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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, July 21, 1897, Image 1

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iV+ ???.??*?* 18,511.
NEW-YORK, WEDNESDAY, JULY 21, 1897.-TWELVE PAGES.
PRICE ????? CENTS.
MADE MAD BY IDLENESS.
SEVEN CONVICTS AT CROW HILL DE?
CLARED INSANE.
TWO *MORF. CABFS TO ?? PFCTOEP T'POX?THF
FFFEOT OF TI1F ABLUTION* OF ?TON
TRACT COXVTCT L.AROR.
Aa a result of the closer confinement and the
idleness which have b*?en necessary with the
rnnvicts Lb the K'ngs County Penitentiary he
cause of th<? law against contract convict labor,
?even convicts hav? h??en nfTlclally declared In?
sane, and taro more are ?aid to bo mentally un?
balanced. The seven follow:
CAT?7?">1.U Jemea. We?tch*?ter County: ????ill?.
C1..*BKR. Patrick. Brooklyn; one ftmt ft*? robbery.
FAST. John W? T'nlted States prisoner from Virginia:
fuor ye?r?.
RAIala fotata, T'nlted Stale? t>rl?<ner from Florida: thre?
year? for robblns? ? poatoffioe.
laOOMIB. <?e .rgr. Brooklyn: one year ?nl t"*00 fine for
m iniifsfintim 'uraiers' tool?,
TAYI/OR. Hnrry. Hrocklvn; ninety dnye (or vagrancy.
f F.I.I ? Henry. BttatOB Island.
All of these prisoners have been declared In?
sane by Dr. W. H. Bates and Dr. J. J. O'Oon
nell. the commission appointed by the County
Court to examine Into the sanity of prisoners.
Two more convicts, it is suld. will be declared
Insane within a few days.
The five Federal. State and county prisoners
whose names are given above arili be sent to-day
to the State Asylum for insane convicts at Mat
trssrSB. The authorities in Washington have
BSSa Informed of the condition of the Federal
prisoners, and an order for their removal Is ex?
pected daily.
The prison law which went Into *-f*ect on Jan?
uary 1 last abolished Ihe system by which the
labor of prisoners was let out by enrtraet. l*n
der the system the Kings County Penitentiary
was self-supporting and tli? prisoners received
regular dally employment. Their days beinT
wholesomely occupied with working, eating an?!
sleeping, their minds and l>od!es were kept In a
fairly wholesome condition. Since the Introduc?
tion ot the new law there has ticen a great
change for the worse. The Tribune has from
time to time told of the efforts of the Brooklyn
Commissioners of Charities ?nd ?Orrectlons to
provide employment for their charges in the
Crow Hill institution. They were urged to this
not only by their fears that enforced Idleness
In stone cells would shatter the mental and phy?
sical health of the prisoners, but by the pitiful
pleading of the prisoners themselves, who begged
that they might have some sort of employment
to aid them ln hastining the passage of the at
rest slow hours.
Many obstacles have prevented the Introduc?
tion of a ponifntlary school, and at the best
"ttarden Hayes has succeeded in keeping only
an average of three hundred a day. out of the
seven hundred inmates, at anything worthy of
the name nf employment. The rest of the prls
01 "s have had trotting and arm-swinging exer
9, which last for an hour or so each day. and
?! . to a certain extent, supply the need of the
human body for exercise. But the remaining
hours of the twenty-four are passed in the cells.
It Is the usual thing for a small percentage
of prisoners to lose their minds, even under a
system of dally labor, but two of the Charities
Commissioners yesterday declared to a Tribune
reporter that this record of nine within a few
months is unprecedented, and could be account?
ed for only by the fact of the greater confine?
ment and their inability to develop by whole?
some work an appetite for the prison fare and
the kind of wearln-ss That brings nature's re
sturer, sleep.
MANY MORE TARE? EXPECTED.
Tt Is feared that this Is only ?ho beginning of
something worse Many other prisoners than
th<se that have paeeed the limit of sanity begin
to have the dulness of eye ami tho inability to
eat or Bleep that portends mental dissolution.
Many of thp details of the condnct and mental
vararles of the insane prisoners are t??o horrible
and repulsive to print. The strangest case Is
that of Loomls, ?lin Is altogether a strange sort
Of individual. Loomls is about twenty-five years
old. and will be remembered as the man who was
arrested by the police something more than a
year ago while walking aUmg the street with a
bag filled with burglars' t<v,]s. It vus finally
proved that he was a manufacturer of cracks
ir.en's outfits, and he was sent up for a year
and ordered to pay a fine of fSOQ, This fine he
Is now working out.
He was a man of great ingenuity, as was
shown by the ?lever manner In whlr-h he opened
th? safi- In the Distri.-t-AtMrney's office, and
that his operations were the result of keen
brains as well as deft fingers Is shown by a
remark he made -hile In prison to Commissioner
J"h:i H Burtls. Mr. Hurtrs expreeeed surprise
at his ability in opening safes, when Looniis said
dryly:
"Any safo that was ever put together can be
taken apart."
An?1, now Loomls has an Id? a that he is sitting
In the eie-trie ch:tir. and that the deadly current
is about to be turned on. Every time he sees
Commissioner Burtls h?? pleads with him for a
reprieve of els dava
"All you've got to do is to turn on the cur?
rent," he said the ?.ther day. "Put 1 will be
ready In six days Can't you give me six days.''
"G? give yon thirty," replied the Commission-r
to humor him.
"NO. .six davs are all I want. I know I am a
bad and bloody fellow, and I want to write my
lust???:.. I <;.:i m. tiiai in six days, and then 1
ani ready for the current."
Th?.? mana ?vife visits him occaelonallv, nut
loes not help him. He looks wild-eyed and
does ? ' -.'it.
Taylor attempted to take his life a week ago
by breaking a bottle and sawing bis throat
With tb?? broken glass. He talks at random and
refus?e t? .-at.
Clark cannot sl?ep because he thinks ev?ry
body is trying to get into his eel! to kill him.
/. if has a queer hallucination. He tir.nks
tiw all th. ot?er prleonere of his wing of the
building heve faetened looklng-glaeeei In tr.Hr
tells so :li?t th.? light is reflected oa him. This
focusing of men) bu ame of light <>n him he
??as la burning him up, and his pc?.r fevered
. and brain will not real or ?..s.? eonecloue
rright ..r day.
<'->n:r h . ner Burtls yesterday declined to
talk with .. reporter. He did say this, however:
'"The same ? onditi m exists In the other prisons
of the Blatt as bere. I think Sing Sing will be
a lunatic asylum within e few months.
INTERPRETINO THE NEW I.WV.
The Antl-Convlct Laboi Ut.? provides that
"the fatate, "r the rolUlcel divisions thereof."
must buy >.is manufactured Is the Btate and
county pena" Institutions whenever !? I? "??'?
? ?? the pr-.p?! officer? ol th? Stati ?? Ile
polii m divisions that such gravis art being
tactured. ?? nul fifty men hav- been en?
gat,??! in the shop*, manufacturing goods tnal
might be us??.. In the ?it;, departments rne
Chanties Commission*.?? recently seni s com?
munication to tbe heeds ol city departments
setting forth the various gooda the pris..? was
..,?,! t?. supply? . ,,
The only ? r,ier thai v?s ? ect l\ ed was a small
.?re from the Police Department Corporation
Couns-i Burr of Brooklyn waa ;?i first ..f ine
opinion -.bat the departmenta did n.-t have w
buy from th.- Charltlee Department anlese it
could supply et once all of a given article that
, lulretL But it ?? now understood th?t
Mr. Mut:- po : .ftgcr holds th'.- to b<? the lew In
lh< eaee Bui he bas raiaede eew point wncn
the Commlseionere of Charities, eeveral day?
ago. asked the head ?.-f a department if h< ?ras
?oins t.. ?,, supplies tnaAa by convicts, tins
officer told them thai Mr. Burr edvttted elm
that this laa >ii<i not apply to cittca, es ?tie*
ver* not''political divisione of tb? Btate.
This point which Mr. Brrr bas raised Is one
Bf BTOel importan??? t.? the people of the entire
State It was th.? I.ell.f before th- point was
raised that the ?Itles would be the largest buy
are of prison goods.
FOUND RIS MASTER'S BODY
REMARKABLK PEVOTION OF A POO WHO
TRACKP HIS PEAP OWNBB TO
A MORGl'R.
On? of the most pathetic features of the acci?
dental killing of Paftpialo Siciliano, an Italian tail?
or, at Llnwood.it. and Atiantlc-ave., Brooklyn, on
Monday night by a Rockaway Beach trnln on th?
Long Island Ral'.road wa? the devotion of a big
white bulldog with one br'.ndle eye, evidently be?
longing to Siciliano, and which. ?ulKlng from a
number of fresh cuts on his body, was hit by the
locomotive which killed his master. Probably mas?
ter and dog were trying to get across the track nt
the same time.
SI"illano'? bo?ly was taken to peinlnger's under?
taking rooms, in Van S'.cklen-ave.. a mile away. It
was some time after the body wa? placed In th??
morgue that the undertaker and the poll mnen
who took the body there noticed the bulldog hob?
bling: along the street, blcding from taevsral cut?.
Every few st??).? the dog stopped and sniff? ?1. and
then restim?-d hi? walk toward the morgue. ?? ho
nenreil It he quiekend his gait, and seemed to ]?>s??
some of his stiffne??. Stopping In front of th.- door
of the morgue, he whined plteously, und Louis
Badar, the manaKer. came to the door and tried
to ?care h'.ni off. He did not go. but rather for??? d
his way closer to the door.
"I ru? ss the dog must btalong to the dend man."
?aid Badar to one of the policemen. H? opened Iba
door a few Inches, and the ?log bolted through I'
In SB Instant, and then scrambled up thr.??- or fi'ur
? steps to a door leading to the morgu'-rouin. Hart
ha began whining again. The door was opened, BOd
I the big bratta, with ? bound. sprutiK for the k< boa
: containing the body of si. Ulano. Ha pawed th? boa
and howled loudly. Then he baesBaS suddenly sav
? age. and would allow no one to g?> near the Icebox.
The hair bristled on the hack of the dOg*a neck,
? his body bacarne riajtd, und the ???????? ran all the
more fr??? ly from his cuts.
He was finally forced away from the Icebos and
1 on to the sidewalk. He walked around t., ti??? back
of the morgue. In Liberty-are., and. taking up hi?
vigil there, remained all nl>*ht. The policemen who
had arttnetased all this became much Interested, and
trit?i various devices lo coax him away, but they
?lid noi succeed.
I The dog finally s"t up such a hideous howll-ig
? that Mr. Bader was compelled by his neighbors to
! go to the Seventeenth Precinct Police Station for
, th" police. A number 0< them came, and after a
: stniKgle carried the dog off to the station, where he
! Is at present. YfSterdsy Sergeant Hairier and oth?
ers made friends with the disconsolate dog, and
?rot meat for him. He refused to eat, but lapped
from a dish of cold water.
Siciliano was a prosperous tailor, doing business
ir, Woodhaven. On his person were found certifi?
cates of deposit for $875. h*-?ides a diamond stud.
Sioiiiano's body was Identified by a man from
Woodhaven, who ?aid he lived at No. (TT Last
Tenth-st.. New-York, and was a young m?n of
| good character.
PRIESTS FRIGHTEN THIEVES AWAY.
BUBOLABfl F.NTF.R A lUDCTOBY IN MBTUOflBB
AND OVFRI.OOK < ?^NSnU'.riAni.F T!rx-)TY.
New-Prunswlok. July 2?. (Speciali.?Metuchen was
vis,ted by burglars last night and fix lion.?-? were
entered. At the rectory of St. Fr.in.is's Catholic
Church, of which the Rev. John Lawr-nec is
pastor, the Rev. Michael O'PonnHI. of K-yport,
and the Rev. Patrick Cantw.-ll, of Long Brench,
were guests. Fathers Lawrence and O'Donnell
occupied the same bedroom. At about 3 o'clock
Father O'Donnell was awakened by a noise In the
room. He saw som? body reru-htng up ta a clothes
reck after three waistcoats which hung on the
I'CKs. The pijes? shouted. "Cet out there." and
the man passed the bed and retreated Into an ad
'?????? room, where a lamp was burnire. Father
Lawrence, who had b-en awakened, leaped from
the bed to the washstand and sentrrd a revolver.
He ran into the ritiing-room, but the rinor leading
Into the vestibule was shut. The pries;? think
that there were three men, for, later, muddy
tracks were found on the porch nnd different trails
over the gras? on the lawn. F.ntrnnce had been
gained through a window opening upon the porch.
The burglars stole a gold watch, chain and charm
belonging- to Father O'Donn? 11. In the same room
were another watch and chain, |2"0 In bilis end a
golden chalice valued at $100.
The waistcoats belonging to the priests were this
morning found on a fence near the rectory. The
house of I?r. A. C. Hunt was entered and a
pocketbook eontainin?? $10 and a railroad pas.? were
stolen. The pocketbook, minus the moni y, was
later found in th?? house of Samuel Qlenfleld, where
the burglars had lefl it. At Mr. Qlenfleld"? house
thr?-e Kol.l rln?s belonging to Miss Jennie ?;icn
field w?-re stolen. Attempts to enter the houses of
Professor And. rson, Principal of the Mctuchen
School, and Robert C. Kennedy were also made.
BATCLIFFE SEEKS HIS WIFE.
AN OKDKR FOR Pit. LYON TO EXPLAIN "??G? UK
DETAINS BEB.
Montlcello. N". T., July 2".--E. J. Raicllffe, the
actor, obtained an or.br from the Judge of Bulli
tran County to-day compelling a l?r. Lyon, of New
York, to appear within twenty-four hours and
show cause why he has Ratei.ffe's wife. Florence
Ratcllffe, detained. I?r Lyon la at White Lake,
and has Mrs. Ratcllffe with him.
ARRESTED FOR SPITE, PERHAPS.
AM> Atala BgCAUBB A SMALL TABLE BAD ????
POT OUTSIDE libs HH<?)?.
Qeorge B. Bellmen, ? Greek florist, who has a
?hop at No. ??,.'? Co.umbus-tave., was arrested laai
evening by Policeman J. sf. Harris because ? small
tahle had been placed outside the shop <?n the
sidewalk. The sergen.it nt the West Slxty-elghth
st. police station held the prisoner on Harris's
complaint, although he expressed the bellet that
the case ivas trivial. Bellman sai?! he had been ar?
rested for spite, because anoth.r ?'reek recently
gave information to Captain Thorn?? that Harrte
was absent from his post and hiding ln ? cellar In
Columbus-tave. The Captain discovered Harria and
caused him to be trlc?i before a Commissioner.
-a?
?G?.?? BURY HER DEAD HU8BAND.
THE WIDOW ?if A DSJAD CKtWlX BATI fiiw. HAS
MONET IN THE HW'K. HIT IT IS
????a TO STAY THKHE.
Mrs. James Hanlon. the widow of the crippled
confectioner of No. 1.1'C Flrst-ave., who pc!'-,red
hims'lf with carbolic acid ln Cftn;r.\l Park ?? Mon?
day night, ?saving a letter saying that his wi:'e by
her drunken habit? had mine l h!m and driven him
to seek death, eal?sd at the Morgue last night to
aea bat buabsnd'a body. The woman ?a.?? a?com
panted by another woman, wlio Mid aha ?as a half
sister of the dead man.
Mrs. Hanlon wanted a lo-?k of her husband's hair,
and When It was given to her she kr.'? ! y the body
and wept. Then she became cxr'.;-', ?. ? Mid tli.it
her husband had been a tarorthless bru:??, ?rho \\ ?<
heter ?lead than ha had been aiiv??. Two brothers
of Hanlon called at the Morgue rh.le Mr-. Hanlon
wa? there. They ipoke km ? y to her, ,? ih< , |
?h? ??..!???.1 nothing to do w:th ai ? o? her
huaban I.
\*. ..???) ?he ?... n.-sk??.] if ehe srould bury t!.?? b? ly
Mi- Hanlon sani she certainly trou'.d noi. She had
so????.?? little mone> in th" bank, she .-.??. and was
going t?. ?et it atay there.
TWO INDIANS DIO OUT OF JAIL.
THF.Y WEBB HKI.f IN <?>>???:'"?'?? WITH THK
Mi HI 'F.I', wh'.'H BTABTED THB BBCEXT
TKOIHI.K IB .?..?????.
Mlles City, Mont, July 89 t How Hair ani
Sam ?'row. two Cheyenne ?n?i??.,- -. aha Were er?
??. led as accesorles with Rugei.; inding Klk for
the murder of John Hoover, over Whoa? death the
lai?? trouble on ih<? Upper Roeebod look place,
broke jail last night by iigi-'ing through ??? sigh?
tieir-ir??-!: nan There wa- no parttculnrl) .?ir.uij
evidence against them, inn they aere held es wit
i,<?????*. They were eonflneii in the women's depart?
rn.-r.t ..f th? Jail. They broke ?.ff a piece <<t Iron
from Hi? h?<], with which th?y made ? hols ai.out
two feel by one. A po?se ??, out scontine the
country for them, but with little hop?? of catching
lhem. St.riff ?.it.b and Under Sheriff Daly ?G?
now at Lion?. Deer Ageir-y wirh warranta for the
arrest ct thr?-e more Cheyenne, Implicated In the
iiiui-.l? r.
??e-?
A BOLYOEB WHEELMAN KILLED.
Si.r.tiKfiei.i. m.??.?.., Jaly 2f? - By a ooUlrston between
bicycles ridden by Kitas ? Ford and Arthur ('
Qaull last night, the former was fatally ir.Jur?,! un.I
th?? lattei badi* hurt, t?? atxMetit o .or. i i?,
Faim? : .\?<?.. Hoiyokc. Mr Ford lived until 2
O'clock this morning. 11?? was a leading ?.'Itlaen of
Holy ?ke._
RIKKRH URI'Ct STORK HAS RKM? ?\ I.I?.
And is now open for business in new building at
SOUthweel corner of Slxih u\enue und TWKNTV
TIMI.-li Sir...,?.?Ad? I.
MUST ACT OH 00 TO JAIL.
an order sionep DflUDCTIKe the ?*<">?
??????? OE THK UOMO ISI.ANP ???
POLICM COItMlSHlOWKBB.
The Police Commissioners ..f Long Island City
have put themselves into serious trouble. Yes
terdsy Jostles Cullen. of the Appellate Plvlslon
of the Baprsme Court, atgned sa order ommit
tlng them to the jail In Long Island City.
Bome time ago the Appellate IMviri.m granted
nn order directing John I, (.r.idy. William Kltz
gibbon? and John Lawlor. as Police Commission?
ers, to reinstate Owen J. Kavanagh as a m BBS?
!.. r ..f the poltCS fore?. Kavanagh ?1* monsf.ated
to the satisfaction of the Court that he had been
removed Illegally. The c??mnilsston?rs did not
reinstate him. and a motion waa made to punish
them for contempt.
This was granted by tne Appellate Division
lUBt before the Court adj. timed, a few weeks
ago, notwithstanding th?? rlalm of ili'* respond?
ents that ??? contempt *???''* Intended, that they
bftd appealed to the Court of Appeals from the
order ?lin-.tlng th.? reinstatement <.f Kavanagh.
and that the Appellate Court had no right to
|?rue a ni.-ui.lait.us. which should Issue from the
Special Term.
The Appellate Court provided In the order of
punishment fof contempt that the Commission?
ers should be tln.d $10 and that they should
stand committed t.? th- County Jail of Queens
County until they compiled with the ?.rder of
th?? Court directing them to reinstate Kavanagh^
Even aft?.? tint the CommlMtonera did not put
Kavanagh bach as a member ..f the force, so rlis
counsel ?Veni t.. Juatlcc Cullen end asked for the
commitment under the order, .._,
His r..?iu.-st was granted, and the order direct?
ing the imprisonment of the <f*???^?*?^"
been placed in the bands of the Sheriff of Qas ??
Count) for Immediate execution.
A PRISONER WITH TBS GOUT.
THE DISCOVERY CAUSES ?G?? ?30 M MI* NT IN
BEIXBVUE B08PITAI*
There was some commotion about Bellevae Hoe
pttal last evening, When It became known that the
feel of Rose, Harnes were swelling. Rose 1? a
workhouse prisoner who has been <1?;?? work
about the hospital laundry for the last ten days.
Hefore she became a prisoner she lived at No. '.'2
Lewkt-Bt Three ?lectors look???! at the woman
without being able t'? determine what ailed her
feet. Finally I>r. Pas.-al announced that the
woman's troubl? was gout.
Nobody could understand why a female prisoner
should have gout, but since she really did have it
ti.-v put ber in Ward No. ?,2. one of the .ooks
siil.l he thought the trouble came from the BStra
nn?.? me.Ua given lo ? risoner?
HE KXFW HOW TO SHOOT.
A BRAVE BOt PRBVEXTS A th imp ???? BOBBING
His PATHBB'S BTOBR.
Paterson, July 2" (Bpe rial).?While Frank, the
thirtrer.-vf p-??1 son of John Lnughlln. proprie?
tor of th?? <??>mp|c Park Hotel, at Lake View, waa
alone in his father's place ?act night, a seedy-look?
ing man entered en.i made a rapid move for the
bar, where the ? tali register rested Laughlta had
left the boy in charge of ;h?? pis.nly because of
e peremptory summon?, which called him to this
elty, and before leaving had told him that there
was considerable mon".? in the register, ..n?i that if
any suspicious strangers came In to take no
chance?. Frank remembered these instructions,
and as soon SB he saw the man rush toward the
cash register he pulled a revolver from a drawer
In the back bar. The fellow saw him nnd quickly
pulled up a heavy wooden chair with which to
protect himself He had no sooner done so than a
build that the lad had meant for his h'.id Im?
bed,led Itself In the bottom of the chair. Th<? fel?
low welted no loiwr, hut ran from the place, curt
Ing as he went. Laiighlin returned ni,.ut an hour
later to And his boy keeping guard over the place
with the revolver.
"Well, |OSt as voti said, pop," was the young?
ster's greeting. "It cam.; off"
"What do you metili?" was Laoghlln'fl rather
anxious question
"Oh. I just shot a bum." was the cool reply.
Then the boy explained what had happened, ani
Laughlln went in search of th" f. How. He not
only failed to find him, but could get no trace
of the chair, which the would-be robber had evi
dently carried off as a mem.-nto of his unpleasant
experience and youns Laughlln'a piuca*.
- - 4?
BCBULE BENTENCED TO DEATH.
A HEW TRIAI, FOB the convicted wife mir
DERER BEFUSSD.
Mllford, Pene . July y: Judge Purdy to-day r??
fusc.l to ?rant the motion for a now trial In the
ease of Herman Paul Schulz. S.ntenco of death
was thee passed on the prisoner.
On June 13, after a trial which lasted a week,
Schul?, was convicted of the murder of his wife.
He s ?111 maintains his Innocence., savin? that there
was no reason why be Should have kllleil the
woman. Mrs. Schulz waa found dead In bed from
a bullet wound Bchuls said he found her deed In
the niorntng and asserted that he had not heard
th?? pistol shot. II<? express.??! the belief that she
had committed suicide After her burial he was
ai rislid In N'w-York City when about to sail for
Europe, the charge of murder haviug he.-n mad"
by his son. The jury, sfter hearlns the evidence,
iras convinced that Schulz had murdered his wlft?
and returned a verdict of guilty.
STORMS AXD FLOODS IX THE WEST.
BKVKRAL PSOPtal KllAMD ?? l.ir.HTNlNr. --?."?' >W
I\ <*.?I>>H.Mh>.
Cincinnati, July IB.?A dispatch to ??The <"*om
mercial-Trlbune" from Marion, ?it,io, says: "A siic
ceasion of terrible electrlctal storms, with heavy
rainfall, passed over the cltv and Its vleinlty.
Qoorge Stout, while driving ? mower, was killed by
llghtnlmr. Charlea Belter and William Son tag.
mchnnlcs. returning hotn?? from work, were struck
down on the street Tiny may recover. Eonr m?n
near Radnor, ftfteen mil??? from this dty, were
killed."
Denver, July as. ? severe snowstorm is reportad
from all the higher portions In the mountain dis?
ti! ts. Three in. lies ?if mow Is reported at ?'ripple
Creek, Aspen an?! other points, and one In h nt
Leadville. The weather is uncomfortably cool even
i:i Denver.
Lodge l'ole, Neb., July ?).?A ClOUdbUTtal six miles
w.st of tlli place tarashed out a mil?? of railroad
track. All traina ar*? tied up. Every dam b?'tween
'.?? md Sidney i.-? washed .ut. .?nd still they are
going. This Is th?? worst Hood * v? r known lot?
Pittsburg, July SD.?A cloudbursi near Carnegie
? night damaged property t?> th?? extent of
$*.'.".." *?. -\t ?he Panhandle minea ?>f ?. A. Hanna
? (?. th?? powder ?torebouse, railroad tracks and
cart were washed ? war, The water rose so rapidly
?).,t t':?? miners v. ? r?? forced in See to th?? hills for
aafety.
-a
THE BIGGEST GAS WELL IX THIS STATE.
>;>;? ?:?; BTEAB ::ai.!'\vin\;yii.!.1? thi? i?\n.v TUOm
????:?: t:?\\ :.?????>??<? ???t.
fivra? use. N. T., July Ml. ? dltapatctl to 'The
Post" from Baldwtnsvllle ?.n-s: ''Another tasssense
gas .vil his been devel ped on th?? l?iinlng farm.
half a mi'?? northeaal <>t BsJdsrlnsvllle. it ?? by far
the most prolific well yet found here. Hy actual
t.st to-day the volume of gas flowing from It
amounts t.? over Uve million fe?t ?.very twanty-four
hours. The pressure Is Intense, and must reach
tar? ? thousand pounds ?> th?? ?pmre inch.
?".'":?<? vv.ll I- down 2..".r*ii fe'-t. It hn ? been sunk Into
the Trillion rock ?M) feet, ??!??t?? ih?? grent deposit
??f natural gas wa? ?truck. No auch deposit hns
aver before been disclosed In th!? Hat??, and It 1?
even f.ii?' !?> expert? that tn?? tl?w exceeds any ?11s
oovered In other State?.
"The for ?<? of the gai will? h proceeds from ?he
boring l? ?o enormous thai it will |lft a weight <?*
tv.?> hundred <?? ihr???? hundred pounds placed over
tha opening it throws out particles of rock from
.. depth of -.?'?:"' feel a hundred feet Into the air.
When tl??? r?.ck is thrown out the (.urtici.?,, nre.
driven through pierna of ?oft wood a? though they
arere ?hut from a gun. The well la now being
piped anil pa. ksd This 1? done in order to ?av? Ih?
waste of gas, which 1? great, amounting, It 1?
thought, to th? vtilua of $1.2*) every twenty-four
hours."
DROVE HIMSELF TO JAIL?
CONSTERNATION CAI'SED BY A BLUE
G???.
G???-???? AU.ES?, PRINK ANP G??.?. ?"REATKP
A SOTNE IN THK DBTOOfjM ??'???-?
iyx-t?p? it BT his ???t???
AND BUSPEBUBI?.
A drunken policeman on a rampage is a rare
sight In this city, but such a spectacle created
much ex.'ltement at Chun-h and Chambers sts
vsterdav afternoon, and caused a large crowd
Of men in the drygoods district to gather and
?ee the policeman drive himself to jail. He ac?
complished that feat after threatening to shoot
some citions, canslng much consternation
,? the crowd. He Is Jnn.es H. Allen, a young
policeman who has had considerable trouble to
retain his place, and he probably will not be a
policeman mimi. kmfST, ?is he was locked up and
,?s,,nded mat evening, and he will tace a
charge in a poliee court this morning.
??,,.-eman ????? Is attached to the poll- ta
?on In Lconard-st.. Where be is now a PS Boner
At 4 p. m. y.s.er.iay he attracted at tent In to
himself at ?-ban?s and Chun'h U..Where
he was on posti In full uniform, by making fran
tic and vain attempts to light a ciotte, t ?
against the,mie. of the. H-pertm.-nt fora pajol
man to smoke OB post, and the men IB the
!.is district who saw Alt*? *V*?*??
a.,.,,,.??.^?'??.-.^p-.???,
? as drunk. His app.-aranc .aus-d .ml ?
him. He sw-.re at everybody in sign?.
,he spectators to chase themselves awa>, but the
crowd only Increased in size.
Perhaps with a view of making a diversion.
Allen made his way to a truck that was stand?
ing In front of No. 10B ('hambers-st. William
?"?.llrnann, driver for ?T/NelH ?t Smith, of No. ?
("naii;l??Ts-st., was sitting on the truck. The
drunken policeman climbed up beside the driver,
grabbed hold of his throat and threw him off
the seat without th? least provocation. Then,
after nearly falling off the truck, Allen managed
to get himself In the driver's seat, pick up the
rein.? and start the team ahead. Beveral men
In the cr.iwd ran to the horses' heads, thinking
It waa unsaf?; for the lntoxtcated bluecoat to
drive, through a crowded street. They drew
back In alarm when Allen made a ?notion to
draw his revolver and declared with a volley of
oaths that h?? would shoot If they didn't "let
go den bOBBte." H?? was then allowed to drive
?o the police station, followed by about a thou?
sand m?n and boys.
Captain ?'r?>ss was looking out of the window
of th?? station when the policeman drove up, and
he was amazed bv the size of th?? hooting crowd
that followed after. The tlrst thing Allen tried
to do wh.n he got off the truck was to assault
Some of ?h? men who were about to enter the
station and make a complaint against him.
Captain Cross promptly interfered, and, seeing
that the policeman wae drunk, ordered him in?
side the station. Th?-n Allen wanted to arrest
the driver of the truck, but, after a short in?
vestigation. In which several business men pre?
sented their cards and told what had happened,
the driver was Hllowed to take his team and
truck away. Captain Cross called a police sur?
geon, who examined Allen, and said the police?
man was too drunk for police duty. Then the
Captain made a ?omplaint against Allen, and
had him locked up in a cell. Me also made a
report to Deputv-Chief Cortright, who sus?
pended Allen from duty.
Allen will be arraigned in a police court this
morning, and probably will be fined for drunk?
enness and disorderly conduct. He was ap?
pointed a member of the police force on March
28, 18T6, He was formerly a member of the
? '.?.!;', vn police force, but, it Is said, was dls
charged for Intoxication. He was dismissed
from the police for?.? In this city for making
false statements In his application to get on the
force, but he carried the case to the courts and
eras subsequently reinstated ns a patrolman.
Captain Cross says there are a number of com?
plaints against htm.
TOMBS MESSENGERS INTESTIGATED.
TUB WAstDBSt AM? ? *? >MMISSIONI'.n WHPIHT QPES
TIOKBD AltofTTMKM ht THB OBAKD G???.
Robert J Wright, the Commissioner of Correction,
arsa examined by the Grand Jury for half an hour
yeaterday In relation to discoveries made by some
of the members of that body in the Tombs on Mon?
day afternoon. Several of the ??rand Jurymen who
w?r.? there .?siting the prison noticed a number of
m?n going in and out of the prison at different
times. These the jurymen thought ?rere pe.iiers,
aa they were Been handing article? to the prisoners
and receiving money In return. Tiie other members
of the Ora nd Jury ?vere informed of tills, and || was
decided t?? a.-k Commission.t Wright ani Warden
O'Shea wha* this proceeding meant.
Mr. Wright explain??.1 yesterday that the caterer
who supplied th?? Tomo.? had two or three assist?
ants, and they wer?? employed at tltm-s hy the pr ??
oners to gel willing materials and other arti'-les for
them. Borne ot the members ..f the ?'.rand Jury
th< ighl thai nrhlakey might thus b?? imuggled into
th?? prison, bul Mr Wright said that would be im?
possible, as each man taras searched every time he
entered the place. Warden O'Shea gave similar tes?
timony.
It wa? sitd thnt the r?ratid Jury wou'.d make a
presentment on the subject.
-?
WONEY FOR A LIVE WIFE'S FIXERAI..
MATOB 0LKA8OB OP IXMffJ ISLAND ?1TY AND HIS
PRlBWDg ??????? A MKAN HtSHANtVS VP TIMS.
John Mullarkey, a bartender, of No. 31 Varick?
st., abandoned his sick wife ??? months ago, leav?
ing her helpleas and destitute. She obtained shelt t
at the New-York Eoundling Asylum, where she re?
mained with her Infant. Hearing what had become
of her. Mullarkey apread a report that she wa?
d>?ad. and began to borrow money from her fornir
neighborfl on th?? pretence of paying for her fu?
neral. Having collected all the money he could in
the neighborhood and spent It for drink, he went
over to Long Island City, borrowed t"> from Ma] >r
Oleasen, and then continued to borrow right and
left from the Mayor's friends, all the time relating
the story about his unburled wife. One day Mayor
Qleaaon saw Mullarkey drinking, ami learned that
the funeral had not taken place. He <.,.n? ft poilcc
mnn to this city to make an investigation, and
learned the truth.
Tho Investigation caused a detective of the York
vin.. Court to go In search of Mullarkey with a
warrant, after Mrs. Mullarkey had been Induced to
mak? .?n affidavit. Mullarkey had carried lis woes
and his thirst t.* Jersey City, however, and a ru???
U..S needed to bring him back Mrs. Mull.irk? y
was Inib?.1 Id write ? letter slating that she had
reo ived a legacy from Ireland, and when Multar?
key received that letter hr thought not of funerals,
"nit bird him back to ?ew-York with furious haste
ami was arresi, d. At the forkVllle Court yester?
day li?? was held In bond? to support hi? wife.
ANOTBEB LYNCBINO IS ALABAMA.
A BEOBO RA3COBO ANP HIS BOOT RIPPLFP WITH
tlt'I.I.KTS.
Birmingham. Aia . July 80??Speciali. The body
of Otorga Blehardeon, colorili, was found swing?
ing from a tree near Alexander City, Tallapoosa
County, ibis momliiK? Kegroeeeoi the body down,
and found It rlddld with bullets. ?Hi Sunday ??????
Hi, bardson entered ?ii?? home .?f ,n?-.-.i Haker, a
Hackneyvllle farmer, and attempted t.? assault
Mrs. Baker, She gave the alarm sad the negro
Bad, effecting bl? eeeape through the window.
? lathering the neighbors' hounds, th?? anim?is were
pined on Hl.hnnl'on r, Ira? k. and th?-y followed
him to within four mil??? of Ooodwater, where h?i
was captured by Mr linker and u posse of u bun
ill ?u ?? litt?? men. Th?? puss?? then started toward
Alexander ?'lty to nut the negro In Jail. On the
Way In? made a confession? Sum?? one In the posse
llre?l a l.uli.-t from a Winchester rllle Into his back.
A rope was then procured, and the negro was s..?,?
swinging from a tree. Th?- posse, after tilling tb?
t..ni> with bullet?, return???! home.
ARRLSTED FOR BBIBBBt IS FALL RIVER.
Fall Hiver. Ma?? . July Ba '"..un'-llman William
Bhay, of Ward '.. was arrested tiu? afternoon,
? ???.????-1 with uc teatina a ?urn of money for bla
voi?? ??, ih., award i? Charles H. Farnham, an
architect, of the contract for furnishing the pians
fur th.? new set ><>i building,
Ih?? most ?ffl.lent morning Iszettve I? Tarrant?
Seltier Aperient. "It laetOB *,?.;. tuo." All ?Jrug
ei?ts.-AUvL bsssbssI
TRE CURRENCY MESSAGE.
REPUBLICAN LEADERS IN THE HOUSE
THINK IT WILL RE SENT IN TO-DAY.
Washington. July 20 ?8pedal).--It waa the gen?
eral expectation of the Republican leaders in
the House of Representatives this afternoon
that President McKinley would send In a special
message to-morrow recommending legislation
authorizing the appointment of a Currency Com?
mission, and defining Its duties and functions,
although it could not he ascertained that d?finit??
assurances to that effect had heen received.
Whether the message. If one shall be sent, will
be accompanied by the draft of a bill of course
nobody was prepared to say. It was reported,
however, that the Secretary of the Treasury
had recently conversed In an informal- way with
several financiers of National reputation on the
subject, and the Impression was consequently
?trong that he was ready to submit at least the
outlines of the proposed legislation.
It Is regarded as altogether probable that if
the House of Representatives shall receive a
message on the subject to-morrow, whether ac
efimpanle.l by the draft of a bill or not, it will be
promptly considered and disposed of before the
end of this BBBSlOB.
WILL ENGLAND PARTICIPATE!
oiownra pkohabimty that bri will into a
iiBi.iy.ATK to a rii.vkh. COXTEMMHCM.
London, July 20.?The negotiations between
the American Bimetallic Commission and the
representatives of Fran??!? and Oreat Britain
have now reached the stag?? which renders it
extremely probable that ??reat Britain will agree
to participate in a conference to be held in Wash?
ington next fall.
BUILDING UP THE FRENCH ????.
A CKaaTJR OP 7.000.000 FRAN? 3 VOTED BY BOTH
CHAMBERS.
Purls, July 20.?The Chamber of Deputies to?
day, by a vote of 518 against 18, without de?
bate and after the Oovernment had declared It
a matter of urgency, adopted the recommenda?
tion of the Budget Committee granting a credit
of 7,000,000 francs, to be included in the ac?
counts of the current year, for commencing new
warships, expediting the reconstruction of the
Navy, and establishing a naval base at Bizerta,
a fortified seaport of Tunis, and the most north?
ern town of Africa.
The Senate unanimously adopted the naval
credit of 7,000,000 francs.
?.Y ARMISTICE IN URUGUAY.
HOSTILITIES BBTTWEEM INSFRIENTS AND GOV
EHNMENT TROOPS SUSPENDED FOR
twenty-two pays.
London, July 20.?a dispatch from Montevideo
says that a twenty-two days' armistice between
the insurgents and the Government troops has been
slsned pending negotiations for a compromise.
A proposal has been made to nominate Se?or
Kamirez as a candidate for the Presidency.
-e
ERA M TO EXPLORE OR FUN LAND'S COAST.
CAPTAIN SVERDRfP AVILI? COMMAND HER?DR
NANSEN TO JOIN A PARTY OF OEOLOGISTS.
Herlin, July 20.?The "Loka'.anzelger" says that
the Fram, the vrssel on which Dr. Nansen'? last
polar expedition was made, will next year explore
the western coast of Greenland. Tne Fram will
be under the command of Captain Svenlrup, who
sailed with Dr. Nansen as navigator.
Dr. Nans.-n, the "Lokalanzdger" announces, will
shortly make a tour of research with a party of
English and American geologist?.
CHINA WANING UP.
HER ARMY ?? Bl REORGANIZED ANT) A NEW
FLEET TO BE ?KINSTRt'CTED.
London. July 21.?"The Dally Mall's" Berlin cor?
respondent says that China Is about to reorganize
her army on the lines of the German military, and
that orders for rifles have bSOB placed ln Germany.
A new ?"hi?ese fleet Is to be constructed, one-half
of the contracts for the new vessels going to Eng?
land and the other half to Germany. The Arm?
strongs will supply the guns for the new fleet.
- ?
TO MAKE A MODEL FARM FOR CHIS A.
A CORNELL MAN OST8 AN INVITATION FROM I.I
RUNO CHANO.
P.nighkeepsle, ?. Y., July 20.?George A. Brill, of
Poiisrhquofc, Dutches? County, who was graduated
from ?'ornell University In 1888. recently received a
message from I.I Hun?; Chang offering him a lib?
eral sum to organize and man ige a model farm ln
china under the Government. He was horn atad
G??.?G???1 Ir. the country and I? one of the best agri?
culturists ln tne State. He will iiccept the offer,
and will soon start for ChlSS to enter on his du?
ties.
-a
TUO INJURED BY A RUNAWAY HORSE.
A WOMAN '*Y>'LIST KNOCKED DOWB AND A FIR!*
??? BPITB ABOL'XD LIKE A TOP
A horse owned by Herman Mander, of the Knlck- I
erbocker Stables at First-st. ..ml ftecond-evs., and |
driven by John Hand, a -reader, ran away In upper
Third-ave. at noon yeeterday, and in the course
of its mad flight dashed for nearly two blocks on
the sldewa.k. knocking down a woman Bad hurdng
a fireman against the wall of a house. Th?? woman
was Miss Bmme Ifalbey, of No. Kg BTeet ferty
s.-v. -nth-st. She was badly bruised by the fall and
was kicked In the back by the horse. She refused |
to go to a hospital, and was taken to her home
after b.-lng attended by an ambulance surgeon.
The Bremen, whose name could not be learned, wae
severely bruis.?,? about the legs and body. He was
taken away by a friend.
While standing untied In front of No. 2.360 Thlrd
avc, which is near < ?nc-hundred-and-tw.-niy
elghth-st., the horse was frightened by an el.-vatxl
train and started at a high rat?! of speed down the
avenue, in which at the time w? re hundreds of
persons. The animal had not gone more than a
few feet before It had upoet and p.i-tlally wrecked
? wagon. The force of the collision sent the horse
on to the sidewalk. Everybody In the street had
by this time feeii the frenzied animal except Miss
Mai hey. She was walking along wheeling her
bicycle, and when ehe saw the borse COmlag toward
li?r she was so frightened that she seemed unable
to movi?. The horse knocked her down and dashed
on. BBS was pb-ke.l up unconscious and carried
into a drug store, where Bha soon revived.
Not far from where th?? WOSaaa was hurt was a
fir.-man II?? thought the hOTM would not come
near tii???. but In passing him the animal swaesad
and sent him spinning around like a lop BgehtSl
the side of a building. Between One-hundred-end
twenty-sixth nnd < ?tie-hundred-.ind-twenty-fifth st?.
tin? wagon strui-k several ????Par doors, demolish.ng
them. The wagon was tiger turn ed and the horse
i?. , ? i...; down. It was finally stopped bv Policemen
Lavender, of ?he Fast Onavhundred-end-twenty?
sixth-st. station.
The ?lrivt-r of the wag,.? was .?rrested, but re?
bus, d, as the injured persons refuse?! to make a
. oniplalnt against him.
4? ? -
IS A BNOW8TOBM IX YELLOWSTONE PARK.
Mammoth Hot 9-prings, Win., July 20--Two spe?
cial trains have brought five hundnd more t'nrls
tlan ?adeaverera to Yellowstone Park, Including
the New-York contingent, a few from P?nn?yl
vanla and some from the Ne,v-J>rsey delegation,
the first sect'.-.n of which arrived Saturday. The
delegate? who arrived on Saturday, and arc now
in li a Interior of the Park, experienced the novelty
>.f ridine In ? snowstorm In Jaly. The snow BBOited
elraoet us fast a? tt felL
e
KXTltA HUM MILK
Qreee Mountain ?'KHTiMKii condensed mi.k eeeaea
from (in choicest dalrj, districi In the world, where
the cow* feed oil tile BSOSl nUtrlllVe grasses a nil ?ne
air Ih famed for Its purity. It does not have the ]
usual condensed inl.k flavor, but Is like ?weet cream.
Those who wish the nurest und best milk should
aee only the Oreen Mountain brand.?AdvU I
TARIFF BILL IN THE BSRATS
A CAMPAIGN OF OBSTRUCTION BEOUW
BY THE OPPOSITION.
WHILE THEIR EFFORTS MAY I-EL.VY A VOTE, IT
18 NOT THOI.'OHT POriiilHLE THAT TIIE ?ON- ?
FERENCE REPORT ?'AN BS* RIM E'TED.
[?? ?G.?.G.',???? To THK ?????G?G..]
Washington. July 'JO.?The persistent obstrue?
tlon encountered by the tariff BUOtSTOBSM report
in the Senate this afternoon has rather dis?
couraged the hope that a vote to concur or non?
concur can be reached in the deliberative
branch before the end of the week. The dis?
gust, either assumed or genuine, of the D?mo?
cratie managers at the failure of the Senate
conferrees to Insist on free e??tton ti??? and free
cotton bagging and the anger of Suvert?as and
Populists of the Rocky Mountain section at the
restoratbin of the *?* a thousand rate on white
pine, found vent In a steady flow of bitter and
Impassioned criticism of the conference rep?:rt.
Interspersed with threats to prolong the session
Indefinitely rather than allow the work of the
conferrees to go unchallenged and unreproved.
The most vehement advocate of a bushwhack?
ing light against the report was, naturally, tha
Irritable ami explosive pitchfork statesman
from South Carolina, Mr. Tillman; but h?: was
ably second.-d In his campaign of btastSff bf Mr.
Rutler, of North Carolina; Mr. Ilacon, of
Georgia, whose amendment laying a duty of
SO per cent ad valorem on cotton was aban?
doned by the Senate conferrees; Mr. JotBSS. of
Arkansas; Mr. Pettlgrew and Mr. Tetter. Prac?
tically no progress ?vas made during th?? after?
noon with the report, and when th?? Senate ad
Journe?! an agreement to fix a time for voting
seemed so far in the distance that Mr. Al'.lson
forbore making any serious effort to bring the
opposition to the point of putting a limit 00 Its
own loijuacity.
But although the prospect of securing a vote
within the pext two or three days is far from
reassuring, there is little ground f??r thinking
that the dilatory fight threatened by the disap?
pointed and disgruntle! opponents of the report
can be long maintained. It Is evident to al', the
factions In the Senate that the report in Its
present shape has a clear majority ??' vote?? be?
hind It, and that no combination can be formed
which can assure either Its sidetracking or re?
jection. No parliamentary proposal Is in BfAef
while the report is pending except the motion
to concur or non-concur in thn flndin?s of the
conferrees; and to carry a moti.m to concur the
Republlcar Senators tarili undoubtedly be aided
by the votes of Mes.-rs. Jon? s, ?>f Nevada; Man?
tle, of Montma. and McKnery. of Louisiana.
Mr. Kyle, of South Dakota, has ?tart-d on a trip
abroad and left word that he shall not be paired
under any circumstances against the conference
report.
So that even If the new Senator from Ten?
nessee, Mr. Turley, arrives to fill the gap ln the
Democratic ranks left by Mr. Harris's death,
the total opposition vote which COttM BS mus?
tered to defeat the report would he only forty
two, against forty-six In Its favor. The Repub?
lican side could even lose the votes of Mr. Mc
Bnery and Mr. Mantle, and still carry a motion
of concurrence with the aid ef the casting v?te of
the Vice-President. Rut the report, wh.-n finally
voted on, la likely to have a majority of at least
six or seven In Its favor.
THE PROCEEDINGS IN DETAIL.
REALINO OF TIIE CONFERENCE REPORT AFOOT
TWO-THIRI?-? ??o.MI'I.KVKii.
Washington, July A?The tariff struggle was re?
moved to the Senate to-day, hut there was little
evidence of an exciting contest when the serslon
opened. Several of the Henal? rs wtn bave btataS ab?
sent from the city were ba'k again, anticipating
that every vote might be Bl Sded
???? attendance in the galleries was greater than
usual, although there w?s no crowd. ?>n tha desk
before Mr. Allison, w.-io la la charge of the bill,
was the ponderous manuscript of t.ie cotafetOBoa re?
port. Immediately after the pra.ver a BM .--age
from tha House annjunced the agr?assent >,f taevt
body to the report. Considerable routine busineae
was disposed of before the report was called up,
Tho Vtos-President annoinced, Is response to an
Inquiry by Mr. Alien, that th?? pending L'nion Pa?
cifie resolution was the unfinished huslncBB. and
would come up at - p. m. anlese displaced Thla
drew from Mr. Morirai? a stal? t?.? nt of his porpOBg
to have a full discussion of the pending question.
It was Intended, he said, to discuss the tariti r? port
in all its political, financial ??nd historical b aringa.
Aside from this, It was propo.-e?l to aeesra eSBSBsV
eration for the I'nlon PactAs r<?solution, either b**
itself or during the tariff .libate, if this btaCSSBS
tstaentltal. It was not sa orderly practica, but Mr.
Morgan said that, erben ??? ? w. ??? litad ?? and
Itasbed over th? back they were not dtaposai to
stand on the niceties of procedure. It was more
Important to sav>> too,?'?),??!) by the I'nlon l'acme
resolution than to p.iss the Tariff bill.
Mr. Allison mildly suggest???! that there wai ??
dlapostttoa to cut off alt reasonable cot.?il.-ratlos),
??f the report. It was too Important^ however, to
give way to other questions which BBiSJht be
brought forward.
l.KADING THI RBPOBT.
The conference r? port was th? ? real in d? 'ail.
When the first clause was read Mr. J? MS Of Ar?
kansas, made an earnest protrst against proceed?
Ing on the tachai ..1 report without an Intelligent
explanation of its meaning. There ha?l be? ? no
opportunity for the Democratic conferrees :o. con?
sider It ln committee. It had been ruabed BsTOMgS*
the House in a slagle ?iiiy. without tim?. ?or preps?
rall?n to discuss it there. It w.i.? ttSS to the
American people, he declared, that BOBBB <xpl.?na?
tion be given.
The reading of the report then peseeeded rapidly.
There were freiju? nt Inquiries b| Mr. Jon? s and
brief explanations from Mr. A 111 tea, but these did
not caus.? material d? ?ay. Seven pages Of the
printed report, covering thirty-eight pages of the
bill, were disposed of in the first half hour.
When the item of window-glass was r. ichsd Mr.
Jones reati a telegram. Just receiVtad from win? ?>?**?
glass deah'rs of New-York, saying that the restora?
tion of the Dlngley rate would pia? e a duty
equivalent to Mi? per Sent on thl? article, which
would be prohibitory and would stop all revenue
from this source.
A SKIlftllSii OVER I.IMHF.H.
The ?umber amendments led to an animated de?
bate. Mr. Tell?r and Mr. Vest ?*onten<lc?l that
the 82 rate on white p.ne and the retaliatory
clause against Canadian logs in effort permitted a
double tax Mr. Teller declared that the wastes
thing was ooacotvod in the mtereet ..f ;? f ? miii
mi>n of Michigan. Minnesota and WleeeasSB, and
they would 80 Seebled tO raise the price of pine
$3 to H tier thousand feet.
Mr. P.-ltlgrew severely criticised the ronf. r-ic?,
amendment, me blag pereeeel references ?o the
Itlchlgae s.u..'?us. li.? Bald tea 12 rate enes
deatened to benedl s few ajee ?ho own what
standing pine tiure is in Mtohigae, iVteeoenes and
Minnesota. Oae Michigan lumi? rman wa.? worth
?,?????, and was prominent In IP|.iil.il.an poll?
tics. "lie Is th,? man win. manlpnl.it. s die ? lec?
tion of Senators In Michigan." asserted ?. P'tl
grew. This condition made the lumiier amen.Intent
BB important one to "the Michigan machine." he
said. This one lumberman's lei, .V ??., counted
again?? the Itiflu.'nc.? ai'.d vole? of ten thousand
ii.cn of ordinary nu-ans The conference report
ought to be rejected o<\ tills lumber Item. it was
ful! cf tricks, he said
Commenting on a newspaper clipping as P> e
gathering of lumbermen In Mr Burrows'? room. Mr.
Petltgrew said It showed that the pine .< menilti.ent
Would take over ??.????..?.'?, out of the pocket? of the
people ?nd put It In the pocket? of "this little group
of lumi), rtiiiii gather ?? in Hurifws' ? room." While
tin? )>ltl ?..:- full of - .ich trt.-k* Mr Pettlgrew as?
sert? d that th.? lumher ran? was on?? of the worst
and BBSS! ban-find nicks cf the whob' bill.
The debate was fruitless of result and the read?
ing of thr report proceeded until th?? amendments
to the eugar ??-hr.lule were reached.
Sir. Vest said this waa the storm centre Of in**?

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