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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 28, 1897, Image 3

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TARIFF REVISION URGED.
^-SOLUTION OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIA?
TION OF MANUFACTURERS.
gA"-f> A.* laOW AS OVNMSTBNT WITTl AT?EQrATK
pitOTKCTION" FAVOREP-RK KSTAI*M?nMKXT
or R"atlfffOCn~r auso PEsiRi-p.
phi;sf>lphla. .'art. IT.--The report of the Commit
,,,- pa tho Tariff was the Art business of Im
prrt.ni e to come before the National Association of
?jannfacturera this afternoon. Chartea Heber -'lark
presrntrd the resolutions, with the explanation that
they were couched in moderate language, but sny
Indu-try whl-h needed protection would he backed
*>)? nil tli* power of the association. The resolutions
-era aa raffa?"*:
neeolTfd Thai it ls the sense of the National As
?octatlon ot Manufacturer! that the tari? law should
> revil d at the earliest nossible moment. In order
,-ni uncertainty may be roaaosed, confidence re?
lier---] and buslnesr permitted to revive.
ptesolved, That rates of duty should be made as
ow SI poaalble consistent with adequate protection
-,f pur manufacturing, ar.d agricultural indus, rles
snd the labor they employ. The tariff should con?
tain only ?neitne duties or mixed ad valorem and
neclfl* duties.
. vra. That f'ongress be invited to re-eetab
nd extend the system of reciprocity which
.. v be easphryed to aeeura for us tariff favors In
American nnd other markets In which we
h:, rn large*! huyers. while Europe i* thr pre
..'--?? I seller solely because of the lower wane rate-.
nor general costs of production In European
ta-tortes
' .rk moved that the resolutions rx- adopted
tv a rising vote. This motion Immediately preeipi
tr.-r-1 a discussion. Mr Hamilton, of California,
?oatended that ln-porten had no bualneaa in the
teaventlon, as their Interests nre directly opposed to
r.h- Intereata of the manufacturers of the I'nlted
c-. ? . He asserted that Congress ls composed
largely of lawyers and scheming politicians, who
"hold the country up" simply to get the popular
vo'e pf the country. He charged that the importers
of the country are lobbying to have the Ways and
Hean* committee make the duties in the new bill as
low as pos-ible. Mr. Hamilton spoke earnestly, al
rnoft passionately, as be pleaded for a hlch pro
tec'lve tari... and was warmly applauded as he con?
cluded.
Kr. HaatlnfS, of Delaware, criticised Mr Hamil
trr.'s remarks as tending to mislead, probably un
hrtenttonall?, the convention ns to the sense of the
resolutions
Mr. Hastings Argued that the words in the resolu
ti..n. "should be m.-.de as low ax possible," did not
m-an that Amerhan industries should receive full
ptOtectlOn Mr. Hamilton repli'ii tO Mr. Hastings
snd objected to the resolution being made to repre?
sent the sense of tbe association on the Question
af the tariff, He prophesied that the competition o'
Japan and ether Oriental countries would ruin the
United Prates unless their poods are barred out. and
?Oked that the words 'as '.ow as possible" la the
r'-^lution bs stricken out.
Mr Clark said that the resolutions were pre?
pared with ths idea of meeting the wishes of
? ind as a happy mean between the extreme high
protection and low protection. He explained that
the word "adequate" wa- intended to mean a duty
Wi would protect; for Instance, if one article
wants P per cent protection and another WO per
east, then the association asked for these duties,
? ri so adequate protection would be afforded* to
each of these industries.
Aa amendment striking out the words "as low as
poaalble** and substituting tbe word? "shall be
ss low as consistent with " was agreed to by a
vote of 75 to ll The words "'rates of duty" were
hanged to read "that duties shall bc as." etc
Tht resolutions were ".hen adopted unanimously
Presldeni Search congratulated the convention
>n this result, and predicted that the -unanimity
ihown would l.e of gr* at benefit to the association.
ll was agreed to ?end a copy of the r-solutions
M paaarfl to each member of the present and the
r.evt Congress. The following resolution waa
agreed to after some de.at. :
Resatved. That tha Benated of the United Btatea la
hereby urten'.ly reques.td to sn iel such a law aa Wll I
allow distillers to bottle distilled aplrtta In bond, so
'hat tne restrictions now placed upon our manu?
facturers which prevenl the export.it ion. of ?ii?
illed spirits in bottles and i is,-- In Pond may be
removed, thereby large!. Increasing our export
trade to all parrs ol lh< a .ri i. particularly rn
central and Sorb America and Mexico, and afford
our manufacturers opportunity for successfu
competing with foreicr-, competitors, particularly
i'ana-:, in dil i. a iw ? nj ry thia privilege
to the detriment of home producers.
'I h-> convention this evening WM given over to
what was designate 1 as a "symposium upon foreign
?rade, at which several ?ddrsaaea were made and
, general Informal discussion of the subject ensued.
Tl ? convention will finish its labors to-morrow.
THE NATIONAL HOARD OP TRADE
CCKKSKCt REFORM ASP "IBC1PROCTT1 RESOLI"
TlOXS AVOVTKD
Washington. Jan I7.-A! 'he meeting of the Sa
Board of Trade this morning tiie time waa
- ;.-d ir. bealing and adopting the r ports of the
nt committees Tba committee report on
banking laws, proposed by the Baltimore Chamber
? mmerce, and the report on currency and bank?
ing, -apposed by the Cincinnati chamber of Com
m. re., -..-re read and adopted, with the following
? .ggestlons: Provisions for th* retirement of the
greenback currency; for the reduction ot the tax on
:rculatlng notes laaued by National banks to one
1 alf of one per cent a year, and allowing National
tanks to issue circulating notes lo the par vaia. Ol
tbe bonds held for their security. Also. ;; provision
for the etjtabllsnment of a National clearing-house
for banks, ar.d that on and after Ju.y 1,
ISSI"-, no notes Issued by National banks shall
1- lor less amounts than to. There was ailso a
declaration favoring International bimetallism on a
basis of an equal ratio, and provision for the abol?
ishment of the Sub-Treasury system and th. mt .-c.
Uor. of National banks to receive and distribute
funds.
Tl ? extension of American <xport trade, proposed
""' tbe New-York Hoard of Trade, resulted in the
foi! .wing resolution, which was unanimously
adopted,
the National Board of Trade cal I attention
?Itn pleasure to the gratifying Increase In our ex?
port trade during the last year, especially In manu
"a lured products, which embodj not only the use
? American raw materials, hut the employmeni ol
America.., labor. The qua tty und utilitv of Ameri?
can products are recognized wherever th.-\
known. "*
auction of goods In this countrv will prove effect Iva
"?'hen appded abroad. That through associated ef
lort much can be accomplished, arni he,,c. se com
no?*,,*11 Th .efr.r!f Th;'' r"ir Government .,?/,,
not on.v closely follow other countries ,,, tne iioii.
*L.U. v*,op,r,K tore\nn markets, but whenever
BOaBIbIs, take the lead in this eommendabk work.
A reaolUtlon favoring the re-estabill.;,rr., n- of rec.
?Sroelty treaties was also adopted.
Jo-*
Wes! 14* St
^"RELIABLT^
CARPETS
SWEEPING REDUCTIONS
harp bpf.n made here in choice carpet
^mnantK, nag?, anti f inuit m-e.
SOLID OAK CHAMBER SLIT
o Pieces -S_2tQ."7g_
Yoi arc Inrited to look - "A looker
U the material from n*b.ch a pur
j*M? lt made."?One glance ar this
bargain will convince von of its excen
tiona 1 liloe.
Oar "long Credit*1 is tho tboii cnt
w> ''Ollifoit.
~ USH or CREDIT
(OWPERTHWAIT [email protected]
KH.lOtand 108 West _4* St.
JjEAR 6? AV.
^Hw Stori: Flaibush A\. mr foi-on St
p
OMMERXT
"SEC" ?
?and
Champagne Nature (Vin Brat),
"SELECTED for the Banquet
in Bordeaux given to the
PRESIDENT of the FRENCH
REPUBLIC."
N. Y. TRIBUNE.
.4 REMOVAL RILL FAVORED.
IT I.Kn is laths OUT OP UTF1CC THF. WWTC'BBB
Ti:n OOMMBMBIOBBB OB .irnnns.
Alhany, Jan. ST.?The Ages moly Judiciary ?om
mltto gave a hearing to-tfay on Mr. Emmett's lilli
providing for the appolntni, it of ihe ?'ommtssioner
of jurors oi nre*t**haater County hy Iha County
.Indee, nnd lop|?l.-.tin? ou, or o'llco Ihe present BB*
. ur.ibent. John Sells, of Yonkers. As the law 1* nt
present, tbe Commissioner of Jurors ls appointed
hy th* County Judge, the County Treasurer, the
Sheriff un.i th-- District-Attorney. County Judge
Smith Oin, would be the ol!l< tal to make the gp.
polntment if the change wire mad.-.
The hearing was an extensive one. Those arguing
against the 1.111 wer.- Assemblyman Unsted. i'on
greesman-eleci Ward. District-Attorney Andrews.
SherifT Johnson and Mr Mortl.ind. chairman of the
Republican County Committee. Those In favor of
the measure were Senator Burna, Assemblyman
Smith and Jacob Halstead. After a protracted ex?
ecutive session, the committee decided to report the
bill fa'-orari) v.
SOUTH ST. ELEVATOR DISAPPROVED.
THE THIEF ENGINEER HF THE BROOBLTN
MIDGI GIVES' REASONS AGAINST IT.
Albany. Jan. Cr**?In response to a resolution
Offered by Senator Ahearn rrs-arding fl proposed
elevator at South-st.. New-York City, for the use of
Bridge passengers, the trustee* of the Brooklyn
Fridge submit to the Senate a letter from <'hlef
Bngll ter Martin. In which he says:
in reference to the Seiale resolution present'd by
Mr. Ahearn arie' forwarded to President Howell. I
would say. If the resolution contemplates the pro?
viding' of a Ht*tlon and elevator for the use of pas?
sengers on the nri<igo railway, it is entirely imprac?
ticable, for the rrason thal lt is not possible to stop
tratni at any point on the Bri Ice bi tween the ,er
mlnals, on account of thc steep grades ano the rios.
headway on whi -h th. trains ar-* rim. If for the
us* of pedestrians, it would be impracticable to put
an elevator a.. that the paaeengers could reach the
premer.ede direct from aoiith-et., becauae the open?
ing which would hav*. to be made in the promenade
would so far reduce the capacity of the latter
that, in ense of heavy travel, ibis narrowing of the
promenade would catlee large crowds to accumulate
at that point.
BLACK IND PLATT SPEAK FOR PAYS'.
THE GOVERN". IR ASKS SENATORS NOT TO OPPOSE
PAWS ro.VFlRMATION.
Albany, Jan. 27 (Special). --Governor Black, lt ls
.lear. Intends to nominate Louis F Payn for Super
Iraendf nt of the Insumne.- Department on February
ll. as be has sent for Republican Senators who
have manifested a disposition to oppose Mr. Payn's
confirmation and asked ih'-m to vote for it ns b
per* nal favor ,0 himself Mr. Blach said to one
B. n itor that Mr Payn's nomination whs about the
first he would submit to the Senate, and he thought
it ought to he received with special favor. He
would feel greatly annoyed if man) Republican
Senators should oppose Mr. Payn's confirmation.
Mr. l'ayns friends ar- confident of his confirma?
tion, and are now working herd 10 reduce the
number of Republican Senators who will vote
against him. Mr. Platt, at Mr. Payn'' solicitation,
it i? said, pul pressure on aeveral Senators \es
terday to Induce them to vote tor Payn. Members
of th.- Republican State ,'ommlttee who w.-r<- here
yesterday also had talks with Senators who are
opposed to Mr, Payn, and tried to persuade them
to forego th.-lr resistance.
? ?
TO MiKE COAL MES GIVE FULL WEIGHT.
Ubaay, Jan. tl. -Mr Austin Introduced a meas?
ure of considerable Importance affecting purchases
of coal to-day. lt provides that in all ettie* of the
tlr.-t class any person or corporation selling or
delivering less than 2,<?>"i pounds for a ton of cou!
slmll be Hubie to a penalty of tSQ, thirty pounds
being allowed for variation* af seelee. Mayors of
. i'i' s ur. authorized ro designate stationary or
movable scabs on which all coal purchased may
b* Sleighed, These are to be Inspected once a
month, and ;. fee ot lt cents a ton may be charged
by the owners for neighing. Thi refusal of n seller
of coal to permit lt to be weighed on scales so
destinies' d 1-- to render Mm liable to a penalty
1 of B0.T
?
FEWER STRIKES IN THIS STATE.
Albany, .Ian. fj, The State Board of Mediation
and ArMtratl rn will submit its annual report to the
Legislature to-morrow, In the year ended on Octo?
ber 1. UM, there waa a noticeable decreaae In the
number of strikes and lockouts In this Stat", t he
number reported being nearly 40 per cr-nt less than
in 1 *!*... ami far below the average number in pre?
vious vi ar*. This is said to be due mainly to th*
continuance ot the bualneaa depression and conse?
quent Increase In the percentage ot un.-mplovsd,
hui it ls i,isl( regarded hs to some extent attribu?
table io conservative action on the part of work?
ingmen, who have learned from experience that
the strike is ii weapon to be used only aa a last
resort. The Hoard exercised Its offices in eighteen
strikes In IBM tber* were Ut strikes and lockouts.
and in IBC UT.
.*>-,
18S1STAST SURGEON-GENERAL RE8I0N8.
Albany. Jan. 27?-Charles P. ,'ook. of Hudson. As?
sistant Surgeon-General of the National Quarti,
has fited bli resignation with Adjutant-General
Tllllnghaat.
THIS VEARs CAPITOL APPROPRIATION.
Albany, Jan. tit Th.- Capitol ,'ommission met
thll afternoon and considered the proposed ,'apitol
appropriation for this year. At the last meeting
of the Commlaslon a sub-committee w.is appointed
ton-port 011 rfu- amount of money required to finish
the work lo be done hy dav labor This committee
reported that 000.000 would be necessary, and the
Commission, In its report to be submitted to the
Legislature on Friday, win recommend that this
amount be appropriated. The present appropriation
ls sufficient to keep the men Ht work till February
"> only, and unless an appropriation ls made avail?
able before that day the men will have to be laid
off al the end of th," hrs, week I ri February. Three
hundred would be affect, d by a lay-off.
STATE PRISOS REFORMS.
Albany. .Ian. 27. -The State Prison "'ommlsKion to?
day submit 1 ed Rs second annual report to the
1/egislature Curler th* bend of recommendations
the report s.-ijs.
"It is now recommended in connection with the
productive Industries required for public institu?
tions, the convicts oe claaetfled and *rrni]"d. and Iii
the upper grades compulsor] education, physical
training anri trades classes !>e Institute.! Mar.v
' criminals are roch hy reason of disease, and h>
phyalcal treatment they can be benefited. Tha
' average age In the prisons is under thlrti yean,
and three-fifths, ar les t, of convicts nr.- there for
the tirsi Km, and thal proportion ls susceptible of
reform under prop, r industrial training, discipline
arid ern o'.1 ..^' mi 1 I
"Thai the Jurisdiction of the Ronni of ,'ommls
. alonera of Paroled Prisoners be extended to Include
'? nil prisoners 01 the flrsr grade <flr.st offenders and
'accidental1 criminals) who snail have served a
1 term of aol leai than six months And the Judgei
nr.- recommended to act upon th.- provision of law
permitting Indet, rmlnate semen, es if rt convict can
; h.- aent out on parole and finally discharg.d ai the
end of om- or two yean with b fair education and
a goo'i trade and equipped for a good industrious
Ufa the st tte g..ms more than bj maintaining him
many years In a treadmill life of 'piece work and
' then" t'urnlr.? him OU1 completely disqualified for
earning s dvina."
WATER SUPPLIES FOB CITIES.
Albany, Jan. tl S'-nr.tor CoggeahaH lo-day Intro?
duced a bill ai'proprla'.lr.K M0.OM to provide for B
survy and gauging the flow of the principal rivers,
ponds and lake* of the Stale, with n f. retire to C01I
atructlng reeervotra for pubtte use* and for main?
taining '. ".inifo-m flow th.r.ln; also providing for
hu invest igation of Ihe feasibility of Obtaining sub
ten an.aii water supplies and constructing conduit*
for conveying water to the cities of ihe Snue. lt
I* understood that this bill wiis drawn under the
supervision of the Slat.- I'tiKlm er Senator Brush,
of Klug*, who has presented a measure authoriz?
ing ii- appointment of s commlsBon to investigate
the water supply for New-Yorh and Brooklyn and
cities along the Hudson, declared to-night his
willingness to substitute the Coggeshall bill for his
bill, which la r.ow in committee.
? ? ? -
A8SMMML1 HILLs.
Albany. Jan. 27.-The following bills were InrO'
duced In the Aisrmbly to-da
Bf Mr Reehl -Authortalaa the Brook); 1; and Ht sr.
v?ik Fe:iv Company t., my between East l\"i>
sec nd-.?t. Ni w-v .rk, and Broadway, Brooklyn, iim
I ling lt* pasaengei fare to 'liri* cents and pr ?'.'duirf
1 for the Intervals there shall b* between 1* nts st al
hours t f 1 1" da)
By Mr Trainoi Appropriating ivti.titu, jor me **
tsi'i.Bi.msi.i of a Bureau of State Printing. unJer the
direction of a Superintendent of State Printing, who
shall receive a salary of ".'."??? a year.
Hr Mr. Zurn?Making any person other than a P?*t
ofltoe employe or employe of a newspaper whi de?
posit* any advertising matter In letter-boxes of flat
houses m New-Vork Orv guilty of a misdemeanor.
By A. E. Smith?Authorising the city of Yonkers
to Issue bones for *2*-.noo to acquire lands for public
dork purposes.
By Mr. Armstrong?Providing that the Capitol
Commissioner shall act as conaultlng architect on all
buildings lo be erectsd al the expense of the S:ate,
without extra compensation.
By Mr. Bedell-Kxemptlng from taxation woollen
mills In the cities of New-Vork and Brooklyn with an
ss?essfd valuation .if under t\JUa\
By Mr. Gllle.and?Providing that persons practising
horse-clipping in .liles of over "n.'iw Inbabttanta shall
OS required te p?s? an examination and obtain a cer?
tificate from a Stat,, hoard of examiner)- to be ap?
pointed by the (Sorernor.
Cv Mr. Austin-Authorizing the Police Commission?
ers'of New-York City to establish an electrical police
signal svstem.
-e
HEN ATE BILLS.
Albany. Jan. "T.-The following bills were Intro?
duced In the Senate to-day:
By Senator I'oggeshall -Approprleting t.'AW for
the erection of an efl iles t ria n statue of George
Washington in Albany.
By Senator Sullivan Prohibiting street surface
railroads from Charging more than live cents for
one conti,mons ride from any place on the road to
any place within city limits, and ?--mne:iirg them
lo furnish transfers without extra charge for such
continuous riiie.
By B*enatOT Guy-Authorizing police in New-York
<"ltv to remove dead bodies from streets and public
parks without awaiting the arrival of a Coroner
MEETINGS AND ENTERTAINMENTS.
The I'nitarlan t'lub. composed of the ministers
and laymen of the I'nitarlan Church, held Its an?
nual meet, dlr tux and election of ofllcers last niac?
in the St Denis Hotel. The following officers ware
elected for th ? coming year: President. \V. H. Ken?
yon; first vice-president. Do Borden Wilmot; second
vice-president. Monro- B. Bogert; secretary. Percy
D. Adams: treasurer. Jared "V. Brown, directors.
John A. Taylor, Sylvester Severance and C. C.
Knowlton. Tie dinner was presided over by the
retiring president. John A. Taylor. The Rev.
Thomas R. Slicer, of Bufalo. mnde an address an
"How It Appears to an Optimist." The Rev.
Stephen Camp spoke on "Pessimism." nnd a general
? discussion followed. About fifty covers were IhI.I
| at the dinner.
I ttood Government Club F will hold Its third an
! nual dinner this evening at 7 o'clock at the St
Innis Hotel, Broadway and Eleventh-st. The. head?
quarters of the club are at No. .121 iiudson-st. The
prealdent, L J, Callanan, will act as toastmaster,
' and among those who will respond to toasts appro?
priate to the occasion are -lamea C. Carter, .1.
Auguatua Johnson, Wheeler H. Peckham, Charles
Mellon nnd William II. Hand.
i ??
Andrew McLean. Kditor of "The Brooklyn Citi?
zen." will address the Executive Committee of the
Young Democracy at ifs headquarters, No. 14!
Wist Forty-oecond-at . this evening, on "Living
Issues."
The Quaint Club will give a dinner on February
ll, at 7 p. m., at the Waldorf. It will be known as
1 the "St. Valentine's dinner." Special efforts havo
lieen made by the Executive and Dinner committees
to make the occasion nn exceedingly enjoyable one.
I There will be many bright and witty speeches.
A ladles' day reception will be given at the Lotos
Club, No. .I'S Flfth-ave, for the Manuscript 8o
i c|ety of New-York, from 2 to I o'clock this after
J noan. There will be music.
The annual reception of the Past Grands' Asso
| elation of I'lstrlct No. ], New-York CW?, I, O. Ci
F, will be held at Lyric Hall. Sixtli-ave . near
. Forty-second-st., February "
A meeting of the Federation of Baal side Work*
. ra will be held to-day al 4 p>. m., when this topu
I WlU be discussed: 'The Dependent Children of
| New-York City." Mrs. Charles Bussell I.,,wen will
I deal with lim Children lr: private institutions tli.it
j ure supported bv the pul,li,-, and with th<- rules of
I the State Board of Charltlee. Morney williams,
'? tiie new prealdent of the New-York Juvenile As>
i lum, will present the Institutional side of the OUSS
i tlon. C. Lorlng Brace, secretary of the children's
A l-l So.-lety. will explain Its methods of caring fur
1 friendless children, airs. J. F. Tapley, of the
Charity Organisation Soi let v. will speak un "The
I Wisdom of lia-inc Children In Families Bather
j Dian in Institutions." The place of meenup is No.
i lal East Fourth-at.
The mass-meeting to be held at tiie Grand Cen?
tral Palace, ilsington-a va. and Forty-thlrd-at.,
i Tuesday evenlnc tn demand tba release ot Irtoh
I men and Irlsh-Amerli ar. citizens now confined In
Hrltl-h prisons for political offences, ut willoh John
: ? Redmond, M. P.. and w Bourke Cockran aili
I..- the principal speakers, promises to be a Urge
ami Influential gathering. Thia will h. Mr Red?
mond's las! Speech in America, as be -ails for
England the following day.
Louis B. Van Oaaabeek, the Temple Court law
I yer, will deliver a lecture on "The Land of the
I Shamrock" at the Washington Square Methodist
\ Episcopal Church tills evening al I o'clock.
The New-York Commandery of the millar?
! Order of the l.oynl Legion will have ? meeting and
dinner at Delmonico'a next Wednesday evening
Major-General Adelbert Ames will read a poem an
"Thc Capture of Fort Fisher, January lo. lMfi."
The third entertainment for the amusement of
i til.- inmates of tho Almshotfse, at the chapel on
Blackwell'* Island, will take place Saturday at
1:18 p. m., under the direction of Miss AJ;i Landon
. I lu nd.
The Socl't* Culinnire Phllanthropique has issued
j a handsome pamphlet in connection with ifs thirty
1 Brat annual ball, which will be h.-!.| February '?>
In Madison Square Garden. The souvenir con?
tains aome interesting recipes and ? ?ketch ot the
- organization, with put ii aits of the officer".
A charity concert celebrating the centennial
. birthday of Fran- Schubert will be given on Sun
1 day al 8 p. m. at No. 144 Madlson-ave by Eduard
I Herrmann, violinist, and Emil Bchenck, violoncellist,
assisted hy ui.le artists. The entire proceeds will be
: a| plied to relieving the wants of the deserving
l poor. Whose condition has been reported by unsul
| arled visitors. Tickets may be had of G. Sehlrmcr,
No. bj rnlon Square, William A. Pond A Co.. No.
124 Flfth-ave., und at No. 144 Madlson-ave. The fol?
lowing are Interested In this charity: M. T. Patter?
son, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Nereshelmer, Mrs. Eml!
Schanck, Mrs. Satah Cape. Mrs. William ti Judge,
Mr. and Mrs. c. a. (irtscom, Jr., Miss Katharine
, Hillard, Miss Lizzie Chopin and Mrs. M. Masclimedt.
The Cheshire Academy Alumni Association Will
give a dinner at the Waldorf next Tuesday at 6:30
p. m. Among the distinguished alumni who will
; be present are J. Pierpont Morgan. Professor An
j drew W. Phillips, of Yale University; c. La Rue
I Minson, president of the association; Herbert II.
Turner. James B. DUI and Hr H. Holbrook Curtis.
j The Kev. Dr. Mallory, Editor of "The < hurchm.in":
; Professor Phillip.-. Professor E. D. Woodbury,
principal of the academy; Herbert B. Turner and
C Ua Hue Munson will speak, and lt ls expected
mat Professor Luther, of Trinity college, and
, William OrdWSy Partridge will also mane ud
dreaoca.
john Kendri-k Bangs, the humorist, Will give a
reading from hla Own works at the parish house
' of St. Agnes's Church. No. 121 West Nlncty-flrst
st.. next Wedneeda) evening. In aid of the free
1 circulating library connected with the church
There will also be vocal and Instrumental music
The library is i snwll one. with a good record.
cut.lining only 3.HO relumes, ll has circulated
them In the last >? ar over forty-one thousand
times giving the library a rank of second iii the
' city and State. New books ar.- now urgently need?
ed and the entire proceeds of the entertainment
Will be devot.-d io -recuring them
The snnual meeting of the Swiss BonevOlenl BO 1
J ny of New-York will be held on Saturday evening
bi' No io" S<->nd-avc The receipts Of the society
! last' rem amounted te over IMak and nfarl* the
I whole sum was spent in works of benevolence and
j charity. _
The annual meeting of tha ITnlveraltj Bettle-nent
' S'.'i.-ty will be held to-morrow al :::"?? p ni st Hie
' City Club, No ttl Flfth-ave. Seth Low Will l-re
si,ie -,n.i addtssaas will ba mad.- bj Carl Behura,
Richard Watson allder and Ja mea 6 Reynolds II
! is Intended to form ? women'a ausillar) aaaoein
; lion. m _
' CITY BOND BIDS TO BB OPENED TO-DAY.
Controller Fitch or Acting Controller W J. Lyon
! orlll open bids al -' oYl.ck this u.'ten.oo.i for ?shV
03397 of ri per cenl bonds of this city. The pro
I poaala for bids havo been advertised for several
weeks by the Controller. Of the bonds put up for
Mle f~0O.O00 Will he used to pay for new apparatus
for tin lire 1'epartment. and the balance of irttfl.
g_go~ win be used to provide additional school ac
i ''Thugai!- to of I per ce,,,,, not ll', per cent bonds
uh the lust few sales have been the reason for
rutting down the rate is tl,, chsnmiaaii of money
?t , resent Th. Inst I -Itv bond sal. was h. ld n
November n ?"<">< ?'ter Ihe election, when fte..
' iMi.iBBi of .".'... p.r .-.nt bold- were overbid tva or six
| times. _#_
A:., von looking fot I I....gain <n ? PUnO. er da
' ,ou wan) to arti o, eschsnse one- rou might nnd
' what jon want In the Illili- sdverllsements In tha
narrow oolam?
Mutual Reserve fund \)k Association
(INCORPORATED.)
FRXIDEIXIXOIK. JL. BTTIINIHL^M, ..... I>r-o?iclerL-j.
305* 307, 309 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY.
9
SIXTEENTH ANNUAL STATEMENT,
Covering Year Ending December 31, 1896.
INCREASES.
In Cash Income. Q 283*195s41
In Invested Assets. 273.059*28
In Net Surplus. 447,420*64
In New Business Received. 15,142,102*00
In Business in Force. .6,366,990.00
In Number of Policies in Force. . 12,571
New Business Received. $ 84,167,997*00
New Business Written. 73,026,330.00
Total Business in Force. 325,026,06ls00
DECREASES.
In Fxpenses of Management.,. $162,341.13
In Total Disbursements., 268,691*52
In Liabilities. 349,642*36
Death Claims Paid since Organization.$28,825,665*66
Death Claims Paid in 1896. 3,967*083.94
Or over $13,000 for each working day in the year.
A TOTAL MEMBERSHIP OF 118,449 INTERESTED.
ANNUAL ADDRESS OF PRESIDENT FREDERICK A. BURNHAM,
JANUARY 27th, 1897.
1 CONCERNING THE IMPORTANT QUESTION
OF ECONOJTY.
I was not and never shall We willing, for the
mere empty plaudits which may follow the show
of savin** a few donara In outgo that may well
eost thousands lu the Impairment af efficiency,
to permit the progreaa of the Mutual Reserve
Fund Life Association to he interrupted, its
hold upon the foremost place among life insur?
ance organizations to he weakened, its power
for good to he rendered doubtful. In 1806 it
had expended hut .t.'.M PER BACH $1,000 AT
RISK, WHERE OUR RIVALS AND COM
PETITOR8 HAD EXPENDED I1S-33, so that
lt was nut ns if our foremost position had baan
purchased at an extravagant outlay atid with
wasteful ezpeoae. On the contratry, in econmny
of management, in the effecttvenesa of the dol?
lar of expense, as in other regards, ire led. and
presented THK STANDARD OF COMPARI?
SON for COMBINING MINIMUM OP EX?
PENSE WITH MAXIMUM OF ACCOMPLISH*
MENT. I'nder these condltlotja lt was not an
easy task to eaaay the reduction of espenaaa
without Impairing efficiency of work, i'nder
thes*> rlrflimatanffa. that would have been a
noteworthy surreal arnica should have enabled
us to preaenl to you to-day the record of In?
crease In business done, ln"rease In business
In force, Increase In premium income, Increase
In assets ami surplus which we d' present, with
stationary expenses. With such a showing we
.should have redeemed our pledges nnd bettered
the record of a year ago, as good as that was.
I am proud to be able to preaenl you more than
this. THK ASSOCIATION* HAS IN THK LAST
TEAR DONE THK LARGEST BUSINESS OF
ANY YKAR IN ITS HISTORY. IT HAS
CARED FOR A BUSINESS IN FORCE MILL?
IONS OF DOLLARS LARGER THAN IT
EVER CARED FOR BEFORE; IT HAS COL?
LECTED AN INCOME THK LARGEST BY
HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS of DOLLARS
THAT IT EVER COLLECTED?AND IT HAS
REDUCED ITS EXPEN8E8 FROM THK
GROSS AMOUNT IN 1005, BY OVER ONE
HUNDRED AND SIXTY-TWO THOUSAND
DOLLARS. OR To ?.".(?4 per tl.OOO AT RISK.
EXPENSE IN COMPARISON WITH FOR?
TIER YEARS.
I have referred elaawhera to the pi^ds-e Riven
I ope year ago "f special economy in the man
] agement of the Association's affairs?the pledge
| of "Good work at honest cost; true economy
and not Its shadow." I present Its redemption
i in the record of the EXPENSES REDUCED BY
1 ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-TWO THOU?
SAND THREE HUNDRED AND FORTY
j ONE AND THIRTEEN ONE-HUNDREDTHS
j (SlffiUMl.13) DOLLARS. NOTWITHSTAND
' INO there has boen i-arrled on our books an
I average of nearly $20,000,000 MORE OF Hl'SI
NKSS; NOTWITHSTANDING we have had to
I collect and handle nearly $800,000 MORK OF
j INCOME; NOTWITHSTANDING we have
bern compelled to pay for over $l.*t,000.(S10
MORK OF NEW BUSlNaMM. I present lt In
a reduction of the expense rate per each $1,000
of Insuram e from $5.84 to $5.04.
(CA I Hf\\^ I 3.1
THE MUTUAL RESERVE AND ITS
FIELD WORKER,
therefore, come to the public equipped with a
plan strongly founded in the actual experience
if the business; A PLAN. THE FRUITAGE OF
.'EARS OF STL'DY AND PRACTICAL OPERA?
TIONS; A PLAN THAT APPEALS TO THE
PEOPLE BECAUSE; IT BRINGS THEM WHAT
rHEY NEED .VT A PRICE THAT THEY CAN
PAY. BUTTRESSED BY SECURITY THAT
ELIMINATES POSSIBLE FAILURE AS A
FACTOR TO BE ACCOUNTED WITH IT
DOES NOT ENTER THE FIELD TO COM?
PETE. BUT Tt) LEAD. IT DOES NOT PLEAD
FOR BUSINESS: IT PRESENTS ITS CLAIMS
THEREFOR. IT HAS NOT STRIVEN TO
BE OF THE BEST. BUT TO BE THE BEST.
lt ls the man who ls Ignorant of the broad foun
latlon on which lt ls built, of the care with which
Its rates have been prepared. Us plans formu?
lated. Its every feature guarded, who will ques?
tion this assertion.
BUSINESS RECEIVED AND WRITTEN.
The business received I.y the Association In
1888 reached the high-water mark in the matter
if number of applications and amount represent?
ed. In 1 H0.r> the number of applications was
24.<M?i; In ISM, 32.A14. or considerably in excess
nf 100 for each business day of the year. The
rimmint represented In 1805 was $i;9.0"_.*?.iH9"?. and
In IM*;. 884, 1117,097. bein- a gain of $l,ri.l4_..10*_.
and being In ?xcess, by several millions, of the
amount received In any previous year of the As?
sociation's existence. As Indicating that the
record has not been made up by recklessness In
the matter of character and quality, I call your
attention to the fact that, while on the 31st day
of December. 1805, are showed 00,287.108 of busi?
ness as rejected, postponed, and still under In?
vestigation, we show to-day $11,141,087, or near?
ly fourteen per cent, of the total business sub?
mitted. This leaves the total business actually
written In 1808 at 80,988 policies, amounting to
I7S.03&880, as against 28*591 policies, amount?
ing to $.r>9.7rV<.7Pn. In 1S05. NOT ONE DOLLAR
OE THE BUSINESS INCLUDED HEREIN
WAS EITHER WRITTEN OR EXAMINED
AFTER THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER.
1888.
BUSINESS IN FORCE.
The result r>r thr? year's operations ls that -.-??
show policies In force to the number of 118,449,
with insurance outstanding to the amount of
8828,028.001, an increase In number of policies
Of 12.571, and of aflfl.SHfi.OOn In Insurance out?
standing, lt may not be out of place to call
your attention to a few facts, showing the length
of time which lt required the four companies
which still show a larger business outstanding
than does the Mutual Reserve to attain the fig- I
tires as regards business in force now shown by
this Association two months prior to the com?
pletion of Ita sixteenth business year.
The largest of these compai.les commenced
business on February 1, 184.1, and on January 1,
ltSS3, at the end of a period of almost exactly
forty years, showed business In force to the
amount of 1828.884.174. The second .wrote Its
first policy April 12. 184*?, and on January 1,
1888. only nine years ago. showed $358,935,538, a
point which lt had taken forty-three yearB to
attain. The third company In point of age be?
gan business November 25. 1858. and on the first
day of January. 1804, juat three years ago, after
having been in business thirty-five years, showed
$325,152,947 st ria*. The fourth and last com?
pany, which hag been a marvel In Ita growth,
commenced business on July 28, 1859. and eleven
years ago. on the first day of January, 1886. at
the end of twenty seven years of energetic man?
agement, reported a business of $',57,338,246.
DEATH CLAIMS.
During the year Just closed there has been,
paid to the widows, orphans and other bene-j
rtclarles af deceased members, the amount of*j
*'l.??7.0H.'t.H4. which swells the total amount;
of benefits so paid during the less than sixteen;
\eara of business of the Mutual Reserve to*
S2K,ti2ft,<j0ft.t?a. The rule as to payment of
death claims announced In my last annual ad?
dress, viz.:?that death Halms are now* paidj
within thirty days of approval, has been rigldlyj
adhered to during the past year, and I am1
pleased to say that, as I then anticipated, thia
change has met with the hearty approval of our!
membership.
THERE WAS A DAY OF SHALL BE*
CUNNINGS, (
when the business of the Association wa* re*,
corded in Items of thousands and tens of thou-'
sands. That gave way to the use of hundreds,
of thousands and occa?lonally a million. To-dayl
we apeak of hundreds of millions as glibly as w*
then spoke of tens of thousands, and to-day tha
Association discharges its enormous trusts wi thi
the same certainty as lt did the smaller trusts!
of a decade ago. The Association has covered;
a broader field; its representatives have crossed
the seas; the benefits it liss brought to sorrow?
ing homes have swelled from the thousands of
the early years until the grand total of nearly
$20,000,ia)0 of death dalma paid has been!
reached. None the less then as now, now aa*
then. Its mission is the same and that mission lsj
to lead?to lead In honest prosecution of the work
lt has to do, to lead in Un power to reach the,'
masses; to lead In Its ability to fulfill tts oblige-'
tlons. It can be satisfied with nothing short ot,
the b*?Bt. AS PRESIDENT. I AM YOUR SER-j
VANT TO HOLD IT AT THE FOREFRONT
THE STRONGEST. THE TRCEST, THE BEST
EXPONENT OF PROTECTIVE LIFE INSUR?
ANCE THAT THE WORLD KNOWS OR CAN,
KNOW, lt must be, as lt ls, represented by the'
truest and best agency force; its official staff
must be one In purpose and tireless in work: ITSJ
MEMBERSHIP MIST BE LOYAL WITH THE}
LOYALTY BORN OF THOROUGH CONFI?
DENCE. It ls at the head of such an Institu?
tion that a ty man may be proud to serve?it la
in confidence that 18911 has done much in carry?
ing us towards this goal of a worthy ambition,
lt ls in confidence that 1897 will do still more lou
the same direction, that I submit to you thin
record of my first complete year of administra?
tion of the affairs of the Mutual Reaerve Fund
Life Association.
of
3
SIXTEENTH ANNUAL STATEMENT
MUTUAL RESERVE FUND LIFE ASSOCIATION.
DECEMBER 31* 1896.
Balance net Cash or Invested Assets, December 31. 1895. 03,067,316.10
INCOME DURING 1896.
Received from members. $5,577,084.05
Received from Interest and other sources. 281,392.92
VO.N2.?, 7f>3.32|
Total Income. ft.88A,476.9T
Total Resources. .
DISBURSEMENTS DURING. 1896.
Dcat h Losses paid. f3.9-17.083.94
Cash Dividends paid to Pollcy-Holders. Tl,80ft80
Advance payments returned. 39093
All other disbursements, Including Commissions. Salaries, Expenses in adjusting death losaes. Advertising,
Printing, Rents, Travelling and offlce Expenses . 1.590,092.23
Total Disbursements. 8.385.417.
Balance ucl Cash or Invested Assets. December 81, 1890. 04,240.878.
GROSS ASSETS.
Loans on Mortgages. First Liens on Rea! Estate . ;. 81.088.10008
Heal Estate, English Consols. French Rentes. Municipal and Government Ronda . 827.22105
Cash Deposits In Banks, on Reserve or Emergency Fund Account . 800.90091
other (.'ash Deposits in Banks . 223.777.61
All ..Hut Assets, accrued Interest, uncollected Premiums, etc.$2,103,715.77
St... lal Reserve voluntarily made to offset anv possible depreciation. 219.235.24 .
' 1.974.480.53 '
3
Total Assets. Bpectsl Reserve deducted . 03,7.aiO,486.19
LIABILITIES.
( >u< standing Bond obligations and unused Advance Deposits. $415,702.18
Losses in process ?f adjustment nnd not due. 927.320.48
.XII oth.r contingent Liabilities, Including Face nf Policy where death loss haa been merely reported (not re?
quired by law io be included In the liabilities) . 380.527..Vt
Total Liabilities. 1.7*10,886.141
-_??
Net Surplus overall Liabilities. Dec. 31. 1890. 04,020,029.96
Net Surplua overall Liabilities, Dec. 31, 1800, naper official statement. 3,882,500.32
Increase In Net Surplus during 1000. 0447,420.641
BUSINESS RECEIVED DURING 1896.
r.2.t.14 Applications submitted, amounting to. $84,167,907.00
Rejected, postponed and under Investigation. 11.141.01)7.00
10,008 Policies written in 1890. amounting to.-73,026,330.00
11H.419 Policies In force. Dec. 31, 1890. amounting to .$825,020,001.00
1II5.H7H Policies in force. Dec. 'll. 1895. amounting to . 308.0SO.371.0l)
12,571 Policies Increase for 1M96. amounting to...,..*. ? . -#16.866,690.644
f I itt

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