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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 22, 1896, Image 1

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NEW-YORK, WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 3*, I896.-EIGHTEEN PAGES.
PRICE THREE CEJVTfi?.
IB&ENTINA WITH BRAZIL
??L?KD'S RIGHT TO THE FALKLAND
ISLANDS AGAIN DISCLAIMED.
rjjE I.A rr-ATA CONCESSION CANCEMJCD?A
?UXIUAN WARSHIP SAID TO BE ON HSR
WAY TO TR1XIDA1 K DEEP SIGNIFICAN? E
ATTACHE!) I.V WASHINGTON TO THE
APPARENTAT l'NITED ACTION
OF THE TWO REPt'BMCS.
Buenos Ayres, Ja?. J! The Argentine Gi v
' srtunent has cancelled the concession grantt ]
:h? English Cable Company t.. land i ; La Plata,
t>n the ground that the company had failed to
??cur? rlghtl ill; the < -tlif-r landing points neces
ggrv for Its au 'cessfnl operation, This action.
Uli und rsl.I, Is taken In concert with Brazil,
and haa llrevt bearing upon the Trinidads [sl<
and dispute. Argentina denles England's i
toil- Falkland Islands, and will Join Bras!! ?:
rsHsting English claims to those Islands and to
Trinidad*?.
Loin!..n, .Tan 81.?The Brazilian Legation here
denk* the w? >rj printed by the "Prensa." of
Bjoenoa Ayres, to the effect thai Dr. Carvalho,
liraz.i an Minister >>f Foreign Affairs, w uld de
asiad from Ores! ?ri;.'.:'', the Immediate restitu?
te of the Island of Trlnldade, off the ci asl of
Brs/.ii. which was recently ? ipled by the
British, and which Brazil claims la h r terri?
tory.
Th'> "Prsnsa" said thai In the event of the
fleman ' being refused diplomatic relations be
pjreen Brasil ??.>1 Great Britain would probably
Mr : ired.
It w a aahi at the Consulate that although
3ra?i' i ' i?nee to arbitrate the question "f i!.
semersl ?? at the Island, the negotiations to de?
die the question would be continu?
"The Morning Post" will to-morro v publish a
distatth from Rio de Janeiro aaylug it In r?
ported that the rtrazilia-i corvette Benjamin
Constant has sailed for Trinidad? to take pos
station of that island.
nemoua comment in Washington.
Washington, Jan. 21.?The announcement that
Lord Salisbury's not? presented t... the Gov
inUBent at Rii Janeiro demanded that Brazil
ihoulil accept arbitration to decide the
ihlp of the IsIhiuI of Trlnldade before Feb
ruary 1?. In default of which th> ?slant should
be conaldered ns belonging t" Great Britain
without further appeal. h;;s .-aiis-t'. seriouj COT?
tier.t here, which has not been diminish ? ? by
th* further statement thai Brasil had del
refus "1 the proposal, and had demanded
that <ir< at Britain should immediately restore
the island to Bmr'llan control. Nor has the
situation heen rendered less acute by the in
telllK^nce conveyed in a United Press cabla dis?
patch from Buenos Ayres announcing that the
Argentine Government had cancelled the Eng?
lish cable company's concession, and had
Common cause w.th Brazil. In official clrMea
deep significance is attached to the concerted
action of the two great South American re?
publics In directly antagonising British claims
to American p .ssesriohs.
Minister Mendoa?a, of Brazil spent half an
hour by special appointment with .-'?
01n*y at the Sta*.- Department yesterday af- |
tern i n and it Is sus; : l that the Interview ;
related to the decisive stand Brazil had taken ;
In record to Lord Salisbury's note. The Bra?
zilian view of the matter is that to expect them !
te arb'trate the owners] Trlnldade would i
b-> as r^ascrnntr??? n? to ask the United States
to arbitrate the possession of Bl k Island, if |
England should suddenly o cttpy it. on the
pound that the United Suites had not hither
to made a good use of it. Or, as ari ither ex
ample, that the United States should tamely
sal It to England's establishing ;? col my on |
an uninhabited Florida Key und. r the British
Has. because It was a deslrabl cable sta
and fit for nothing else.
A naval officer, who is Intrvsti ' with th
duty of ke-iylng account of the submarina <
cables of the world, explained the Buenoo
Ayres dispatches tO-dl] as . Ilows:
HOW ENGLAND GRABBED TRINIDAD?.
An English rofnpai y h Ida an i >??)??
? m for coastwise cables In
having about twenty yean Sir John
1'ender, the "Cable King," several y<
?ermlned to srcure teleg? ipl
hir. gr.i*. aystema and the Pacific Coast ?,] .
America, which Is a lucrat
faterprlse. To thii IB '
lUtlona with all the bout ta An
?-Mionr. being successful
try except in ?raz?', where he waa ant
the Kng-lish eampany "?hi h, undei
r:i;ht. operates all !!?? lines froi
It in learned from a member ->f the Diplomatic
Corpx who has the confidence ?'. the .-? uth Amer
ictn representatives th,?t Argentine's action in
?anos?irip the concession is due t i Prerident
Oeveiarid'a aperlal Monroe Doctrine m< ssag<. and
Vtauplred by the hope that the United States
?111 recognize the right of Argentine to the Falk
lttil Hand?, which w. re forcibly taken by Great
Attain with the acquiescence of the Unit? 1
8Ute?fii:.? <i i< nt t ? th. Monroe Doctrine'a cnun
ftaMon. Thf Islandi were owned and settled ?y
*P?ln. and thus became part of the Bu n ? Aj res
Republlr-.
ARGENTINE'S RIGHT TO THE FALKLAND*.
Argentine vigor, uslv protested when they were
?Hied by England and in a proclamation dc
cl?red that though Argentina wj? unable I
"l?t the powerful force of England it contli
flrmly to adhere to its claim to th" rightful ;
ownership of th" territory. Under th. in
?anc?s Argentine on January 11 informed the .
c?Me company mat it considered th'- proposed |
itodlng place at Trinidad? as Illegal, and that It !
wuld not recogniz? any alb grd permit to use the |
'alkiand Islands, consequently by its own terms ?
the concession fell to the ground.
It ia intimated that a specially accredited Mln
j ' fr,m Buenoa Ayres ?rill soon come t i the
r'ited Stat<s to endeavor.to reopen the dispute
*? to the ownership of the Falkland Islands, in
lew of the stand taken by President Cleveland
**J"siTsBesueUa boundary dispute.
, "lldtm Cleveland In his drsl annual message
?cossireai in 1885, referring t, this question,
dormV^/S!?-?/.1'* ^^.''""l"'1 u,< revived the lontt
?a? from Vh, tt-T.."i,u''- Falklan.l Ulan -Ik by elalm
?UrlbuEu^ lv' "?'' Kr',!- " ???mnltj for the l-.-s.
?loop of 'r ^-,a<'t,on "' '?'"? ' ""?"?'' lei ??: Hi
?fr"? con.il.v>n ,t ,\ :"' ???xin-iton and the
A?1'alleged"c? a- '?', UIHn'N ,'"f"'' '?'"> ;':'"
i?tl icono....-,m iht claim aa wholly ground
?v?r.ecldaL0f.wthp Ar?*nt,?>? Covernment, ha?
.w.-v lt,m ??*? this referred wholly to claims !
Wn><?hth?* referred wholly to rial
?U*sain\ii thu "n" a.uthor,t^? were then pre
?^? dsaalteiy ,l':u","'' ' ;",! as ltlw >'^ve .,
*^ bell?vs \yh ?ban'> J'^'l r"r amicable rearons,
??that the i;??u.d States will not dis
, regard th? pr ?fa of ownership, which can now
be presented, as they arc similar in all respects
to those of Brasil and Venezuela, which have
been espoused by Secretary Olncy.
The sctlon taken aim *; almultaneoutty by the
Argentine ;tni Braslllan Governments against th"
political encroachments of England, disguised under
the nam" of cable enterprises, la rep rted Just In
time to contradict certain mallcloui rumcrs api >p -
of the M ?nr ? l> .< trine. :: ha I been ?aid on
I hand that the Spanish-American Republic, w il ;
? acl In accord I > repel Buropi m "Infiltration"
? i by force 01 by dlpl imacy; and. on the other
'. thai 'ivy w v.iiti not st:i!: i together > >>? the
! I'nlti 1 St it--', if aome of them ahouid ash ' r N ?rth
American support, n a ?! 'fenalve war aga'nal Bui -
ji >an ? ncruNchments.
rumora hava Just been started sfresh. .in<i
; the guise of Interviewa with many South
American diplomatist* In France, The} have been
?!? i In the Paria Minister) il organ, the
"Temps" and Indor? ; with the signature, "Gaston
1er." But theae allegi I dlpl >m il c opinions can
) be aocepted an genuin?, arhen it is remem
'"??? I that Hi?- reporter ;- th* snm- reporter who, n
f \. months ago, h Ir.ti ???? is .1 privat* rltls
Mi K istls i.t Paris, ai i 1 ubll h- hi? 1 nfldentlal
raatl>>n with On Am?rtcar Vmbn*?ailor In an
? ? : which Hi" latter urnclalmed Incorrect. The
r entente between Brasil ai I Vrgentlnn Indlcsl ?
rely up>n iru support of th* I'nlt? I State?, foi
. ter Into an all
1 - iwer not dl*i. 1 to ac ?;>!. ?Ike Brasil It
? ? ? ?.,. n ? . 1 ; 1. irpoi es with the
rrlted Siat< <
The m ijorltv of the Argei tin" ; pie lo nol
think a? es-Pr?sident 1 ? ? : '? in ins rupulo.i?
in polltlclnn, w'.k - ? ant I-American attitude
- repente ;:? flaunt? ! her?. He recentl;
action of the t'nlted Stete? i? only a re,
of the hatred an 1 rlvalr asalnat England: the
adoption 01 th Moni e Doctrine reaulted In die
aai " to the smith American Republics.' On the
contrary, the Argentine? unit? l with Brasil :
again?) Rnglnnd, arel thus ?how that they do mai
?? lain 'un- grudge agalnat th? Cnlted State?,
Pre? ? ? ? haa rei ently deel led In fa : of
Brazil in the porition of the Misiones territor;
?
In Chili, also, there I? only ?1 small minority dli
1 i? I ? s ,v with the Clerical CThlleno i'oneerva
tlve, "The Monroe Doctrine i- not America fot
Am rleans, but America for the Yankee?."
MtI .": Chill it yet ? m much under European
Influence, I? s'lil be cne of the Brat to aupport th?
lea expi seed b? ? South American diplomatist ?
r?gard tu the formation, under th-? shield of th
Mi nr e Doctrir rightly understood, of a league
of all American countries which would be thus
able, even without being undei the protectorate of
the Cnlti ! State?, to treat on equal footing with
.11] the European P< wera.
8QUADB0N KIDDLE SOLVED.
BRITAIN'S FLYING FLEET TO GO To
BERKHAVEN FOR INSTRUCTIONS.
IT It DESTINED POR NI > PARTICULAR QUARTER
OF TUB WORLD NO SECOND SQUADRON To
BE COMMISSIONED MR. CHAMBER?
LAIN DEMONSTRATE?! THE t'NITY
OF THE EMPIRE
London, Jan. Zl Tha Right ll^r.. George J
Gesehen, Kirs- Lord of the Admiralty, mads a
speech at Grinstead today, In the ccurae of
which he said he wished to dlaslpate
inp rumors that were in circul?t! n Referring
to the flj Ina squadron, he said it waa lnt< n Is 1 I
.use In rgi n 'y In an din ? n. It woul i
to B? reha v( n with ?: takli h seali '?? ot other
? ? ?c< pi to pr 'i-i-'i t 1 that pla ??? and swall
Instructions. The squadron was not lnt<
a m< na ?? to any c >untry, nor was II destined f- r
;:\'y particular quarter 1 f th" worl I II w ? il ! a
aquadronj nr-- us. I.
Mr. n sehen api al< ' I 1 th" public, if they
; thai ?h" squadr n had been ordered any
wh< re, n A to Imagine that It ha ! hi ?
menaoa anybody. The disposal of the squadron
would n >1 be guid? i bj political consideration! '
whila th ? situ?t' n remained as it !? now, He
denied the rumor that the G ?varnmenl me Htated
placing another squadron In commission.
Nevertheless, It c aid no; afford ' 1 real on its i
oars, it dli not propose t> adopt sensational
measures, but would continue aa hitherto stead?
ily to augment the number f ships, guna ?n-i
men, In 1 rder to maintain supremacy on the 1 1
? secare the natl n from panic when?
- were clouda on the political horizon.
MR. CHAMBERLAIN ON THE LATE CRISES
The Right Hon. Joaeph Chamberlain, Beere
t.'iry of B'ate for the Col mies, delivered a si.ch
to-r.lg*i< at a banquet given by natives of
Queenaland residing or visiting In London.
He referral to th" solidarity of the Imperial
sentiment, which made it Impossible f >r a bl iw
to 1? strack or a chord sounded in the most
distant part of the Empire without its being
re-echo* 1 In every i>ar' o? Her Majesty's do
mlntona Great Britain, he said, had been
guilty of mat.y sin? of omission and commis?
sion ti >ws rd i.'-r i olonli a Still, she alone among
the nations of th" earth had bean able to estab
lish and maintain colonies In all parts of the
world. A few weeks ago, he added, Great
Britain seemed to stand alone surrounded by
jealous competitors and was assailed with al?
together unexpected hostility. Long-standing
differences appeared suddenly to come to a head
and assumed 'hreatenlng proportions. The
quarter? whence she might have looked for
friendship and consideration confronted her
Instead with suspicion and even hate. England
had to recognise that her success, however
legitimate, whs Imputed ;im a crime, that her
love of peace was taken as s sign of weak
and her Indlffer? ni ?? t 1 foreign criticism
ns an Invitation to Insult. He regn tted lo 1 ?
f reed lo admit that au h feellnga existed, but
!. ? rejoiced, seeing that they did exist, that
they had found expression. No better service
had ever been done th< nation, for It had en?
abled her to show hi r face lo the world Rng?
lnnd, while resolute lo fulfil her obligate 1
was equally determined t>- maintain her rights.
(Cheers.) Rngland, If Isolati I, stood s?cure In
the strergth of her own reaoun. In the Arm
resolution of her people without respect to ,
party and in the abundant loyaltj of her ;hll
dren from one end of the Empire to the other
At the conclusion of his speech Mr. Cham?
berlain was heartily cheered .'hkI applauded.
? ? -
"THE GLOBE." OF LONDON, RAMPANT.
Bt;i "THE DAILT NEW1 ' BATS THAT JtTSTICE
BREWER Dli :i-A ;?:]> GENUINE BTATESMAN
BHir IN DRAfTINO THE LETTER TO SEC
RETART ?IAKV "A REASONABLE
AND PAIS REQCEST." SATS
"THE CHRONICUt"
London, Jan. ZL?The communication of the
United States Venesaela Commission to the !>??
? trtment of state, recommending that (?rent
Britain arid Venesuela he asked to lay befon
the Commission such evidence ns they possess
wbl< h would he likely to facilitate the Commis
si m'a Inqulr/i sod thai the two Governments
?.. represented before the Commission by coun?
sel without prejudice to the claims of either,
has provoked "The Globs" to the publication of
..,, article on the subject couched In language
of extreme s verity "The Globe" say?:
1 ?'??? ? ? . ,,,. ?,ih ,?issi?ori!> ar.'i mouiiue me ne< 1
?l\ i\, !V, ... ,,. rrle'ous Commissioner.? undertake t
f r the effect upon the people of thelt osn
. ; th.- British Premier io snub
of BUte?
?-The D?tlJ News/' Will to-morrow- say. in con
.?lon with the letter of the Venexuelan Com
"'?' .?'? re.nt ?ting SecrsUry Olney to ask Great
Rrual? ?nd Venesuela to lay before the Com
"., melr side-. Of the boundary dispute, th.-.t
? m nBrewer dlsplsyed genuin- sUtesoaanshlp
J*1?"0" ! , letter, it rtt,,,s ,lia' ,h'- requsst
i:i ,l!a"ir" ;., Salisbury an opportunity that
furnishes ? The Prime Mlnlstsr would
^?J? wisdom snd dignity If ha compiled
with the ''"i";"'.. ?H to-morrow say it hope,
?yh,. Chronn ?
That is a p.,in* ol which a sensible Government
win take not
"THE TIMES" HEARS CHEERINO NEWS
"Th.- Tim- a" to-m rrow will give unusual ,
? ? to .?< \\'a. hlngton dis] atch sent I ? it by Its
? ?!'? : indent, O. W. Smslley, asserting thsl hi
has personal knowledge <?' the existence in the
White House and the State Department of a
ati ?:,:: snd ' ?i dial wish ro?
? tt!e nenl ? ?:" the dispute ? fl u rit?.ln 0:1
terma thai ?rill ln> ilve no dis redil * ? ?'
Oovi rtiment, an 1 als . '(? "xi-;. nee ? ?' the if lief
1 nt may be spe? dlly r> 1 ? ?? I.
Mr Small? y adda that u' md o 1
given ? 1 ,'eni zu< la and ma; be 1
?
"The Times." com?
' and Mr. Smaller'? assertion that there ha- been
idri n chai ge In the ?plril of In ? B? natc, will
expresa Its pleasure at th* cheering news. The
al,??? nee of a dei Ire tu ha 'ten B< nator I '1
itl m. Il a? -, will allnw llm if? the I
that are makii p. for peace t.. operate Th? pa?
per note? ih< li itory and mod?
;' Justice Brewer's letter t.. Becrets ? '
but eaya II tiii'iks it must be bvloiu :?? th
Americans lliempelvM thai th. origin if ''
V? n zuelan Cotnmlssi >n and th( mann >i In wh' h
??s crea ti. n I 1 reg irded In tin- ITnlted States
, make ?t altogether Impossible f. r Great Britain
to recognize Ita doings elthei din t;' or Indl
r tly.
I. .1 l Rallaburj 's original objei tlon to arbllr.ite
concerning districts settle?! years ago bj Bi
subjects and under British ?aw still h? Id good,
but Hi.- American Government must be well
, ..war,' of th.- perfect willingness on this aide to
disenrd th Schomburgk line and arbitrate on
all the disputed territory, excluding only the
districts the British or Venezuelans have per
I manently settled, This basis for negotiations Is
.?I" a for Venezuela to seek at any time. II
certainly would not be rejected here, but it la
Impossible foi Great Britain to resume diplo?
matic relations srith Venezuela until th? latter
shall have made the tirs: advance,
SLAVERY WITHOUT PROTECTION.
A P\!:|s pAPgn TRM.fi WHAT TUB MONROE HOC
TRINE, AS NOW INTERPRETED, MEANS
?,11 g, i.'TI' \M'IM '\.
Purl?, .Inn LI. The 'Tempi " In an srtlcte on th?
Anglo-American dispute, ask? whether Senator
I'avis imagines that Burop* \\:'.\ accept without
protest ti,.' extravagant Innovation contain? I
bti resolution 1 ineerntng the Mom ? D trii
If the State? of Central and South America ,( :
submit t.. BlSVery without prote? tain President
Cleveland, it adds, must regret that he help?
create the frame >.f n I I ? h ti..lut...:,
originated.
??*?. ?
HE MI> NOT OFFER TO BE ARBITRATOR
STORY THAT THE POPE WISHED TO JPDOR BI
TWRER EXatA'.'n AND THE t'XITED
states i>exietj
Itome. Jsn tl. Tlie "Ossei msno," Ih?
of Ih ? Vstlcau, "Hi ally deni? ? th? ?tat?
contained In a dispatch recently published I".
I ?ally Chronli le" id !.? : ' n thai ?)..? Poj
fsnlinal Satolll, had made .1 'eml-offlclal ?"
Presiden! f'leve'isnd to sel au arbitrator In th* lls
pute ! ? tw?. n the fuit. ! Stan and Or? it H
It sis 1 denies lhal UN Hn
itoi In t '.. v m I? ? \ ? ? ? .tueli ?
snd that h a 1res
F? >H CHANGES i\' BRITISH EQUIPMENT.
1. md ? . .tin. i'l "Th* Psll Mall 1 ' says
? ?? Cabinet ? II ifhm* its';
rtani In the Hi llah mlllui 1
.
?
OI'IANA WANTS VOLUNTEERS
I ' I m, .'.ir- fl Adt ? ? . ? I
:?h Oulau . an 1 ?? 1
inti ? ? ' ' ? ?'
.... ; ? ?? ?,??_? -A I, t 1
point Ha tima, .? h* ? ... 1 .
T p 1 mu rtalli ? 1 I ' .m| u 1 hsi ? extra
: .!,; I nal li-.'
?
N?W-ZEALAND INTERESTED A1JBO
Wiiiiuiftf.n New-Zealand, J.-? It it. .1 ?
to-day Ihe H'.n. It J Beddon, Prim.. M it ?
t(.;? colony, aald II il Me? Zealand wa? spi
Interested In Ihe Wnesuelan and Tran
.wir? t.. ti.-' atn? 11. an and <?
?n Samo ? TI ? colony, '.,?? add? '?
British, and th* pra? tlral way 1
home rjovernmeni ?was t.. he In a poaltlon !?? il?
? ? ; 1 ? 1 t .- ? 1 r? I
WOrt t.
?- ?
UK A D LI a A 8 E X I'L r).s7 ON,
THREE MEN KILLED AND \ BtTILDINO
DESTROYED IN NEW-HAVEN.
Tilt: TRAGEDY DfE TO an EXPERIMENT WITH
ACETYLENE 0A9 DE EAT THAT REKt'IVTBD
IN THE I ? '-'?? OF 'l WO M
N* w TI.i\ ? ?:', i '"im . 1 i ???? -1 I'1 " i ?
Crown-a . ppoalte Orana*-st., occupltrd bj Hngllsh
A M eral k snd two other firms, was -1 b>
Are thin morning, which started from an ? ?pi
As i dire t rei ill thre? lives were loal 'i'..-: dead
are:
IIAI'SER, JOSEPH ?'.. machinist, ihlrtj eight y?n old
TisjP, i ?; ? ? . ? , ? ,
nr. i ? : ml
STEVEN'S. IIARIfciNA I I ? ?'?- ? ! 1. Lnjn
?!.?...!. , Ulf ?:!,.. I '?.,..!?? II 1 ,? ? ??(
About 10:30 n'?lu k mis morning Krank P. Phl*
gar, ?i '.. a m.. 11. i, ? Jobber, was ezperlmenting with
n ? !?? ?? >n . ti i. r of
the building. Around him were a corps of ..
ants. It :.- aal?! lhat Mr. Phlegar was working
,,:i i an. H.jtt ?if regulator t.. control the delivery
.if the gas from steel yllndera. In whl i. it -
kepi ua'!? .' pressure, sometimes ,m ;. k!. .is 2,i>>i
I la to tl i|?iare In? h. l?ertnll ? hn >w>?lge ant
lo ihe conditions of the experiment 'anno! h ha.I
... the I I I? : ' ? positlvel) refus? la talk to-night
beyond ai'knowledglng the experiment.
It U kie>?n thai when Ih? ixiiloi on o urred I
Phlesars, father and son, and live men w*r<
Ins al.; a cyKndei of the gas ?me ..i the men,
II . i ? 'I mukei. wa - killed hj
explosion. H ?> rlahi foot waa torn off al the
.ii.l.i". an ! Ih* ' fl les was hon Ibly ts
Charlen \/*az, an engln*^r. himself cul and bleed?
ing, carried Hauser* l?o?lv out of tM<- building,
. i ,.li! y being >"i\ .?.'j..- 1 In II imen
i'lank Phlegar. sr., " is burned and cut.
The foi ?? ol tin- expln Ion tore down Ih* celling, I
and when ih. lire . partmeni tame and before
water was pul on the ''?? a B*<ron<l explosion was
heard. This wa? doubtless caused by s ?mall lube ?
1 the i-.is. Wh< a he First expl.i . curred
there v.r. nftj pel . the bulMlns, and s mad
rush to i-scap. irr? ! Happily ..1! ..f the em
- escaped, excepi t ? i? - three who were kille?!
It is said t: at Toof an I Btev? ns, both i mplo ?.
t,t K. J. Toof, remained behind lo Iocs a sar? ai l
-?tu valuable paper*. Boon after the Ht"
iif..k" out St."."ti^ was Been al the window, and
was to!d to wall a moment and a ladder woubl
be sent up ?I" answered that li" would get some
more things from tiN desk, and, throwing oui some
books, wenl awsy from the window. II" wss nol
? ??a agsln, Hos T? if mei hi* fate is not known,
but hla body was found near Btevena's.
It was nol until - '". thre* hours ?tut tho flre
w.i* under control, 'hat th? bodies <>f T.?of and
Bt?*veni were found bv the firemen, who were then
clearing awsy the debris Both bodies were burned
beyond recognition, and were Identified only by
in.-ans <.f peculiarities of clothing or by pni>*rs In
the pocket.
FATAL BLAZE fX sr. LOUIS.
FOUR BALVAOK MEN 00 THROUGH Tin:
FLOOR OF A BUILDING ON NORTH
BROADWAY \M> AHM PROB?
ABLY DEAD.
f?t. I.OUI?, .Ian. -'I At M oYloek to-nlxht fire .1.?
-.ti v.. I the flve-atory bull.tins No. 41". North Broad?
way, ...'.ii|.i"il b) A.C. Al..- & Co., o|>tl'lan?. Three
m.ti wir.- shocked Into Inaenetbtllty by r.imin? in
.'ont.it vi 11 ti electric wires, and Plreman H>-ne*, of
iCnKiii" Conpai ? Na '.:. t.i. fron .? lad 1er snd waa
?erlously injar-- I.
Twenty-two streams of water were pouned laof
'?.:.'."iv upon th.- bisse. While the salvage oorp*
was .(i\"iitiii a showcase on th- i r :?i Boor, th?
door .'oHa;i?e.i sad weal to the basement Poor ..f
th- salvage men are in the ruins, and there l* no
nop* ?it leK.-iiiri^ tii?-m iilve. They .?i- In the centre
..f t!i" bulldiRi ii'i'i.ii witii wnsekage and heavy
packing cases Their cries of help ?;r.-u fainter sa
time passed, and at li o'clock they had ..-a-.'I
Their names are Reine Miller, James ito.ldv, .lam.*
Ulenvllle and Henry Kirley.
While the liieniea were workiliK to save their
unfortunal.imrsdM the lire took a n.-w start and
the r??s.'iie was t.,r the time abandoiasd. Th ?
RtOCk Wai Hi" DKM i .'(.tup?ete of it-' . bara.'t.f In the
West sud tha loss will be fully 1360,001, Insurant?
.' at.i|?l".
I!\h: LIVES l.osT IS IV EXPWSIOy.
Munch-, Inl.. .Jan. Zl. ? in., persoa was k.ll"d and
four fa:u!ly Injure.l hj- an explosion of natursl
ta* here to-night. I'amaRC ?monntiiig to nearly
. 0.000 ? lo ??
MR. DAVIS'S RESOLUTION.
WHAT IS THOUGHT ABOUT IT IN" THIS
CITY.
'A OBKBRAL AGREEMENT THAT THERE IS N(>
NECESSITT FOB IT AND THAT IT UAH
BETTER BE DROPPED,
Mayor Stror.g said yesterday that while he
' agreed with the general principles sdvanced In
Senator Davla'a resolution Introduced Into the
Benal.i Monday concerning th.- Monroe
Doctrine, he c uld see no n< ?esslty for any
oracular deliverance on the subject by Con?
gress The effect of Mich a measure, If enact?
ed, might prove disturbing so far as ur fot
relations are concerned, and might needlessly
stir up animosities, with no good results to the
business snd commercial Intereata of the eoun
. try.
"We have had enough of panics and the un?
?a of value* r..r tli- present," added the
Hayi r.
Corporation Counsel Scott said. In answer to
j n question as to hla opinion of Senator Davls's
: resolution, that he did not regard it as a Judl
! clous measui Mr. Scott added: "I <1.> not
tlit.'ik ? would be wise on the part of Congress
to frame a deflnltl >n of Its conception of the
Monroe Doctrine, rhat is s matter which be?
longs to the realm of diplomacy, and should be
left ;i- ehuMIc :>?* possible "
A, B. Hepburn, president of the Third Na?
ti.mal Bank, and formerly Contn Her of the Cur?
rency, said about it: "1 think the resolution
would have l.i unwise at any lime, and It H
especially unwlst at this particular time. When
about t, dual a loan to preserve the public
credit Cleveland himself s.-nt to Congress his
Venezuelan message, which serloualy Interfered
with the placing of bonds? abroad. Th.- Davis
resolution was a mistake and is demoralising In
its effects). No possible good csn come from it.
it ir? extreme, and some of Its positions are un?
tenable There is no reason for Congressional
formulation of the Monroe Doctrine at this time
or at any other time, l believe in enforcing the
Monroe Doctrine when it properly applies. The
Davis resolution practically asserts a protec
? irate over all this hemisphere, and that la cer?
tainly an nut. nah; ? posttl n. '
Warner Van Nord n, i resident of the Na?
tion;.! Bank of North America, said: "The
Davia resolution is \-ry unfortunate, as it re?
vives the uncertainty and nervousness felt a
month ago .\ ?.i feeling was beginning to
grow In England toward us and toward our
securities, hu' now i fear this resolution will
??-?. a chill over the situation i fancy, how
er, II '? the resolution was only s political
manoeuvre."
Thi ? mment of Robert M Gal la way, presi?
dent or th- Merchants' National Hank, was: -|
? t.. express my ?pint?n on tie- I? tvla
-"! n '. :? i r- hi in\ language would be
: e forcible than p..ht- "
Hei laid "Tl ? curse ..: this coun
time la ;.. . much poll'lcs.
\- li in statesmen arc evidently vying
' ; ? ? bring ab .ut ra-<h " i [
? It connects their harnea
? -? ? ?? ; mal and nivea m., m ?
I fan . to b? a Pr-aJ
; ? iu r t?. ,\t nroe
I1 i : , en ted to the Senate yes
?? lay ??'.!?!.?!?. thought that he made a taking
I to t:. masse i He a III, ho a i t ??:. so- ;
realize that he did Just what is calculated to
tl ?? '. ill ? him as a W'iii;.- House as
; - be< m ? tn. i.p| of thl i ?:!.?? ? w mt
erlty, the b*-*.a ..r which is pests and
i te ? war with foreign Powers, esi.lally with
? Mi itnln, th- t. '9t customer f r uui :
the i oni'M of all others that lends
m- .r money to our people to
enterpi i-. . f th.- country Whli h
ngulsh (self In ' >
relal I it >at
?? ad ??? v Idening th- breach which
U make th" atroi gent and most
ippeal I ?? al tie- next Nati nal
? i- ? my Judi nt. A ws.- aei liment
i ; pulir flame in
? ? "-i tt:-- present slim pretest grow
Ing ? . .? uf the MiitNh Guiana and Venesuela
dispute It v. ill t.ik- ,i sti nngi ; vl da
M ? ? ?? 1> . trine than .-xNts in that
in".' .1 \l- . ? nly be worked advan
for political fame whan it i? based
ui .i Justifiable International grievance. It ,
time enough l i r ? ori to war talk when )
dlpl.-:...'- hua exhausted Itself in a foreign
complication, snd not before Th.- VenesuAls
niait.-- i-? clearly o caas to i... settled by dl
[don a
The Davis expansion of th> Monroe Doctrine ,
fell 'V,.i in thi dry go-ids district Bo dead, in ?
fact, t?..i- nobody worth quoting there wish...I
t.. speak ..n th-- subject foi publica Mon The
opinion whs <-\,:-- ? : among th.- recognised
leaders in tie- dryxooda trade that th.- lesa said
about Senator l > ? \ i- and the Senate resolution
waving alofl deflam e th.- better.
The general opinion In th.- trade was prob
ably v ii expressed by th.- following words of
.i meml r of one ..f th- largest drygoi da houses
In tli.- -.<...rid: "Win not 1-t this whole mati r
Irop? I; "as dying a natural and easy death
when no? up pops th- Senator frcm Mini
I i reasons best known t" himself, and -
-.i this a hole matter up an >w Drop if drop
i;' i.-- M?.> politicians, the newspapers and
i vervh dj drop it, and we shall have pea - fnd
pi isp. rlty."
si fCIDE IX His sn\'s OFFICE.
AN AGED Rt'BSIAN KILLS HIMSELF HIS
FAMILY \\.-i !.l> NOT LIVE WITH HIM.
Hym in \: lerm in, sixty-three \ ? u < old, shot
elf through th- heart hit- yesterday after
In hi ..a'- : i a off! ???. ?" So. '-'.' Sorfi Ik l,
man haa for two years lived away from hla
li- ?as s,. shiftless and diaslpated I it
I . fumllj -\ . .i i not t lerata him. Aboui thlt h ? n
...us ago hla three son ? to Russia for their
father and mother, t'p to thai time the old mar.
had been an iJy hi hi; habits, but contracted had
ui hla ai? iv.ii here.
Two yeara a^o h'.s wife uni children went to live
at No. SI Kasl (Ions'..-: *t. They lo not know
?rhere he naa lived since He frequently called
on them for money, aei nearly always obtained ,.
sin ill sum. Ofttn he spoke despairingly, aeveral
threatened aulclde, on I on-.-, ah .at a ye ir
,i. ., was ah..hi to .?.. so with i revolver, hut was
thwarted by members ol hla family, who took the
weapon awaj.
The old man went to ids son's em? yesterday
fternoon and ask I him to writ- a letter. Mas,
his son. seated himaell al a desk to take down the
words when hla father luddenly drew a revolver
s ml shol Mms.-if through the heart. Th- son be?
came great!) excited and ran into tli- street to ?> t
.m ambulance
Not finding a policeman Instantly he ran to a |
lire i>nx and had grasped the handle when Police?
man Taylor, of the Eldrldge-at. station, asked him
what the matter was. Alderman explained, and
the pod?m i'. sent for an ambulance, but when it
arrived the old man was de id.
fill I f Il A sfJ/O.VD'S APPEAL.
in: BXOI PRUIDBXT ci.KVKr.ANt? to OCT His
I7MCUI JACK "t'T <T JAIL.
VlssKa. CaL, .Inn H.?When news sf th? tm
prlsoament al Pretoria, Transvaal, of John Raya
Hammond, the American mining ergineer, reached
the home of the prisoner's hrother, W. S Hammond, i
ef this city, the family wire greatly alarmed, and i
discussed the probable fute of their relativa with ;
mueh concern In the presence of the smaller >-h.i
dr>-ri. Willie, the nine-year- iM nephew of the
prisoner, who :n greatly attached to his un.de. con?
cluded tli.it the only way he could SSSlSt him was
?n making an Immediate appeal to the President.
Without takln? any one Into his confidence, the la I
procured writing material, and post d the following :
t,, the chief Executive yesterday:
Vlaslla, Cat. Jan. IS, nss
Mr. Cleveland, Pr? stdent:
Dear Sit: Will urn please make the m'n that
bava my uncle in j'iii let him tp>? I think you will,
won't vim" if von will, I will be very pleased.
Thev mitfht kill him. Von may be n very Btsrn
man. but I th'nk you will he kind enough to set
m,- Uncle Ja-k fee?, if you wers s little hoy hke
m.-. v ..r would not like jour un. le In Jail, und f
1 were y mi I would s?t him fre... If It CSOSSd WSr
Mi ?sela Jaek is a good m m, so you will plsass gel
him out. Write Boon. I am th- ? >n of W. :;
Hammond. Mi papa Is County Clerk In Vlsalia.
Yours truly, BlLLY HAMMOND.
For a delightful tahle water drink the ABB
THUSA RPItlNii WATBB, from Seymour. Conn.
Company's entes at -ijist ?nd r.th-avc. Tity IT.?
Advl
SILVER MEX ?88EMBLINQ.
Til KIR CONFERENCE IN WASHINGTON
OPEN8 TO-DAY.
THEY HOPE TO LAUNCH A NT.w PARTY WITH
FREE COINAGE AS THE ONLY ISSUE ABOUT
l". OP THE LEADERS PROM Aid. OVER
THE COUNTRY EXPECTED TO
BE PRESENT.
I tr V TSUKMAPH TO Tilt: THLBINK.l
Washington, Jan. 51.?The free silver men are
gathering In force for their conference in this
? ity to-morrow The c inference will be called
t . order al 11 ..''lock by General A. .1. Warner,
of Chlo, who will probably he elected the pre?
siding 'dlh t o! the gUherlng. The meeting
will be private, and nor- will i- present ex?
cept those who have been Invited, it is ex
pe ted that there will be nt least 100 prominent
free allvei men In atl ndance, and probably half
i ot thai number are now In the city.
The conference was brought ah a it !>>? a meet
Ing In Chicago ah.au three weeks ago of the
presidents of the three leading silver organiza?
tions of th. cuuntry the American Bimetallic
League, the National Bimetallic Union and the
National Sliver Committee, it whs agreed at
that meeting to cons t?ldate all the allver or
' ganizations under t?? ? name of th? American Bi?
metallic Union, with headquarters In Washing?
ton, Chicago, Ban Francisco and a point yet to
be decided on In the South. General A. J.
Warner was elected president of the consoli?
dated organiratlon. it was also agreed to call
a conference ..f the silver leaders, to be h-.d
here on January 22, for the purpose of ratifying
the consolidation and for mapping out a pro?
gramme will be followed by the silver men in the
coming National campaign, sin? thai time the
opinions "f the Independent allver men have
crystallise i Into ?he belief ihat their only hope
! Is in launching a new party, with silver as the
; only issu-, go th<. conference to-morrow will
: ally have for its main object the estsbllsh
menl or s brand new polltlcsl organisation
The preliminary caucuses of silver Inflation?
ists have been In pr. gresa all day to-day. Borne
political characters have naturally been brought
together. General J. B. Wesver, of Iowa, is one
of thee? characters; Senator Marlon Butler, of
' .North Car..linn. Is an dh-r. Then there are
General Warner and Judge Stark, of Chlo. Oen
eral Weaver and Senator Butler declare that
the-.- have nothing to do with th.nference,
; but are simply here to confer with the allver
men as to all the silver organisations and par?
ties holding their National conventions at th?
: s-.iin- time and place. When the Populist Na
. tlonal Committee mi t In St 1. >ula last
' it was aware .>( th- probability of a new party
'? being sprung here thla week, and decided to
leav? .p- the date for holding the Popullat
Natli nal C til It ferred with the
new party leader? In Washington.
The following api lal commitl ?? was appoint
n ????: the silver i-i ?:: to-morrow General
J. B. Weaver. Iowa; J. G, Field. Vlrgli la; >? n
M.irlo i Butler, North Carolina; T. M. Pat
'?':?;. .1 C li li. Col rad C. M
Wardall. California; .1 11 Turner, Georgia; B.
? ; Bri a i . Massachusetl i
should t?. neu party and the Populists agree
, to hold their Nati..nal conventions al the same
time and pis ?. it will probabl] mean ? con?
solidation of both Into one party Oen ral
Weavei said to-day that the ?'..pulls- National
Convention Would m?t in St. Louis at s .m
date b* i- . n Jul) T and 2:'. after the old parties
have held their conventions. The date will
be fixed by the Executive Committee
The fallowing are some of thi free-#4lver m<-n
who are In the city t . atl -id the -
K. c Chamber?, of t'tnh: ex-C<>ngre**man M.
I' Bartlne, of Nevada, Bdlt >r of "The Bin ? I il
llst"; li It. Light, of Colorad i; .1 It Tooie. of
Montana: General A .1 Warner, of Ohio; George
Mi It ? ?sh, o| Utah; Judge Stark, of Ohl . .1 I.
Johnson and General Robert Beverly, of Vlr
R i la l" i .1 Mott, of North Carolina; Whar
ton Barker and John H. Lortmer, of Pennsyl?
vania: Joseph Battelle, of Vermont; Oeorge P.
Keeney, of California, secretary of thi Bin tal
II- Union; K C Warner, of Washing! in; Oeorge
B Nixon, of Nevada; ex-Congressman T. .t
Clunle and George \\ Baker, of California;
JosephC Blbley, of Pennsylvania: G. i' Merrill,
of Montana; Or Taylor, of Chicago: Judge Mil?
ler, of Virginia; Judge Cole, of l uva; a. C.
Bhlnn, of Kansas.
Beside th- foregoing a tarse sprinkling of sil?
ver Representatives and Senat, rs will he on
hand.
A XEW YORK d.I BM l.V ARRESTED.
T. WALN-MOROAN DRAPER IV JAIL?HIS
FORMER PARTNER WANTS TO KNOW
HOW MANY BOOS THEY SOLD.
T Wiia Morgan Draper, the New-1 ?rk lu
s/Il an odie* in the I>rcx.-? Building, gas arraigned
before Judge L'onnorton, In Flushing, Long (aland,
yesterda] on a charge of ?ran ) I ::? renj, preferra ! ' -,
his former partner, Thomas P. Peterson Draper
pleaded not guilty, and naked for an adjournment
until ihia morning, as his i.nsel had tared.
The request was granted, but Draper was taken by
??hen i he i 'ourt afnnounci : that he >\ oui i
have t furnish 11.000 bal!. Ha su allowed to
!? iva the Courthouse, sccompanli i by a cons able,
?? find . bondsman. An hour later he returned
srlthoul one, and was lo ked up for the nig
tn his complaint Peterson all?gea that ha in?
? ? ? ? ! in ad\ irtlsement of a wealthy man who
sranti ' a partner in the "chicken-raising" business
..n the advertiser's large countrj estate. One
i!i usai I dollars would buj i half Interest in the
buainesa. it was said. Peterson answered the
advertisement an I waa a^cepti ' aa Mr. Draper's
partner, lie Invest, i over 11,3 '. but Draper bad
:i.\ er t true i over any profit,
Last Friday, the complainant went - Drapei
proposed !.. Increaa the capital, and want? ! Peter
ion to take m ire aha : ? ? Peten Ing the
stock had nol Increased, and aa he h 11 not re?
vived any money from the proe.Is of the sale
l . taya h- gres Indignant, and lemanded to
iee the firm's books. Drai n he never
kepi bcoks, but said he would romp.ie the tol
lay, as it was too late to so p? :in> ba ik,
i'ii Monda) Peterson areni to Flushing and swore
oui a warrant agalnafhla partner. Constable Allen
went .'?. the Draper home, at Gr?ai \. -i,. m serve
lha warrant, but Draper ?ras nol there. Allen
fourni him I. er In the atable, and pla ??? I him under
arreat He was released on bail at Little .N.-.-k,
ii.id ippear l m Pluahlng yesterday, thinking the
bond given >"i Monday would hold good. Last
night he telephoned to several persona to furnish
bonds, but without success
l \n\i Mill) AFTER HIS FALL
ADLER INSISTS UPON PEINO TAKEN HACK
To ALBANY DONE il' IN PLASTER
<>K PARIS.
Assemblyman Charles S Adler, of the vmth Dis?
trict, that Irrepressible ehamplon of the wronged and
oppressed Investors In excise licenses In New-York,
start- .1 back to Albany yesterday with his fractured
shoulder and broken nrm dona up In plaster of parla
These Injuries Mr. Adler received by falling on
Capitol Hill last Wednesday. He was brought home
for repairs, bat as some of his hills for the relief of
the downtrodden liquor men were to he considered
i) the Excise Committee of the Assembly list even?
ing, he wus determined to ba on the ground at ad
hasih li
I win ko if I reach Albany hy piecemeal." arara
th.- devoted Assemblyman's courageous words aa he
was deposited Inside of a ear hound for the Btat
capital.
BO?XD MONEY TOOK .1 BACK BEAT.
IT DIDN'T HAVg A OHOST OF A SHOW IX Tin:
ALABAMA I>KMi>? RATIO KXIJ.TTIVK
i I'MMITTKn.
Montgomery, Ala.. Jan. lit.?The State Democratic
Executive Commutes met here to-duy to fix the
time for holding convention*, flu vacancies and
transact other business, The fre.. silver men had a
majority of the committee and ran things their own
way. Fous vacancies arsre BUed by fres silver men.
K< solutions were passed Inviting all persons who
agree to support Democratic principles and nom?
inees to take part in primaries, out permitting
county committees to decide whether negroes shall
be allowed to take port. District meetings will be
held on April it. county conventions on April IS, and
the Slate Convention on April 21, the latter to meet
in Montgomery.
I A WOMAN'S HEROIC RESCUE.
I.V Tilt: MIDST OF DARKNK3S AND STORM
SHE SAVES TWO ICBM FROM
DROWNING.
TUET HAD FALLK.V TMROt'OH THR Id" OM
OONSCIENCSI BAT?TIIK BRAVE PISHRR
HANS WIFE MAKES HER. V.'AT
tiihoiv.h a HOWLOni oai.e at
NIGHT TO WHERE TUET ARE
RTRVOOLOra -HER roOL
-NES.-: AND OOtTRAOl
SAVE THEM J' ST
IN TIME.
Mary Sharp, the wife of "Charlie" Sharp, a
fisherman well known in the vicinity of Port
Jettera n. Long Island, last Sunday niftht
aaved two men from drosrabag at grant
personal peril end exposure to herself.
The two men are Htnry Palear ans a and
! Fritz Kramer, Qannans, who work in ths
rubber factory in Betautet, and who live near
the Sharp bouae. They were crossing the ice
on Conscience Hay. a branch of Port Jefferson
Harbor sont? two miles long and about a mile
and a half aride, guadal SVi nlng, in a squall of
snow. It was Just dark, and the strong north?
east gale was blowing the blinding snow furi?
ously.
Th? men ha<l reached a nr!nt about halfway
' across the Hay when, without warning, the
i ??* gave way under Herrjr Dstekmsn, who was
walking in advance of his rompa ni sa, and he
found himself struggling In ley C dd water uf> to
, hin neck. His companUM Fritz, hastened to
reach a hand ..?it to him. Henry grabbled it, hut
in his ".-i);, mess to g?t out he pulled Fritz into
the opening w'h nlm. Deickmaa was
; aide to swim, and managed to keep his head
above water, but Fritz, unfortunately, could not
awtm, and floundered about helplessly until he
reached a cape ot ice, ?nd by Its aid kept his
head ab ?ve water.
UTTLE HOPE OF DEINQ SAVED.
It was then .?.. dark that it was impossible to
see the shore, about thr.?pjarters of .1 mile
: distant, and th?re was little "hinco of any ?me
1 healing a cry for help, as the bitter cold had
kep; the !??? pie bugging their fires all day. But
the two men began shouting for help in an al
nii st forli 11 ti h? pe.
The sharps live in nn humble fisherman's cot
1 n the edge of Conscience Hay, fur away front
the nearest house, snd about hilf a mile from
the ?p t where the two Hermans ?.'.ere struggling
In the water. Mrr. sharp la an expert swim?
mer, handles an car perfectly, an i is an all?
ind water woman ?le 1.is lived in the
neighb irhood many years, snd kn >wi every nook
ind corner of Port Jeff ; on Harbor and Its
hee, and all of their many peculiarities.
Just before nightfall ahe happened to glanes ont
window, which overlook?sd the Hay, and
noticed two men on the ctLer ?los start ng to
walk ar s?. This waa n it an unusual occur?
renca, ta thai portion of the Hay had been
a over solidly, and there was no danger if
the persona taking the sho.t c it across the toe
knew the track ?i 1 h ? 1 avoid the dangerous
g holes, where fresh va:er from Bstaukst
P? nd caua d the I? ? to rot
THE FAINT SOUND OF THEIR TRIES.
Supposing that the two men knew the track,
Mrs. Sharp gave th? matter no further thought
until about forty minutes later, when it eud
|. 1 |y . nrred to her that the two men had not
piss.'d h r h us.' yet, as they wsra compelled t)
do If they took the usual and only safe route
- ths Ice. Th>' til night that they had
fallen Into on? of th? spring holes Instantly
flashed across her mini, and putting on her
shawl she stepped out inf.. the free-lug cold
night, and placing her tai dose to th? froten
rurf t - of th" I ay, listened. Her qui k ear so m
letected the cries for beip, in spite of the fierce
a rtheaster thai was howling and whistling
! round her. .Mrs. Sharp St "nee ?rasped a
iot:g pole, used by her husband f"r eellng, and
hsst? ned over the le? t 1 the res us.
Her way was besei with the greatest dangers.
for there were many spring holes, and It was
pitch-dark it was only with the greatest diffi?
culty, to??, that she could distinguish the lamp
In the window cf her cottage. Placing her ear
??lose to the Ice every moment or two, so as to
.atch the crl.-s for help, sh? aoon came upon the
struggling men. She shouted ? r. oursgement to
them and they gasped they could hold ..ut little
loi ger.
Seeing at a glance that one ..f the men, Fritz.
was near some soli 1 Ice, Mn?. Sharp cautiously
approached th.- place, lying down at full leng'h
? and gradually working her way toward the
spring hole, pushing her eel-pole ahead of her.
THF SKILFUL RKSCUR.
She at la~; r.-ach? d a place where Fritz could
? seize one end <>t the pole and. cautioning him to
? 1 slowly, she work-d her ?ray backward over
the chilling Ice, dragging thj heavy man after
her, until he ais . reached the solid let. Obcsj
tinte he painfully rolled himself on to the lc<?
I and mal.- his way toward hi* rescuer.
All this time Delckman was .tying for help,
declaring thai he would sink the next moment
it he w -re n t 1 TX'u.-d. Mrs. Sharp promptly
started out t" rescue this man as she had the
first .'ii". but Fritz Insisted that he should take
t: " eel-pole and rescue his 0 mpanlon. The
woman ronserlted, as the operation had been a
painful and perilous one for her. She directed
Frits at every point, and he finally resetted his
friend In the earn ? manner in which he had been
saved.
I'n.ler Mrs. Sharp'? guidance the two men
made their ?ray across the los it; the bltndtns>
! anow and reached the Sharp boms, where a
' change ?if clothing and stimulants were gives,
1 to them.
Mrs. Sharp, when seen by ? Tribune reporter.
; declined to sa) ?ir; Il about h-r heroic pie.e o|
, work, and passed it off as a matter of little
consequence. Win n asked If Bh? were not afraid
of the exposure in ?be bitterly cold night, sho
said: "<>h, no. \v. fishermen's ?rives have
to be accustomed to nil sorts ?if weather."
"Hut ?lid you not take a pretty big risk in
venturing out or that treacherous ice on such
a dark night?" persisted the reporter.
"? ?h. goodness, gracious, no." she replied. "I
know every Inch of that hay, both above and
bel iw water Then, besides, I never could have
endured staying In my comf? rtable boms when
1 thought those two m.-n might have fallen,
through the Ice and wer? freezing to death." ?
A FAMILY OF LlfV-SAVBML I
This in no? the only instance of Hfe-savlng
that Is (edited to th? Sharp family. "Charlie"
Sharp has resetted a number of people from
drowning In the years he has fished in these
waters, while even his twtdve-year-ol<l son
Qeorge has come In for a good share of praise
in tills line. It was only last summer that three
young men from Brooklyn erara fishing in the
Narrow? <>f Conscience Hay, where the water
Is the deepes' and the tide the swiftest. The
boat they were in was of the Mat-bottom kind.
and it happened to be an old and rotten one.
At all events, the bottom of the boat suddenly
fell out and the three young men. not one of
whom ...uld BWlm, found themselves struggling
In the water. Little l?eorgt' Sharp happened
to be flshln* near by in his father's boat, and
hastening to the place he adroitly picked up
the young men, MIS after another, and landed
them safely. This, esp.vially considering the
i?i/.e of the little boat the Sharp boy was In,
was a feat requiring the utmost skill, adroitness
and caution. For this service (?eorge received
no reward except a scant "Thank you."
KKW QOTEKNOM UfADQUMATBD.
Jackson, Miss., Jan. 21. -Ten thousand people t>
day witnessed the Inauguration of Governor Me
Laurla. Twenty-two companies of the Mississippi
National Guard mrs In attendance. The address
of welcome was dellv? red ny Mayor Clifton, and
the n?w Governor spoke to th? multitude from a
platform In front of th-' Capitol. Chief Justlc*
>? i a.": sdministered ths oath of oflk-e in the House
f Reprcsentathraa
DAILY HINTS AS TO FASHIONS.
Watch our windows hy day or night for the latest
hints as to sly la in oiothliis and men's furnishings
?ra-R- S* '**'* UH()A?WAY. ceS

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