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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, May 11, 1897, Image 1

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(jrp*?. LYII..? ???? 1S.440.
NEW YORK, TUESDAY, MAY 11, L897. TWELVE PAGES.
PRICE THREE CENTS.
THE POWERS TO INTERVENE.
?JEKMS OM WHICH PBACI WILL PP. RE
STORED.
A RCTORT FROM VlKNNA THAT TOKMTR WAWTi
$15,000,000 INDEMMH- ???G?????3 H*
flggUO ON Bl OTsMMAMI -THI
???????? OF ORKF.^F.
AthT.?, May M.* Th? Dot? of the Towers has
rot yet b?.? presented, but II has been drawn
pjpl Is to tin-* following ofTtct:
Upon a formal declaration hy Greece that
?he will recall her troops and agree to such an
autonomous r?*-glnie for Crete a" 'he Powers, In
thfir wisdom, shall deem boat, and accept un
issjai ?ailrj the connecta if the Power?, they will
?adertene In the ir.ter.-s?s of peace.
The note will prnlai ?y he pr???. nted tO-mtWTOW,
B,fter the Oerman Minister haa received linai In?
stru?'
It Is understood that Greece, In her reply, will
geeckt to all of thes?? conditions.
The conditi? nt? Insisted upon by Germany, the
chief Of which Is that Greece shrill give her for?
irai conacnl to tlie principle Of autonomy for
Ci?*tc, win be accepte1, by the Greek Govern
t rit.
4:80 p. m.?It la ptnted that the Government
has drafted a note to the Powers, requeetlng
mediation.
?:? p. m. ?11. Palli, the PremW, and If. ikou
loudls, the Minister of P\>reign Affaire, have had
? long Interview thin afternoon with Mr. Eger
ton. th? l.r'rish representative, which has cauaod
c neMetmble comment. It la believed to be con?
nected with the expected Intervention of the
Towers.
The recall of the forces from ( rete hn? been
received wtth resignation hy the public. The j
Delyannls organs attack the Government bit- j
terly for appealing to iiurnpe. but most of the
pepati accept this a? Inevitable?, and violently
attack the Ethnlke Heuirirt, Raking it to render
an account of its notion.
Vienna. May 10.?Il la reported here that Tur?
key's terms of peace with Grece In? indo the
payment of an Indemnity of {3,000,000 ($15,
(>0(',?>*?,. a rearrangement of the Greek frontier,
Th?? annulling of the treaties favoring the
Greeks, the cession of the Greek fleet to Turkey.
a- i the settlement of the Cretan question
i'ans, May ??.?A semi-official communication
was published this afternoon Baying that the
impressi"?! prevails that the peace negotiations
between Greece and Turkey Will not be attended
by greed difficulties, and will aoon heve a satis?
factory issue. The Tower?-, it is further stated,
have already nrrced among themselves upon
the conditions of per.ee. <;? rmany's hesitation
was due to the fact that the Greek Government.
In a circular to Its representatives r.t the courte
of the Powers, did not formally adhere to Cre?
tan autonomy a? demanded by the Powera
Greece subsequently pave the necessary aaaur
- In thla respect, and t!i<? German Minister
at Athens has b. on instructed to support ne?
Uvely i!. efforts of the Powera to conclude
; ?
London. May 10?Apart from tho peace nego,
tlatlons, the principal feature of the situation is
? Turkey la predine reinforcement? forward
;?.?.! preparing for a rapid advance. IThleea the
]' .? i-rs BUCCeed in quickly nrran,{ln?r- a Bettle- ?
ment, the Gi"< ka are iik?-iy to Buffer further die?
sati IS.
The Exchange Telegraph Company announces
thai privat* advices received in London fr m
Constantinople declare thai the Bultan has ex?
preaaed deep sympathy for King George and ti,e ?
?jroek ?3oveminent, whore hainaa, In his opinion, ?
were forced by revolutionary agents at Athens ?
and Alexandria The Aullan, according to these ?
advice?, declines to claim a war it: lemnity, and ?
pr ? ?see a Turko-Greek treaty based upon the
simultaneous evacuation of Thenaaly and Crete. I
Finally, it i= snid that ?be Rultan desires to deal ?
direct with Greci?,? and noi thr< u^h Mie powera.
"The Daily Ifall'a" Berlin correepondent says
it is reported th< G?? thai the King Of Creer,, haa
summoned m. Delyannls, In view of a po
Cabinet crisis.
WANT MEDIATION', BUT k> ??? ASK POP IT.
Tim ????? <,<?yf.kn.m;.nt ova*A-PASnc*v?u?Ji
audit troniee, iroxn sAuanvnT savs.
London, May 10.?The Karl of Klmberley, the
Liberal lcailer In the House of borda to-day
asked whether Greece had announced h?r will?
ingness to,withdraw tier troops from (Tret?, end
whether she had reqoeated the Powera to medi?
ate with Turkey.
The Marquis of Ballebury, In reply, ^nld that "
*he answered In the negative It would be strictly
correct; yet such a reply might be mlaleadlng.
Therefore he would say a word on the subject.
The Greek Government, the Premier explained,
had not ai"ked for mediation, but members of
that Government expresa r desire for mediation.
The Greek Government aa ? whole, he added,
did not intend, to the best of his belief, to ask
m?diation
Regarding Crete, he said, there Is some lndef
initeness in the ? reeeni ; in?.? ? r thlni a The Greek
Government doea not conceive that It would be
tOtMaBtent \?ith us position to promise an Im?
mediate and definite withdrawal of the Greek
troop* from Crete. But the Premier understood,
though the Governa ent had no "ffioinl Informa?
tion on th?? subject, that the Greek Government is
prepared to Fay that it ?'111 withdraw the Greek
troops from Crete in the not very distant future.
Continuing, the Marquis of Ballebury re?
marked :
"1 am sorry to say that, as we stand at pres?
ent, I do not think thi? asmirano.?? is? entirely sat?
lefactory to all the Powera However, J have
only to ansv er for oureeive* and our Instructions
have been in Join In any procedure f? r the pur
?' enti ring upon mediation which is accept?
able to the othera in our view, the main point
?s to arrest, so far aa possible, the effusion of
Mood, and We are not very partii ular about the
i'rins. I regret exceedingly that the Greek Gov?
ernment is more particular about the forms than
the dr imai in ea In the rase Justify.?*
e
VOLO IN ITS NORMAL STATI?:.
??? PEOPLE INDIGNANT AT BEINO DESERTED
HY THI ORBES TRO PS.
Larissa. May 10.?Affaira at Volo are fast as?
suming their normal condition; but the Inhabi?
tants are very Indignant at the way In which
they were d<ver;.d by the Grell* troops, it is
eaid that when the municipal authorities naked
the military commandant ? hat th? y w.-r.? to do
when the Turks arrived, ? replied; "Do what
you l.ke; it's bjo concern of mil ??.??
The ?.reeks nt Altayro ai ?? In a Mate of panic.
The newspaper cerreopundopta with the Greeh
forcei ere subjected t., th? ,, rerest censorship,
General Smolensk! Is highly praised, but the
prevailing r>pinlea is that th?? majority of Greek
officers have had only t),,. smallest practical
training, and ent;r? ly fall t? .i,tr.r,:and the con?
fldence of their inen.
The Gfek (fleet has left Vc*p, y,ut ,n(> 1i?r(.nrh>
Italian ana British guardshi?* remate. A con?
siderable numi?,?, ol the Turkish troop, have
taken up positions ?m the Buifounding heights
the bu.k of tbe Ottoman Arrpy, however, has
sessi wlibdra .?. and la marcbfpi in another di?
rection.
Quantities of arms, ammunition and a number
? *? ?*?*-? eiPtured by the Turks at
??? the heights commanding Paarsaloa ?re bjo?
* . ? the Turks.
Pu:.?,,, ???*?, the Turkish cosamander, ell hin
?.?????.?.a,?, and a number of officer? of ],.v. .?, ,?. ,k
heve been decorated, sad man? of th Turkish
oOcers have been prometed nirgiah
front. arrU?-<l here and pi-led ,? tjll.
m53 ?G'??, V"," ?? ",,!""''? * railroad ma?
nm at the talo railroad stetlon, but were
unable?to? uno the er.KineP. as th
lemovtd the esaentlal ?arta
e Greeks had
.^1lfL1.Y"_.rh nHVn! 'l""t'limen' saluted the Ot?
X .'rY,n ?r?_?f an<l ?h" latter responded.
lh.? Turkish oflcen Complain <?f the nnn
r^istat:.-? of tha Greek*, and declare il is not
war, rmi merely a militar;? promenade
rue opinion is expressed here that Um Oroolta
are avoiding ? seri, u? fleht in order to spare
tneir troops, who may b? needed at Athens
In the event of ? revolution.
Coaatantlnople, May Hi. -Edhem Parha. th" |
Turkish commander In Thessaly, has tele?
graphed from Velcitino to the Ministry of War,
giving details of th.? occupation of Volo hy the
Turkish troops, the Institution of Ottoman ad?
ministration then?, th.? withdrawal of the Greek
Heel from that port and the seizure of large
quantltlea of munitions of war, and has re?
quested that Turkish customs ?tfBcei ? be sent
V * '??? lo Inaure a continuance of business at
that port.
I'? iti'iko. Thessaly. May 1? (1 p. m.)?Up to
'his' hour th?ere has heen hn fighting here lie
tweea the Qreeks and the Turks.
Athms, May 10. A ?lb-patch from Potnnkn
says that the heavy mina there prevent light*
GREEKS ROUTED AT ????????.
an BNOAOKMBNT WITH t?p??t?: hattaMONS of
TI'P.KISII TTlOOl-s?.
Conatantlnople, May 10 -The Turkish com?
mander at Junlna telegraphs that the Oreek
fores nt Kamarlna have been routed hy three
battalions of Turkish troopa, who occupied
?.", ? arina.
Later, the dispatch ndds. the Greeks gathered
in a church on th" heights above th.- village,
whence they Bred on th? Turks, who eventually
took ??-..? church by assault, killing man> of the
Greeka and capturing some prisoners. The re?
mainder of tl-.?? Greeks retired to the brino? of
?.groa Georgia, where they mad.? a determined
-tut .1, Imi were finally routed by the Turks.
-a, -
THI?: RETIRAT FROM PHARSALOe.
A B-CKDEJt HY BOH- ONE- WHY THE CROWN
PIUNCI LEFT UARIMA.
London. May 11.?The Athens correspondent |
of "The I ?ally Chronicle" pays:
"The real and only cause of the Oreek retreat
to Pharsalos was the blunder of one who mis?
took the retreat of the enemy for a forward
movement designed to outflank the Greeks, and
therefore ordered ? hnsty retreat.
"The Grown l'rlnce Constantin left Larissa
because he believed the exasperated reports
of danger to his forces. It is a fact, however,
that on the evening of the retreat Edhem Pacha,
despairing of breaking the Greek lines, had or?
dered his army to retire to Klassona, while the
Sultan had dispatched a special commissioner
to the tireek Government with overtures of
peace. The state of the Turkish Army at that
moment was siniplv pitiful, and terror reigned
at the TlldlS Kiosk."
Mr. Btevens, the special cor respondent of "The
Daily Mall" with the tireek fortes In Thessaly,
declares that the province has been lost through
rank cowardice.
PEOPLE ET.EEIXG FROM THESSALY.
NEARLY THE ENTIRE G???,????? HAfl ??? RM
G?GG?,? IN ??G. MOUNTAINS.
London. MaV 11- The Athens correspondent
nf "The Standard" says that almost the whole
population of Thessaly. numbering o?>?.000, has
fled to the mountains In the west. Refugees
from Volo, Pharsalos and the villages around
Mount Pell?n hr??- been transported to the
islands Sklnthos. ?-?kopeips and ESuheea. Kort y -
flv? thousand r-=fuire.a from villages along the
cast are clamoring for food at Almyro.
???? RT. GEORGE*! LONTRIBUTIOM.
The eontrlbut'.on to the Greek Relief Fund, made
by St ?leorge's Protestant Episcopal Church, ???
Bundajr, was merely an ordinary collection. The
.-.mount was 174 l_
BRUSSELS EXPOSITION OPENED.
KINO LEOPOLD n.F.ASANTLT HK'TCIVriD ItT THK
i'lloWDS.
BrUSSela, May 10,?The Pr';rscl? Kxpisltlon wes
formally opi ned nt 2 o'clock this afternoon In the
, ? - nee < f the Ministers, the lUplomarlc Corps end
the civil and military authorities, Immente crowds
of people were pr?s. tit. M. de M<>t, pr< sldent of
th.? Executive Committee, and If. Nyssens, Min- I
later of Publie Worki, made speecbea The In*
augural cantata araa aune by a choir of l.RTO voices.
King Leopoldi arrived on the ground nt 1:45 p. i
m., accompanied by a large and brilliant suite, and ;
rrade a tour of the exposition. 11?? met with ?
sympathetic reception from the crowds assembled
In tin- main hriii ami gurdena
The cei ?mony of the opening of the exhibition,
?ned from Saturday until to-day on account t
? ?f ili? tragic (lentil of I hi- Duche??? d'Al'-ii?nn, Waa
r? .s; Impoelng. Th.? weather waa uns and In every ?
>? suited for the occasion. Ti.e city is filled with I
???rangera.
VESSELS SUNK IN COLLISION.
MANY MSN BELIEVSD TO BAVI perished near
HELIGOLAND.
Hamburg, May .0. ? diapateh from the Island of
Heligoland announce? that the Dutch steamer Tir
?l'-ne, irr m Cagliari, Island of Hardlnia, f,,r Sto,-k
hotm, has be???, m colllalon with Die Not-weglaa
bark Roadaar. Both ?reaaela are auppoaed to have
foundered. It Is reponed that thirteen men of the
two ? r-ws bava been saved, and that many others
were druwr.ed.
FETE IN HONOR OF BISMARCK.
SE YES TEE V Ml\SES KILLED.
London. May 1".- A terrible axplOSloa has taken
place on the isle ef Man. In the finaef. ?I lead mine.
A -arne number of ml:.? rs wer?? Bjitombed, and I:
now secme oertata that ??-t leaal seventeen have
? aea killed.
BUBONIC PI AGUE INVADES CHIS A.
Pnt!? May 1?\?It !s reported that several ras's
of the buboril'? plairue have I" ? ? dteOO?rered by th*
Tonkin (.mel?is on tue Chinea? fr.mu.-r and Just
within the l.miti.inri.-? of ui. colony. Special pre?
caution? ar?? belBi takes to praveni the ?pread of
r ?,.- dieoai '?
BIBETALLIBTB EN ? BET AIN COLONEL BAT.
London. May 10.-A luncheon was glvm nt the
Rt. Jame? CHtfa to-day In ROBOT of the I'nlte.I
Btatea Ambassador, Colonel John Hay, In order to
.tu,i,le 1,1m to meet in* leading English himetii Mist*.
Mr iim k?-?;iiib?., Kir liavld Harbour, Blr William
llouldsworth, Hanrj R Orenfell, Barclay Powell?
and Kenn while, aecretary of Hi- unii d Btate?
Kmbaai \ were emoni th. present.
EARTHQUAKE ih AUSTRALIA.
Melbourne, sfa? W a ?.-vere Bolsmic disturbance
took place today In Hou.h AilMlrftll.l aivl VI? tuli
Tn?? . boca wai Intermittent? a?"? c??ntloeoi (et
.?????. ? ? ..1 luit,til. a.
AN AFFAIR WHICH <-?__?G> PORTfl A d????G?????
BPSBUH.
Frledrl-hsruh. May 1f).~Three thousand men were I
In line In a torehI le ht pnr.-ule given this evening In |
honor of Prince Plamarck. A heavy rain was fall
ltiK. but In spue of this Prince fHamarck appeared
on the balcony and Witnessed the marcii past. The
crowd then gathered in front of him and listened to
a lulef address bf I?r. aVemler Congratulating him
untili recover?/ from his rece?? maesa, 11, ?pite the
rain, ev.rv'body uncovered when Prln??.? Blsm ir'k
began hi? reply. He changed hi? familiar cap for a
culr-issler's helmet, nnd the Incident was fro? tad
with a storm of cheers. He spoke deliberately and
distinctly, and with much of h!? old ?Igor. He re?
ferred t0 the feel that It was ?tmt fifty year?, ago
when he entered Parttonientary Ufa, and added!
"??ne of th.? advantage? of Itaoomlng old la that
one becomes Indifferent lo hatred, Insult nnd e^.i
iimnv, while one's capacity foe love ??.? good win
Is Increased."
In concluding he expressed his love for ail who
lind done him the honor of the evening, called for
cheers for Hamburg and then left the balcony nn.i
sat In a tent ? r< eti d In lh? part to aitnase the fa?
ther proeeedlnga, Counl Herbert Blamarek, Couat
von Rantsau and Hr. Bchwenlager r.i\?d numer?
ous ?otal token?? on behalf of the Trim e. Every?
body was delighted to sen the veneratile ex-Chan
cellor looking so ?.???1?.
AFTERMATH OF THE F i RIS FIRE.
CARDINAL RICHARD THANKS rr.KSinriVT FACRE?
THK IiriMiR OF 1???7.?*0 fHASl'S ????,??
CN'KNnWN?.
l'ari?, May la?Cardinal Richard, the Archbishop
Of Parte, has written lo President Finire thanking
the Government fir having taken part in the fu
ernl ceremony '?? Saturday at the Cathedra] Of
Notre Dante?, where a requiem mni-s was celebrated
for th" re'ir??,e ,,f the soul? of ih<? ricttsaa of the
Charity li.irinr fire, nnd expressing confidence that
the ceremony will mark an epoch by 'he union of ?
all Fr-nohrnen in their devotion to the country, and
that henceforth ttvre will he no liissemdon t>
separate Ft? neh hi arts united In grief.
Cardinal Mchard'S letter is genorallv regarded as
a reparation for and a disavowal of the |:nprii<lcnee
>?( Pere i>ll!vler, who In his rvrmon nt the requiem
servii,? m the Cathedral of Notre. Dame virtually
declared that the victims of the lire fe',1 as a ?acri?
li lai holocaust In expiation of the ?Ins of the free
thinkers In France. ?
The holly 0f |(U. Comtesse I?uppe has h??en Iden?
tified hy the doctor? among the Ihe unburled bodies
rescued from the tire.
It iva? announced to-dny that Barones? Hlrseh
was the anonymous donor of tho 9:17,500 franc?
itU?Mt) rr*aceived >?>? the eon-mtue,? of the Charity
Basaar. Thia sum, tegetber with the proceeds <.f
tho nrst day's pule, ?.?,???0 frnnrs (ttjttt), mak??? Dp
tini eaact receipta of th,? basaar ?n 1BBB, thus en
ablins the committee to distribu?a .ts tends to
charitable purposes as before, t?,?? Baronesa, it
was added, mude this ?if? in order to commemorate
t..?? anniversary of the death of her husband, which
? "?? urred on Aprii :\, UK
During 'he afternoon, hnwcvr, a senit-ofheial
note was iiMue ? denying that Baronesa Hirsch ?rea
?..? donor "f the money.
London, May 11. The Paria correspondent of "The
Times" say?: 'The Deputier* from the municipal dis?
tricts In tie? quarter "f Ih? Une Jean ?loujon, ate
pi imotlng a subscription Hal for the erection of a
commemorai ment, ar- ., m! reu.Inder of
the Charit* Mazan- fire, in the Place Piangola
Premi? r. feet? rd ij more than three hundred thou?
?and persons visit? d the scene of the disaster, and
? Ireda !hr<w flowers over the high fence which
tbe authorities bave bulli around th* basaar site."
THE QVEEX BACK IX LOXDOX.
AMr.RICAVB TO BJg PlU'.Si-NTI'r* AT HER DRAW
INQ-TtOOM Tu-MORROw?.
I?ondon, May io ijur?en Victoria arrived In ??>?
don to-day in order to hold the drawing-room to?
morrow at Huoklngham Palaci?. Her Majesty was
loudly cheered at the railroad Btation and while
on bar way to the palace.
In the diplomatic circle at the drawing-room to?
morrow the Misses May and Mis? Bessie Davis, of
Washington, will he presented, and In the general
circle Mrs. Leali. Cotton, of New York, and Miss ',
tlilpln, of Philadelphia
LOXDOX OPERA SEA SOX REGIXS.
A RRII.UANT ?G?????, TO ????. EMMA KAMKS
SINO ?N ??FAfPT.'?
I/ondon, May 10.- The ?prlng reason of French
and Italian opera opened this evening nt Covent
(larden with the most flattering prospects. ?Mr.
? Irmi and the new manag-ment will have the same ?
brilliant array of supporters nn brought prosperity ?
under the direction of the late Sir Augustus Harris.
In the crowded audience w?re many of the beat?
knov.-n members of the aristocracy of London. |
among th-mi th? imke and Duchess of Fife, the
Marquis and Marchioness of Londonderry, ti.?? Bar)
and CounteM of Cadogan, and Lady Charles '
Bereaford, Lady Randolph Churchill, liaron and
Lady Rothschild, and Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Mar?
tin. "Faust" was admiral ?) ? p. rf..im-.?, with
l'imma Eamea as Marguerite. She was In splendid
voice and bad a cordial reception.
BRITISH EMISSARIES CAPTO RED,
UgUigMANT HaWUMigOM AND HI3 companions
TRTSONERS OF T1IPJ KOFA TRIBE.
Cape Const Castles Gold Coast. Africa, May 10.?
Official news ha? heen received to the effect ?hat
th? memhers of Lieutenant Henderson's mission
(reported to bara Irisen attacked hy Chief Samory
at Wa. while the Htitleh ofllcer was making treaties
with the ,-hlefs in tlie Hinterland, and concerning
wboea safety the gravest fears wero expressed ?
bara heen Iliade prisoners by tho Sofa tribe. It 1?
lidded that they are In no danger.
BAB0NE88 VOS TVBKBBIM IN DISTRESS.
UHF. REAI.TZEB THF TKOTB AT I.AST AND WANTS
TO HAVE ARNOLD ARRESTED.
San Francisco, May 10?A cable dispatch from
Jennnlne Young, tho 'Barones? vor. Turkhulm." re?
ceived yesterday, says that she has awakened to the
fact that sh?; is the victim of a conspiracy, and that
?lie Is anxious to return to this elty. She 1? at the
Hotel Cecil, In London, and Bald that Arnold, aliaa
Von Turkhelm. Intended to disert her early this
morning. Bhe asked her friends to ?end her euiM
clent money to return here. That she now appre?
ciates fully the duplicity of Turkhelm Is shown by
the siitrgestlnn that step? be taken to effect the ex?
tradition of her husband and compel his return to
this state, whore, it is alleged, h? committed tho
crimes of bis ?my, perjury and conspiracy. The de?
ceived and deeertea woman sent three cablegrams
tO Ban Francisco, all of whi.h w.-re of tlie same
tenor. One was addressed to th? Chief of Police and
read as follows:
"Discovered proof of Delmas*a villany at Hotel
??. London. Turkhelm Intends leaving early to?
morrow. Tell filen.Is. Wish f..r unni. .Hale return.
?o mon.-v. i'ari vou have A r ! ? ? ? ? i. aii.is Von Turk
helm, extradited to Ban Krancisco? ila? valuable
p..per.?; ii Fair case In bla possession. Cable me,
i-ir.? Am? '?'? an Embassy."
Chief 1.s turned tbe meessge over to the wom?
an's attorney, who probably will demand Arnold's
? . ?!??? to-day.
London, May 10.?The correapor.dent of the Asso?
ciated Presa saw the Baronera von Turkbelm, ?n
she It known, to-day, Ha found 1er In a state of
greal mental agitation, in the courea of the later?
vp-w Bhe sld ?
"Owing to mv knowledge of important facta bear?
ing on the Pair will case it became desirable, in
the Interest of certain pare?os, to remove me from
the Scene f action. To ????? this about I was iti?
li . ' ?. or Instigated, to marry the man calling hlm
?elf Karon von Turkhelm. We sailed for England.
During the royase there wer?? repeated attempts
?. poison me with laudanum, when we arrived at
Liverpool ? discovered among ihe effects of the
man calling hlmselt Up ron von Turkhcim certain
panera showing him to ba a detective employed by
BtillweU'B Agency In Ban Francisco. When I
charged him with his duplicity, be admitted I?. We
ci ?;,.? t . London .'?no took rooms at th?? Hotel Cei II,
? To-day he paid the boti ! bill and left me. I Bo
not knoar hla whereabout, ? am pennlloM, and
am obliged to go to a boarding-house.
??The bottle of laudanum used against my ?if?? on
board ship was purchased ot tn?? Joseph Hahn
Company, Bacramonto."
ROCKAFELLOW GUILTY OF BMBEEELEMEST
Wilkesbarre, Pena., May 10.? The sealed verdict
of the Jury In the ease of F. V. RockafeitoW, the
former banker, who was charged with ernietSSle?
nu nt, whs opened In court this morning. Th? de?
fendant waa found guihy. with ? recommendati p
t.. mercy. The Jury had beili out forty-two hours.
I'.CK-kafellow and hlr friends were greatly disap?
pointed, aa they had expected either an acquittal
or s disagn ?ment
TELEGRAPBIC NOTES.
ClnctnnaU, Btajr IO-The body of Marie Flood
wea found in the Ohio River to-da) and identified
by frlenda al the Morgue. Bhe wa? m prominent
Bister of Charity, and eacaped from Mount Adama
Convent over a month it?-?". .Sine?? then search
for her had been asad, everywhera ?rihe was
evidently demented.
D-troit, May 10 Herman Preund, a well-known
merchant of '??troll, woo established "The Pair"
?tore on at on roe ave, committed suicide to-day
i,\ taking poison. He was despondent mer Lisi?
ne?.?? dilli uitle?. He leaves ? family of ten chil?
dren.
Cleveland, afay io. Tlie circuit court to-dav dis?
charged Mr. Post, who was arrested, convicted
? ?entai ed for contempt by Judge Lmhimui ,.f
the Common Pleea Court about six weeks ago.
|>osl bad written an editorial which wa? n ?trlct
ni, ,,n ? mm naettv I? In general, and .Ju.Ik?? Lam
?on'? BBethoda In pattleaiar. Tne m?, |g m,w
dlaunissed.
Monttcello, ? Y . afay io jame? Guy, fourteen
yeara . "f New-York, staying at the St Dom
(tilo Banitarium, near lure, sras drowned In a
l?k. near '?- sanitarium i?st night. Ouy and a
friend were out rowing and the boat capsized
?Pir othrr occupant Of the boat was saved Ten
pound? of dvjainlt? were exploded In the hike
without bringing Guy's body to the Burface
When ?'" overed to-day, the body wa? In ?nag?
and wee Is at IN lak.? bottom.
Souii. Bend, Lei Isay m\ Two masked robben
?.?' ] o'clock thi.?. in ? nine- raneaclceil the house of
the Be? Joseph Flache, the Catholic pri??t nt
Over Ind. The priest and cook wen awakened,
and the robbers used an Iron bar, striking the
??ook "ii it"? head. Inflicting dang?-rou? wound?
Th?? priest attempted to ?hoot, but his revolver
failed to work, and he was roughly hui.il 1
bloodhound* are on the trail.
NEW MOTIVK POWER USED.
ELECTRICITY TKSTKD ON THE NKW
BNGLAND RAILEOAD.
A TRAIN RfN RY THE THIRD RAIL SYSTEM FROM
RERUN, COSTIL, TO HARTI-illin-IMPOR?
TANCE OF THE EXPERIMENT.
Hartford, Conn., May 10 (Special).?The di?
rectors of the New-York, N??w-Haven and Hart?
ford Railroad Comj.any, In conjunction with the
director? of the New-York and New-England
Rallmad Company, to-day began the most Im?
portant experiment ever undertaken hy those
who ballare In the ultimate supremacy of elec?
tricity over steam as a motive power. A train
moved nnd controlled by electricity developed at
a central power-house was run from Rerlln to
Bartford, on a recular schedule between two
traina drawn by Bteatn locomotives, In the ordi?
nary way. The electrically ?quipped train did
not In any way Interfere with the passage of the
train drawn by Inn motives. This Is lm
portant as showing th.it railroads on which
there is a hirer? and constant volume of passen?
ger trafile may be gradually changed from
steam to electricity without any interference
with th?? comforl of passengers.
Though th.? public has not been gener.-'lly
nware of the fact, there bas ?????? a bitter Aghi
on for two yean between the backers of ?lec
trlclty and the future motive power, and the
ba 1;? rs of steam as the most economical power
known. Strange to ?rry, the operators <>f urban
and suburban trolley systems were almoai
unanimous in th.-ir adherence to the advocates
of steam f,,r regular railroad Journeys. It grew
to be a saying In the American Institute of
Electrical Engineers and kindred bodlM during
last winter's discussions that the effective ratiK"
of electricity In railroad service was only six
miles. The advocates of steam trunk linea with
trolley feeders paid, in effect, that a current <>f
electricity could not be kept at a hlKh enough
pressure beyond the six-mile limit to move
trolley-curs without passini? it through a
"booster" or auxiliary dynamo for the n?xt three
miles, and that beyond tho nine-mile limit It
would be neeetspary to transmit the power from
the central power-house as an nltrrrating cur?
rent, to be changed before actual use Into a
direct current by means of a rotary converter.
CURRENT CARRIED A LONG WAY.
Colonel H. H. I ?"ft. the chief electrical en?
gluer of the New-York, New-Haven and Hart?
ford Railroad, demonstrated to-day that a direct
current of electricity can be sent without serious
loss from leakage for a distance of nearly thir?
teen miles; this means a radius of twenty-live
miles from the central power station. Taking In
this case. Berlin, Conn., as the centre, It will be
p. sslble to replace steam locomotives and ?ars
for Hartford, New-Hrltain, Merlden. Waterbury,
Miblletown. Wallingford and other cities of th"
Nutmeg? state, comprising a population of over
200,000 Inhabitants.
The directors of the New-York and New
Haven roa.l have ?rone into this work In earnest,
nnd If the present trini Is successful there is
little doubt that the branches of the New-Haven
r? ad, and ultimately the main line between
New-York and New-Haven, will be equipped
with electricity on the third-rail system Instead
of steam.
The present power-house in Berlin contains
two engines and dynamos directly connected,
capable of being: worked up to 1?.00*?-horsepower
each. This power-house Is only half Its full
size. When the building is complete it will have
six times as much power.
THE THIRD-HAIL SCHEME.
The third rail system, In which the "live"
rail la In tho centre of the track, was adoptad
by C 1-?. (.'lark, president of tho New-Haven
r.-ad, after his experience with the third rail at
Eaat Weymouth, Mass. Mr. Clark made one
great saving In laying the track between Berlin
ami Hartford by deciding that creoaoted wooden
pega were sttllK'I'-ntly DOn-COndUl live to re?
place the expensive Insulators of porcelain and
glase, which had hitherto be.-n employed. The
central rail weighs M pounds to th?; yard. The
conductivity of Iron as compared with copper
Is In proportion of one to six. go that an Iron
rail weighing 98 pounds to the yard would be
eipial to I."1?? pounds of ?opp.t to the yard, an
amount which Ii never usad in actual practice.
The cara are Bfteen-bench open cars, each
equipped with two 1-?">-hots.? power motors, a
controller is on each platform, and on one plat?
form Is an electrical all pump, fur the electric
brake? nnd whistle. This pump Ih stopped and
started by an Ingenious automatic arrangement
which cuit.???? Into play as the pressure in the
tanks rises above or fails below ninety pounds.
The current waa produced at the dynamo at a
preaauee of 600 volts, and six Incandescent lamps
fed In series at an average of 11*? volts burn
brightly at the further end of the line, thirteen
miles from the power-house, showing that the
electrical pressure neceaaary to mera tb...? train
was still more than BUActenl and greatly inure,
than vas expected.
At all crossings and BWltchea this third rail Is
omitted, th.- circuit continuing over two copper
cables, each one Inch In diameter, burled in the
ground. The contact shoe?, which are flat plec.-s
of Iron hung under each truck, are 83 feet apart.
At slmrt <r.'?!sliii<s one Is always In contact; at
crossings wider than 39 feel ? Bh< e bung In the
rear of th?? 11uil'-r car continues in contact until
the first shoe reaches the third rail again.
Th?? distance t" which the power was trans?
mitted and the f.ic that no Intermediate feed?
ers wore used were the chief features of inter?
est to the railroad and electrical experts to?
day. Usually in th.? overhead trolley system
?? .ilers of copper wire k'-ep coming direct from
the dynamos Th.- rond was Opened without
much ceremony. Prealdent Hark came down
In his private car and brought ? number of of*
?leers and directora with him. These were all
transferred to the open mot,.r-car at Herlln and
the Journey over the road began at once. The
thirteen miles were completed In eighteen min?
utes.
?,-a
AN EMBASSY UNDER BU8PICI0N.
BOMB CHIXAMKN whom tmh HEALTH AUTHORI?
Tin WILL KEEP AM KYI?: ON.
Albany, May I???The Secretary of the stm?
Hoard of Health is In raeelpl of a toUanraa, from
I >r. A. T. Watt, superintendent of the Provincial
Board of Health, of Victoria, Brltiah Columbia,
which rends aa follows:
Would advise thai yoil keep under observation
while paaeing through your territory th? members
of the Chine?? Embassy who were on board of
the Empreaa of China, lately in quarantine at
Wtlllamahesd, They left Vancouver Wednesdaj
afternoon, going '" Wew?Yor?t, ria Montreal.
Ti.,, aecr?tary of the Sr.it.? Board haa repeated
th? message to the Hoard of Health In lfew*Tork
Clty, where the party irill eventually land, as ll
will be well niKh Impoaalbl? fo* tb? Rt.ita Hoard
to lind th? Bmbaasy OB th? way. The secretary Is
Of the opinion that none of the Embassy le af?
fli, t.?.? with a contagious disease, bfcaua? If they
w. re they would not have been allowed to leave
Vancouver In view of tin? fact, however, that
there wa? dl ? ?.->? on lh? ?teamahlp which brought
the party to this country, it i? deemed advisable
to keep then under obatnrattoa.
lir. Crsorg? 1? Fowler, the Health ?"ornmlssloner,
?aid to a Tribune reporter last eight that h,? in,?
r.celve.l instructions to koev u watch on the mem
i.er?. of Um Chinea? Bmbaasy. which is now on the
way to this city. II?? add ad thai 'lie tu.-niber?? of
the Embassy were n.'tn?; carefully watched while
they Were on their way b? thai eity, and that they
would not be lost sluht of by the health oflcarfl
durlng their atay liar?. Thli action would he fol?
lowed m a matter of precaution. He ?nld it waa
the belief of the henith "til. lai? at Vancouver that
?ne of th?? attendants of th? Umbaus-, had had a
rontagtou? dlaeaao. No steps h? laid, would im
takm u? fumigate th? baargag? of lb? Bsesabers of
ili.? party. _
I SLUCKY I SE OF THE Foot AS A BRAKE.
y,i,idi"ti.?ti. N. v.. ? ?) i" James Kennedy,
whii?? btcyehag down ? hin al flash sa ????^arday,
pi ?.?ad hl? foot betw*??-n tin? forks to set a? m brake
i.n.i was thrown heavily to the ?round ill? skull
wa? fiactured, and It la expected that he will dio.
TO VISIT BEHRING SEA AGAIN.
PRBSIDBNT JORDAN ACCEPTS AX AP?
POINTMENT AS COMMISSIONKR.
lit: AND Hlfl roi.I.K.XGL'ES WILL ONCE MORE IN
VTaarnOATB the C&efOnuym ov thk seal
HERD-SlRPRISE CAt'SEU BT THE
nniTisH expert a report
Washington, May 1?.?Charles 8. Hamlin, formerly
Assistant Becretary of the Trearury and now em?
ployed hy the Government a? assistant counsel In
ih?? pr tiding negotiation? with Great Britain rela?
tive to the seal fisheries, has return?d from Call?
forala, where h ? went to confer with President
Jordan, of Leland 8tanfonl I'nlverslty. Tresld. nt
Jordan spent a j.nrt of last season on the Seal
Island.? as commissioner In charge of the Investi?
gations, nnd Mr. Ilamiin's ml'slon was to secure If
possible the aeeepfnnce by I'resldent Jordan of a
similar commission for the coming season, and hI?o
to discuss the ?cope of tills year's Investigation.
Mr. Jordan his agreed to undertake the wor'?. and.
in company with Professors Stejneger anil Lueaa, of
the I'nited States National Museum, the other mem?
bers of th,? commission, Joseph Murray, ef Color?
ado, and Mr. Morton, of Indiana special agents of
the Treasury Department, will ?ail for the I'rlby
loff Islands about June I, Th- Instru? lions to the
CommlMlOnera are now In preparation and will be
completed lr? a few daya it ?- Bald that th.y will not
diff'-r in any important particular from those ?riven
? year ago Th.? practice of branding the female
pupa begun last year, will I?? continued
The report of the British commission, which prose?
cuted ?is Investigation on th" Islands m conjunc?
tion with tin? United states commission, has
reach*?! the state D?partagent, ani although the
Officiala decline to di?cuss It. there I- no doubt that
they were somewhat surprised at the conclusions
reached. It had been confidently assured that the
commission could not avoid the frank statem?it
that under existing conditions the seal herds wer.?
In Imminent danger of annihilation, but !t does not
<lo so. The report, however. Is not entirely disap?
pointing, as Mr. Thompson admit? that the ?Jtui
tlon demands prudent management to prevent
depletion of the h'Tds.
Mr. Thompson, in rinsing v.s report to the Brit?
ish authorities, says: "Tl.? alarming statements to
which utterance has been given in re-ent years,
the accounts of the hi rd s Immediate decrease and
the piT.i.he.'i??- of Ita ipproaehlns extinction, are
overdrawn and untenable. Mut it Is my duty .to
state tn Your I,ordship that there Is still abundant
ne ?! for ear, and fur prudent measures of con?
servation In the Interests of all. A birth rate which
we estimated at 113.000 per annum is not great in
comparison with the drain upon the stock. From
one cans.? or another, a 1 l.ss of over twenty thou?
sand Is experienced among the pups era they emi?
grate to Bea, and, though 111?? dangers th?>y there
ncounter are unknown to us. we paaj lake it for
certain that the risks they run are great nnd the
Iosa they endure considerable, When to tlie meas?
ured loss in infancy and to rhe unmeasured loss
In youth arid ??? we add th? toll taken oil the
islands and the toll taken In tlie pea. It is not dif?
ficult to heller?! that the margin of safety is a nar?
row one if It be not already In some measure over?
stepped. We may hope for a perpetuation of the
present numbers; we cannot count upon an In?
crease. And It is my earnest hope that a recogni?
tion of mutual interests and ? regard for the com?
mon advantage may suggest measures of prudence
whl?h sha!! keep the niirsulr anil slaughter of the,
nlmal Within due nnd dednlte bounds "
SUICIDE OF A CHEMIST,
PR WILLIAM MOULIN TAKKS POISON in HIS
ROOM.
wni'nm Moulin, a chemist, engineer and Inventor,
was found dead In his room on the second floor of
the boarding-house nt No. 1?! West Tw??nty-'hlrd-st..
about 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Op a dresser
was found an emptied bottle, which had contained
hydrocyanlte, and another, three-rjuarters full, of
chloral hydrate.
Dr. Moulin wh? last seen alive Sunday night. A
servant saw nlm as sh? passed hi? room Tne sime
servant discovered him dead at 2 o'clock yesterday
afternoon, when she entered his room. In the pocket
of his coat was a letter, asking that his body he
taken to an undertaker should any fatal accident
befall him, and that the sealed letter? In his pock?
ets l>e sent to the persons to wliom they were ad?
dressed. The letter asked that A. G. Hartman. No.
fil Wllllam-st.. and J. 11. gpaldlng. No. 19 i'.irk
IMnee, be informe 1.
There wa? also (lowed a copy of a letter dated
April ?, asking Harold Blnney, Room No. USB, No. 81
Nassau-St., to visit him and Inspect an invention of
his which he called "chrome steel." With this was
found a note from Blnney. nsklnar Moulin to call
at his office to see a client who would Invest In the
Invention.
Pr. Moulin had an offl M in Liberty-??., and was
connected with "The St??. I and Iron Journal," which
Is published In Jersey I'ltv.
According to A. fr. Hartman, who wa? Infornvl
of the ni..n's .??at.??, Moulin was one of the beat
metallurgical engineers in this cmintry, and acted
as chemist for the company taat ounufactureB what
l? known as Harveylsed steel Mr. Hartman de?
clared that had Moulin been willing t? leave the city
m? could have earned a large salary, it ?? thought
that re,-,?nt business trouble, were the motive for the
suicide.
AI.DRIDGE REG 1X8 TO SAVE.
THE NEW MASTER OF TUR CAPITOL CDTB 0??
$SO,000 A YE\R IM SALARIES.
Albany, May 10. -George W. Aldrldge, Superin?
tendent of Publio Works, who hns taken charge of
the completion of the Capitol and who supersedes
the Capitol Commission, began the work of re?
trenchment to-dny by discharging all of the per?
sons who served as clerks under the Commission
The Superintendent thus cuts off In salaries some?
thing like $??0.000 a year.
PRPSIDEST8 VISIT TO PHILADELPHIA.
HE 13 TO REVIEW THE ??????? AND SFBUK
AT THF. WASHINGTON ???G????
UKVEILINO.
Washington, May M Arrangement* In outline
were practically completed to-day fur the presi?
dent's visit to Philadelphia on the occasion of the
unveiling of the Washington Monument. The Pre?
Ident, accompanied by his secretary, Mr. l'orter;
the Vlce-Presldent and his party, and all the mem?
ber a of the Cabinet, w?n leave here at ? o'clock on
Friday afternoon over the Pennsylvania Railroad
The President's party probably will ?tay at the
Walton Hoi'?!, and that of the Vice-President at
the Continental. At 6::??? o'clock the Prealdenl vni
dine Informally with >ome of th?? officers of the
G???? I.e.igu?? Club. At 9 o'clock he will give a
public reception. Baturday forenoon he will re
vlew the parade, and al ? o'clock he win deltrer
an address on th'? monument grounds. This is
tlie only speech he will make during his stay. The
president will leave Philadelphia at 7 o'clock
Baturday evening for Washington.
? - - ?
WATSON COUNSEL IX A Ml RDER CASE.
A TRIAI. INVOI.VIMi PROMINENT CJEORiJIA FA??
ILin BMTJJI AT I.A C.RANOE.
Atlanta, Ca.. May II -Special?.? Thomas K. Wat?
son, lately fopulist candidate for Vlcc-l'r? stder.r,
appeared et La ?.ranee to-day as leading counsel
for the defence In a murder trial which Involves
two of the maist prominent families In C-orgia ?,??
la likely to agitate the entire Sinte before it |? fin?
ished The defendant Is Douglass Cooper, a m?m
ber "f one of the leading families of i.a Orange
un December -? Vttt, he shot and Instantly killed
Claud Dunaon, s ssombar of a family equally prom?
inent The young men w re ?he best of friends
Coop, r became Involved In a dltflculty with a n< gro
and .Ir.w lim pistol. Imnson Interfered In the ra?
paelty of peacemaker, and was shot through the
head, c.'op.r then escaped Into the woods, but re?
turned the sam?? night and surrendered to the
Sheriff When the ??ase was called to-day the
courthouse wa? packed.
The 'as.? is being proaeeuted for the State by
Solicitor Thomas ?\ Atkinson, brother of ?Joveroor
Atkinson, Chart??? I? Hill, son of the lata gei '? r
Benjamin H Hill, and I.ongl.y & Long-ley. Wat?
son i? conducting th. defence, asafstad by four
well-known lawyers
DIV0 BBFOEB Hi XDREDs of BPECTATOES
Chleesje, M?') It, A doubla fatality occurred la?t
evening bifore hundred? of sp,?- lators In Lin.-ot?
Park. While boating on Lake Michigan. Matthews
lt.. he and hi? ten-year-old nephew, Harry Klynn
mt.nipt-i te ssahenga sesta The boat eras over?
turned and the boy dreamed, attheajgh Rech, twki
? ??',?? .'?-?.? in pulling the little fellow so lop ol th?
capsized craft wiiiie thi? waa going on, Aib??r;
M.iii.ill, who wa? In the crowd Bt the water's edge.
BUddeniy pitched forward on his face, dead HI.?
death I? ascribed to excitement canned by watch
Ins the su -???,.???? of th? drowning boy.
HALE REPLIES TO MORGAN.
A CALM AND TEMPERATE REVIEW OF
THE SITIATIO.V IN* CURA.
THE MALVE PRNATOR G??????? THAT THB
FATS DO NOT WARRANT INTEKFF.nKVE
BY THIS eOUMIatf SI'HH-URS HV
MKSSHS WHITE ANfi TIRTIE.
Washington, May 10?Mr. Morgan'? Cuban
resolution was discussed at considerable length
M the Senate to-day. Mr. Hale, of Maine, and
Mr. White, of California, spoke against the reso?
lution, while Mr. Turp'e, of Indiana, supported
It. The speeches were In the main calm and
dispassionate reviews of the situation In Cuba.
Mr. Merrill will speak to-morrow, and there la
some prospect that a vote may be reached on
Mr Hale?? motion to r-f.-r the resolution to the
Committee on Foreign R'-!at|on.,
Mr. Ha!?? .?aid ther.? would always be g genuine
nnd heartf.lt sympathy throughout this country
for every strugge In behalf of human liberty.
? This sympathy could not be the exclusive prop.
' erty of any Senator or body Of Senators, for It
? was universal. Hut not .very revolt la in the _|
roetiOB of human liberty, and before invoking
? his sympathy the tmctm must be calmly reviewed
? tO M4 If they warranted action.
He pointed out that the peeling resolution
came from n<> esecutive offl <t, no < ??t.rtulttee,
, no sub-cotnmltt.-. It had Its root and blrth
1 place In the mind of the geagtOf ItOM Alabama.
He did not doubt the ?.In.erlty of thar IpQnatOT.
who was ready no doubt to follow the resolution
to Its logical resulrs, even although its adoption
bhould ba followed by the withdrawal of th?
.'pnnlsh Minister from Washington, the termina
? tlon of relations between the United State and
Spelt?, and the pttaatl le segnai of bttigttlltlog The
Senator was no more alarmed by th? spectacle
Of the drawn sword than he was a year ago.
PRKSIDK.VT M'KIVI.MVS ATTITUDE I'HAI.SKD.
Mr. Hale reviewed the Cuban policy of Presi?
dent Cleveland and Secretary (?iiiey. It was a
conservative and peaceful policy, he said. H?
then read from the message ef l-tesMant McKIn
i ley relative to foreign relations. It showed, Mr.
Hale said, that the President was not for mixing
In the affairs of ?Ore|_n governments. H? was
not for war. but for peace, although he would
' abate nothing In upholding the right? of an
American citizen threatened abroad. The words
Of the President were a happy augury for con?
servative action on this and all other foreign
questions.
Few real American? wer? imfrlsored in Cuba.
The information of the St\te Department some
time since disclosed that there were not more
than twelve. He had never heard of a genuine
Yankee being among them. They ? ?re all San
gully? or Delgados or Radar* Turning to hie
associates, Mr Hale said that no one ever heard
of a Hurrows or a Smith OT a Frye as a victim
of one of thi'se alleged outragea. T?tere ?a? not
a genuine Morgan among them. The real mo?
tive for the resolution was shown In the recent
statement of Mr. Morgan that its [tgggggj would
prevent Spain fiom making a loan, and thus
stop her from putting ?low.? ihe insurrection.
Mr. Calling.?!? dissented from this statement,
saying that the question of a loan was only
one ground on which th?? friends of Cul a had
favored the recognition of Cuban be'Ugcrancy.
There were, he said, other and higher grounds.
Mr. Morgan also dissented, saying that the
resolution was predicated on a number of
grounds, and that ? Spanish loan was referred
to only to show that delay was danger?"us.
NO REAL DEMAND FOR ACTION.
Proceeding. Mr. Hale said that the President
should be left unhampered to pursue the In?
vestigation he had entered upon, and It would
be unwise to embarrass him by ? r'-s- lutlon re
?inlrlng approval or a veto. Th- country did not
ask such action. If there wa.-, .1 r-al sentiment
throughout the country, hundr.-ds of v-terana
would spring to anus. Hut. -n the contrary,
six thousand had started to all Greece in her
struggle where one had not?- to Cuba. Mr.
Hale ci.-isej with a motion to refer the i-solutiun
to the Gommiti.?? foreign Retati oa,
Th.? Cuban resolution waa laid Salde tempo?
rarily to allow Mi?. V"St to Bei ??? agreement
to a resolution directing the Committee on Com*
m?-rce to ln<inire int.. th?? eaiUBM "f the recent
floods In the Mississippi Riv-r, and report to the
Senate next December.
Th- consideration of the Cuban resolution was
resumed, and Mr. Turpi?, <>f Indiana, spoke In
support of it. He Mid that the sympathy of
the peopl? of thla country .vas unlveraal in be?
half of the struggling Cubans, but it ?as time
now to give this sympathy official expression.
Practically the present war of Independence was
In Its thirteenth year, the first priod of th?
war having last d ten years. When th? terms
of tbe temporary truce were violated then this
second period of the siime war for indep.-ndene?,
broke out. No government, monarchical or
otherwise, had succeeded In subjugating a nation
which had made up Its mind to be free and to
throw off oppression. "D Is the ag.? of revolu?
tion.'' Mr. Turpi?? exclaimed, "and I hope that
it mav last long enough to drive the last rem?
nant of monarchy from the American conti?
nent "
THK IXQIIRV IN THK Rl'IZ CAM
Mr. Turpi?? then took UP Mr. Rale's p'.ea that
th" Presiden? should be lefl unhampered to pur?
sue his Influirles. "How can the Pr.-sld-?nt learft
anything we do not know?" he ask?d. The
President's special commissioner waa limited In
his Inquiry to the Ruiz cage. We might a? well
?end a special commissioner to Athens to fln?T
OUt whether war exists ?Mtween Turkey and
Creece aa to seek further Information aa to
Cuba.
At 2 o'clock Mr Gear, of Iowa, interrupted to
give notice that he WOUld move tO-moCTOW to
take up the Senate bill for the settlement of
claims growing OUt of bonds to aid In 'he con?
struction Of th? Central Pacific and Western
Pacific railroads.
Referring to the reports that another Spanish
loan was being negotiated. Mr. Turple said:
? Spain is now on its last legs financially. Shall
we fill up her treasury ' Are we charged with
supporting ar.d maintaining the Spanish crediti
Is it our duty to support the armies and navie?
of Spain on land and sea In h? r vain efforts to
subject 'he patriots of Cuba once more to the
oppression of the Spanish yoke" I think not.
But the Senator from Maine ?ays that if we pasa
th.? resolution the Spanish Minister will ask for
his passports, break off diplomatie relations, nnd
go born.- I d.? not attach Importance to that
conaequenea." He admired the enthusiasm if
not the discretion Of the man who went forth to
light the battle of llb.-rty. bul It was a eettotm
Question whether the I'nited States Government
Should follow ar.d protect Its cltlze?-?, th? world
over when they went to foment revolt against
countries with which it was at peace
Mr Morrill gave notice that he would speak
on the resolution tO-mOTTWW. The r?solution was
then laid aside, and th?? Senate at 1:10 p. ni.
went Into executivi- session, an.l shortly after?
ward adjourned.
DKNIKD RY THE STATI?: DKPARTMFNT.
THK IlfMOR THAT IMl'ORTANT SK'RKT NK..???TI,1_
nOm ARK PRtb'KFiniNO WITH SPAIN DB
Cl.ARKl? T>> BK l'NKi?! ????
Washington. May ??. The report that ?erret ne
?.'iittalions of ar?-nt Imperi:.tic.? are bSBBg carried on
between Spnln nnd the liilud rtt;:?.??* iti renard to
Cuba 1? denied at the St.tie I>.varun? nt.
? WOMAN'S FATEFUL LEAP.
THK WIFE OF AS F.X MAYOR OF VANCorVKR IIAB
HER KKET C IT ?'FF HY A RAILROAD TRAIN.
Iludaon. to. Y.. May 10.-Mrs. David Oppenheim,
wife of an ex-Mayor of Vancouver, H. C, la In the
hospital here with both feet cut off. She wai on
th? way tO Philadelphia to be trente.! by a spec|i|
i?t for a nervou-? .Ilx.usc, timi 181 ?.?? .?mpanlag
by h? r husband and a BUTM They occupied a
.um cm? m .?nt in ? Wagner ??.r on th? New-Tern
? vtitr.l Railroad Barlj t.??lav. whea th?? train
was a few mile? above Iludaon. Mrs. Oppenheim
(luna heraelf out of the car window The wheels
cut off both her feet. Amputation of both lega will
be neceaaary.

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