OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, May 21, 1897, Image 1

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1897-05-21/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

??-?0???
Vou LVn?-S* 18,450.
NBWYOBK FRIDAY, MAY 21, 1897. TWELVE PAGES.
PRICE THREE CENTS.
XWO BANKS CONSOLIDATED.
NATIONAL CITY TO ABsORB THE THIRD
NATIONAL'S BUSINESS.
JAMT.* STtLLMAN TO RRMAIN PRESIDENT AND
A. R HFPHPRN TO BECOME VICE PRESI?
DENT? REASONS FOR THF. PNION.
Of much lntere?t to men lr. Nevr-York financial
?Jrc'c? and to many other? frill be the an
r.r.:: oment that the Third Nation?! Bank, at
?Cassati ar.d Cedar st?., ami tha National City
Bank, at No. G.2 Wall-nt.. have been consoli?
dated and that the business of th.? Third Na?
tional Is to be absorbed b> the National City
Pnrk. The announcement ?vas n"t made until
ifter the ckraa of business In Wall Street yester?
day, and It t??? be BOI*priatng BOWS to many
bankers this mornine-. fr>r the negotiations look
In?: to tbe consolidation of the two bank? had
been kept s?eret until their rompi, tlon, for ob?
vious bualnaaa reas ins.
?? 8004) as the arrai-grement* for winding up
th- 1 ualnaaa of the Third Nati,ma'. Hank can be
0 n plated that bank will go out of existence,
ar.d its depoaltora Will transact their business nt
Bet ?Nat! nal City Bank In W?U1-at .lames
ItJUman is to remain president of the National
City Bank, and A. P. Hepburn, Ihe president of
the Third National Bank. Is to be the vice
president of the National City P.ank.
It Is most unusual for two large, Influential and
solvent banks to consolidate. While the Third
National Bank has been doing a gooil busines?
And is entirely solvent, as shown by Its sworn
PHI \*W / i
V % ? / //
A_ ?. HF.PBVRN.
To be Vlce-Presldent of the National City Bank.
statement of May 14. the depressed condition of
business generally throughout the country In?
fluenced the directors and shareholders of the
hank to seek consolidation with another strong
? ank. The cost of operation under consolida?
tion, it was said, would be less, and there were
other ways in which the directors thought con?
solidation would benefit the interests of the
shareholders and depositors. Meetings of the
Boarda of Directors of both banks were held
yesterday afternoon, and attorneys for the banks
?Irew up the articles of agreement to consol'.?
?late, which were signed. In the evening the
presidents of the two banks made formal state?
menta about the consolidation.
MR. HSFBURN'I STATEMENT.
A. P. Hepburn the former Controller of the
Currency, who has been long and favorably
known in banking circles, made the following
atatemsaiti
Representatives of the Third National Bank of
;. and the Nation?] City Bank aavlni con
ited ?o agreement tur the c?>i,s,.,;jdailon of the
l?:.?!!,?-...?. of the ?-a o tja:,A.>, the iiu<.:i ot Directora o?
lh?? Third National lUnk, by a unanimous Vote, to?
on and ree nimen.ied ?.o the stock
lioiders the conflrmstlon of tii?? agreement,
.? Th;rd Nsiiunal Bank, by a
more than tero-thlrda \<??..?, ratified tins a.-tion and
? .,;?:?: all :, ? ? ry | , rltj upon the Hoard
"' ? . ra and officers ol the batiK to fully con?
summate the ?am. in consid?ration of th?. trans?
fer of the bnslnesa ?.,.' the Third National, the Na?
il City has aareed t. pay in full all diposUois
?.: the Third National Ba?a, to receive their ?.c
tounta and ace >rd to them the -am.? t rest ment and
?.,?..-.d? nati "t"i ? 1 ? ' ived.
The Wat ??:?. City I? one of the oldest and stronK
eel bonk.' country, na\liij; a capital of n.O?O.
i... ,. iu ? ? llvlded profit? of ?,???,???, und
?line ?? ?J - more than tw.000.000
The cual er? of thi i National have cause
foi ? ?' placed Wi'h BfOll ? de
. ? - A branche? of business ihrough
oui th< ro .? try 1 en much depressed for sev?
eral ) ? -' Pe? ?:???? have been compelled to
. y. ??. noel ? ? notny uni tr, ?dopi ami
practice all av: liable m< it ? ol retr< :i"hment. What
appliea to i isinesa generali)' applies srlth equal
io the business ?if hanking and wh> we nave
.?.-.? and valuabl? clientage und profit?
ti ?Ini icing ove 112.000 -
lay, yet, ?? ? ar at the prevalent buslneea
,ns and the evident economies of ?on?o:id,ited
."?ment, th? "f the Third National
a??? conssdeni th.??? th? y have best served the Inter
: their ' m >rs and all intere.?!?. l,y effecl
Mr. Chapl ? r. and I. ns president, under
Irectlon of the re? I itton of our Hoard, have
?r^f I s letter 1 each ? ustomer of the liank. in
<: rslni thi? n? 'ion and urging th'-m to con
???-t to thi " fei at their accounts to the Na
ti<-nal City. W? tee] confident they wi'.l do this
v. ? practical 'inanimlty. for it Is certainly to their
a'vfmtaize to do ?o
????G??'????'? OF MR STIM.MAN.
T'r. sident Stillman, of the National City Bank,
said:
The gentleaaen mtereeted in th? Third National
F:*:k were snxlous to effeci s consolidation of their
% nee? wi:h that of the Nations! f*lty Bank Th?
? ini irei U ?? Ihe addition of a very
large smounl ol vai labi? i. islnesa ?rhleh, of course,
ray? desirable Th?? volume of business done
i\ ? -.Ik avlng ? large line of deposit? may be
rre.i:ly Incn ised without much addition to the labor
<'. managin? ?
Our object s ?? two?o.d: first, to secure the hu-l
?<??.? ,< - : national, and. second, that we
t hi Mr Hi :?'? im ass ? ? ite 1 ?rflTh ni in the
c of our bank We have agreed to take
?>r ???ta of the Third National, to pay their
? full, and have addressed s letter to
. ' ? Ulna the transfer of tb?? buslnesa
*.Vr? .... much -rriool a) ?.Ing the service? of
A. R. Hepburn. I I ' dem of tho Third
N'rv o-.nl ;.nd a former Controller of the r*nrr?nev.
Mia Ions snklng e> ? ? ? ? ? I ?? ? '' known finan?
cia1 ability ? ? ??'" ici ? lire?? additional
business of the m li "'ter
*?'? ' ?? ? ? to ? ? ' irmer euetomerS of the
Third Hi nal th' nelderstlon that they
ha?re beri lofore ? .... >,-.nj<?.
?VCCUM of Tin-: T'HT'.smEVT.
Mr Stlllmsn ha? been president of the ftp..
tfonal City Rank f? r only a few y?at?. but his
tx reaa baa ? id? htm irorolnenl among the
bank presidenti ? ' tl ? Ity, Hla father ama a
ffiend of Ine lat" .M"s??? Taylor, who did much tn
build up Hi* bnalneaa of the bark, and be had
? en a dir?? -tor of tbe bank for aevi ral years be?
f re be area Induced ; take :h?? office of proal?
?cnt, He la ahm engaged In I'm cotton buarkteaa
a? .no. 22 William-ai The other directora of
the National CltJ Hank ??? Sanili??! Sloan, presi*
?? ? ? tin Delaware Lackawani m and \?? at? rn
Railroad Con pany; Lawrence Tvrnure, of I?aw
reex <? Turnur?? ? c>>.. No "u U'.ill-st.; RooeWell
? i: latoi :t ildenl of the Panner?' Loan arni
Trust Company; Cleveland Hi Dodge, of Phetpe,
??'??? & r,,. Va n ?'liff-Mt.: Henry A C. TuV
pr, \' .-,?_? W'liist : William Rockefeller, preel
?ni of the Standard ??? Compaui|r; w. \Vait?>r
m bb, third vlce-pr? sid'-nt of the New-Teeh ''en?
trai pr.d Huttaoai River RoJtrond Compnny: Ftan
? H liman, ut ftecoa & ?a, Ho. 83 rmnklln
??. at Taylm Pyna, Ha ~>2 Waiim ; William
?Hiaias 8loane, of w. ??;? j, gloane. ?a 884
?roadway, ? i?J Rn ,. n Baoon, "f J. P. Morgan
iCa, Ho 23 Wi-.ii m.
Report of thk NATIONAL ?itv bank
The official report "f the HatkMMl City Hank
( Olitili mil ou ?,,-?. ??? il, l'imi?.
THE ARMISTICE SIGNED.
THERE IS TO RE XO MORE FIOHTIXC,
FOR SEVENTEEN DAYS.
? ??????G? ZONE nKTWKKN? THE ARMIES OP !
GREECE AND TTRKRY?REPORTS AS TO
FtRTHER ????a??????.?? AND
TERMS OP PEACE.
Athene. May 20 ?An armistice between the
Turkish and Oreek troops In Tliess.-vly, to ex?
tend over a period of seventeen days, was for
mnlly concluded to-day.
Constantinople. May 20.? An armistice was
formally concluded to-day for seventeen days
between the Turkish and Oreek troops ,on the
frontiers ?if Eplrus.
The armistice is general, and Includes the
Land and sea forces of both combatants.
The Ambassadors of the Powe-s met this after?
noon to consider t'.i" terms of pro????.
Although it is not definitely derided, it Is
tii? ught the peace negotiations will ho conduct?
ed between Turkey and Creer? direct and that
afterward, following the precedent of tho treaty
of St. Stefano, the terms will he submitted to
a European conference, which will probabl*/
meet at Paris.
London. May 21.?The armistice agreement
stipulates that a mixed commission of officers of
superior rank shall '--tabllsh a neutral BOM
bel ween the two armies and that no advance on
cither flank ?hull be permitted. It la understood
lhat Turkey wants the commission to be con?
st it uteri of the forelga military atta, h'-s with
ihe two armies.
Tho Crown Prince Constantin, It Is said, sent
a personal appeal ro the Czar not to allow the
Greek Army to be ?-rushed by a fon-e four times
greater than itself, and that, as a cunseqm-noe,
the Czar insisted on the armistice.
The nu?netous suggestions as to the condi?
tions of peace now coming in from all quar?
ters may be dismissed, for the most part, aa
untrns worthy, it is probable that a majority
are prompted from Constantinople, with the
idea of sounding th? Powers. In all likelihood
the negotiation.? wlil be protracted.
Ihe Rom.? correspondent of "The Daily Mail"
says he learns on unquestionable authority that
the Powers hav?? agreed upon the chief condi
tknsof peace, namely, indemnity to th?? amount
of t.i.OOo.tXVl. guaranteed by a control of the
Orook customs, and th? rectification of the fron?
tier, details as to which have not yet been se;
tl Hi'.
TCRKTSH TROOPS ORT'MBLE.
THET ARE DISPLEASE;) AT THE CESSATION Op
HOSTILITIES.
London. May 21.?Tb?? correspondent of "The
Standard" at Constantinople says:
"The armistice has caused widespread dis?
content among the Turkish troops in Thessaly
and Epirus. ami the Military Commission has or?
dered the most prominent grumblers to be sent
home under escort. The ptiests who are with
tho army have been Instructed to preach special
sermons exhorting the soldiery to be loyal and
obedient.
"An Imperial order prohibits the sale of draw?
ings, photographs or poetry dealing with the
war or with the exploiis of tho commanders, the
object of the prohibition helng to prevent any
Individual general becoming a popular hero."
-F
CONSTANTIN LAST TO RETREAT.
niS ENSIVCESSFIL EFFORTS TO RALLT THE
FLEf IN?? TROOPS.
I/ondon, May 21.?"The Times's" correspondent
at Athene says: "When the Crown Prince ar?
rived at I.amia he had been practically aban?
doned by his army. Colonel MaMrapas and his
division had already quited the town, directing
their flight toward Alamana, Molo and Ata
lantl. After vainly trying to collect the rem?
nants of his army at I.amia, the Crown Prince
with his staff went to Alamana, where another
attempt was made to rally the fugitive troops.
Rut this was only partly successful, and during
the whole of Tuesday Lamia lay deeerted and
at the mercy of the Turks, who, however, made
no attempt to occupy it "
RAI.LI TALKS AROPT TERMS.
WILLLNii TO PAY AN INDEMNITY. RITT NOT TO
GIVE OP TERRITORY.
Athens, May 20.?M. Rail!, the Premier; in an
interview to-day, said:
"The indemnity which Greece will pay Turkey
will be in proportion to the resources of Oreeco
and her financial position. The cession of terri?
tory is out of the question.
"Greece cannot accept a modification of the
strategic frontier, which would render easy the
? aiding of Greek territory by armed bands and
which would compel Greece to maintain a nu?
merous army in order to prevent such Incur?
sions."
-?
FP?XOR FRATTI ?? ?? KILLER
London, May M,? According to a special dispatch
Tmomivott Y,fTf from Rom?, Siernor Emit!, th? Italian
DepntJT who was reported to hav? been killed while
fiKhtlng with the It?Nan volunteers agnina*, the
Turks, is not dead. A dispatch, it Is announced.
haa be*m received in Roes? from th* Duk? of
Averna, the Italian Minister at Athens, denying
the report of Frattl's deatii, and It I? added thai
th? Deputy lias telegraphed to hli sistei saying
that ho fought iipatnst the Turks at Domoko. bat
was not oven wound*?!.
Athens, May 20. Signor Hprlanl, the Italian So?
cialist who bended tbe flret detnebment of Italian
volunteers whi'-h crossed the i.roek frontier Into
Macedonia, and who subsequently disbanded his
followers, h;?s landed here. He was wounded in
the knee and lay six hours on the field of battle,
losing much blood before ho was rescued.
BELATED VOLUNTEER* FROM AMERICA.
London. May 21.?A dispatch to "The Standard"
from Athens says that L*\ (?roo?? volunteers from
America arrived there y.-st.-rday.
NI AG ABA'S NEW BU I DC, E IE USE.
N?-> LVTERRrPTION i?F RAILROAD TRA FEU' WHILE
IT WAS BFILT OVER THE OLD ONE.
Niagara Falls. ? V. May Ml?The flrst railway
train passed over the new bridge spanning Niaga?
ra's gorge yesterday, and the work of removing ihe
old ItructUN over Which tho new bridge was built
w.-s begun to-day. The feat of building a new
bridge over an old one and then removing the old
on?? without In any way Interfering With the im?
mense railway tratti?? paaelng over tho ?truci ?ire
1? looked upon by engineer? as one of the greatest
ever attempted in this country. With the demolition
of tb.? old bridge this pari of th? Siale will lose
one of Its landmarka. ? having been bulli in ire.?.
it was supported by Immense wire cables. The
new bridge is bulli on the cantilever prln? ?pie. it
will take six weeks to remove the old structure.
????? BUNT OFF Ktli A TIME.
Albany, May ... Referee Ward to-day adjourned
the Coal Trust |nt?MtlgaflOH until June 1. This was
done- a?ter ? brtet sitting this morning in ihe
chambers of the Court of ?'lnlms. The adjourn?
ment Is to give .Indg?? <'bester a clUUXM to rie.ldi
tbe motion to vacate the order for nn Investigation
It ??- unlikely thai any testimony will be taken on
.June 1. as the matt.-i will probably be tied up In
u,.? coarta for ;. long time.
BLIGHT ? Iti: AT THE CAPITOL.
Albany. May 20?A temporary roofing over the
eastern approach t<> the Capitol caught fire at ?
o'cloik to-?!a> A stiff east triad was blowing nnd
in live minutes tl??? t-ntlr.- i'iipltol wa? UM with
??tifimi" smoke. Great excitement was o?-<-aaloocd
throughout jhe deparmeeta. The structure which
?_?? i.iiniiif? was directly In front of the private
rooms Ot the Judge? Of the Court of Appeals. The
hr?. was mit oui with band extinguisher? ?ft?-r s
.if hour*? work. It did no damage to anything but
??,, rooting and wine scaffolding it to Believed to
have originated from the ups-ttlng Of ? plumbers
fiiniine. _
VOTE o\ TUE GAS HILLS BEOONSIDMEED.
S.-MUKiVld. 111. ?M??) -'"? Th'? v"'?" '-'f?-'-"??. Um
das G??????.??? and <??? ConeolWatton Mila bave
??.? reconsider?*-. Th.- hills are mad? .-?.lai
order? for ni ?? Tuesday.
THE MAMMON'P TYPEWRITER 00. m ?vej to
1C? P'way. iUv? you tiled .Nuiiuirr i iJuninundi
-Advt.
SOME OPPOSITION TO QUIGG.
"CHARLEY" MURRAY AOAIN'PT HIM FOR
PRESIDENT.
MR. I?AfTERnAr*!IS RF.RIONATION FORMAI. LT
FRESKNTEI? TO THE COfNTT COMMITTEE
??G???? ON G? DEFERRED OBTXL
NEXT T1E.-DAY.
Tho main feature of the Republican County
Committee's meeting at the Murray Hill Ly?
ceum last evening was th?? -Utemnt of "Diamond
Charley,?? who used to bo known as Police Com?
missioner Charles H. Murray, to prevent the
election of Congressman Lemuel E. Qulgg as
ptofildcrrt of the -?ommitt-?:?. to succeed Edward
LauterbactL The real purpose of th?? meeting
was to receive Leutorbaoh's resignation, but
Murray managed to change the Issues. Con?
gr? sainan Quiet: was once the Editor of "The
Press," and In some of his editorials he admin?
istered caustic criticism to Mr. Murray and his
R?publican assordite on the Police Roard, call?
ing upon Mayor Strong to remove them and to
put Edward Mitchell ami Theodore Roosevelt
in their places. Mr. Qulgg had obtained an ad?
vance tip that the M ?vor had offered the two
places to Messrs. Mitchell and Roosevelt. an?l
although It did Ml result exactly ns Mr. Qnigg
rr??dieted, for Mr Mitchell declined, nnd Colonel
Crant was taken in his stead, nil the same Mur?
ray nnd Kenvln were remov.-d. and Mr Murrav
has never forgi ve J Mr. Qulgg for the vuy the
latter criticised him. Mr. Murrav has since that
time given Mr. Quigg only a co'd mare when
they met.
It becoming apparent tha* Mr. Qulgg had been
selected by Mr. Platt and his intimates to hold
down the chair of Lauterbach, et-Conimissloner
Murray enlisted the services of "Lightning Jim '
Stewart and Charles K. Lexaw. the little Nya?k
Senator's brother, and thoy hatched a scheme
to circumvent QuIrf ? paper was drawn up
calling a caucus of district lenders at Republi?
can county headoiiarters, No. 1 Ma?llson-a?-e.,
on Saturday next at 4 p. m . to discuss the mat?
ter of electing Mr I.anterbnch's successor. Mr
LeXOW was deputized to hustle around among
caucus members after the meeting last night
and secure signal uros to the call. He succeeded
In getting five signers of the thirty-five caucus
members, as follows: Charles K. Loxow. XX lid
District; <;. ay, Warner, Vlth Distrl.-t: II
H. Outtman. XXVIIIth District; J. L. Stewart,
XXth District, and Charles Dress, Vlllth Dis?
trict. ( Mr. Dross, last named, Is ex-Com
mlesioner Murray's dummy on the com?
mittee. The meeting may be he'd, but F. S
Cihhs and others who are supporters of Qulgg
predicted that there, would hardly he a corpo?
ral's guard pr-sent.
MR. LAITERPAfirS LETTER.
President Lauterbach did not appear at the
meeting last evening. George R. Pidwell. first
vice-president, wielded the gavel, and directed
Secretan' Ceorg? R. Manchester to rend Mr
I-auterbach's letter of resignation. It was as
follows:
New-Tork. May 20, 1?**.
To the Republican County Committee.
Ontlemen: It Ii with the deepest regret that I
am compelled to present this, my resignation, as
president of tho Republican County ?Ommittee.
The role caiiiic for tht? is tho stchlMSS of my wife,
who has been seriously 111 for more than three,
months.
Tho momentous campaign to secure Repun
llcan supremacy ?t the next ?le-tlon In th? great
municipality which the Republican party has
created demandi a devotion of time and energy
on the par: of your presiding officer, which, un?
happily, I will not he able to give.
I step down from the high place ?o which vour
unanimous vote h.is elected mo, ind sunder" the
delightful official relations which have existed bo.
tween us. most reluctantly, but the sacrifice is one
which It Is my duty to make for the party and tlie
organization. Faithfully vours,
EDWARD LAUTBRRACA
F. P. Cihhs, who Is master of ceremonies at
all County Committee meetings, was on his feet
before Mr. Manchester had reached the last
words nf the letter, and moved that If he laid
upon the table without action. Mr. Oihbs's mo?
tion was adopted, but it was aflorward decided
to hold a special meeting at the same place
next Tuesday evening, when, If the plan nf the
leaders Is carried out, Mr. LMterbgch'l resig?
nation will bo accepted and his successor el.-.'tod.
OmCE-HOLDBRl MAY BERVE.
Mr. Qulgg Is slated for the pla??e, and to pave
the way for his election the amendment tn the
constitution, already described In The Tribune
which abrogates the provision forbidding office?
holders to elt aa members of th.- committee, was
adopted
The number of election districts In New-York
having been reduced fr?>m 1..".!>_ to SDo. causing
a reduction of about three thousand in the num?
ber of election officers, a motion submitted by
Mr. Olbba was carried for the appointment of a
?iinin-?lt???? '>f two from ea.-h ? i* se mol.? district
to confer with the Commino? on Election offi?
cers, of which Abraham Gruber Is chairman, for
the purpose of arranging th" list of inspectors
and poll and ballot clerks, so that there may be
as lit * If* heartburning as possible amori? the ap?
plicant? for places on the registration or elec?
tion boards. It will be a delicate undertaking,
calcul?t? d to brini Mr. limber's powers of
diplomacy into full play.
The secreta-y read an Invitation from the Ros
coe Conkllng Club ?viking tho committee to J.iln
in the memorial decoration of the lat.? Senator's
montimi nt on May 29. The Invitation was ac?
cepted, as wa_ also one from the managers of
the Irish Fair asking the commltleemen to be
present on "Republican Day," May 2.".
The committee adjourned, to meet at Murray
Hill Lyceum Tuesday evening.
-e
WORTH WANTS A PU8ION TICKET
THK BKOOKLTN liADflR'S YITgWg Oil THR
GREATER NE"v7 TORK ??.G>??">?.
Alhany, May 20 (Special)?Jacob Worth re
covered sufficiently from the sudden "Illness"
which, prevented his attending Senator Platt's
conference In Washington to come here to-day
and have a long ?hat with Oovernor Black.
Mr. Worth was Influential In bringing ahout
the nomination of Mr. Black for Governor, and,
therefore, was received most cordially. Previ?
ously he had had a long talk with Louis F. Payn
in one corner of the Executive Chamber.
Mr. Worth (111 DO? plead illness when asked
how It happened he did not go to Washington.
?What Is thP use of 00uferen?!M of Republban
politichini about a candidate for Mayor of Jfew
Vork." lie said, "when the Republican party Is
M i. turki voies short of a majorty in the city, and,
therefore, cannot elect Ils ?candidat? without
aid fp.ni ?MM other people'.' It strikes me that
by union with th.- elementa hostile t.? Tammany
Hall and tho McLaughlin I>em?.oraov we Re?
publicans can win. but ??th-rwlse Ihm is groat
danger that WO ?111 DOt A straight Republican
ticket Will ?-it be as powerful, In my Judgment.
?oneformedofaoomblnatlonof those PPPoaed
i? ih?? Democratic organisation that is, if
nramlnent nnd trusted citisene are nominated
for Maw.r and for Ihe olhoi offices which are to
L Ailed In N-w-York this fall."
?Would v"u support Beth Low tot Mayorr
Mr Worth chewed a cigar for a D?ment, and
?ion answered frankly:
? f Lavi not sp?.kei. to Mr. Low In sixteen
lut if B? should receive the united it???
* wi#_n and ?'itiz-n??' Union nomination he
P.U Id certainly receive my most loyal and
hear.y oiiri????^_^_
4 NATIONAL BANE CLOSED IE INDIANA.
-? ni?!.. Mav ??.-The State National
Loi/n nspori. . ? ...
iti.uk was closed tt'is morning by Rational Bank
Emmlner a.**? * Cldwil The depo.,?,
amount M oheal am'm?^
?IHi: SUEDES OF BMKOB? LAMONT.
Molile Visi?. ' -?1 . MSJ M Willi,m T Hrvunt. .,,,
inmate ??? ih- Soldiers' raOmi bere, meat an ?m
,,;,;,' ?,..|H> -h.?? I'- ?as U. Kmanu-I ?Baptist
,-i.ir.i, in Sin l'r.m. I" o. OB lbs ?!a> Of the
mu?der'of'Blanch? Urnon*. and saw Pastor ?km
carrying be? ?,?,1> lu *?"*' b,ilfr-'?
A BIG BLAZE IX ROBOREN.
FIRE DESTROYS A LARGE FACTORY
AND TKNFMFNT HOFSF.R.
ONE Ht'NTRr.n AN!? ?11???? G????.11'3 KAM
?OaraUMI? T11C PAMAOK F.ST1MATFP AT
OVER HAM? A MILLION rvOI.I?AnR-rANAI^
boats mmian) on the hiver front.
The most disastrous fire In the hlitory of Ho
boken took place last night, whan a five-story
factory building and thirt??en double five-story
flathouses. occupied by 180 families, the whole
comprising the block bounded by Twelfth. Thir?
teenth. Hudson and Washington sts., were to?
tally destroyed.
The factory build in?* was 20 feet wide, 4SO feet
Inni?, and stood In the middle of th? block run?
ning from Twelfth to Thirteenth st There was
a spare of 40 feei between this building and the
llathouses, which faced Washlngton-et. The
factory building was occupied by Benton, Heath
& Co., wallpaper manufaeturers, on the second,
third and fourth fl.iors, 'lallagher & Paul, manu?
facturers of toilet articles, on the first floor; R.
H. htncy ft Co.. on the fifth floor, and H. Ward
Leonard, el?ctrica! apparatus, on th?? first floor,
facing Thlrteentb-st.
The Are was first discovered in the southern
part of the factory, In which were stored chemi?
cals and goods "f Inflammable material. Hy
?h?? time the firemen arrived the flames had
swept through the upper floors, and chief En?
gineer Applepate at once sent in a second alarm.
The department could not control the flames
with the limited apparatus, conststtng of three
steamers and a chemical engine, and word was
sent to .iirs.-y City for aid Th?? department of
that city responded at oni-e with two engines.
Every few minutes after the firemen got to work,
a loud noise was heard in the burning factory as
combustibles exploded. The force was so ?Treat
that the Bremen were driven back from the
Tw< lfth-st. end. for fear that the walls would
fall In on them. In the mean time the 180 fam?
ilies In the \\'.ishlngton-st. flat? were working
might and main to get their furniture Into the
street, where It was piled many feet high. Fully
seven hundred people were made homeless by
the blaze. Two or three sick women were car?
rier! out Into the street by strong arms and sent
to St. Mary's Hospital. After the flats had be;?n
fairly Stripped of movable stuff, the flames were
driven fl*om the horning factory Into the rear
windows ?if the flats. At !i o'clock the interiors
of the thirteen houses were In flames, and at the
same time the high walls of the factory began
to fall/
Tha scene was one of Indescribable terror.
As the walls fell, sparks flew through the air
for two or more blocks, and landed on the awn?
ings of neighboring houses. F.verybody turned
to and turned water on a?vnlngs to prevent
other fires. Mayor Fagan telephoned to the
high-service station of the Ha?-kensack Water
Company for Increased pressura, but was told
that the limit of force was on. The firemen
worked splendidly, and turned most of their
streams on the flats, but jslthout much success.
Though the walls were brick, the woodwork was
of the llgh'-st kind and burned with great
rapidity. Despite the firemen's efforts the flats
were completely destroyed. Fully fifty thou?
sand sightseers watched the progress of the
fire The sparks settled among some old canal
boats in the Weehawken Cove, two bio. ks
away, and six old boats were destroyed.
The factory and the long row of flats were
owned by the Hoboken Land and Improvement
Company. The flats wer.? built four years ago
at a cost of about 9160,000 by John C. Crevler,
who recently committed snidile. The factory
building and Its contents are estimated as b?-lng
worth between ??50,000 and |300,000. The fac?
tory win well stooke.l and contained much valu?
able machinery. It was impossible last night
to ascertain what Insurance the several con?
cerns had on thetr stocks. The tenants of flats,
who were principally working people, suffered
great loss. M much of their furniture was
wrecked in being thrown from the windows.
It is believed that the total loss will amount to
between one-hilf and three-quarters of a million
doliera.
The burning of the factory will throw out of
employment about one-hundred and fifty hands.
Fire Commissioner Hender is authority for the
statement that the flathouses cost IISO.OOO and
the factory building coal over $100.000. l'aimer
Campbell, ?of th?? Hoboken1 l??md and Improve?
ment Company, yesterday paid off a mortgage
,,f $180,000 on the buildings, wtltcb was held by
the Mutual Life Insurance Company.
Louis I'errnnd, of NO. 1,808 Washlngton-st.,
received a severe cut on one of his fe??! while re?
moving bis bo?ehotd g,">ds from bis (Tat. So
far as Is known he is the only person who was
injured.
About 10*90 o'clock, while the big fire was at
its worst, fire broke out in the big drydc? !<s of
Tletgen A l?ang, at Scventeenth-st. The Penn?
sylvania tugs, fitted with 'Ire apparatus and
pump? resfiiinrlerl to th?? Ore on the river front
and saved the drydockrr from BertOUS damage.
six canal-boats lying in th.? basin were de?
stroyed. They were not of :rreat value, most of
them being old on.'S that had been towed there
fot repairs. A covered ?>ll barg?*, which was
lying Just alvove the drydocks, caught tire and
was burned.
The fire boats, after their arrival, kept the
river-front buildings saturated with water, tins
preventing sparks from the big fire from setting
other buildings on tin?. The ripe nn the canal
boats stai ted. It Is believed, from a spark carried
from the big rire.
CRFSHEI) RY A FIRE ENGINE.
? ?,?????'?? ST.?/rt FROM A TROI.I.FY ''AR IN
FIKiN'T OF THF. HOIUUCa AND IS KII.t.KI'
Wh!!? Are engine No M was on It?/ way from the
engine-house, nt One-hundre,l-nnd-twenty-?ever.th
?t. and Park-ave., to ? Ore beyond the Harlem
River Inte yesterday afternoon. It ran over and In?
stantly killed Jos?'i'h I?? tano, thirty-seven years
old, a laborer, of ?No. 216 East Flfty-nlnth-?t., on
t'n?? bri?!?,'.? at Third-.ive. and On*-hundred-and
lWSnty*nlntb*St. Betuno was on the rear platform
of a southbound Union I.n?? trolley-car when he
heard ih.? gong of the tire engine, lie jumped from
tii- cer directly in front of th?? engine, eras knocked
.?own by the horses and two wheels of the engine
ran over his bead, crushing it so bady t hi? t tlie
features arer? unrecognisable, it wa.? from feiiow
workmen on the same , ar that the man's Identity
area h traed.
Ti,?? ilriwr of the emrin??. John Robinson, fiftv
tnree ye.irs old. or No. mi Kart One-hundred-and
fort.?fourth-si . wn? arrested by Patrolman Donlon,
of tlie Basi One-biindred-and-twenty-slxth-st ?ta
-t itlon. .ind locked up. The body of the dead m.in
?TOS also taken to th?? station.
All the witnesses to the affair .igre.d In ?nving
thai ?' aras an accident which could not posslbl)
have been avoided hy the driver, ns lietnno Stepped
from th?? car almost Under 'h.? horses' f?et.
-??__
CANADIAN NAIL MARKET ofrs.
ONF. OF THE RFSI?.?? ?? THF KKW DOMINION
TARIFF LAW.
Montrent Mny ??. The wire nnd cut mil manu?
facturers have been shin out of tl ?? Western
Canadian market by Am-ri'-nn rival? ns ? result of
?h? ciiniig?? in the tnritT. There Is consequently
much compie Int American? lay down wire nails
in iniiiith al ft ? enta ? bundred pounds, ns agalnat
67 ?ent? for Canadl n. Large orders heve been pro?
cured by Americans in Winnipeg Th?re is no bus.?
price for ?Ire nail? now in baatera Canada, Pitts?
burg prices controlling th?? market, ?'ut nails have
fallen tn ?1 M a k???. s de.line of $1 attaO* the
tariff changea
-??
EING CABBED THE CERTIFICATE.
thi r.<iv!>Tu\ n.'NK MganxoKn ??t aerai
WITH ?.??.!-??'? IN CaOH.
Boston. M1)' Bt Wh.-n tl)?? banks here opened thi?
morning it *??'? deunltely loomed that Albert m.
King, the Hoylston Bank me..eni/er. cashed th.?
????,???. tnit. ? Htutrs eertlfleate srhleh be took >???*.
iri.in. in n.....? tu?? lutai amount uf BSOasy he ?toi?:
tou,ooii
Watt) has he**u received rioni uowel! that th??
pockettoook "f tb- Boytston National Hank, which
Kiii? ara? eccuatomed to curry, w.i? found in a
Beaton ami Maine Railroad car leal night Thief
,,< Police \V?;ts think? that Kin? wll'. be found in
Montreal or ????? other nlace tn Canada soon.
vo sali: as ? ?? medi at ios.
A SEMI-OFFICIAL DBCLABATKM THAT THE
?CUBAN QI'KSTION* CONCERN9
SPAIN ALONE
Madrid. May 20 ?A semi-official declaration Is
Issued to the effect that Spain will never agree
to the sale of Cuba, or to foreign mediation in
"a question Which she regards as exclusively
concerning herself."
-o
THE PRESIDENT DBBIRB? DELAY.
WAITUfQ FOR MR. l*ALI|OfNS RRPORT HEFORE ?
ACTINI? ON THE CUBAN QUESTION.
Washington. May *?(>.?President McKinley Is
not likely to be called upon to take action on
the Cuban resolution passed by the Senate to?
day for some time, and perhaps net at all. Tho
resolution will not be sent to him for his ap?
proval until It has been adopted by the Hous?,
and whether or not the House takes It up must
be decided hereafter. It la known that Mr. Mc?
Kinley desires the postponement of final action
by Congress on the Cuban question until the
report of Mr. Calnoun. who ll In the island to
Investlfrafe conditions there, has been made.
Mr. Hitt, one of the Republican le?iders In the
House, said guardedly In the debate to-day that
the adoption of the Morgan r?sol?jtlon at this
time might embarrass negotiations which the
President has In r.lr.?! to secure the indepen?
dence of Cuba, and although Mr. Hitt expressly
d.-nled that he sp ikS by authority. It was well
known that he ha.i been in consultation wtth
the Presldenl on Cuban affairs, and his utter?
ance was tak'-ti as a reflection of the wish of
the Executive. The Senate resolution ean I??
brought before the House only by a special
nil", and Speaker Raed is known to be oppo.svd
to its adoption at this time.
Pressure may be brought to hoar by th?? Re?
publicans who think early action on the Cuban
question advisable to have the resolution adipt
ed by the House, but so long as the loaders con?
sider that It may embarrass Presl?P-nt M^-KIn
ley's plans, It Is likely to lio on tho table.
-4
TO INCREASE THE ARMY IN SPAIN.
tiik minister or w.wt wishes t? bring it up
to ionium HEX.
Madrid, May 20,?General do Azoarraga, the
Minister of \V,n?, has Introduced a bill Into the
?'.?ries providing for an Increase of the army in
Spain to 100.000 men.
-e
RUIZ COMMISSION READY FOR WORK.
Tin; INQUIR? to BBOM at ?????????a to?
day.
Havnna. May 20?The Ruiz Commission was in?
formally organized this afternoon and went to
Qusnsbaeo? to begin the Inquiry Into the death, ?n
the jail of that place, of Dr. Ricardo Hull, a n??.
urallzed Anvrlcan cttliea, who died under sun
pi. lous circumstances oa February 18. S? flor Kn
rlque Rolsr, whose name wa- presen;od hy Dr. l'on?
gasto, the Spanish i'onsul at Philadelphia, who ac
?ompanie? ;h?? l'nlted Btntes <'ommissioner, \V. J.
Calhoun, was finally ac-epiod as counsel by Genoral
Fitshugn I.ee, the United States ConsuMSeneral,
and Mr. CslhOUn, Dr, Congos:., and General Lee
breakfast? d together to-day.
Trie Commission met ar H. p. m. In the Town Hall,
Guanabacoa, perfected the work of formal organiza?
tion and ndlourned until to-morrow, when the in?
quiry win begin.
-f
CASTILLO'S CHIEF OF STAFF KILLED.
Havana. May _V-The town of Rio Honda has
surrendered to the Spanish.
During a skrrmlsh ?rear Morales, Havana
Province, tho Insurgent Lieutenant-?'olonel Pancho,
chief of staff of ijeneril Castillo was killed.
The authorities have liberated William Randolph,
the American.
-??
EACB EB8P0NDED 'PLACET."
TWO rANONIZATIONS ABOCT TO BE PERFORMED
BT POPE LEO.
Reme, May .?.?The Pope thl9 morning held the
Ir.st of the consistorios preliminary to the great
ceremony on Muy 27 of the cancnlzatlon of Father
Zaccaria, founder of the order of Bgrnabttea
Father Fourier do Mataincour, surnamed the Apos?
tle of Lorraine, will be canonized at tho same time.
Tlie nbje?-t of the consistory was to allow the
prelates gathered In Rome to pass a fina, opinion
on the canonisations
Tlie Pope accompanied by he members of the
Congregation of Rites .in.l tho Prothonotaries. en?
tered .fu? Consistory Hall nt 10 o'clock, where they
wer. awaited by two hundred prelates. Including
dignitaries of Italy and France, Cardinal Vaughan
of England and Archbishop Williams of Hoston.
Mas. His Holiness, who appeared to be In ?????1
leni health In the course cf a short allocution
said that, although he was quite prepared to per?
form the prop .-??! canonisations, as the procedure
of such functions was rigorously defined, he was
nevertheless desirous of previously obtaining the
freely expressed soffrano}, of the dignitaries of tho
Catholic hierarchy now in Rome. The roiicall fol?
lowed, und each prelate responded "Placet'? to his
num.?. .
VNDEE0EAD?ATE8 IS 0PP0SITI0S.
THE QUBBTIOM OE CO.vr ? f? p. ? no r EGREES ON
WOMEN AT CAMBRICO! TO HE VOTED
ON TO HAY.
Cambridge, May 30. -The University Is In a fer?
ment over the question of confo-rlng degrees <m
wpir.en. ?m which a voto will be taken to-rr.i.rrow.
Th? undergraduates, who imp no the proposition,
are terrorising the seniors, threatening to mlgi ? ???
to oxfonl ami to refuse to take -heir degrees In
June. They are ??ponding large sums m firework.??
and eg???, s.i is to !.. ready either to lelonrit?) the
defeat of the proposition or avenge ir? ?riel try. In
consequence <?f tne threats of the undergraoustes
t'.iere have been many defections from tue ranks of
Cms.? who supported the proposal to corner degrees
on women.
.1 TRISSEER <)F 1)1 TILS PROPOSED.
Mil. L0WTHBR WANTS EN.'.l.AND TO UOUD HE?
own, BUT fails TO CABBT p*.-* POfST.
London. May -> In th?? Hou?e of Commons to?
day the Right Hon. James l.owther, Conservative
member for Kent. Isle of Thanet. moved a resolu?
tion In favor of the transfer of nomo portion of
the Import duties from art!?.es which, like tea and
coffee, are unpeodudble in England, to aniden
producible hen . to "enable ns to maintain our own
against th?? Industrial competition of f ?reign coun?
tries'" He suggested a smell duty un rorelgn man?
ufactures and a duty of on?? florin per quarter on
?jtchegi'er, opposed tn?? proposal, contesting that
the revenue returns proved th it Kngland possessed
nn enormous preponderance of trade over sny
other country, ?nd that, therefore, it would be in?
advisable lo change the tiscril system.
Sir William Vernon Hsrcourt, leader of the Lib?
eral ?Opposition, congratulated Sir Michael upon
; 111 ? enormous suesess, which was. he said, a pijof
that the fis'-al system of England ?a? based ?p
sound financial and curien, y principi, ?,.
John Dillon, antl-Parn. Hi:.?, member for Fast
Mayo, and leader <?f the Antl-Pamelllte party, with
other members, ?-(?ok?? In th? same strain, and Mr.
l.owther finally withdrew h'.s motion.
THE DIKE Or' HAMILTON'S BROTHER?
London. May 20. ?A special dispatch from Jo?
hannesburg, publlrhed to-tlay. says that a man
who has been a resident of SotiOi Africa for a
?..-..re of yean claim?? to be a younger brother of
the late Duke of Hamilton, who die?! on May IH.
is;?.'., and therefore heir to the dukedom. He alleges
that h?? lef: Scotland In ???G?. after killing a man In
a dii.l. and is sunposed to have died shortly after?
ward II?? Is Bald to have convincimi proofs of hlu
allegations, ami expects t?. return to Bugiane and
clsira the title ami estates,
TO SESD A MESSAGE Elton ST. PAUL'S.
London. May 21. -"The Pally Telegraph** an?
nounces that the Queen has onosnted to the pro?
pos ?I lirai she should send a message to ever) part
,,?? her dominions simultaneously during the Jubile?
servi,?.? at SI. Paul's. For lbis purpose n. wire
communicating with all tbe cablee will be carried
Up tl??? <'i?tl?edrnl steps, nn.l probably Into the
?anctuary.
-*
A LOAN OF S?.ii'xi.ijdo POE VB?GVAY.
Montevideo. Muy 20 A new loan of |4.??is?,f?0il has
oeen MaettOOSd by the Crxiguayun Chamber.
COLONEL HAY sees LORD BALi?B?Ef.
London. Mav ?0 -The l'nlted States Ambassador,
Colonel John ll.iy. bad h long interview to-,|ay with
tin? Marnili?? <?f Bsllsbury. Their meeting took
pi ?.?.? after the Cabinet Council, and was by special
appointment srlth the Pr.mier
passen? ; Kits v.o Pennsylvania Lines take 23.1
! Street Ferry at Jersey City, then I'-onsj lvanla
1 Csb to Windsor Hotel, Jth Avenue.-Advt.
CUBA'S DAY IN CONGRESS.
ACTION BY BOTH HOWES.
THE MORGAN* BELLIGERENCY RE80LU
TIO.N PASSED BY THE SENATE.
mi">vf*y for MR4gg t BUFFKUBjaej aMMMCABB
VOTKO RT THK BOOn I?0\0 AND EX
pt??? BTBTOOOUi oxv.n ??t?
PROPOSITION*?!
G?t te?.e???a?p t? thf: tt????t.?
Washington. May 2i?.--The different tempera
and Instincts of the two houses of Congress, so
often Illustrated in recent years, were strikingly
emphasized again this afternoon, when in one
branch Mr. Morgan's programme of recognizing
th? belligerent rights of the Cuban Insurgent?
triumphed signally, while in the other It suffered
a distinct and ferlons reverse The long-de
bate.l reeotatteu ?f the Alabama Senator ?-ame
nt last to a vote In the "deliberative branch,"
nnd, as was to be expected after the develop?
ments of Tuesday and Wednesday, its passage
was opposed onlv by a feeble though determined
minority. In the House, however, an effort to
attach the Morgan declaration a? a "rider" to
the appropriation of -Sol ?.? H t? > f,,r the relief of
deetltute Americans In Cuba was pattai hy a
decisive vote.
HOW PARTY I-INKS WERF. DRAWN.
The final division In the Senate on thp rjuee*
tlon of recognizing the belligerency of the In?
surgent forces show.??! forty-one Senators re
**Orded In favor of declaring that a ?tat?? of pub?
lic war exists in the island, and only fourteen
mustc-red In opposition t<> such a policy. Of the
forty-one votes cast In support of the Morgan
resolution, twenty were given by Democrats,
fifteen by Republicans, four by Populists, and
two by Sllverites. All but two of the fourteen
votes in opposition were cast hy "Republican?.
Meters. Caffery, >?f Louisiana, and White, of
California?one a Sound Money and the other a
free-sllver-colnage Democrat?& .paratine from
the solid ?ipposltlon ranks and siding with the
Republican minority in Its efforts to prevent
the "Adniinlstratl.m's hand In Cuba being
forced" by Congressional interference with the
exercise of purely executive functions.
The Republican side of the Senate divided al?
most equally on the question of propriety and
expediency involved ?n the passage of the Mor*
j gan resolution. The Republicans who favored
1 the attempt to recognize belligerency by lejti
lation were ?Messrs. Raker, of Kansas; Carter, of
Montana; Char.?];.t and Qalllngtr, of N-w
Hampshlre: Clark, of Wyoming-, rul!om ani
Mason, of Illinois; Davis and Nelson, of Min?
nesota; Deboe, of Kentucky; Forak^r, of Ohio;
! Hansnrough. of Worth Dakota; Prltchard, of
! .N'orth Carolina; Shoup. of Idaho, and Thurston.
; of Nebraska?fifteen In all.
Those who opposed the Morgan resolution as
an Invasion of the Executive's prerogatives and
; for other reasons w-re Messrs. Allison and
<?ear. of Iowa; Rurrows, of Michigan: Falr
; banks, of Indiana; Hale, of Maine; Mnnna, of
Ohio; BOgr, of ?Massachusetts; Hawley, of Otte*
| neettcut; Spooner. of Wisconsin, and Wetmore,
of Rhode Island?twelve In all. Senators Platt
and ?Murphy, of New-York, were both absent,
and the attitude of neither toward the resolution
I was disclosed.
FKATt'RKS OF THE DEBATE.
To-day's struggle in the Senate can, under the
circumstances, scarcely be called a partisan or
factional one, nor can the final vote be said to
show any particular partisan cleavages. Yet
party politics could not be kept entirely out of
the latter stages of the controversy, and a de?
cided political tinge was given to Mr. Morgan's
triumph hy the declaration of Mr. Gorman that
almost solid Democratic support of th??* resolu?
tion of recognition was dup to the apparent fail?
ure of the Administration to meet by energetic
measures the exigencies of the present situation
in Cuba.
Mr. Spooner. of Wisconsin, In an eloquent and
effective speech, also deprecated the passage of
the resolution as an unfair attempt on th?? part
of the Senate to compel the President to declare
by assent or dissent to the Morgan declaration
his policy In Cuha before that policy had had a
chance to develop Itself on clear and intelligent
Hn???. So tierce, however, was the pro-Cuban
sentiment in the body, fanned into flame by the
recent disclosures of Mr. Morgan and Mr. For
aker. that no appeals, however reasonable or
well grounded, could stay the pressure for some
sort of a declaration supposedly friendly to the
Insurgents and inimical to Spain.
The debate whi.h preceded the vote lacked
something of the dramatic interest and intensity
?rbtCta marked the discussions of yesterday an<4
the day Lefore. It was made notable, however,
by several lively pasrag.??? between the friends
and opponents of the Morgan programme, by a
succinct attack on the resolution from Mr. El
kins, a defence of the Cuban cause from Mr.
Thurston, and a wholly admirable and masterly
assertion of the Executive's prerogative, to ex?
tend or withhold belligerent recognition from
Mr. Spooner, who thus signalized his welcome
return tu the arena of debate in the Senate.
Mr. Morgan's resoluten now goes to the
House of Representatives, where Ita fate Is for
the present shrouded in obscurity. The resolu?
tion as passed roads as follows:
Resolved, etc.. That a condition of puhlt ? war
exists b.tween the i.overnment of ?pain and tlie
?lovcrnm? nt proclaimeil and for some time m.un?
tren.-1 by force of arms by the p.-opl?* of '.'uba. and
that the I'nited States of Amer;.?a shall maintain
a strict neutrality between the contending l'irti?-.?,
according to each all the rights of belltgerenta in
the ports and territory of the t'nlted States.
THE STUn.'.LE IN THE HolSE.
An expectation that the attempt to pass the
Joint resolution to appropriate money f..r the
relief of sick and destitute American etUttM In
Cuba would result In *->me ex.eedingly lively
If not riotous proceedings in the House of Repre?
sentatives to-day filled all the public gallerlee
with spectators, and drew a larger attendane?
of members than usual. The expectation ???
not realized, but the performances of the Demo?
Populist minority were such as to Justify the
? suspicion that Ralley and hie Mimera regard
the people of the United States as exceedingly
1 gullible, and. Indeed, as half-witted. Certainly
: a gam? of political thlmblerlg more transparent
? or played In a ?noie awkward and bungling
manner than the one pia? ed by Ralley and his
I lieutenants ?McMIUln, Simps?.ti. Bland, Wheeler
, and the rest--erta never witness*??! in the House
? of Representative?, where so many Democratic
! bunco games have been played In the past.
DKMo-1'orrl.IST INSINCERITY.
The curious thing about It V08 that they and
j their followers seemed actually t?> fed ...n.tnced
that If they piled words high enough and slmuted
: loud enough p? <>pl?- would believe that the cause
! uf .human liberty was In Imminent peril at the
| hands of the Republican party, because the ma?
jority in the House of Representatives Insisted
on passing, a resolution to 08884 an immediate
pressing emergency, which threatened the health
and even the lives of destitute Ainetbun citizen?
In a foreign land, without combining with It a
Joint resolution declaring that a state of war
exists In Cuba, and granting belligerent rights
to the insurgents. And not only SO, but that
every member who was opposed to coupling the
two propositions, which b?r<? no relation whet
,,,r t" .a?'h Other, was un ?'iietiiv of freedom,
ami eepeclally of freed..:? in Cube
The s-nate. in which the lutter ??solution had
beeil muter consideration and ?ils, u.-sion for rive
o. six weeks, had temporarily lt*bl It aside by
unanimous consent until it eeejld eoi aider and
pass without a dissenting vote the relief reao
lutlon. That was a sensible course uf procedure.

xml | txt