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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 25, 1897, Image 3

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TALK ABOUT TURF AFFAIRS.
PRESENT FORM OF SOME OF THE
HORSES.
y^OPOSlTTON TO HAVK HIM fig! ItACTNM IN MO.
T.AND.
Winter form is not an accurate guide of racing
form H Kl amusing to hear trainers who have
been more or less successful on the turf predict j
brllllsrit futures for horses that have he-n highly
tried as yearlings. In every stable, with the single j
f*ception cf George K. Smith's, which contains no ,
youngsters, the hopes of the trainers aro Almost !
wholly centred in some promising two-year-olds j
The average Quality of the all-aged division last I
reur made it possible to secure large ftelds In handl
agna, a majority of which were arranged on the |
form Indicated by the weights carried In selling
races
Many racegoers have almost forgotten Hastings
?nd Har-dr-prlng. and estimate the form of Pen
Brush on the showing he made in his Easton
rsces. B B BASS le In the same category, and so
are several others that showed fair form In the i
Mr!y spring races. Now, take Helmar's form, with ;
his record of victories at the close of the season, j
Belmar is not of the class measured by the form j
eihihlted by the crack three-year-olds In the early j
gprh.g of l.ist year, but in the fall, pitted against |
the survivors of a severe campaign, in which sick- '
r.ess played a prominent pan, itelmar was a verl- j
table Hindoo. It ls to the all-aged division that |
racegoers lo.^k for some stirring racing to arouse
the enthusiasm of the masses. Two-year-old races,
no matter how valuable the prize may be to the i
?tamer, have never created one-half tho Imprest or j
fn!h'js!asm aroused by races between well-known
.-torses which have fared In public and (tvea people
an opportunity to form an estimate of the calibre of
each contestant. No decided effort has been made
to preserve the staying qualities of the thorough?
bred hy curtailing the numb, r of scrambles and
dash?s at short distances for two-year-olus. in
nd the best friends of the thoroughbred In?
veigh against excessive two-year-old rai lng, but
ow.ns t" thc fact that a leading American turfman
S I ' ai by an English breeder that sprint races
were desirable because horses could be raced more
tly, and that short dashes for two-year-olds
were excellent for betting purposes, the American
in returned filled with the buncombe of one
' "if shareholders in a gate-money race
?ra k not far from London. When it is possible
for a throe or a four-year-old to win in n single
itason upward of $l?0,0c0 in this country, and in the
all-aged division to win fully as much, the quality
and quantity of sound aged horses that can stay a
I will be greatly Increased. Nobody desires
Wholly to suppress two-year-old racing. Far from
Intelligent, thinking turfmen and racegoers
?v.. a:.- rans :n which one man can Win
Bingle race, while a doi.n others are un
the old L*,!lons for th'.dr forfeits with a
if crippled two-year-olds ruined in the vam
se '.rr the coveted prize.
There- has been overmuch weeping and walling
??'.i.tt might have been if the e; Mernie of
sa ti,at ravaged the Kastern stables had not
0 -r: J he si. kn.-ss that prevailed furnished a
ide of excuses :..r the notorious in-and-out
? * Of many horses last vear. Nearly every
- >n indulged In by turfmen whenever they
talk ov>r the doings on the turi last vear ls al?
ni. -: ill ava ended by somebody referring to the
. runn :.^ nf ^ert.-.in horses and attribut?
ing it to the epidemic In the early spring.
? fit benefit saay bs derived from the al
leged dis-aster cf last year, and that ls, fair purses
the all-aged di vial a of iv", because of the
?a.t that ti.e best li;, ern three-year-olds were
not ra.e-o. to de.iwi last year.
It ls now tnt- rule In the allcsed athletic clubs
In w:.: ostensible boxing matches, whl.h are In
prizefights, take place, that a competent
- ian shall examine the contestants betore
in permitted to enter the ring. This state
of affairs was brought about by the death of a
t-inele prUenghter. When the large number of
?- thal were reporud "dead." to all int-nts
and purposes in ra-e.^ |aat year, ts recalled, pirhaps
it might be wise? if the Jockey Club took some
precautions to have hor-es that are sick when they
ri beaten and well when they win. examined by
impotent authority before they are, permitted
? :-'ari in races, lt is the solemn duty of every
lt turfman and racegoer to pray that no
mic afflicts the thoroughbreds In the coming
1
L'p to date everything appears auspicious for the
K.istern turf. One little cloud, however, ls on the
horizon. Some of ihe profession.il bettors object
'.n the most energetic- manner to what they call
?he wolfing propensities of racetrack keepera.
Everybody who ls familiar with the affairs of the
turf ls aware of the fact that certain men who
have never paid a single dollar to support the turf
tex.ept as tribute for the privilege of betting when
the Ives Poo! Inw made such tribute legitimate)
arr never satisfied, and are constantly agitating
their associates by talking about grievances Imag?
inary or real.
Men of standing on the turf, who desire the general
iperity cf horsr-owier*, as weil as the racing
it.ons. detest the mischief-making agitators
try aboui their grievances on the stree;
Aid In public places, Some of the horst-owners be
-at the Jockey Club has the power to make a
dei ag the amount of every purse offered on a
Jo- key Club tr;, k
Of all the long list of men who were known aa
tl aker? !n the golden days of the turf lt ls ex
?remeiv doubtful If ten men can br n.imci that have
. ?: :..'. their Winnings and their oilglnal capital.
R n turfmen who are considered well-to-do are
illy in debt. From th;s it will be seen thal all
es of men associated with the turf have suf?
fered as severely as men in other callings.
- is no rime for dissension-*. To secure the best
Ul (he turfmen should be united and give- their
Individual support to the Jockey Club. Racetrack
-- should ne satisfied with .'. per cent div. len li
^ |j ?! more tran the first mortgage bondi of many
.-? ? corporatlona pay to the holder?. Every penny
" ;vr cen* should he add-d to the raring fund,
ted by ti-ie Jockey club When
-.lng reason opens thcro shi.uid be no dis
between the associations and the '.ayers of
arrangement" should be compietp-j before
Kin rep.t.s. for it is extremely probable that
.. in tnt Pei ry-Gray racing atv -ruing to
. :rom tutting will oe repealed at the
requeat of the mi t; associated with the breeJing and
trotting Interests .n this State.
Tl trotting horse admirers desire to hold mee:
.tics, bul '.j Jo so successfully it is essential to ob
u ? revenue from sources other than the pate.
In Kr.g'and there is more or less agitation about the
?ttl..- cf winter racing, which li rapidly becoming
ir and profitable The oid trainers of long
I In vigorous terms to the recog
.' w nt i racing, Heretofori racing during
- month* in England has laen almost
fined to cross-country racing, varied by
rial dashes of live furlongs on the fla' 1: ll
-. : to arrange for races ar longer distances
- .- 4, j to '.ave regular meetings at u
n | v h:;i ea^v distance of l.ond "i The
Wei != ' :::e w.nter raclr.g project, assert ttiat suer.
.? *-. 1'. improve the class of horses that are not
registered tl roughbreds.
Oaring I tba frequent misinterpretation of the
"quiet In >arne?c'' phra?e used !n describing '??? irsei
?old a- Tattersall's, in I.onlon. the following revised
rulei ' Bales have been alopted by Tattersall's:
" tJood hunters' must be sound In wind and eyes.
'lUlei to ride, h<ivo been hunted, and be capable of
ted. . , , . .
" "Good hti -k"' must he sound in wind ann eyes,
quiet la ride and not lame.
" 'Goori chsrgers' must be quiet to ride, quiet with
trco: - md In wind and pyes, and not lame.
" 'Good broughnm or buggv horses.' 'good wheel
"- - leaders' must bo Bound In wind and eye, quiet
I ..r... M Bpedfled, and not lame.
" *Oood polo penlee' nnswer the description if they
go to a ball, can he played, and are workably
"Hunters harks, chargers, polo ponies, harness
horses hrougram and buggy horses, wheelers or
leaders, without the word 'good.' ar- not warranted
beyond thar the animals so dsacrlbod have been so
'JSe.l
"Horses described with *good action* must not be
larrr
H '.e. poid With a warranty thar they are quiet
to ride or drive must also be workably sound, and
ave any Infirmity or disease that renders them
? - - h|? of'reasonable work
"Horses thar have be?n unnerved do not answer
a warranty Imposed under the description 'good.' ai
Shove defined.
' a veterinary certWeate must be sent with all
ber ?- ?<? irr.ed for not answering any warranty ot
ess."
Tie foregoing rules might Ve adopted with nd
ce by some of the establishment where horaei
a-e ?,,,,? in ni!* country lr has been decided li
England t ???? Tattersa'.i's that the expression "quiet
In hernes*" ii a guarantee of soundness: hence thi
of the expression from the CBtalOgUei
The spring- handicaps lo England have r.ot flllei
ni well a? in previous years Tue classes ol horse
In Eng ? i ar.- behind the classes of previous vi ar
I ? aiid with the single exception o' p r
simmer- English turfmpn do nor look fro stan
smorg the pprformers of last year, unless '"alter
More proves a real choker. Kew American horsei
? r- entered In rhe spring handicaps. The long
gtsiai ??? races have been eomnietely is-norni bj tm
Asserleani Richard Croker*! horse* havg beei
?r'erer* j,, several stakes Ir is likely thal AmeriCUl
WP] be r*n<\ a*- a sprinter In the future.
So-v, e'lr'-wit Americana believe rbat horses cm
r* trained and rrle.i in this country and shlppe,
real th< Atlantic In eondltlon to race two week
.ft.- meir arrival iti England Tie si perl men I I:
te bi ? .ii by one cf j ti*- heaviest plungers on thi
Ae-.riai, turf in June If the horse he has In vlei
nh hi* expectations. Colonel Thomas P e?-hr
"? believes In the itM??ry. ano is Arm!) convlncei
that after the experiment is made American turf
rr'* win tddp horses to England with ns mud
?tldlty ai to Chicago to race for valuable prises,
?
9VAM0MMEJS SHOOT OFF B ATC BER.
Th? prone class and non-expert matches wen
?hot off ar the 7th Hertment >rmory on Saturda
r'ght. Fly* prlxea were awarded In each contest
*h?- i-ond)tiona of the prone class match ail fo
?'Vee shots standing and seven prone. The name
?nd scores of the winners follow:
P_ ataad n?. Prats*. Tata)
?-nvki* A Si,vent.f,l ag ?
gfjersj Iirake . S .'tl ?
r^'-'s B r. Oeeaspesd.;;. M o
gt rsl E w !^nrai-?r . 81 ft
'"vat. F g. Baker . Mi ?
no^!?Rame ron<lHicn" sb to she's prevailed In th.
SjetSf?1 m*toh *'hleh was open to all who ha.
?rn made a score of Ci or better in any armor:
Removal Sale.
FISCHER Pianos.
In consequence of the removal of our ware
rooms to 33 Union Square West, February 1, an
UNUSUAL OPPORTUNITY
ls offered, from now until the above date, lo pur- j
chase Fischer Flanos, new and slightly used, at
preatly reduced prices. In all stylos and woods.
Cash or chp.v payments.
110 Fifth Ave., cor Kith St., M. Y.
rifle club match,
were:
The winners and their scores
- . ?. .. Handing.
Private ff. M. Phillipa . 33
Private 1\ K. Raker, jr., B
Private C. ll. Plump. .rt
Private ll. R. Murrough*. sa
Private R. lt. patton. BJ
Prere.
.14
rn
li
H
rt.".
Total.
?WI
11.1
ai
ci
M
The following men qualified as experts:
PaMsaraM HiP'il
PltvatS A. S. WSUa. ga' ita
Private EM. l/>uli.,.CS lill
? V^rpornl i'. l>rak*.na f.7
< Corpora] B. IV. lancaster. SS Hil
The M Regiment marksmen shot off a bull's-eye
match at the armory on Satur.Liv evening Entries
were restricted to members of the regiment rifle
vlub. Fourteen shots v ere taken prone at MO
yards, bull's-eyes only being counted. The condi?
tions o:' the match allowed ono re-entry. The
scores follow:
Poer*.
Rr*' ant fl. K. Ztist. lu
'aptaln M. E. Durnton. M
Ssrgaaat g. \v. iinff. 11
lieutenant H. lla.mulne. V
sergeant Sf. s. Ooeray. 7
Captain j. q. unienrti'ril . 7
>' 'rp .ral \\". W, Warren. 7
1'at'tHln J. B. Tuttle. . 7
8?ri[e<,r.t A. H. Vivian.1. 7
Lieutenant C. H. St?li]ar.l. fl
Captain M. M. Mlle*. . .'?
Private H. niehl . n
The conditions of the sharpshooters' match called
for a scorn of fia out of a possible 70, to qualify.
Seven shots were taken offhand and seven prone.
The following men qualified aa sharpshooters:
Offhand. Pron*
Sergeant ff, K. gust . M .'Cl
sargeant A. ll. Vreeland. 30 SJ
IX THE CYCLIXG WORLD.
THE RACING MEX OF A BROOKLYN* CLUB.
OFFICERS OP NT.t\--:r.l,PKT'S ASSOCIATED cycling
cm;bs RUBCTRD?THU inoqrots WKBEL
MEN'S (TIMING "STAG'1?A NEW CTSH
ION FR<MF. PEVICE?SOME GErt
MAX WHBRUNO laws.
Th*) chancre are th it the members of the Brook
I lyn Bicycle Club will take a livelier Interest In
racing hereafter. One of the best racing men In
the club last year raced as a member of another
club. Ho ls Frederick W. Richt. and is extremely
popular with tho other members. Richt was the
whiner of the Irvtngton-Millburn rac? two years
ago. He is never tn the clubhouse on Sunday, and
no one has ever seen him on a wheel on that day.
Not more than two men In the club know where
he lives, and he has never been known to touch
liquor or tobacco tn any form. He ls a clever
mathematician, and ls employed In a large whole?
sale house In Brooklyn. Frederick Allan, who
bolds th* mileage record of the club, will leave
the city for Kurope In April. (>n his arrival be
wlll try to make the trip from Liverpool to landon
on his wheel in ene day. The distance ls about
one hundred and ninety miles. President Rabbling
will nor be a candidate for the presidency of the
club. AV. R. flnedeker, Oscar Edgerley and Joseph
Dale are mentioned as likely to succeed Mr. Katini
lug.
The following officers have been elected at tb*
annual meeting of the Associated Cycling Clobs of
New-Jersey: President. George B. Minshull, Mont?
clair Wheelmen, 'Montclair; vice-presidents. James
Barber. Englewood Wheelmen, Englewood, and
Dr. C. R, Holmes. 1'nlon County Roadsters. Rali?
way; secretsrjr, Arthur S. Kimball, Vim Bicycle
club, Newark. Last year tho organization con?
sisted of twenty-one clubs and had a balance of
$2,v>. This year then aro twenty-three clubs, and
thts balance is over WO.
Some Interest is shown by the Jersey cycling clubs
In the "stag" of the Iroquois Wheelmen to be
held at Prosser"? Centra! Hall, Jersey City Heights,
next Saturday evening. The paopl^i secured by the
entertainment committee in provide amusement
for the evenintr Include 'Uss Sadie Fox, who will
' sing lier lat-st composition, "Sunshine for You
mid 1"; V(bretts, the dancing sonbrette; Paul Mac?
Donald, the black-face humorist; Miss Annette
Wiltsle. SOU bret te: the Spanish dancer, Roseclta,
and Michel and Thompson, sketch artists. A spe
rial attraction will be an exhibition of scientific
1 kg-punching by Adolph Michel, of the Iroquois
Wheelmen, who claims the bag-punching cham?
pionship of Hudson County, and will be ready to
meet all comers in a contest at tho stag.
One of th<? many features In connection with bl
> ?? construction being exhibited nt the cycle
shows this year is th? cushion frame device that
ls fitted to the 'fd Spalding bicycle. Many claim
that this Improvement over the rigid frame ls as
much of an Improvement as the pneumatic tire
was over the solid tire. Th* device IS unlike
former so-called sprint,' frames. There ls no !? Ott 1
lng or rebounding.
The New-Jersey Dividion of th* T.enpue of Ameri?
can Wheelmen, and the wheelmen of New-Jersey
as a body, composed mainly of responsible, tax
! living citizens, a?k for the passage of the Free
j Bicycle Baggage bill by the Legislature, not as a
' favor, bul a* a right, which they believe belongs
; to them, in common fairness and justice both to
! themselves and tbe railroads. The latter, tb.
I wheelmen believe, will benefit by such a measure.
A wheelman sojourning for tho winter In Dres
j den writes that the rules regarding bicycle riding
I in that city are ridiculous. Hiders aro compelled
1 to have a nlckollsd shield, with name and address
I attached to the front part of the wheel. Bella
' must be tung at all crossings. Lamps must bi
lighted at dusk. No coasting is allowed, even lr
the country. At no time can a cyclist ride In thi
middle of the street, and they are not allowed at
I ali on somn streets
When riding on a muddy road, lt ls advisable to
endeavor to keep the head of tbs machine as
straight as you cnn and to steer as cautiously as
! possible. Frequently a sudden swerve ls tho canst
pf S nasty spill.
Cyclists desiring to Join the League of American
I Wheelmen mav obtain full pnri"ni Information and
membership blank-; by sending names and sd*
' dresses to the Cycling Editor, Tribune.
?
THE LAW OF THE BWISOISQ DOOR.
MANY n:ori,E PCRglgT iv kkkpisg to tut. UCFI
v.iikn they Kiion.p KKEP TO 'nu; hight.
In olden times lt was said of the Inhabitants of a
certain great city that a large number of IhStB I 1
not know thflr righi hands from tia ir left. That
was a lamentable s;a;e of things, and ti r<a,l of it
awakens an emotion of compassion in the hreas:* ol
the men and women of the mote favored nineteenth
century. Rm there ls reason to believe that r.uht
here in New-York city, as the century ls drawing I
a close, thcie are a goodly number Of people sfll ti d
In much iii" .-arne way as were these ^f Nineveh In
the i^ng a>
Tho number of swinging doors In tins ;own l?
legion, and lt ls ? rule slmosl without an esceptloi
that v\:, ? ona swinging door la there la 1
also. Thal ls to say. the law of tin ll ni ol thlngi
pglr if -winging ? J'? ir - ? ihouid 'ak'- :'li?
the light hani, ia; iel than lbs oilier.
Observation shows, however, thsi there are hun
dreds, yea thousands of men ,n thli city wi
* der ti" rule mon honored in the breach than tin
observance. Not are naen tin* only iffender* Mam
w mien ate empl vd In ogle buildings in all parti
,?? city, and thej too often manifest lamentabli
Ignorant-* ol the principle thal one should keep 1
tiie right, Instead of tht left. Why this li iliu- ni sh
lean Interest lng q eslion foi thi ho! gist. Th.
thing now under consideration I- thi alien fact
wh.cli 1 Mt,;.- 1,1,- -a : , - ,,? ? . ? .
' ? ?ceK.
lt se. ms . ia) enough to lo tbe rlgl 1 h rig; 1 1
si the rule irfi.i down by Spurgeon : u getting u
Heav?n: "Tum to ? ? 1 ghi and k-< p straight on.1
The trouble with many people iv n,.,, [he] perl
I to lb* hf. winn they com.- r.i ? to face will
., poll of ?winging d nus. a plain duty ls Ineumben
"ii tho^e t? hu know what nugm to be d ina In such , ,,
cumstanr - Lei them never depari from the estab
hilled rule; never take the left-hand door, even If I
la swung alluringly open at toe tight saoaseal bj
.?ijme ora .? mir g in the opposite direction
Thai ls D' only path af safety lt.- walking In 1
unswervingly thoet wh<. hsvs learned the lesson wli
he able lo exert some educative Influence upon th li
Rho go astray as often ?s the opportunity present
Itself Let the former not be discouraged If the In
Iluence In ?mnll. The cumulative force of the righ
's Bligh ly, and one hsssrda Mule In saying thai li
time the us- of the rlgnt-himd door will become uni
i.isal. The present generation may not live :,, -??
th- day. but those wno lend a hsnd In th. aceom
pllahment ,;f this reform may rent assured that th
triumph of the cause, though long delayed will b*
.'aire
Keep to the tight In meeting perml* in trie sidewalk
Above all. keep to the right when entering a bull : iii
or an a; ar ..-.en; urjvlded with awtnirin*- Sonea
PLANS FOR NEW SCHOOLS.
ERECTION OP'BUILDINGS AND ACQUIRE?
MENT OF SITES.
what Tin* itoAi'tn rip kdl'?'ation has DOSTg t.r>n
IN'TtBASINO KCHOOI, An*OMM01UTinS!>.
In view of tho prevailing desire of the cltUens of
New-York to have sufficient public school accom?
modations for all Hie children In the city, without
overcrowding, the t plans of the Hoard of Kducation
for the erection o ' new schools hoiI for the acmilre
nietit of new school sites are of general Interest,
lb low flt a list of the new school hul'dings now In
course of const ru Mion, or recently completed, with
the number of classrooms In each and the time
when the schools will be opened, adding that the
schools will fur nish accommodations for 13,978
' pupils:
HEW SCHOOL I-.I'II.PINGS NOW IN COURSE
OF CONSTRICTION.
New Grammar Behool No. va, One-hundred-and
i nlrieteenth-st. a ii fl Madisun-avo. Opened Decem
ber 14. 1**',.
1 Annex. Primary 'H< hool No. 3t<, Hronxdale. Opened
December '. ICM,
Annex to Grammar School No Z", KlKhty-elghth
St.. near I'ark avo. To be opened April 1. 1X97.
New Grammar Fehool No. IDS, Anthony-ave.,
Mount Mop... To br opened April H, ISM
New Grammar Behool No. SO, Elghty-elghth-st.,
between Second nno Third aves. Basterly half to
t... opened May l, Ki'T; westerly half was opened in
i September last.
New Grammar P-tVooi No. Ri, Bedford Park. To
\ be openi d Mav 1. UK.
New Grammar Behool No. KM, St. Ann's-ave.. be
i tween One-hundred- ainl-forty-seventh and One
hmidred-and-fort*?-ei*.l,th .-ts. To be opened May 1,
1897.
New Primary School No. .", Hast Fourth-st. To he
opened June il, ]*'.>~.
New school l.ulldlr ir. Nlnety-flrst-Bt. and Flrst
nve. Io be opened <>' lober ia, ISM
NEW SCHOOLS, COl-TTRACTB FOR WHICH ARE
AWARDED.
Contracts for the t dlowinR buildings have been
' awarded by ths Board of Kducation and are now he
; fore the Board of Estimate and Apportionment for
. their approval, namngy:
New s.-hool bulldili]:, Trlnity-ave., between One
hundred-and-thlrty-ftCth and One-htindred-and
t thirty-sixth sts. To lie completed in nine months
, fr..rn date of contract.
New school bulldlm-. Unlon-ave. and One-hun
dred-and-forty-nlnth-ot. To be completed in twelve
I months from date of contract.
New Grammar Behool No. 1, Oliver. Henry and
1 Catharine sts. To be completed in fourteen months
ftr>m date of contract 'rinse three buildings afford
accommodations for UBI pupils.
The Hoard of Education has under consideration
contract for new Grammar School No. 103, on City
Island, with elpin eJussrooms, while plans and
specifications for near Grammar School No. 63, at
Ono-rnmdred-and-seveniiy-third-st. and Fulton-ave.,
with three classrooms, .are completed, but contract
cannot be let owing tot pending street-oper.lng pro?
ceedings.
TLANS AI.RRADT APPROVED.
Plans have been approved by tho Committee on
Buildings of the Hoard of Kducation, snd are now
nearing compilion in Hie Draughting Department,
as follows;
New school, west std(> of St. Nlcholai-ave.. be?
tween Onp-hundrpd-and'-twenty-slxth and One-hun
dreii-and-tvventy-si venth sts.
New school, south skli of Rlvlngton-it., between
Forsyth und Eldridge sat:'.
New School, Fust 1 (roadway, Bcammel and
Oouverneur sts.
Annes to Grammar Pnhooi Ni. 3.
Annex to Grammar Si.l.ool No. 24.
Annes and alterations to Primary School No. 31.
Annex and alterations to primary School No. 27.
Ail thp foregoing furnish accommodations for a
total number ot 31 .iC.
SITKS ArQtllRKD IN 1896.
Below ls a list of s!*ea> acquired during 1896, with
the dates of acquisition:
New sire at northwest dimer of NInety-flrst-st. and
Flrst-ave. Acquired January is. IK*'?.
New site on wes! ilde of :;t. Nlcholas-ava., between
j Or,e-hundiP l-and-twi n:y-!-.l.:rh and One-hundred
J and-twenty-seventh sta Acquired February ll. 1'96.
New site adjoining Grammar School No. 63. at One
hundred-and-seventy-third -I t. and Fulton-ave. (pro?
posed). Acquired February 1--, ISM
Thieo lots at the corner -if Broome and Sheriff sts.,
adjoining Grammar School No. 31. Acquired May 1.
UM.
Lot No. 732 Fifth-"*., a.Tiolr.lng Grammar School
No. li Acquired May 11, EM,
New sile on north side of One-hundred-and-forty
nlnth-st. between Beach ir-'d Tulon aves. Acquired
May ii, ir;-;.
Strip of Und (3T,xlOO feet) in thp rear of I'irammar
School No. R. A.quired Mar IT,, \sy\.
Vacant lot (Irregular) of ground on Cortlandt-ave..
next south of Primary Department. Grammar School
No. ?0. Acquired May I'T. \K< I.
I/Ot No. 626 Fast One-hund rrd-and-flffy-sevenfr-s!.,
adjoining Gramma-- School Mo. 62. Acquired May 28,
UM
New Bite at City Island. Arq.ilred May Ss, ISM
New Bite for Grammar B-thoOl No. 1. at Henry',
I Oliver and Catharine sts At quired June 12. UN,
Lots Nos 11.1 and ll". Ka?t l'.iu";i-st.. In the rear of
Grammar School No. 23. Acq aired June I.". 1VK
New Bite .ti south aide of r?ne-hurn!red-and-forty
first-st., between Hrook and S... Ann's aves. Acquired
June 15, iv.*;.
New Bite for Grammar Sc hotd No. 20. en the nouth
Bide of Rlvington-st., between forsyth and FUnJgo
?ti Acqulri d .1 ine IS, ISM
New site for Grammar Behool No. 4o, cinslstinfr of
lots No. no to tao (Inclusive) I-.?st Twentleth-st and
Nos. 8Z7 and SB East Nlneteensh-st. Acquired June
Itt, ISM
Lots No, 165 to 171 (inclusiveI Madison-sr. and lot
N i. ..'1 Henry-it., a [Joining Gi ummar S-hool No. 2.
Acquired June iv iv..
Ia.ts No. :'.".: West Thlrty-flfth-ot. and No. SB West
I Thlrty-slxth-st., on east ilde ofiSrammar School No
] Sf. Acq dre I June S, ISM
Plot, lOOzlSfl feet, "ii west e'de if f>pdcn-ave., siuth
; of Grammar Behool Na 91. Acquired June 28, ISM
j New site for Grammar Behool No. 12, at East
Broadway, Bcammel, Henry and Oouverneur sta Ac?
quire .1 June 2.".. ISM
Three lots at the northwest corner of Orovo and
Bedford ats., adjoining Grammar Behool No. 3. Ac?
quired June 2'i, Iv;.
Plot on thi "..-.ti --ile of Fortyr-seventh-Bt.. In the
rear of Grammar S.-;m..i No. Tl Acquired June St,
New site on the west slue of Trlnltv-.-ive fpro
posed), hetweei One-hundred-n pd-thlrty-fifth and
One-hundred-and-thlrty-Blxth stn. A'-oulted July
2", ISM
I?nt No. 171 Fast tine.hundred -and-fonrtrenth-sf
In the i..ir of Grammar Behool No. c;. Acaulred
Auerust li, ISM
Three lota si the south asl roimer of Bast Hous?
ton and Rsm i eta, ad loin ti g Grammar Behool No
: ? Acquired August 23, M
Strip, 25 bv I2S feet, in the rear of Grammar
Behool No. SS. Acquired October 12, ISM
Two lots In Sixty-eighth-st., on west side of
Grammar Behool No 94. Acaulred June K, l5'.-*;
Lots Nus. ::2 and SH4j Cannlm at., In the r. ar of
Primary Behool No. 13, Acquired November 10, ISM
TpII of tllP above lites are for tv .V buildings and
seventeen are Bites for iddltlonrt light, ventilation
and sanitary Improvements
BITES TO BE ACQUIRED.
Tlo- following ls a Hst of sites bein*? acq aired ly
condemnation proce* lings lu th" hands of the
Counsel to the <'on.oration:
Lol No. 4J Greenwlch-avi . on ihe north Fide of
Grammar Behool No 41.
Lots Noe. SH and 2M Weet Tenth-st. end No. ftft
Greenwlch-st. adjoining Primary School No. 7.
Lol oti south side of One-hundred-and-seven
, teenth-sl . on vv i side of <;r.iiiim ir Behool No. io
New Bite 11 northeaal corner -of Andrews and
1 Burnsldi svea
A st: io of land on Ihe nc-th ajtid west sides of
. Grammar Behool No SI
Lots Nos BOG and 504 Bast Eighty-second-st, nd
. Joining Grammar Behool ,\".-. M
Lot- Noa ! - and -?' Easl One-hundred-snd
nlnth-st . i-i the rear of firs mum r School No. M.
? *omn i i ? have repoi t- d.
I New site for Grammar Behool No. 42. on ih?
north ald< ol Hester-st.. between CUrchard and Lud?
low sts Commissioners have resorted.
Lol ."?'" ':''s U'est Seventeenth*st., on west aldi
of Grammar Behool No. ll. Commissioners havi
reported.
Lot No. Iii West T'-lit). ih-st., OH WP-t side ol
? ;? irnriai B hool No SA
Plot rirrerulan lt rear of Grammar Behool No
t: ,t One iundred-and-twenty-'ilnth-st. and Am
m-ave
N*i w site (ten lots! on east ildn of Avenue A. be?
tween Beventj -eventh and Sevmty-elghth
Xf,v pits '?' I.' Bel.I *:.. ll .,-id rnmin
Behool V ? i i. '? ' I - ci . '?' Hubert i
Lot No '-" Sherlff-st. ard Lot No. 21 Willett-st
i.f Gr imm i< s >hool No. nt.
I,,,: No. 214 East Beventy-slath-BI . In rcirofGram
ii... B tool No '?"
L ? so '-" Mott- t., on thi Multi si le of Prlmarj
N i ? -
Lor No |tj Br ??-?? st., on I ? Wrfll Ide of Primar
N" '-"
? . ? ?, foi Oi ''i'll. ? H ? ? (Jo, 4. al southeai
if n inst i md Buffolh i :.-.
1 ? N.i T.. Lewil ll "ti Ihe norr?-. id.- -f rirainrna
St hool S . W
i/P. w. Bl Bssi PWentleth-i . on eas! ams i
Grammar B< :"' ?' No H
.V-iv nit on One-nundn l-snd-n?neteenth and One
hundred-and-twent!eth si-, bet reen s. 1 am
Third avei (No ."l t ? :'?'? Ea"l One-hundr l-iad
,,,..:: -t . and No S3 to M4 "??>-< ? m.?-hundred
nd-twi ' nclusive)
i.,,, ?; nt Hester-st . "ti east sids of Oramms
Btrio of lard, SI hy ItW fi -1. .-.f rears of Ne ttl t.
4i] -\ , pot' ? !' -st. In rear ce* Grammai s ?
Ni W
Lol No. 123 We-: Fifty-fourth* :. en east Ide e
Oi .'rm -i s hool No -"'
Ni w site So SM to Sit (Inclusive) Ksst One-hundred
and-fifth-Bt and No BS to SK (Inrlustve) Bast Om
hundred-an'-'ourih-st. between First and Second
Nee lite, Mn H le ltd Attiirney-st, betweei
Blvlngton and Siam ll Si
\,w -it,- il-' Otsl on I ?-ip-!i'in l-ednnd-rhlrd in.
Om hundred-and-fourth stB.. b?iwen Fif'h uri'
Madison sree.. beginning 1M f?ei east of Flfth-ave.
New sit.- hi Market snd Moonie sts . *1T'| feel
Ini-he* 'n Monroe-et . and 1*1 feet <'4 Inches on Mar
kp:-st 1
ADDITIONAL SITES 's/AKTED
In eddltton to the f0re3e.hu. th-i Hoard of F.dura
I non hai niresd* aooewred of Ute following sitei
THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE
EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY
OP THE UNITED STATES,
FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER lt, 1896.
ASSETS.
Bonds and Mortgages.$32,021,426.97
Real Estate, including tbs Equitable
Building and purchases under fore?
closure of mortgages. 26,088,242.94
United States Stocks, Stste Stocks
snd City Stocks snd other invest?
ments, ss per market quotations
Dec. 31, 1896 (market value over
cost, $2,796,863.63). 113,077,465.66
Loans secured by Bonds snd Stocks
(market value Dec. 31, 1896,
$'4,738.055). 11,723,700.00 j
Real Estate outside the State of New
York, including purchases under
foreclosure and office buildings. 16,670,386.37 1
Cash in Banks and Trust Companies
at interest. . 11,262,939.63 |
Balances due from agenta. 632,697.20 j
Interest and Rents due and accrued.. 518,896.58 |
Premiums due snd unreported, less
cost of collection. 2,57^037-00
Deferred Premiums, less cost of col?
lection . 2,20t,I55.00
Assets Dec. 31,1898.$216,773,947,85
We hereby certify that, after a personal examination
of the securities and accounts described in the foregoing
statement for the year 1896, we find the same to be true
and correct as stated. The stocks and bonds in the
above statements arc valued at tbe market price Decem?
ber 31, 1896. The Real Estate belonging to the
Society has been appraised by the Insurance Depart
ment of the State of New York, and is stated at the
reduced valuation aa shown in the official report of the
examination of the Society, dated July 9, 1895.
FRANCIS W. JACKSON, Auditor.
ALFRED W. MAINE, and Audltsr.
LIABILITIES.
Resew on all existing policies,
calculated od a k% standard,
and all other liabilities--$173,496,768.23
Sarplas, on a fy standard.. $43,277,179.12
Wa hereby certify to tbe correctness of tbe above eaJ
culatiost of tbe reserve and surplus. Dividends will be
declared, as heretofore, on the basis of a 4* standard.
OEOROB W. PHILLIPS, Actssry.
J. G. VAN CITE, Aaalstsnt Actuary.
INCOME.
Premium Receipts.%&tO&9>3S7'7*
Cash received for Interest and from
other sources. 8,921,700.67 |
Income.!.$45,011,058.38
DISBURSEMENTS.
Desth Claims.$12,380,249.0?
Matured and Discounted Endow?
ments. 1,096,193.24
Annuities. 410,793-3*
Surrender Values. 3?58?%JOX.OO
Matured Tontine Values. 2,041,970.20
Dividends paid to Policy-Holders_ 2,425,933.61
Paid Pollcy-HoWen.$21,937,439.45
Commission, advertising, postage and
exchange. . 4i33?,268.30
All other payments: Taxes, salaries,
medical examinations, general ex?
penses, ftc. 3,736,714^6
Disbursements.$30,004,422.01
ASSURANCE.
rmr Aianrr tolksss trarro at Taara oonartrrsa valvss,
Outstanding Assurance Dec. 31,
1898.$915,102,070,00
Kef Assurance written In 1896 $127,694,084.00
Proposals for Assurance Exam?
ined and Declined.$21,678,467.00
We, the undersigned, appointed by tbe Board of Di*
rectors of the Equitable Society, in accordance with ita
by-laws, to revise and verify all itt affairs for the year
1806, hereby certify that we have, in person, carefully
examined the ac conn ta, and counted and examined ia
detail the Assets of the Society, and do hereby certify
that the foregoing statement thereof is true and correct
as stated.
E. BOUDINOT COLT,
T. 8 YOUNO. " - ?
O. W. CARLETON,
OT COLT, ) loaokl caasautssi
W. B. KENDALL, > of Om Boara af
H. J. FAIRCHILD,) Bli I Mm
OFFICERS.
BENET B. HTDK, Prttidont.
JAMES W. ALEXANDER. Fie*-Presides*. THOMAS D. JORDAN. OmptrtUm
LOUIS FITZGERALD, Second Vice-President. W. ALEXANDER, Secretary.
GAGE E. TARBELL, TMrd Vtee-Prttidenl R. D. BIPLEY. IWasterev.
G30RGE T. WILSON, Fcvrth Tiee-President. J. B. LOBING, Regittnr.
EDWARD W. LAMBERT, Medical Director. EDWARD CURTIS, Medical Dint*.
HENRT B. HYDE,
LOUIS FITZGERALD.
HENRY A HURLBUT,
HENRY G. MARQUAND.
\YM. A. WHEELOCK,
MARCELLUS HARTLEY,
n. M. ALEXANDER,
CHAUNCEY St. DEPEW,
CORNELIUS 9. BUSS.
TIIOS. D.JORDAN,
CHARLES S. SMITH,
JOHN SLOANE
HOR.ua i. JAisKWU),
DIRECTORS.
LEVI P. MORTON.
GAGE E. TARBELL.
MARVIN HUGHTTT,
FRANK THOMSON.
G FORGE I. GOULD.
SAMUEL M. INMAN,
(?lr W. C. VAN HORNE,
CHAS. B. ALEXANDER,
EDWARD W. LAMBERT,
JOHN J. McCOOK.
WM. ALEXANDER,
JAMES H. HYDE
HORACE PORTER,
JOHN A. sr BW A RT.
JACOB a SCHIFF.
A. VAM 8ANTVOORD,
DANIEL LORD.
WILLIAM A TOWER.
MELVILLE E. INOALLS.
THOMAS 8 YOUNG,
A VAN BERGEN,
JOHN E. SEARLES.
DAVTD H. MOFFAT,
JAMES H. DUNHAM,
T. DE WITT CUTLER,
JOSEPH T. LOW,
JAKES W. ALsTXAWBOL.
AUGUST BELMONT,
THOMAS T. ECKERT,
WM. B KENDALL,
HENRY S. TERRELL,
GEORGS W. PHILLIPS,
GEO. W. CARLETON,
E BOUDINOT COLT,
DANIEL R. NOTES,
ALANSON TRASS.
BRAYTON IVES.
SIDNEY D. RIPLEY.
J. F. Db NAVARRO.
to h? acquired by, condemnation proceedings, anti
wbicb aili In th* near future be submitted to the
Counsel to hip Corporation for action:
StI|. twenty f-'.-t oft Um n;ir of lots known as
Nos, ls? .m<i lil Nlnth-ave.
Lot No 28 Kiist Twenty-etghth-sL, on wrst side
of Orammai s<hcol No. H
New alte for Qrsmnisr Behool So. af, in one-hun
di?-<i-;infi-tsrenljr-thlrd and I (ne-hundrad-and-twen
t> -fourth sts., between Second snd Third aves., be?
ginning Itt feel weal ol Second-are,
Nsw site (BM by isl feet) on south sids of Colum
bla-ave., between Jackson and Monroe aves.
New Hit" (twelve lots) on One-hundred-and-elev
onth iirui On-vhundred-and-twelfth ats., between
Kifi ti snd Leno, aves., beginning 175 feet east of
Lenox-ave.
Lot No. 607 East sixtli-.?t.. and twenty feet off
th. resr of Nos. fig, 106 and 608 Bast Sixth-st.. In th*
rear ot Grammar School No. 7L
h;ri[> of land (28 \>\ io feet) tn reor of Primary
School No. M. twenty-five feet ?fr Nos. ii end 16
Oanaevoort-st.
New alta (eleven lots* on west sid* of Audubon*
? ff
Guarantee
for
Booth's
"Hyomei
"All persons purchasing Booth's
Packet Inhaler Outfit during 1807,
anywhere In the United States, who
will say that Hyomei has done them
no good, can have their money re?
funded by applying direct to the head
office, 23 Hast
; rkcvew t*.*****
'1 lie experience of the past nar land
tuc in giving this guarantee for the fu?
ture. Hyomei has given universal sat?
isfaction, and has done more than I have
(humed for it. lt breaks up .1 reid over
night if taken in time. It stops a ( uu;^h
, almost instantly. Hyomei i. a specific
tor Bronchitis; it rsovj Catarrh. Booth's
Hyosnei, the Australian "Dry-Air" treat?
ment.
"CURES BY INHALATION."
Your druggist has it, or '.in %et it if
yog insist, lhere ii do substitute.
Pocket Inhaler < hlttM at druggists',CC by
mail, $1.00. Extra bottles Inhalant,
50 cents. Hyomei Balm, ?5 rents.
^?^^r,l,,"* 'rM ("Trclial ??ii.om? ?nJ fi?e a J vms
u yuu asl w> >t? weal sa
R. T. BOOTH. 23 Cast 20th St., N. Y.
ive between One-hundred-and-sixty-elghth and
One-lundred-and-sl'irv-nlnth sts.
Plor Wv 130 feet) on west side of Audubon-aire.,
iin.-hundre-i-and-slxry-elghth and one-bundied
and-dxtv-nlnth sts.. In Twelfth Ward
Twelve lots In Ninetieth and Ninety-first sts.. be?
tween Amsterdam-ave. and thc BoulevardT beeta,
nlng 100 feet wept of Amsterdam-ave, Twelfth
^Twelve lots, Oae-hunaTed-and-flrst and Ooe-hun
dred-and-second bu., between Columbus and Ab>
?terdsm sves.. beginning S? feet east of Amster?
dam-ave.. Twelfth Ward
New giles .thirteen lots, for Primary* Behool No.
19 ,leas.-,! building) on One-hundred-and-thlrty-tMm
and one-hundred-and-th'.rty-fourth sis beginning
i. feet east of Eighth ave.. Twelfth \\ard.
HIM tots on One-hundred-and-elghth an-JOnr
hundred-aiid-r.lnth sts. between Pfc* and Second
aves., Twelfth Ward.
DIFFICULTIES IN THE WAY.
I? hts hires* message to the Hoard of Aldermen
Hayor Strong said:
A? an illustration of some of the difficulties under
which th- Hoard of Bducntlon baa heretofore
whored" cite ihe history of the acquirement of the
? il of the new school Jual contracted for In the
Fourth Ward at I Uiver. Henry and Catharine sis
rn M.v i* WM the committee on BlteaL reported
Jo the full Board In favor of acquiring the aboye
mentloned site: they approved of this recommends,
? ??,? he same dav the Commissioners of Estimate
were dulirwotot'ed and rhe remainder of MMland
wit of lial passed by with no rep,,rt from the Com
msaloners of Estimate. At the Instigation of the
Hoard of'Education the Legislature passed an set.
wm, ? .--ame a law on Hay SlfISM compelling the
, ^ii?i-^n,.r^ of Estimate appointed to condemn
SSS?,0fS?lchool*Purpose- io report within six
? i-I -,rter their nppolnttnent or forfeit all feei
T".11,*,,? wouldI hf-entitled to receive ss such Pom
ClonersThis law aigles to all Bites and will
nuasioners. ? f j 2- |flst mor,. thm
E,?nv*r mr, "hs"after -he Board had decided
i ,h i-ecessitv for the ,il,.iv-i'..im"il s.te. nolle,,
upon th..J-r'"""n ' ,llr..menr. The school referrer
"?"wlfl eoVer a'bout^tt" elly lois, and will proh
.ni le -he largest schoolhouse ii, the world, and ls
?0 be built in fourteen months, ga shown by the
hgures above sut-mltte I.
TRADE ASD FIS AX CE IBROAD.
fjovernment regulation! and taxation of exchange
operations are not successful lr. two of the Buro
,:.,? countries where they have bee,, attempted,
?mere was In the first days of this month of Jan
?;rv wo.-t nas really a strike of the brokers at
^Agricultural Bourse of Meru,: They were rn
'..,,.'.1 ar the enforcement of the recent decree for
(Wdlng m> oprattona in "futures" "*?"*?;
uee not "visible." s measure unfavorable te bael.
?,.-, and highly humlltottaii rorthe a?4?ber. of the
Aarlcultural Baehange These of rhe Stock Eu
?S? Berlin. Hamburg, Stettin and other
,;,, ' ...!iv SPPtoaded the course taken hy those
, riger, who thu. protested against the unduel tar
m * .he lara* aristocratic SI downers, who
ETZJZ he .b>"rnm.,? to >m,. -ne obnox.ou.
ha.i oroeo iw preach Qorern
, h.. ,w und three rears -sc establishing ?
Ol the law. w onerattone BealdSS the fact
? axstion uP^A^bjjSraased the French money
that the law had - -rn bar r.is ? Treasury the
market, ll *StiAw5St eitpVted In lt* the re
"f ,,r,;a,;n he a!, non "already felling off com
celptfl from the tan>? , ..mounted to
pared to those of the year* . ,
h^\r?n'':forrtheflrfr"7e!eve.f inonrhs of BB*
While the (iovernment of Honduras was eon
ci dins with -hs. of the Catted B?stes sarango
clt.dtng w BaratSS between the two coun
UtfM anothe? Republic of Central America, Casu
\
r>?rr purrhmr delfgbted.
PERFECT LAMPS.
v mi csa bay If not from <:*ai*rs?from aa
"MILLER" LAMPS ARI PERFECT
Pa stool Unlit (better n.ht thea ?ither sss or rte.
tele lo read by). Perfectly simple os easy to Uga*.
i.ntrol lae wick, aa tt ls tn*, as trouble to rrwiojo.
Perfectly beanttful imn!? tn avery alvis st prto*.
fp.m $1.0<? tu 6t0a.SO each.) Perfectly safe. Evsry
loni;. una rs n teed, lb sure ros get th* genuine.
MM )?-. K.I .var.I Miller & m., RaUblM ISM.
?_n g ;t?> ICssl Broadway, bat r?rk Pi sud Bsrelsy.
In I 001. neither -MILl.ttt" oil hasten sr* a rOMFOBT.
Mea was MgnliiK with Fra noe a postal convention
to facilitate the money-order aervloe.
Th? Argentine Republic haa recently revealed
Itself d'- ti redoubtable competitor of the Conti?
nental countries of Kurope which formerly had the
monopoly of Ibo botte* trade In the markets of Eng
l.-nd The butter ls sent from Argentina well
wrapped up with psrebmssH paper and placed lo
pine or poplar boxes of a capacity of about IS)
pound, each. These boxes are shipped froiS Oe
tober to November In the refrigerating compart?
ment, of the La Plata. Southampton and Liverpool
steamer. The Argentine butter arrives thus In
Kurope dunns th.' winter-that lo, at the period
whi n the hiRhent prices prevail. From Buenos
Irres no fewer 'nan 11.161 boaes of butter were
shipped during tho flrbt half of tho year 1?? walch
is not tho ordinary season for sven shipments.
V thia time when the Cuban insurrection la so
Seriously Interfering with the .production of the
maples of the Island, and notably with that of
tobacco ll I' interesting; to note that the exporta?
tion of Mexican tobacco to the Cnited Statea was
ia ig* double what lt sss In 1W5 lt is true that
this exportation ls lnflnlteslmsi compared with that
sf the Cuban product, since the Mexican papers
. Mate that it amounted last year to a vslue of only
i meg Bul there is no small aignlflcance in tba
(act thal ll bis been doubled In the space of ona
I rear Tobacco continue* to \~ planted on a large
' s,,ie ia Mexico; tba planters are encouraged by
,?n.ir.n of affairs In Cuba, and they ara sure
l^nnd , e"sv market henceforward. Inasmuch ss
to find sn aas? pronounced good
a,*con?a????m WtsBaBal ..rant, who wa. fond
ol Mexican .iauts _
SPBAKBBB IT faff PLATT DIWER.
??,?,.,. f,>r the dlni.er to lie given Ot
u "Z Z^r Hs" Albany, on Tuesday e?B
" ,r"::" , rZf .he lt.r-.hll. an Senator-elset hsva
,,m '" ' , 1 steted Pwessss.1 a b. colvin
been about comp* .
of lbs Bepubttosn Btste beag ?.. ah.,? toipro
i l. v.o i, 1.1 the sencral direction or
fal*' SSf, ^.Hhi innouoS yeaterday th.
th- affair waa nota io ??? , .peak.r. in addi
, namea of foi r of ll)^V'xn^mfX Senator William
1 I ut Kenna*. "\, ' . ?_ 1,^1, during Mr. Platt a
I f,7t.,"r"? MWE Mri wl.IM-h.lM4 MT
",,l*"li1"V. h,, pr.p.r^.1 .h. .p.Mh h. I, M 4*.
iwSr'Jtthw auMrTaSS h. ?"1 BS .v?in, thu
lt wa* a short one.
-a
Da you wsnt s boy. a ??>^?r ?r ?^ffHfuS
Tou csu And where the best help can bs got by
reading tbe little advertlaementa In tbs
columns

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