml?Inc beams ami the BOees
slty of doing the work over again. This ls the moro
aggravating, as three Breaks Would have seen tho Iron
work self-sustaining, and as by completing the bridge
as per conti-act by January i">. 1880, the eompany
would have eclipsed tli* reeord, and that with ? bridge
having thc lon get tru^s .pun in Un world. Tue *t*'
lay will be a cause of serious loss to the Chesapeake
and Ohio Valley Ballway Company, tlie hridgu being
constructed to bring Hits road now building down the
south bank of the Ohio River hilo tho city.
THE DEATH PESALTY IS TEXAS.
A VERDICT OF MANBI.ALT.HTkR EOLt.OWEB BY ONE
Bf MUNDER IN THK FIRST DEGREE.
Marlin, Tex., Aug. 20.?In the District Court yes?
terday K. W. I jcdbetter was convicted of manslaughter
and given fivo years In Stale prison. This waa bl*
third trial. Ills first trial resulted la a verdict of
murder In the fli-*t degree, with tho death penalty.
He was charged With tho killing of a Bell County
ofliclal In 18SU, while lin- latter vva.s lu Falls . on.nly
executing a process boob Louis Rewiring on a eharge
Of murder. At lhe la.sf term of roon How kin*' via,
convicted and received a life BBBBBBeB. A bow trial
being granted, he was at this term convicted ami
given tho death pen I y. This ls the Ant time
that a Jury lu Ibis c mn y bas assessed tho deal li
penalty after a verdict /or a lifo term had been given.
ROBERT GARRETT MOVED AT LAST,
A SUITABLE HOUSE FOUND AT RINGWOOD, N. J.
?FITTED UP FOR A LONG STAY.
Robert Garrett was taken over to Ringwood,
New-Jersey, yesterday morning, and ls now estab?
lished In a comfortable house, In every way fitted
for one In his peculiar position. Thc Journey w?.s
made In a special train, and Mr. Garrett showed
no sign* of discomfort or fatigue from the trip.
The train started at 5 a m., that hour having be*-u
selected in accordance with the advice of the Ml
Railroad officials, to as to avoid the numerous
excursion trains that pass over the road on Sun?
day. Dr. E. L Partridge accompanied Mr. '.ar?
len, as did also all the members of his party who have
been at the Brevoort Bonn, but Hie doctor ratnrned
to the city as soon as his patient had been comfort?
ably established In bis BOW Bjaartan.
Mr. Garrett was accompanied liv his w'fe. I.ls
sister, his father-in-law, Mr. Prion; his sister-in
law, and Ida -cemtery, Mr. Ony, a- wall a. i>>
nurses awl servant;-. All thc servants from Hr,
Oarrett's Baltimore establishment bave twen trans?
ferred to Ringwood, a* weil us his imi-e, ami car?
riages. Preparations have be,ra made, in feet,
for an Indefinite stay, arri Ulna Mr. (Jarrett
speedily improve,, ha mav renata there perananently.
Tho house has beea selected after a careful exaaiiini
rion of various properttn. and although lt bad not
been occupied for some lime, lt I-, believed to be
well adapt ed for ll- present purpn-e. Mi. Garrett
Booda nat and quiet above ail things, and then
requisites rendered Ids llaltimore boan iiusatl-factoi v.
KILLKDASD WOBSBSB IS TBL SETTLERS'FIGHT
Trinidad. CoL, Aug. M.?Up to I :::o la*t night no
more couriers have arrived fis.in the **ICM of war ai
Stonewall, making lt |mpo**ible to get any further
particulars of yct-n lav'.* Ight betvv.cn tin- settlers
and the sheriff's poSBB, It ls rumor* d that Governor
Beea, of New-Mexico, ba- ordered ont troops to pta
rent any trouble In thal portion ot Maxwell grant,
which iles lu his territory, when thu, hu oo conflicts
have laken place. Late In-t nigh! L. R. Wooton and
D. D. Finch lei! here (or Stonewall, to arl.niue mat
lei*, with the settler*, il possible, and allow the six
deputie, to return to Trinidad. *>ii arriving al Sion*
wall tit*- besieged boa-, via, found vacant, the deputies
having escaped at ll o'clock, arriving in this city late
this evening. In the light yesterday Francisco lVt
rlgue was shot through the In-ari, IL D. Bussell
severely wounded, and eight or ten sottlers moro or
les- di "lided. Two doctors are on Hie ground.
MFBDEB AT A FOX HCST.
Unlontown, Penu.. Aug. td especial).?In a fox bun
on tho mountain about midnight la t night, near
Dubols Camp. MMBBBB Jeffries shot and killed Jacob
Pollock, .leifncs M jard boss at the Lemont fnma* c.
He says tbat lie -liol Polloch In self (Wi me; that live
ol Pollork', MOM-! Wera N-ating bim af Hie time, as
they held a grudge against him iur discharging one of
them last spring._
TEXAS FEYER IS THE ORMMASLABR VALLE!,
Carlisle. Penn., Aug. 20 (Special).--secretary Edge,
of the Fennsylvanla State Board of Agriculture, bas
discovered another outbreak of Trias fever among a
herd of cattle at Shrewsbury, near this city. Tho
llaltimore authorities deiiared lt pleuro-pneiimonta,
and were about to establish quarantine against Fenn?
sylvanla cattle, when Investigation showed thut lt waa
Tex a* fever, and that the cattle caine Loni Baltimon,
It ls ri-- ii-ted io I*" spreading among the cattle In Ibe
Cumbeiland Valley.
A FATAL AURRAOA cai: ACOIDABT.
leSBph Williams, six years old. WhBM parents llvo
at No. .'.Cl Tenth ave.. I ,. ? mn ole. ly i ar I... of
the lld! UM, WhBa playing n-ar hi., BOOM la-t nigh!
aod killed. Tin- drivel. John Wv nn". us, arr,
August Faulkouber, a boy of eight yea. a, living at No.
?G-ii Crust Eighty slxtli-st.. was run _\_r p^i ulght by
a Seeond-ave. car at Eighty-, lx.th-.-i. and seventy
Injured. He was sent lo the Prnbyterian iii" piUi.
Tho nuilee arm led the driven
RELIEF FOR THE REFUGEES
A CHANCE TO FLEE FROM JACKSONVILLE.
THE ACTHORITIES TO RCN A TRAIN TO THE
QUARANTINE CAMP-NINE NEW CASES AND
TWO DEATHS.
Jacksonville, Fla., Aug. 2fl.-There are nine new
cases to-night: J. E. Bogue, Burton Mays, colored;
Amelie Costellaw, Mlsg Minnie Bours, Grace and
Fannie Harden, Miss M. A. C. Craig. Henry McGuire
and Mrs. J. A. Bogart. Two new cases were dis?
charged, Robert Grace and Davis Lloyd, and there
were two deaths: E. W. Dixon and William Craugh.
Up to date there have been 100 ea?es. with sixty-four
under treatment and fourteen deaths.
From reports to-night lt ls announced that the
United States authorities will take possession of Ihe
Savannah, Florida aud Western Railroad trains be?
tween here and Way Cross. A train will be run
dally each way between tatt and Camp Perry, and all
people wishing lo go North nm st quarantine there.
One eas. was brought In from thero to-night
A carload of Jacksonville refugees was turned back
at Way Cross last night and excitement ls at fever heat
In consequence. Tho closing of the routes to tho
highlands and mountains, where various cftles and
towns havo offcre.; an asylum to the people of Jack?
sonville, ls a mcclure of unnecessary severity. In
fact lt may bo characterized as simple barbarity.
Thero are twenty or thirty places that havo invited
our jieople to stay within their limits until tho
epidemic here shall end and until day before v.-t.-i
day there was little difficulty In reaching them bv way
of Wey (it-is and .le-sup. Now all who get "away
from thc city must pass a Weary sea,on at a quaran?
tine camp before being allowed t" pi'"????? I- tl -
rigid quarantine at Way Cross is wholly
unnecessary, for lt will add nothing til
the safety of Savannah, Brunswick and
Mic IB, and only pul-- thOM who wi li to leefe a safe
r'-treat to a great deal of IncOBfBlCBCC and discom?
fort without any eurmpondlng advantage to anv one.
It ls io be hoped that Pmnenl Daniel will vet be
a!*!" to sciiir<- a relaxation ol the regulation lu the
Interest of several hundred ladle- and children.
AMI CASES CONCEALED AT J.M'KSONVlf I.K I
Ni'w-Orleat.s, Aug- 2*1.? "The Times Democrat's''
special from Jacksonville. Fla., .ays: "Tl* lack
of confidence was again '**uatratod hp tha tact that,
as soon as Friday's rep' wai -h I??- "nf. 1 number
of people left tho elly, and yesterday many more
loft, lhere was talk yesterday Beaning nf suspicious
MBM that were not nported. Ono case ls that of
a city official who has been confined al -? prominent
physician's house for several i.i.y-. ?md still no re?
port is made. Deeena of such mw am given to
rsjKii-ters, and tho feeling created thereby certainly
does not temi to allay the panicky feeling of the
people. It would .ctn that President. Mitel.ell tt In
favor of giving tho wiliest publicity to all nows, but
lt seems that tbe newspapers aro n,*t held In much
esteem by one or two others. If theso concealed
cases aro yellow fever then some ono ls criminally
responsible.*'
A St. Augustine dispatch say-: tbat Mr. Sabin, a
dry goods merchant of Jacksonv bas been at that
placo endeavoring to seem.* sn.nt patronago to
establish a direct line of stcA.iii?i*, from Charleston
to Fernandina arsl St, Augustine, and that the mer?
chants heaillly Indorsed the scheme. Mr. Sabin had
aJso visited Palntka, ami the merchants there In?
dorsed the movement. Mr. Sabin has received a?
snr.vires from steamship lines that steamers would
bo put on Immediately, provided they obtained a
sufficient guarantee, in two weeks st. Augustin, win
probably be connected willi northern ports
THE PLAGUE WORSE THAN REPORTED.
A private letter received Thursday from Savannah,
Ga., says that J-chsonvllle. Fla., is fill of yellow
fever and Ihat tho reports sent out lo the newspaners
illve ou.';- a slight a**euunt. of the -coulee's disastrous
norh. " I would not bo ga rp tiled lo find lt breaking
out In Savannah at BBS moment."' addi 'hi writer.
?? thoush ws an Inking _-.ii iha isonaanr steps to
prevent it. U'e have ntahUahed a strict quarantine
a.-alust tho fever distilets, and ail trains aro thoroughly
lnsi*?ted belan being allowed to enter the city, whllo
Ihe malls have tr* go through a fumigating process at all
the dlferent stations botwven liore and Florida. Still
the -copi- hero aro excited almost lo th. verge of a
panto, and business between here and the South is
e'ltlrelv suspended. If cooler weather comes soon
IhON ls li**" ? for us, barf If not I bar th's worst. Wo
li ive not bsd such warm weather here llncC lf"(i,
which was tho year wo were Visited bv the .con. ne.''
SEGROES DYISt'r OF BLACK MEASLES.
AX ALARMING EPIDEMIC RAGING IN HOCTH CARO?
LINA.
Charleston. S. C., Aug. _<"> (Special).?The secretary
of tho Stato Hoard of Health lui, received additional
and Important Information concerning the alarming
epidemic of black neaeln Whleh ls prevailing among
the negroes tm plantations along the BnatOB River lu
QeOffetOWB County. On thc plantation of Mr. Ha_airi
alone over thirty negroes have died fi om l _ ? dtaoneO,
and lt ls said to be BgreadlBg n ra pl Hy ilia' aa eui,ru
i-??atluii of work on growing crops i- (eared. The
crops consist mostly of rice. Whleh la now In the milk
and requires careful watching. Efforts will at euro
bc made to control the disease by legregatillg Ihe I lek,
but hospital l" -lillie* in that ?tlon up- bo. great,
and lt ls doubt ful if any telle! can be Ind anton tho
general Oovernmenl takes hold ol tbe matter. No
appeal has been made as yet. 'ibis ls |he "lily epi?
demic in the State. The minted se. Con |, lu the * \
irene northern part oi the Mate, remote from titles
and trade centres.
FEARS OF A NEGRO UPRISING,
A NEGRO DESPERADO KILLS AN INNOCENT MAN AND
IS IIIMSKLI* SHOT DEAD
Florence. S. C., Aug. 20 (Special).?A shooting affray
occurred here yestenlay which resulted In the deal li
of a negro desperado and a negSOtaMo and Innocent
while man. On Thursday W. C. Itluunt, a consiablo,
arrested Jim Mindrow-, colored, for stealing. Thins
BBgTO women, armed with hoes, rescued thc prisoner,
for which ihey were arrested on Friday and Hued #10
ea* li. ThBM winni ii were relatives of a dc-p radii
named Malter Hov, e. who ?=woro vengeance a.-ninst
UN cnn*'able. Yisteiday Edward I'.Iomit, the. con
stable's brother, was walking along the street when
Hone, wh*) mistook him for his brother, shot him
through lhe groin. Ulount. though desperately
wounded, pulled out his pistol and Bred thine shots at.
his assailant, the last penetrating his heart anti kl I lng
him Instantly. Blounl died to-day. Considerable
excitement prevails lu the town, and there are grave
feats of a general uprising of the negroes.
DISFRASCUISEB LS DER THE LAW,
THE POLITICAL EFFECT Bf TRYING TO FIGHT A
DCC.L IN* VIlKilNlA.
Richmond, Va.. Aug 2d (Special).?T. Spicer Cur*
lelt, an ex-member of tho Legislature of Virginia,
has licen iorced to resign lils position as Cowon
wealth's Attorney of Lancaster ('minty, having re?
cently sent a challenge to a man of tho county to
neut,il combat. Carlet! ls a Republican and was
originally from the Barth. The challenge wai aol
aenpted, but the sender is now disfranchised under
tli*-, law.
ir Cl DI" FOR A MOBSTBS MBBT__tO OF FAU-IER".
CailUle. Fenn., Aug. 0* (Bpeelal).?The annual
reunion of the Grangers will open a* Williams move
to-iiiiiiio-.v for a "irks nn lon "vcr -jin) car loud-;
of exhibits are alie .dy on the ground In pnltlOB ami
every train brings Bu-lltieni to Hu exhibition. Then
are up to this evening over 1,000 tont-hnldeis Who
have taken po.-ersSlon of their tents. PnaMenl
i loveland and pany WlB arrive on Tu*-day morning
on a special train. W. H. Hatch will address tho
a-s'iiibiy ob Thnieday; enngr-t-smen McKinley,
Osborne and Reed. I li airman Cooper ami (Ieneral
Bastings on Friday, "lld* gathering will be the lamnt
eoBectlon ol farmers ever h'-ld li tba Baited statis.
CAVALRY TROOPS OS A LOSG lt ARCH.
lort Bobin-on. Neb., Aug. ML?-Tha Bth Dnited Mates
Cavalry, with regimental bOOdQuntell and band, com?
inan,l-il by Colonel J. K. MlSCan, (Hived here to-day.
having completed 1,530 ml!*'; **f ihelr man li iroiu PM
Davis. Tex., lo Euri Mead-. Hal;. Tlie officem alni men
an- in spic mild health umi the bonn an- lu excellent
condition Tho regtiBOBt will reach lori Meade on
-* pt tnber il.
snoT I.V A R<AVERY RAB-ROOR.
During a brawl In Richard J. Grant's liquor shop,
at '.',__ 1*1 Bowery, belween 'I and i o'clock yesterday
nionilng, John Sammon, of No. 7(1 Ea*t Houston st.,
shot and probably fatally wounded John J. Clancy,
of No. li'.T Mulberry st. I lancey was removed io
Bellevue Hospital, and In his anto-mortem statement
taken by Cmunn- F.ldmat. ?ays that he was trying tn
prevent r-uinmoii quarreling with a woman who was
In tht pinn winn the latter shot him.
'I, io the effect that bo was Inst ruc! ni
bi th- . a tindal IO l*"-p (laney and a man named
.'it ol lha place lim li-- finally allowed
them io tom- :... and tbej Immediately Uc^an quarrel?
ling, and lo save hiuvcif bom being a saulled be flied
iv.o shots, one of which took off'*! on I lau* < v. Siter
Hie shooting the pise-; wa- raided by AntlBB I'aptsln
fiallacher, and lha bartender WM h'-ld i.i OlUO ball for
buaklug thc Fxcl-e law, and Ham mo a was held n.;dei'
C-OO ball lo await the remit ul Clsaeep'l mjurj.
DID THEY DHOWS OR nLurjif
A SENSATION Hi STORE FOR BAR HARBOR
YOUNG REED AND MISS MILLIKEN SAID TO
BE ALIVE AND WELL.
Boston, Aug. 2fi (Special).?Somo two weeks ago
Bar Harbor people were startled by the accidental
drowning of J. H. Recd, of Albany, N. Y.. and Ml-s
Annie Milliken, of New-Orleans, guests of tho St.
Sauveur HoteL Diligent search has s'nee been made
for the bodies, but an overturned canoe and a coat.
Identified as belonging to Mr. P.eed, are tho only
traces discoverable. There have been rumors afloat
at Bar Harbor ever since the affair to the effect that
there was another solution to the sudden disappear?
ance of the young people than drowning. An elope?
ment was suggested. The story seemed so cruel,
however, that despite some things that pointed that
way, the matter was hushed up.
To-day "Tho Globe"1 publishes an Interview with
J. E. Potter, who is employed about tho baggage
rooms of tho Eastern station here. Ho created a
sensation at Portland, Me., lt says, by staling that
Reed was stilt alive. After the accident, at Rai
Harbor a reward of #500 was offered for tho recovery
of tho bodies of Mr. Reed and Miss Milliken, and I:
was at first surmised that Potter was Inclined to claim
the reward by producing the man in tho flesh, but
he say : " Nothing of the _.ind ls intended."
Potter, whon aslted If ho had any statement to
make regarding tho matter, said: '* Nothing moro
than I havo already made, and that ls only this, J. H.
Recd ls still alive and was alive to-day, August 25,
at 12 o'clock, and as well as ever he was."'
" What about Miss Milliken I"
"I decline to tag anything about MN, Milliken.?
Many aro Inclined to believe potter and that a
sensation ls in store. Tho officials at tho Beaten
station said to-day that they believed Potter must bo
deranged.
-a
IOREST FIRES IS YADISG TOWRA.
TWENTY BOOSaS BCll.NhD AND THE COUNTRY DEV?
ASTATED?A FAMILY OE BBTBB MISSIN?}.
Ishpennlng, Mich., Aug. 2d (Speclali.?Forest fires
burned twenty houses at Badana, Bolton and Mum?
ford. Stores, coal kilns ami freight car, ai- de?
stroyed. Tho railroad bridges were saved by engines,
but telegraph poles and wires weie burned dovvn.
People from the burning villages are removing io
Powers and Stephenson. One family of seven paiBBBB
ls missing from Mumford, and ls supp*)-ed lo ho
burned. Farmers havo lost their buildings, crops and
everything but their lives. Smoke coveis everything.
lt ls Impossible to estimate lhe loss. Fires are burn?
ing on both sides of the raliway track for a hundred
miles, with occasional breaks. Soveral hundred peoplo
aro homeless. There ls little prospect of rain, which
alone can check thc flames.
AS EXPEDITWS IO MEXICO.
NAVAL OFFICERS TO DETERMINE SECONDARY
MERIDIANS OF LONGITUDE BY TELEGRAPH.
Commodore John G. Walker, chief of tho Bureau of
Navigation and Office of Detail of the Navy Department,
was at tho Brevoort HOBBS on Saturday. He has de?
rided upon sending another expedition of naval officers.
to Mexico and Central America to make a series of
observations In connection with the work of determining
secondary meridians of longitude by the use of tho
telegraph. Thc la*t work of this kind was don*, about
tinco years ago, and a chain of longitudes was carried
from Galveston to Vera cruz, on tho Mexican Gull
coast; also, from Panama up the west coast of Central
..tnerte,., to I.lbcrtad, In Salvador. It ls now proposed
to connect these points
An expedition under command of Lieutenant J. A.
Norris, United stales Navy, will leave here early In
November, .o as to reach Mexico at tho beginning of
tho dip season, as ellar and dry weather is neces-aiy
for tho requisite astronomical observations. From
Vera Cruz, a sm1, ni nine cablo extends to Co:ii/.a coaleus,
on thc Isthmus of Tehuantepcc; th nee a land lin*:
across the isthmus to Salina Cruz, on the Pad tlc, from
which point a rabi, is earned down the ciu-i. An
nb-piviiig patty will bc stationed ai eaeh <>i these
plac*s, mid ihe difference ol limo bOtWOOB them Will bi
determined. Tho exact longitude of Yera Crux being
kl)*.-ll. il will only be licet" -ai.v to apply the difference
oi' longitude to tim position it* nive the posttfciB *'f
Coatxaeoalen. When this ;- Balshed the parts al ihe
Inner point villi cross to salina ('ru/., and Hms .ha
wink will proceed until all lhe links of tho chain have
been measured, "ihe expedition win be absent about
five months, and after Hie computation! havo been
completed tho result will t.e made public.
TIIE VICTIM OF A GRUDGI..
A YOUNG MAN LIKELY TO DIE FROM A PISTOL
SHOT WHICH WAS THE RESULT OF A QUAR?
REL.
Shooting and stabbing affrays have been of such
| frequent occurrence lu tho v clnlty of Newtown and
Long Island City that Ibo authorities were not sur?
prised when, early yesterday morning, they wero In?
formed ihat Michael Schwainb had been shot and
probably mortally wounded ht Middle Vlllag" by Km 1
Schiitte, a truck gardener's a,,lstani. who has been In
thl* country but a few months. The wounded man
ls at St. Catherine's Hospital, and Behatta ls detailed
at the jail in Long Island City. The shooting was tho
outcomo of 111-fcclug which has existed for several
days.
Sohwamb and Schutto and twenty others had held a
meeting for tho purpose of forming a target company
and been drinking In Louis Petzl_'s saloon anti! 1
a ni When on tho highway Schiitte shot RehWBBlb
vvlh a 22-calibre pistol, the bullet taking effect Just
above the groin. The wounded man was taken to hi*
home, ami thence to thc hospital. Constable Bepper
arrest d Behutte at. his employer's bom.*. The pistol
was found In lils possession, and a nair of ii ul y ron
knurkl'-s as well. He was arraigned later in the day
before Justice John 0. Schepor ami held without bail.
Ho is twenty years old.
SHOT WHEE HE ASKED FOR ITA TER.
LIKELY TO DH*. AFTER CARRVING THE BULLET
IN HIS BODY FOR TWO MONTHS.
A man who has carried a bullet in his abdomen for
two months ls a patient at Bellevue Ho.pltel, and is
In a critical condition. Ile Ls Francis Farren, who,
until he was wounded, w_- cmploved at, Charles
Chela's brickyard at Otana, on the Albany turn?
pike. To a Tribune reporter who saw him yester?
day he told the following story: Two mouths ago
to day I had been drinking, ami about S p. m. was
strolling along the Albany turnpike. Becoming thirsty,
when aliout nine miles from Kingston, 1 stopped at a
cottage and asked for a drink of waler.
?' Tho door was not opened, and a man on thc Inside
ordered me lo go away. I turned to i^o. remarking
that lt was pretty mean people who would not give a
man a drink, and |usl then a gun was fired in tim
bonan, and the bullet, eraehlBg through tho door,
-truck me in the abdomen. I fell, ami the man who
had ll ret 1 the shot came out and a,ked. ' Will you be
quiet bow?' Ile assisted BM to a tia,.-plat where I
became Innnslbto, mut when I recovered eotuetous*
tiess i wa, in a bara being cared tat by two simons
men. Al daybreak Father Flynn, the parish pries) of
Seugertitt, had bm 'akin to his bonn, when i staved
ten dav,. The wound healed in the meantime, ami i
went io work again. lu tour day. I returned to
Father Flynn's and Baked him to send nie to St. Fran?
cis' Hospital. In Jersey city. Instead of doing so, ho
kept me at his honse under medical can- nulli v
14, wheo I Insisted on going lo a hospital. Al ht,
.'rands', in Jersey City, there was not room, and I
came to ihe branch in iiiis elty, when l remained.i
Friday. When they told BM they could do nothing for
bm, and transtorred bm hare. No effort has been
made te lind the bullet,
?? I v?s told ihat Blower Moore, a carpenter, was
the man who shot in-, aul ihat when he did It he
thou-lu I wus a burglar. I lear him no ill will, ami
I allier Hy nu has advl-ed me to take uo Heps lo have
him punished. If I tile, the law mav iain- Its course -
I arran I* thil iv veera old and unman io... ll,- Uved
at '".Uko Mill.-rs boarding hon sc, Bve miles this aide
of Gu sro.
?--?
A CBtLD IMC1U.D HY I WU.n mn
A wibi steei- breen norn a drove on the weg t<> the
slaughter house. In Johnson ave., Brooklyn, eiiily l.i.t
-Vining and ran up Graham-eve. at a great pace,
causing much excitement among the Mianga of
people In the stree- , who hun billy got om of tt,?
way. There were several narrow escapes fiom bela a
HUI over or being tossed by lhe Infuriated animal
Al Rocrum-.st. and (' aiiam ave. the steer ron over
Frankie Matu.-, age nine, of No. li* Monroe si _,u\
ti am pled on her. causing severe Injin le,. ??,' WAS
taken to her home. The steer was caught near the
head of the street.
BRR WtttRR shops at altoosa.
Philadelphia, Aug. M Ope dali. -The Pennsylvania
Railroad Company ls lo begin Imtiu .Ilate'v the erection
of live shops In Kast ..Boona, at a t*P-t ol BM OOO
The shops will have a capacity or l- > laeoBMltl
year ami they wil ?i\r- employment y_ \ (?,,i bands
in addition la tho-.* aiicuiv ,,i nari- Alisona cobbii
lins Bl a gain of lo.ooo to Ms population. Thi, ls a
nari of ihe plan lo com-entiaie all Ute engine ead cai
biilldlng of the I" niisv Iv ania Railroad a: one central
point. The amount ul inoiu-v tu be o\pended to
?PH -_C '**? l'wout Programme will be over
lljt'.V' uou.
THE fttJOJlU-SttllALi 'TLur.'
AN INCONSISTENT DEMAND FOR FURTHEB
RETALIATORY I-f. WEBS.
CLEA" Ft AND'* LONO J.iCRNBY FROM CANADIAN
BCBSFiRVILNCT TO HIS TRUHKNT POBITIOll
?THK MSSSRtBM TO B DISCC8SED IN
THU 8KNAT" TO-DAY.
fBrTixKGnvviiTiTiia IBHBBBl
Washington, Aug. *_i>.-Tiio hysterical joy anl.
perfunctory enthusiasm of Democratic officeholders
over the I*residcnf"s rein lint ion message seem td
have died out, completely within the Inst twenty,
four hours. That extraordinary exhibition o|
cheap bluster nnd sham patriotism continues nd
longer to lie the absorbing topic* of tho day. In*
ten-st in it may be temporarily revived to morrovn
when the Senate takes up tlie debate agnin upon
tho message and the motion to refer it to the Conn
mittcc on Foreign Relations, or when thc Ilousg
Committee proceeds to the consideration of ths
Wilson bill, but it will be of shut duration, undi
Democrats will derive but little comfort from it.
Tlie uticstion as to what tile Senate will do,
whether it will accede to the demands of the Presi?
dent for enlarged powers, or whether it will ref "I
him to those conferred upon him under the net oj
March :?, 18S7, does not excite half as much inter,
cst as that which everybody is asking himself:
** How i.an tlu* pgesent Administration consist*
ently resort to retaliation as a means of settling
lhe fisheries troubles ?"" .
An answer to this question must satisfy evett
the most, prejudiced [.artisan fin' the President il
neither honest nor sincere in his d-maud upon Con*
press for more power, and ihat he really has nd
iden of committing his Administration to a policy]
of vigorous nii'i effective reprtanl. In his_M_snajg
1*? th' Setm'e ol' February 70, lSr*r". trinsmif t*n<
tin- Etapnid-Chsmberlnin Treat',-, th*- President sai*i:
fha tt* Big meets tny ai pr vi b'.t'i " I belle.e Ihtt I*
supplies it sal.sfat-toiy, pfBQtlnl Jud linn' adjustment,
open a beela heaenWe 'ni ju*- to hot.ii parties, of the
dBi,cult and v tied gaSBltoa ii which ll iclates.
Ile conceded, in other words, that the posit hfl
cf Canada wns a correct om- in this muter, tin*,
she was just ilie.l in seizin:,' Ainerionii fishing ve*, ol.
and that th* Uniied St 'lei Iel no commercial
rights in Canadian harbors which it must no! o .*?
p.ct to pay for. Canada ha I no fault to lin [
with this view of thc ca>e, ii'ithr hal Croat
Britain In both these countries the treaty wm
considered eminently " practical"1 an*l " MAtaM
factory."' Not a single voics was raised in op?
position to :1.
Rut in the United States it was different. Tho*?
primarily interested in a solution of th*- ? difficult*
and vexed finestion" denounced it with on- a.
cord. Thc New-England lishcrman to whom it.
provisions appeared either '* hon ma I ile"* or " sntis
factory" has yet to he heard from. II. doesn't!
exist, except in the imagination of Secretary Buy-,
ard find ii few Administration Senators. Her*-,
then, was thl President, backed by the Democrat,*>
minority iu th" Beanie, Inking issue with Great)
Br,tain aud Canada against citizens of the United
States. He held the 'latter, in fart, th if they wer*.
wrong and ihat Ureat Britain and ('.ninda. w?r>
right. In his retaliation messsngo, however, h*.
tiirns a complete somersault. Ile says in .sub?
stance: " Vou fishermen arc rifhti afler all, nn*L
Canada was wron;.': V.o mu.t bring her to t rms,
and we can do it, by stringent measures.?
Now, it is evident that he cunno!, without
stultifying himself, or makin,, li.s Administration
ridiculous Iq the eyes of the world, turn on Canada
and say: " I know your case is f. just one, and I
have admitted as much in an official communica?
tion to the Senate in February last, but a political
necessity has arisen which corni?is mc lo cat a,
little dirt, aud you must excuse me if I tlireai'-ii
to punish you, though you have nully done i.o
wrong."
Tho absurdity of thc EYesident'l position is ob
vi*.iis. Ii e0,?, iar |q prove tiiat ho is nither
h.nest nor sincere in his demands upon Congr* ?,
and thai be never intended, when penning his
miS-Bge, lo result to retaliation, but only regncttotl
thal document as a clever trick lo retrieve the
criminal blunders ot his Adnunistiatioii.
There IS another point which must nor. be over?
looked? iliai the Retaliation Aol *>t i*-sr wm
drafted l>y Mr. Bayard himself, ami passed bp
Congress * without ohange, substantially in us
original lorin. It was aagiaCaetorp io the Ad?
ministration then. Why is it BOt BO BOW? What
circumstances have arisen which jiistity ihe Presi?
dent in miking for nn enlargement of his powen
at the preaent time:' No outrage! of the kind
which atnlied ibo IndignaUon ol every isitri'.i;-,
American two penni Bgo have happened *?i hst?.
lt i.s true that two lislnng rcnela wnw nix*-1
the other day. but. they were th i/*'d lor Bobing
or buying bait without a licennc .uni in <l"in;
this the President has d.-Ha.^l dat I !t a Ca nadia'i
authorities were acting within tbe acope nf in?
ternational treaty rights Re . n11n??t pomihly r -
taliale upon them tor BUeh out nu's, and Other.
are not likely to be resorted to while lils Admim*
iraiion remains in power, because it is constantly
waxing in harmony vvith Canad:! to secure for tho
latter an unrestricted market for ita Huh prodnel -
in tbs United States, ami i.s constantly cu lbs
alert fog an opportunity to break down the last,
barriers which still .sustain th*' lish iudiisttio, of
this country.
MK. BLAISE OS THB UR88AQB.
A SCATHINC CRITICISM OF THE PKESIDENT"3
POSITION AND M(HIVES.
Kl OP MB. BLAIN Cb BPEBCH AT LEWISTON
KKTALIATION AS A POLITICAL BRVXCB TO
DIVCKT ATTI NH*IB -HON Tllti
.'Kl.r.-TUADI.' ISSUE.
Mr. Blaine's sp-eoh at l.wiston, Me., on Sat*
urday evening, was a scathing an.l poinU'd criti?
cism of the President's message. The |?int WM
niall*- that thc Executive document ie not tin
patriotic American measure which Mr. Cleveland
und his followers would have the (..iniuy to
believe, but a Demoeialie BUt-BBB device, con?
ceived in order to divert the all "nt ion of tho
jK-ople from his free-trade inessa;? and thc Mills
bill.
Delays in the transmi.ss.on by telegraph of Mr.
EBaiBS'l .speech made it impossible for Till. Tltin
UNE to publish it entire in thc Sunday issue, but
tin- addreaa, as delivered ut Lewiston, will i>e
found in full below:
I did not hnppsn to have an opportunity of read?
ing the full text of I1,1 lidia! 1 level." id's missa^e
on th- lisheries subject until this morning, and,
with all (lue wanOCl to the Chief Executive of th"
Nut ion. I hui-1 say that, liimhlsillll all the circum
Btni ' s. it is tlie mest e-tiaoidiiiary i|oeiuii*'iit that)
ever was sent from the White House to tlie Capitol.
Here are til" multi lnels ol' the isMio between
Canalla -ind thc Unit '?! Stares, or. p.-.hup.*, t i apeak
more exactly, between Creal Britain |and the
United Statis, in NSPSSl to the fisheries. It was
our belief, and still is, that BfUC thc articles sf
the Treaty of WsshtBgtSB relating to thc lisherica
had expired lhe Canadian ?."oveiniiieiit b"havotl m
BB mint i.hl'orlv, BBMtB__JT :*>i<l unjust manner
t<*.-.1 i'I our fishcinien in refining them rijihLs which
they hail enjuycd by long i res-riptiou.
In order to brine the Uovcrnnuut of tho Do?
minion to a jtisl a|p|iree.af ion of tire* subject, C,ii>
ptlS authorized !li<- Presidt nt in the spring of
1Kb" to adopt St his dis.-."tma a poling ol stiiuibla
retaliaiiiii, direct ni-, BBMBg otiu'r tilings, that
whenever and *? \w*A as Anitii?,i,i vessels wero
deprived of commercial privlleg*? lg the ports of
Cnananh GubbJbb avsnmii sliould ba deprived of
like privileges in the |-orts of the United States.
This, if I may i:idul?? in appropriate slang, was a
genuine tiMor-!at policy, in which the punishment
was admirably tltt-d to tin- nitiv- Itcsidont
Clevehind decttnid to enforce the policy, und al?
lowed o era;,'*- nfior oulrnge OB our Uslyng vessels
to go nnredr*ss"i|. Ile wis hem uncii som- fo.ai
of ncgotiatii'ii willi Eaffa-Bd, even against the e\
pressed wish and will of tiie United Stales Sen
utc aud in dataset of !h- !,ir."' slmre in the tit nt,
Bsnking p..wit wiiich Hm OnBBiitaslaB assigns io
the Senate. Fimilly, wiio.iui ih** consent of Ihe
Senate and praclically uguinst iu proiest, thc Presi?
dent oiganuod a comm inion to frame a titntz thal

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