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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 22, 1897, Image 3

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AHEARN'S BRIDGE SCHEME.
THE WARDS ISLAND BILL. KILLF.D LAST
YEAR. BOBS VP AGAIN.
tT PROPOSES TO OIVE A VALCABIaE FRANCHISE
TO A CORPORATION-HOW MAYOR STRONG
CHECKED IT3 OOCRSE WHEN IT
CAMS TO HIM FROM THE
LEGISLATIRE IN 1*>A,
Albany. Jan. 21 (Special).?Senator Ahearn Intro?
duced to-day his MU to give the control of a large
part of the water-front of New-York to some private
citizens of that city who profess an ardent desire to
build a bridge across the Kast River at Ward'a
Islsnd. With a single exception the Mil ls identical
frith the one vhlch war. killed by Mayor Strong a
vear ago The grounds of the Mayor's action were
that New-York ought riot to surrender possession
of sny of Us water-front to private individuals. Mr.
Strong cited as an Illustration of this folly the
granting of a chnrter to Frederick Chlmann and
other capitalists connected with the Brooklyn Ele?
vated Railway to build two bridges across the East
River, and the fact that neither of the bridges was
ever built, and then the cities of New-York and
Brook.yn had to pay I'hlmann and his associates
?06,000 for their franchise in order to obtain the
lecal right to build the East River Bridge. Mr.
Strong gave hearings on Ahearn's bill last year, and
George Bili's appeared in advocacy of it. but tt died
In the Mayor's hands.
It is probable that Senator Ahearn will seek to
gaea Ms bih at such an early day this year that, al?
though Mayor Strcng may veto lt again, the Legis?
lature may be asked to pass it over hts veto. The
bill gives the city authorities no real authority over
the bridge company, which asserts its desire to
bulid a bridge to Ward's Island. For all people
know, lr may be a company like the East River
Bridge Company, formed to obtain a valuable fran?
chise from the city for nothing and then sell lt
ra~k. The bill names as the Bridge Commissioners
one man to be appointed by the Mayor and three
to be chosen by the bridge company, namely. Henry
O'Brien. Thomas H. Bauchle and James C. Reed.
Section 2 of the UH say?:
Said Commissioners, or a ma.Vir.ty of them, being
preaenl ari acting, shall, as soon after their ap?
pointment as they may deem expedient, have power
ro locate said bridge, over the waters between the
Twenty-third Ward of the city of New-York and
Long Island City, together with their appurten
sa snd approaches thereto and stations for pas
and other traffic, which location shall not
se changed except by and with the consent of a
majority of the Commissioners so appointed ana
named or their successors.
TM' !s a pretty big section of the shore line of
New-York City to concede to a corporation. The
company ls IO have the authority granted to most
corporations to take such property as it
desires by the aid of the courts.
CANAL PONDS AND TAXATION.
DEMOCRATIC SENATORS OPPOSE CON?
TROLLER ROBERTS'! BTTifj BBTTfATl
PROCEEDINGS.
Albany, Jan. tl. loon after the Senate met this
morning Governor Black sent in the nominations
cf the members of the Greater New-York Commis
IBM and on motion of Senator Cantor, they were
tonflrmed. The members of the Commission were
rt eal appointments, made by Governor Morton.
?enatOT Ellsworth explained the provisions of a
hill prepared I.y the State Controller, exempting
th? bonds sold under the B0.00O.O0f> canal appro?
priation from taxation, and lt was considered In
Committee of the Who)?. Senator Grady opposed
the bill, contending that there would be no dlffl
?v rn floating the bonds nt par If they were sub?
ject to taxation, despite the statement by the Con
?r liter that nearly nil the responsible bidders for
thc bonds had made their bids conditional upon
rh'ir fxemption from taxation.
Senator Raines defended the bill on the ground
tha' a great amount of personal property now
?1 taxation and taxable bonds afforded spe
'lal inducements to the dishonest man who sought
? . v ade the Assessor. He might, therefore, bid
crier than the man who honestly paid tax on
hts personal property.
S'nntor Ellsworth said that if this bill did not
pass the Controller would be obliged to readver
tias for bids at an Increased rate of Interest and
that the expense of this advertising would be
kbout S.VOOO, A motion by Senator Grady to
atrlk* out the enacting clause was defeated and
the bill was advanced to third reading.
Senator Lexow, from the Judiciary Committee.
reported favorably the resolution passed by the
Assembly expressing sympathy with the Cuban
revolutionists. Senator Grady offered a substitute
reaorotlon in favor of recognizing the belligerency
of the Cubans. The subject was made a special
order for next Monday night.
rVn^'or Guy Introduced a bill appropriating BsV
MO tor a bridge over the Bronx River at West?
chester River.
Isnstra Cha hoon presented a bill appropriating
r.:.o r nid a hospital for insane criminals at
Clinton Prison. ,
Ser.ator Wieman. of Brooklyn, presented a bill
taxing thc gross receipt" of the street railway
companies of New York and Brooklyn 2 per cent.
Bt-nator Sullivan Introduced hla bill of last year
permittlr.g policemen and firemen to ride, free on
all surfa-e or elevated railroad* In New-York City,
and also ghin? them the free use of telephone and
telegrarh lines. ..
The following bills also were Introduced In the.
Seriate to-day: . ,,,.., ,
Bv Servitor Ford-Prohibiting the distribution of
advertising matter In letter boxes or mail boxes
of flat houses or Spartmenta in New-York city, ..x.
cetit by posting ,
Bv senator Koehler?Making lt unnecessary for a
torpor it lon constructing a railroad In Queens or
Suffolk Counties to obtain from the Railroad < om
mlsnion a certificate that public convenience and
necessity require such road before exercising the
powers conferred upon lt by law or beginning the
construction of a road.
Rv Benstor Raines-Appropriating Ko.ono for an
squestr . il ? ;?? of General Slocum at Gettys?
burg _ _
GENERAL .APPROPRIATIONS REDUCED.
LEAPER NIXON" MAKES TUE FIJIPT MOVE FOR A
LOWER TAX RATE.
Albany. Jan. 21 (Special).?Assemblyman Nixon,
chairman of the Committee on Ways and Means,
introduced the General Appropriation bill to-day.
A Ung ;n the sp.rit of economy Inculcated by Gov?
ernor Black, tne bill. Which appropriates gf,7N,00B,
carries t/vivmn less than that of lam. The tax rate,
under lt would be 2.25. Vast year it was 2.89.
-a
STAT F. TREASURER"! REPORT.
A,nany, Jan. 21?State Treasurer Colvin to-day
traaaniltted his annual report to the laegislature.
Or. Januarv 1. ISM, there was in the Treasury Jfifil,
f-M. and on Jan iary 1. Mg?, $2,377,rV"..'. The difference
ls more than made up by the receipts from the
Raines Liquor Tax law.
HARKET HEN UXD A FRIEND IN STRONG.
THE MAYOR APPROVES THEIR BILL FOR THE CPE
OF THE STO. >P LINE.
Albany, Jan. 21 ?Assemblyman Finn to-day, In
speaklrrr of his bill authorizing the use of the stoop
Has la certain streets surrounding the public marketr
? '? N- w-York for ihe display and sa'.e of merchandise,
ta'.i irs Introduction was brought about by the cru
*??> which has been started against tht merchants
tA Vsaejr-at beoauaa they 1.splay their wares on the
stoop line, and the Bureau of Incumbrances may,
within the next f?-w days, i.e mandamused to re?
move ai, those wares, the practical effect of which
would be to ruin the merchants. The hill was sent
to him hy a New-York lawyer, who. in a lette- ti
h.m. stives the following ie,,- ?? t ,r its Introduction:
"Th.s bul does not In any way Interfere with the
Passing of the public over the sidewalk. The stoop
Jun of Vetey-si. and Beatably of other streets sur?
rounding the markets ls raised above the level of
iii*? sidewalk fr ,m six to eighteen inches, .so thHt the
?na .,'i?" J '?''' ;n arv *wn;- walk ?" the stoop
um. unless they steppt 1 up bat distance
VssbTS. ' '"".'?"? evideni -.hat tba business of the
lionVt v'"' ^ wa'* *oin* :" '" ' ' '" I by the sc
La r ;r \.' ?' ?"?" ' delegation composed of Mr.
Mr fifi!l M' ';"nl"'*"- Mr. Miers. Ml M.,. .WI. and
As6,^fa^;;"J?i',"':'n' ?/ the -Vaahlngion Market
Mayor ?lrn?J. ;? "Jv*",f ?? ?P?*"nwn, walled -ri
sround t*. miAu.:,hc,r:2':,*; "" "" "' '?'? "? "?' I-?"
OB condP'on .V... - h**rt>'. "U.PP?? to thi measure.
?"o^"s",he ?f.,iTat *fh'ulJ >?*??*? sll the streets
?nd ?h0j .1 de."vea M fV " 4uUn? ?* ?hree blocks,
?? rV. ruff ,h* *tr<"?", in ?W Mil. I lhere.
for ihe Mavo, fol m.17?''1"' tho?*' wl!,nM an^ Wt it
received lt R'aeJ^aJ"**?^ anJ *? morning
?? ' BOeaj from blas, with hts hearty rapport"
IAW-BCMOOL COURSBA MAY BK EXTENDED.
.*?'-? 21 -The IUU Boird of Regent, gave
-?**? "? tftemoan on an ordinance which ls
UnTt\Z *'1')p;1"n ,,y the ""verslty. p?ivM!?K
??r/orl?,hWll?01 r'yar'e 'hilii <*****? *****
?*Cree of M n?UTb ?22 * ?T^ * ^^ ?*
"oum aff ' , .' Z adof,l?n of such an ordinance
^tnry'Z \S^-Y'':k and Ruff-10 ?? ?-^""?.
^?n C r. a V. 0n'" re"r*9*nt'><! BJ the hearing.
Ur gen', ?****' tzi the New-York diversity
??l favor*d '?* Proposed ordinance, which
If we told you that your baby
was starving, that it actually didn't
get enough to eat, you might resent
it. And yet there are thousands of
babies who never get the fat thev
should in their food, or who are not
able to digest the fat that they do
get. Fat is a necessity to your baby.
It is baby life and baby beauty. A
lew drops of Scott's Emulsion for all
little ones one, two and three years
of age is better than cream for
them. They thrive and grow on it.
srOTT * BOWNE, Chemist!., New Tork.
e ' - _ _I_
would. In effect, be an advance in the standard of
qualifications for the 1.1..13. degree. Qeneral Benja?
min K. Tracy and ProfSSSOT George Chase. IV.in of
thc New-York Law School, opposed the change. Vcr
the Buffalo Law School, former l,ean Leroy Parker
urged an extension of the lime before the new or?
dinance should go Into effect, the Begems having
proposed January 1, 1S9S. The Begems took no action
to-night.
IX THE LOWER HOUSE.
RICHMOND COUNTY POLICE BILL AD?
VANCED-NEW MEASURES.
Albany. Jan. 21 (Spacial).?A wrangle over the
Richmond County Police bill occupied the greater
part of this morning's session of the Assembly.
The bill under discussion was Introduced by the
new member from Richmond County, Mr. Garby,
who made his malden speech in defence of thc
measure. It ls drawn on the same Ilr.es ns tho one
which last year passed the Legislature and received
the approval of the Governor, hut ls more positive
in the bl-partisan character lt would give to the
Board cf Police Commissioners. The bill waa finally
advanced to third reading.
The Lexow resolution against trusts, ns adopted
by the Senate yesterday, was handed down by the
Speaker and made a special order for next Monday
evening.
Several bills relating to New-York City Interests
were presented to-day. Among these was a bill. In?
troduced by H. T. Andrews, of New-York, author?
izing the New-York Parcel Dispatch Company to
construct Its tubes over bridges rather than under
the waters of such streams as lt shall find it neces?
sary to cross.
Three bills affecting ferry rates In and out of
New-York City were Introduced. Ono of these, pre?
sented by Mr. Krltz, provides that the New-York
and Greenpolnt Ferry Company, operating between
New-York and Brooklyn, shall reduce Its rate dur;
lng commission hours to one cent. Another bill,
presented by Mr. Barry, provides for a two-cent
fare on the ferry between Astoria and East Nlnety
scond-st. Mr. Fritz also handed In a bil) which
provides that all ferries running between Brooklyn
and New-York but south of Newtown Creek, shall
make no charge for foot passengers In excess of
two cents a fare, or fifteen tickets for twenty-five
cents.
Among the other bills Introduced were the fol?
lowing:
By Mr. Mathewson?Appropriating JW.Oof) for pav?
ing J.rome-ave.. New-York ,'ity.
By Mr. Mathewson?Making a city expense of the
cost of establishing a public place In New-York
City at Tremont and Burnside aves.
By Mr. Nixon -Appropriating $2.1,00-1 for the pro?
motion of agriculture hy the College of Agricult?
ure of Cornell University.
By Mr. Kelsey?Appropriating I1S2.000 for build?
ings a.i.l improvements at the Craig <'olony for
Epileptics.
By Mr. Austin?Authorizing the construction of
subways In New-York City between the Knited
States Custom House ar.d the Sub-Treasury and
Assay Office buildings for tho purpose of lighting
the buildings bv electricity.
By Mr. Barry?Authorizing the New-York City
Common Council to grant licenses to bootblacks
with small boxes.
By Mr. Reinhard-Increaslng to $l,RVI,nno the
amount to be paid for the construction of the ap?
proaches to the Thlrd-ave. drawbridge In New
York City. The original appropriation was $1,100,000.
By Mr. Graves?Appropriating $29.130 41. with In?
terest from January 1, lS'tf, at 6 per cent, for the
Stockbridge Indians, ami authorizing the Gov?
ernor to appoint three commissioners at ta salary
of $1,500 a year and travelling expenses to see that
the money is economically expended.
ROBBINS HAY OPPOSE LEXOW.
THE AUTHOR OP THB AVTI TRUST BILL WANTS
NO PROLONGED INVESTIGATION.
Albany, Jnn. 21 (Special).?Assemblyman Robbins,
the leader of the attack on trusts last winier, and
the Introducer of the Anti-Trust bill this year, said
to-day that he was not yet certain that the appoint?
ment of a special committee to Investigate trusts
and report remedial legislation was the proper dis?
position of the subject and that, unless he obtained
more light bet we, n now and Monday night, when
tho resolution of Senator Lexow will come before
the Assembly, he would probably have something to
say as to the danger of such a course.
"I cannot hw." snld Mr. Robbins, "the necessity
for such a committee. The bill now before the
Legislature ls a good bill, made In the Interest of
fair play, and was passed by both houaes, ami would
have become a law last year, had lt received the
signature of Governor Morton. Last year Senator
Lexow proposed an investigating committee, and
the Senate quickly voted such a Jiroposltlon down,
s.-.ying that they bad had enough of these fruitless,
expensive Investigating commissions. I cannot see
why there is a disposition to see things differently
this year, if this bill was a good one lust year, why
ls lt not a good one now? No one has pointed out
Ps defects. I um not certain that such a committee
will not delav Indefinitely the settlement of this
trust question, and I for one d.-slre honestly and
fairly to see the people protected."
-a--?
FIRST LAW OF THE YEAR.
Alhany, Jan. 21? Governor Black to-day signed
Senator Ellsworth's bili appropriating y?<?..r*00 for con?
tingent expenses of the Legislature. This measure
thus becomes Chapter 1 of the Laws of K'7.
>- ?-??
A WOMAN PROPOSES A SEW OFFICE.
Albany. Jan. 21?Mrs. Clara Foltz, a lawyer, of
New-York Kity, brought to Alhany to-day for Intro?
duction In the legislature a bill to create the office
of Public Defender. It provides that there shall be
elected In each county, at the general election In
1?97, and at the general election every third year
thereafter, a Public Defender. Any lawyer who haa
been a resident of the county for one vear shall he
eligible to the office. The Public Defender ls to at?
tend criminal courts and appear for and defend per?
sons charged with violation of the law. who are with?
out counsel, and ls also to attend the courts and
boards of charities and appear for persons charged
wlih being insane.
A YO TH E Ii TRA A S PA CI EIC L INE.
San Francisco. Jan. 21.-Honolulu papers received
here yesterday contain news of another trans?
pacific steamship line, having Its origin In
Yokohama. The first steamer will leave Yoko?
hama for this city on or about February 5. The
company ls known as the San Francisco and Yoko?
hama Transportation Company. It will enter Into
active competition with the passenger and freight
business. The steamers will touch at Honolulu.
LAI NCH OF THE MANNING POSTPONED.
Boston. Jan. 21.?Owing to the Inclement weather
the launching of the Knited States revenue cutter
Daniel Manning, which was to have taken place
at the shipyard of the Atlantic Works, in Hast
Boston, at noon to-day. has bren postponed until
the conditions are more favorable.
COLUMBIA'S NEW CYM X A SUM.
At a recent meeting of the trustees of Columbia
University lt wns deckled to construct the gym?
nasium, which, it was hoped, some generous friend
would provide, on the responsibility of the Board.
It will be situated In the rear portion of the lower
floor of University Hall, which ls to stand Just be?
hind the Library Building, on .Morr.ltigj.kle Heights,
and win cost $400,000,
The northerly portion of the floor, a space lot*
li'! feet, will be occupied by a seml-clr.ulnr room.
Which will have a height of ID feet, and will be
lighted by twelve windows. Above this Bserctss
floor a nlne-|;.p running track will be suspended
Staircases at the southern anglea of the room will
lead from the exercise lloor lo the swimming pool
below, whir h will be seml-clrcular In shape, juox
&0 feet, with a depth of lu feel It wll) be arranged
so as to serv.- for a rowing tank. A large supply
of lockers ami shower-baths, a f.-nclng-roum and
storage-room will also br- features of the gym?
nasium.
THE LION NO LONGER RAMPANT.
THE KING OF HEASTS UNPOPULAR IN KANSAS
Krom The Kansas ,'lty Star.
The bristling lion rampant, emblematic decoration
of the Santa Fe railway's time cards and adver?
tising literature, la no more, and henceforth bis
challenging countenance will not be seen on a single
"??P ?f Psper emanating from the railway's offices.
A Lew "a"''" aK'0 the order was given from one
nigh In authority to dispossess the king of beasts,
and to substitute. If un animal emblem was neces?
sary, the American eagle.
The reason for this action wns that the lion wns
misunderstood. ..nd bis dignified sprawl over tbs
Santa Fe railway system was misinterpreted. The
emblem was suggested by General Passenger Agent
J. J. Bryna Of tbs Atlantic nnd Pi.elfie a year and a
Ralf ago. Th.- purpose was innocent enough, had
not campaign agitators In Kansas culled every*
I DOdy a attention to the fact that the Hon was
essentially British, and therefor.- represented Eng?
land's grasp on one of America's greatest railroad
systems. Since that fateful day a remonstrating
wall has gone up from the good people of Kansas
against the Mon rampant, and lt has at last ac?
complished his downfall. Now all the new folders
of the Santa Fe system bear simply plain lettering
on a royal purple background.
BORNE ALOFT OX KITES.
I.IEKTEVANT WISP. HOISTED NEARLY FIFTY
FEET IN THE AIR BY AN INJENIOUI
CONTRIVANCE OF HIS INVENTION.
Lieutenant Hugh D. Wisc, of the 9th Infantry,
stationed OH Governor's Island, made a kite ascen?
sion on the inland yesterday afternoon to demon?
strate tiie practicability of kites for observation
purposes. Th.- Lieutenant is the Inventor of the
kites used lu the test, which, he fWlareg, are his
own modification of the Hargrave kite. He waa
assisted bv Corporal I.ewis and live men.
The kites are constructed on the principle of the
aeroplane. Two kites in tandem fashion were first
sent up. The upper one contained twenty square
feet of cotton-covered surface and the lower one
ninety square feet. They wer<* connected with each
other by l.V) feet of manila rope. Two other kites
In tandem fashion, one containing forty square
feet of cotton-covered surface, and the other lfti
square feet, were then sent up. All the kites were
oblong and had box-like frames, the ends and
the mld.le of which were open, two strips of cot?
ton covering one-third of them at each end. The
frames were made of strips of spruce. Running
lengthwise in Hie middle of each frame was a
spine of a heavier strip of spruce. The ropes hold?
ing the tandems were fastened together by a ring,
from which ran the main hoisting rope, the end of
which was wound around a windlass. Before let?
ting out this main stay from the windlass a block
was fastened to rings, and through the block was
passed one hundred feel of half-inch manila cord,
from one end of which swung a boatswain's chair.
The other end wns held by two men. who nt the
proper time bolster] Lieutenant Wise into the air.
When the lieutenant flew ,he first tandem the
spine of the kite with ninety feet square of cot?
ton surface broke and the kite was torn to ribbons
bv the wind. Another similar kite was substituted,
however, nnd when the kites were all flying. Lieu?
tenant Wise took his seat in the bnastwaln's chair.
At the time the wind was light, and he was not
lifted from the ground, but the wind freshened at
4 o'clock, nnd he gave thc signal to the men to
holst him to the ring, fifty feet from the gTound.
The wind was still weak, and his weight bore the
kite cords down to within twenty feet of ihe ground,
but as he was being lower..! the wind freshened.
and he waa hauled np as hlch as forty-two feet
above the ground. He remained at this height
for about five minutes, and could have reached a
greater height, but, having accomplished his ob?
ject, descended.
THE COAST DEFENCE CONTENTION.
its Mr.Mr.r.Rs spend the pay tv demon-strat
ING THE NEPI OF FORTIFYING TAMPA BAT.
Tampa, Fla., Jan. 21.?This wns an off-day with
the delegates to the Coast Defence and Harbor Im?
provement Convention, but while no session was
held, a practical demonstration of the necessity of
fortifying Tampa Bay was given. At 9 o'clock 400
delegates took a special train for Port Tampa,
where they embarked on the steamer Margaret for
a trip down the bay. Mullet Key quarantine sta?
tion was visited, and the precautions taken to
keep yellow fever out of the country were fully ex?
plained. The steamer olivette, from Havana, waj"
met nt the Key and Inspected. The j.arty then
proceeded to Egmont Key, but did not land, on
account of the rain. The steamer returned at 4
o'clock. The need of fortifications for Tampa Bay
was pointed out. and will b.- presented to the con?
vention at to-morrow's session.
General E. A. McMpin. of New-York, and others
wi] ldeliver addresses, and the Committee on Reso?
lutions will report. This committee |? the working
body of the convention. The plan ls to form a Na?
tional Coast Defence Association at this meeting,
and a National Naval Reserve Association as an
auxiliary- captain (J. H. Merryfield, the commander
of the Florida Naval Reserve, ls here, and has al?
ready organized a Tampa division with thirty-five
member/". He will ask the Legislature to create a
State Naval Reserve and make appropriations for ita
support.
Fifty more delegates arrived here to-day and will
take part In the proceedings.
FIFTY YEARS OF MARRIED LIFE.
MR. ANT MRS. CLASS CELERRATE THEIR GOLDEN
?WEDDING?HIS STORY OF GROVER
CLEVELAND.
Mr. and Mrs. William Class, of No. 1 East One
hundred-and-eb-venth-st., celebrated their golden
wedding with feasting and rejoicing on January
K Covers were laid for thirty-six. In addition
to the eight living children, their husbands
and wives and the grandchildren, the occasion was
honored by the presence of chancellor J. R. Day,
Of Syracuse University, and ? number of tho fa?
vored acquaintances of the old couple.
Mr. nnd Mrs. Class were married half a century ago
at the little wooden Methodist Episcopal ,'hurch
at Parsippany. N. J. Hs WSS twenty-four years old
and she a girl of seventeen. Both c.ime nf old
Revolutionary stock, frederich c|;>ss, the grand?
father of William Class, having served from Au?
gust, 1776, until the close of the war. Upon the
mother's sid.-, tbs Bdwardg stock ls traced di?
rectly to tho Edwards who came over In the May?
flower. Thc famous divine Jonathan Edwards ls
also a collateral relative. Of this pious and pa?
triotic ancestry tm children have boasted, and
th. lr happy parents lived to seo every one of their
Children grow to full ago and marry. Death has
since taken two, the third son. Kranklin Northrup,
for thirty yesf*l a prominent Custom House broker,
and the third daughter, Susie, wife of Edward
Janke.
The remlnlscen.-cs of BO long a married life com?
prise tho story of tho accumulation of a comfort?
able fortune only to be swept away by the perfidy
r.f b trusted frl.-nd by the Indorsement of negotiable
pap.-r. the p.-r-..ri.il acquaintance with such gr.-at
men ns Webster, clay and I.ln.-oln, and Interest?
ing reminiscences of th.se, as they figured in tlie
social life of the home and In public life, and In
the sunshine and shadows of which every life Is
made up.
But Hie storv which Mr. class last likes to re?
late ls the following One Sunday Bl Caldwell. N.
J., while Uncle Grover was preaching in the little
Presbyterian Church, his nephew and ward, the
future President of the Knited States, was on,sid.
playing with his uncle's whip. Grover cleve?
land was a tall thin young f.-llow. weil dressed In'
a light-colored cult. He twice accidentally struck
Mr class, and ths latter then warned him in pure
Janey verna, ular that bs would boot him If It oc?
curred again. It did occur again, and Mr. Class
was true to his word. Tin- seventh and youngest
son T. S. Class, recently wrote to tlie President, re?
minding him of the Incident, ami requesting bs sn
acknowledgment his autograph, which th- Presi?
dent gradousiv and promptly sent.
Mr Class has a good story from the Hp*; of Lin?
coln which the latter related at the expense of
his Wife, but, SOOd as this ls. and the Interesting
anecdotes from the personal contact with Webster,
these afford him no surli delight to relate as the
Cleveland episode, In his early manhood Mr .'lass
was a carpenter of the old type, who could build
a church or house from raw materials. He built
several churches, one of which stan.ls ,o-day at
Pine Hrook, N. J., and another at Carmans,, 111.-.
For ma nv years he was a class leader nnd n
steward of the old One-hundrad-snd-eleventh Street
Methodist Episcopal Church. Ile la now well bent
with the weight of years, but his wife ls as
straight as an arrow and not far from six f.-et
high, weighing marly 2W pounds and crowned with
an abundance nf hair, now- white as snow. She
came of sturdy stock Of thirteen children the light?
est weighed 185 pounds and the heaviest MS pounds,
the lat:, r being the late Joseph H. Edwards, who
died la?t September. For twenty-five years they
ha\e been faithful and consistent members nf the
Methodist Episcopal Church. They have had the
joy to se.- all of their children give their hearts to
God and now as the sun of life descends and the
shadows o' Its twilight deepen, they tell their
Children that "at eventide lt ls light "
THE TESXESsEE CENTENNIAL.
The New-York State Commission of the Tennessee
Centennial sad Internattonsl Bsposttlon, has issued
ar, fl IdrSBS. ' Bptalolng tbs alms and objects of the
Exposition. The ? Idreee, la part, ix as follows:
It is ,- -afklontly predicted that the Exposition will
s.rp.'f Bil *BBSUsr trSpoMUons held In this coun?
try, BSCSB4 the WoM'U Fair, at Chi-ago. Th- Ex?
position promises to be not only national, but inter?
national, for lt ls already receiving recognition from
many of tne leading cities, and from tn .r-- than thir?
ty States, and also from various foreign countries.
Tue Oovernmenl of trie Knited Slates, by sjrec.al act
Of Congress, has appropriate! $]-*i...... |. be apmU
In the cns,ruction of a BUltSble OoveraSBStSI Lu,Li?
ing, and to defray the gXpOSSSS of B ll-n.-rnm, nt
exhibit.
For the ben. lit of exhibitors who may not And li
convenient to accompany ind give personal atten?
tion to meir exhibit, septets! arrangements have
been made, by the formation of a company, which
guarantees to take all mich exhibits in charge, and
to give them tne same watchful superintendency
as they would ha\e If their owners were present.
Trie President of the New-York Commission is
John C. Karnet, of the ll. B. Catlin Company, this
?Mg.
THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE
EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY
OF THE UNITED STATES,
FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. x8g4.
ASSETS.
Bonds and Mortgages.$32,021,426.97
Real Estate, including the Equitable
Building and purchases under fore?
closure of mortgages. 26,088,242.94
United States Stocks, State Stocks
and City Stocks and other invest?
ments, as per market quotations
Dec. 31, 1896 (market value over
cost, $2,796,862.63). 113,077,465.66
Loans secured by Bonds and Stocks
(market value Dec. 31, 1896,
?t4,738.055). 11,723,700.00
Real Estate outside the State of New
York, including purchsses under
foreclosure and office buildings. 16,670,386.37
Cash ia Banks and Trust Companies
at interest. 11,262,939.63
Balances due from agents. 632,697.20
Interest and Rents due and accrued.. 518,896.58
Premiums due and unreported, less
cost of collection. 2,578,037.00
Deferred Premiums, less cost of col?
lection . 2,200,155.00
Assets Dec. 31,1896.$216,773,947.35
We hereby certify that, after a personal examination
of the securities and accounts described in the foregoing
statement for the year 1896, we find the same to be true
and correct as stated. The stocks and bonds in the
above statements are valued at the market price Decem?
ber 31, 1896. The Real Estate belonging to the
Society ha* been appraised by the Insurance Depart?
ment of the State of New York, and is stated at the
reduced valuation aa shown in the official report of the
examination of the Society, dated July 9, 1895.
FRANCIS VV. JACKSON, Auditor.
ALFRED W. MAINE, ind Auditor.
LIABILITIES.
Reserre on all existing policies,
calculated on a \% standard,
and all other liabilities--$173,496,768.23
Snrplns, on a # standard $43,277,179.12
We hereby certify to the correctness of the above cal?
culation! of the reserve and surplus. Dividends will be
declared, as heretofore, on the basia of a a% standard.
OEOROE W. PHILLIPS, Actuary.
J. G. VAN Cl'E, Assistant Actuary.
INCOME.
Premium Receipts.$#,089,357.7*
Cash received for Interest and from
other aonrces. 8,921,700.4)9
Income.$45,011,058.38
DISBURSEMENTS.
Death Claims. $12,380,249.00
Matured and Discounted Endow?
ments. Z,096,X93^4
Annuities. 410,793-31
Surrender Values. 3.582,301.00.
Matured Tontine Values. 2,041,970.20
Dividends paid to Policy-Holders_ 2,425,932.61
Paid PoUcy-Holdors.$21,937,439.45
Commission, advertising, postage and
exchange. 4)330,268.30
All other payments: Taxes, salaries,
medical examinations, general ex?
penses, ftc. 3,736,714-2^
Disbursements.$30,004,422.01
ASSURANCE.
IXTTALMTIT POUCOS IT4TSB AT TOT* MBOaTTBS SAATrSS. ,
Outstanding Assurance Deo. 31,
1S96.$915,102,070.00
Hew Assurance written In 1896 $127,694,084.00
Proposals for Assurance Exam?
ined and Declined.$21,678,467.00
We, the undersigned, appointed by the Board of Di?
rectors of the Equitable Society, in accordance with its
by-laws, to revise and verify ali its affairs for tha year
1896, hereby certify that we have, io person, carefully
examined the accounts, snd counted snd exsmined ia
detail the Assets of the Society, sad do hereby certify
that the foregoing statement thereof is trna aad correct
as stated.
E. BOUDINOT COLT.
T. S. YOUNO. W. 8. KENDALL,
O. W. CARLETON, H. J. FAIRCHILD
,\
Special *sBSBBsfBja
of tbe Board of
DtisctecB.
OFFICERS.
HENRY B. HYDE, fntidmt.
JAMES W. ALEXANDER, Vice-President.
LOUIS FITZGERALD, Second Vice-President.
GAGE E. TARBELL, Third r\te-Pretident.
6Z0RGE T. WILSON, Fourth Vice-President.
EDWARD W. LAMBERT, Medical Director.
THOMAS D. JORDAN, Comptroller.
W. ALEXANDER, Secretary.
S. D. RIPLEY, Treaturer.
J. B. LOBING, Registrar.
EDWARD CURTIS, Medical Direct*.
DIRECTORS.
?Bf B. HYDE,
LOUIS FITZGERALD.
HENRY A- HURLBUT.
HENRY G. MARQ.UAND.
WM. A. WHEELOCK,
MARCELLUS HARTLEY,
H. M. ALEIANDER.
CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW,
CORNELIUS N. BLISS,
THOS. D. JORDAN.
CHARLES 8. SMITH,
JOHN SLOANE,
HORACE J. FAIRCHILD,
LEVI F. MORTON.
GAGE E. TARBELL,
MARVIN HUOHITT.
FRANK THOMSON,
GEORGE J. GOULD,
SAMUEL M. INMAN,
Sir W. C. VAN HORNE.
CHAS. B. ALEXANDER.
EDWARD W. LAMBERT,
JOHN J. McCOOK,
WM. ALEXANDER,
JAMES H. HYDE,
HORACE PORTER,
JOHN A. STEWART.
JACOB H. 8CHIFF.
A. VAN SANTVOOBD,
DANIEL LORD,
WILLIAM A. TOWER,
MELVILLE E. INGALLS,
THOMAS S. YOUNG,
A. VAN BERGEN,
JOHN E. SEARLES.
DAS7ID H. MOFFAT.
JAMES H. DUNHAM,
T. DE WITT CUTLER,
?JOSEPH T. LOW,
JAMES W. AUtrAHDJBa,
AUGUST BELMONT,
THOMAS T. ECKERT,
WM. B. KENDALL,
HENRT 8. TERRELL,
GEORGE W. PHILLIPS,
GEO. W. CARLETON,
E. BOUDINOT COLT,
DANIEL R. NOYES,
ALANSON TRASE.
BRAYTON IVES.
SIDNEY D. RIPLEY,
J. F. Ds NAVARRO.
MEETINGS AND ENTERTAINMENT*.
There was a meeting of the New-York Academy
of Medicine, in West Forty-third-st.. last evening,
when papers were rend by a number of well-known
physicians on tuberculosis its Vestment, and the
need of sanitariums where such cases could be
Isolated thus lessening Ihe liability of contagion
resulting from the spread of the disease. Papers
WOTS read hy Dr. Irwin If. Hames and Ir. B. A^
Knopf. A paper on "The Preparation of Blood for
Microscopical Examination" was read by Dr.
Henry 0 Plffard. The establishment of a sani?
tarium where cases of tuberculosis could be iso?
lated and patients receive better care and purer
air, was strongly advocated.
The trustees and faculty o' the New-York Dental
School held their second annual dinner last evening
nt tha Arena. Pro'essor Dwight L. Hubbard pre?
sided The speakers nnd th.-lr toasts were: Pro
feaaor William M. Polk. "The KnUerslty Medical
College" Dr. William Carr, of the State Hoard of
Dental Examiners. "Oeneral Dental Practice"; Asa
O Gallup "Preliminary Dental Education"; Sen?
ator 'john Ford. "The Hoard of Trustees." and
Professor John I- Mart. The Faculty." Dr Carr
Included in his remarks a greeting from the New
York College of Dentistry, with which he is con?
nected Among those present were Professor Fte!
erick W C.wver. Dr. H. c. .Vast. Dr. W. C. Dean,
Dr Joseph Fournler. Dr. Arthur L. Swift. Senator
T W Osborn, the Rev. Dr. .1. Elmendorf. Professor
iifnns Muller Professor Delaney W. Ward, Pro?
fessor rm *"?*-"?? ????? Protaaaot winiam s.
Russell. _
The annual meeting of the Ooo! (Jorernment
Club o' the XlXth Assembly District was held last
night at No Ml Columt>us-a\e The following
trustee's were elected to fill expiring terms and
vacancies on the Hoard: The R-v. H. E. Cobb.
Vrthur ll Elv, Oeorge Barclay Moffat. Oeorge
ilaven Putnam'. Joseph M Price. A. Whitman and
| \V Watson, to hold office for three years: J.
F Andrews to hold office for two years, and Hor
a.e, A. Davis, to Hold office one y.-.r.
Th- twenty-ninth anniversary r.ception of the
Harlem branch of the Y. M C. A. is to be held In
,,,.. parlors of the branch building. Nc I West One
hundrod-snd-twenty-Sftb-st., this evening u 8
? i..w ThM will t?- vocil and instrumer:-il mu*
?i5 'ii ,'rief addresser, will be deliver*;-! by the
;!'..v d' WWIemC Bitting snd William H. Sag-.
, i,airman ot th.- branch.
Charles H. Olibert. of New.uk. will lecture on
?The Doctrine ..f the Worthwhile," under the ans
i.ices of the Public IMu.'.Mon Ass..-I mon, at No.
fl Ma.lt*>:. ave. at I o clo. k IblS af.erno.t,
William Everett Hicks will addr.-s th- Manhat?
tan Liber.I Club. No. M East Fiflee.u!i-st., thia
-.vening on "The Resl Mission of the Clirlstlati
ci ireh as Revealed In the Last Election." with In*
'.dental observations on Dwight I.. Mood
At the semi-monthly meeting of the Twilight Club,
held at the St Deni* last e\eninx, there were about .
fifty members and gilesta present. Chares F Win- J
cate presided The topic for discussion waa "Aa
O-hers Bee Cs." The preildlng officer opened the
discussion and was followed hy O.W. Wingate, Dr
E. H. Porter, Captain Conman and others.
Tho Theosophical Home Cmsada will hold a asset
lng at the hall of tho H. P. B. Theosophical Society.
No 143 Weal One-hundrad-and-twentF-Erth-at.,
Bundor at I p. m. Baveral prominent^speakers will
Ker sddrcssei upon theosophical doctrines and
purpose. _
v meela! matins of tbs New-York Yaehl Cluh
win ba held at tho clubhouse Tuesday at ? pm to
reeetva rho report of tho committee appointed to
consider the advisability of organizing a Yacht Rac
in? ?!?".? Appropriations recommended bj tha
i"na.V,,:. romml.t:,' JrlU siso ha acted upon.
Tho thirty-third annual dinner of tho mn month
cou ko IsBoclotlon of New-York will ba hod at the
u wf ,h:s evening al 7* o'clock. Tho president
5 thi asVoclatlon. Charles P. Marlwon, * wU
pe do. Tho Hov. Dr. William J Ticker pro.,den,
ot Dartmouth, will respond to tha toa* "The Col
.??.>?? ?nd wii: ba followed by Colonel John J. Mc
loee, an i ?n. igreea of Princeton I niver
Cook, of the 'u'r;' I,, ,ssiKne,l the toa-; Amer
rltV' r?lv'eV?<t\' Work'- Samuel W. McC.ll. Dart
i>-an 1 ?iye?"'wTr If conaTess from Massachusetts,
?"?,',^;,r,^ rw -I./,rtmouth ar Washington';:
wr",1? nn Iv William?, 'SJ, who will answer to
William n.rno>\Ni ia , gi wier.
?The Triangular LHUW R whfj w|1) ^.
Oarrmouthi . . Of concj.? An ???,?,,, |arf<f.
KteSancftoIndicated from praaent responses.
Tho PnagreaalTB Cirll tenrlee Reform' Aaaock*
non of which Abraham amber ??" P"*** ?"
hol.l its much-taaked-of mass-meeting at I coper
Inion this evening. Tho speaker., announce.!
brides Mr 'lr.il.er are General Charles M. Orosve
Daa?.<hllMn CongrsBBmBn from Ohio; Senator
nor. BavamcMn ?nK ? of ,.hautauq,Ja
^?T/lf R^ubHcan loader of the Assembly, and
?Tr-.i HonrvK Tremain. General Tremain ls
*'Vn I,''., i ,? hHvlne bo.-n the first man to Intro
dK a civil"iSrVlca BaSrm neasnre In tho Raw
york Legtelatura._
Tho annual maaUng of the nh Regiment Veteran
Club will ba held on .Monday evening, at tho club?
house Fiftv-elKhth-st. ami Klfth-ave. New by?
laws will ba enacted, and the reorganization scheme
arin Ire considered. It ls proposed to make former
*i a? nf the Army and Katy and Marine Corps,
ofllcors of tn. ^.u> N.l(lonill r.unnt and officers
ff;".nha. molmtteel service eligible for membership.
?f tiY]n , hate r I io name of the club to "The Mill
;in,l to ai UP W* V()rk .. Ttl? mrm,?,rshlp will
^limited to A ot Which only USN may be resi?
dent inamhora, _
The Society of Colonial Wars In the Slate of
New-York, will hold Its annual dinner at Deimonl
CO'a on Thursday, January :'H. at 7 p. m. Frederick
i... i'evKtor will preside. The dinner will comment
,.. ihe siKnlnn of the contract In January. 1?09,
h.'.weenU'enry Hudson and the Dutch Kast India
?? mnanv for the voyage which resulted In thu
rtl.rovery of Manhattan island Among the speak
I',..!.ted are chauncey |f. Depew, colonel
!? w*e F Waring. Biku Root. C. c. Beaman and
v'v'-i'it.m H M.FIroy. The sister societies will l.e
r J "nt ed. a.id an unusually large attendance
Of the members of tbe society ls promised.
TbO*Y0Uttg TdOut League of the Hebrew Infant
a vitim will have an Informal dance to-morrow
?veningBl tbe Tussda, Fifry-nlnth-st. and Madison
a\e _.
The annual ataOSttaf of the American Yacht Club
was held at Pelmonic-j's Tuesday night. The reports
from the various officers show the ciuh to be in a
flourishing condition. A surplus was reported by tha
tieaaurer, and aa increased membereiilp waa als*
annunced. There were about two hundred sad
thirty members present. Tlie following officers wera
. lected to serve for the ensuing year: Commodore,
Charles A HoiiM: vice-eommidore, William R.
Hearst: rear-commodore, William H. Burler; secre
rarv. Th..mas L. Scovlll; treasurer. Wli'.Iam Parter
Allen: fleet surgeon. Dr. Ciiarle- I. Pardee; measurer.
Charles H. Haswell; consulting engineer. George *A .
Mag... Knited States Navy: trustees <to serve for
three veers. B*. R. Lawrence, William H Parsons
ar.d William Porter Allen; to serve for one year, J.
Il .ward Wainwright and Dr. charles I. Pardee.
Hrlga.ller-C.eneral Edward H. Ripley will resd a
p..[.er on "The Defence an.L Surrender of Harper's
Ferry In 1*32" before the United Service. Club, No. ll
West Thlny-first-st., to-morrow at 8:30 p. m.
The special services in the North Presbyterian
Church, Nmth-ave. and Thlrty-flrst-st., the Rev.
Dr. 8. H. Rossiter, pastor, have been well attended
this week. Thia evening Dr. C. 8. Young will be the
?peaker,
A course of lectures to men on "First A'rt tn the
Injured" will begin Monday. In the Knited Chsrl
tles Building. A course to women will begin nett
Wednesday.
The annual dinner of the Rutgers College
Alumni Association will be held this evening at Del
tnonloo's at I'M o'clock. Tickets may be obtained
from Phillp M. Brett, secretary and treasurer, No.
120 Broadway.
The bi-monthly dinner of the Knltarlan Club of
New-York will bc held at the St. Denis on Thurs?
day evening of next week. Mrs. Julia Ward Hows
and Mrs Mary A Livermore will pm the speakers.
V HASHES IS THE IROS INDUSTRY.
An important change ts taking place In the Iron
and steel Industry. The dissolution of the wiro
nail and billet pools was under circumstances thst
preclude any attempt at their reorganization on old
lines. Bv the contract made by Carnegie with
Rockefeller, the former secures practically an un?
limited supply of Bteeaba Iron ore at figures far
below the present market price and considerably
under the cost of production on the Alder Iron
ranges. Moreover, this contract hns placed In the
hands of Carnegie a weapon with which to eom
hat effectively the Chicago steel Interests tn their
own territory. The freight rate from Pittsburg ls
offset by lt. chicago ls a heavy consumer of
Connellsvllle coke, fully ?n per cent of which ls
made or controlled hy Carnegie Interests. In UM
this coke was sold for tl a ton. The decision of
the manufacturers to hold the price at S2 la highly
Important. The cost of coke laid down tn Chicago
ls l-l J-', to fl .'?? against a nominal cost of 12 BO and
an atual cost or St lesa to Carnegie In Pittsburg,
lt costa about tl a ton more to make steel rails
than billets lu i?*'. billets sold at about fig and
steel rails at $2$. The reduction in steel rails to $25
takes about to.OOVtoo from the business on the basis
of last year's production.
tfnropran 3Uurrtiscmeius.
-Lfv********!**** *???*****???***"*?-*-*" *?*-*?*- *?** ^?ll^r*~*^^-*~^rv'**rxfv\r\rHf>f>f\j\f\?\Af
? * UUOl'ICANS AND TRAVELLERS will tai
tb* I/oodoo oflles or Tho TMdudo. TS neat Strr**, BL O*
? eoav-ntont pis ra ,o los*** UteJr BSbSBBJBBBBaBSg ead ?**??
?crlptloas for Tbs Tri bus*.
Hotel de Lille et d' Albion
1*23. Rue St. Honore, Parla.
Between the Tullerlea Gardens. Placs Vendome
and New Opera. Advantageous arrangements
for families. Beautiful Hall. Large Drawing
Rooms. Electric Light, *c. Telegrams. "LtTIal*
blon." Paris. HENRY ABADIB.

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