OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 01, 1900, Image 11

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1900-02-01/ed-1/seq-11/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

PART 11.
FOUR PAGES.
DELATED BY HEAVY BIAS.
OF NEBRASKA AN*D ETHIOPIA
ETATE OF NEBRASKA A-™
HERE AFTER HARD VOYAGES.
«>«. AU, THE W.T ACROSS-THREE
rnatCE DALES ALL THE WAT
_, --Tr. ALLAN STATE
BREAKDOWNS * THE *
USER'S HACHISSRT.
_„ Ethiopia and the Allan
The Acchcr *^ c "^^fUg. both from Glasgow
Etite Uner State o. >«d w into port yesterday
and maey days cr orles ot tremendous gales
uninjured, but with of the Atl»ntlc to the other.
j^yrin? from «*.•*•" was sighted early yester-
Tne State ot N . e^Jcd her pier at West Twenty
a y morning. *^je* ooc)scko oc)sck A , mOft from tna
aril . !> t. S<>On •» ihe other slde phe encountered
tt- , the vessel »<« J»« « lp9- heavy .quail* and
a series of 3*rc< > »^ this trouble her machinery
besd was. A ™*\ d s . opa had to be made for
pave out thr« Mrtin- • Jhe Eay ywte rday
repairs. Wne ";l nY out wartl *tjrn about her to
ntn. The
*T a , weH as the few V*M~**V* on tIM trla
eflcera. as well as Qn Inp
gg S^SiS SSJ they would ever S ~
America agaw. ; ,-,:n Hamilion Perry.
Th, State o: £*«£*££ £ She carrl ed three
- aaad I •
M W mi!e S . »»
a >he m-ide or.ly flrty
reached port uu storm door, were
*? n::1 * ? - /:„,,. tfie ofneers and men of the vessel
p\sse:cgeks thko^-n AND brl-ised.
**„ flr«t brief «peH ,' good weather the
■ Vt T l.o ™ JS which tossed her about. The
•^ the ■ " -B the
nfTC e •""; Mst'r than the smokestack. Thi,
JTZ2Z — - *• «* ~- «f S
™ variedly driving iteet and snow. Some ot
-.Angers were bruised by being thrown
-«- -he fornltare and itfai of the saloon. The
SJiTw.. thrown out c! bH berth and his knee
V%iurrf it if- estimated by the steward that
Snap . t!w exten' of (30» was done to the china
"cidont to the 'hlnen" of the State
,1 Nebraska occurred on January 14. when n-r
*.J!l D r?-,.,. became deranred The vessel wad
for fix hours by thw. Much water was
£,££2 On January B the piston rod got out of
crftr aa« the vesse* was forced to slow down
w "«le th# engineer force, ln the face of great dan
rer made the necessary repirs. One of the flre-
rMWvcrely scalded while at hi? work.
The coupling again gave out and more repair*
were ■-»^led.
ONE OF THE WORST HE HAS MADE.
Captain Perry, who has been making the trip be
rtreen here and Glasgow for twenty-five years, said
that the voyage was one of the most tempestuou"
he had ever made. "Such wa6 the force of some of
th* gales " he eaid. "that we were unable to steam
th-euith and were hove to for hours at a tlm^.
Ever-thfcr that was movable was lashed to the
<ie-ks. and : am surprised that we *ot through
without having a single boat smashed."
it was a foruuiata thing for the State of Ne
braska that she was not many more days on the
wruer for when she reached her pier yesterday
lßornirs hrr supply of coal was reduced to about
forty tone She carried, however, a supply of Scotch
coal" for emergency in her lower hold.
XOT A SCRATCH ON THE ETHIOPIA.
The Ethiopia reported much the same conditions
a 5 did the State of Nebraska. She left Glasgow on
Jar.vary 11. Captain Young, the navigator of the
Eihiopia. who was formerly in command of the
City of Rome, said that his vessel had had a hard
tjs»». but had come tnrough without a scratch.
There was a succession of westerly gales, with
tr«njtndous head seae. The lowest day's run made
tss only fifty-two miles. Another day they mad«
only fifty-seven, another eighty and another eighty
oce miles.
The Ethiopia carried three saloon, thirty-four
t*cond cabin and elxtv steerage passengers. There
»-*r<* days when ir was extremely dangerous for
even the teamen to be on deck. Seas broke over the
chip fore *ad alt. • ----.-
Archibald Dawnn, a seaman, diei from pneu
aionla on the voyag-e, and wa« buried at sea.
riS WOBTBASD'B CONTEMPT REAFFIRMED.
HE JtrST FAY HIS FTNET OF $100, AS WELL AS
$10 COSTS.
Crvr.rilsr.av. Pavi'* N. Van Nostrand. the last of
tie Councfmen to object to paying the fine of $100
lni|»iwi il on the members of the Municipal Assembly
»ho refused to vote for the bond Issue of 12.100,000
for the mtm Hall of Records, was duly adjudged in
cor.temp* for the second time by Justice Beekman
is the Supreme Court .*terday, and was also dl
rected to pay $10 CO*'? for making his motion to
vacate the origins! order declaring- him in con
iobj •
The other Councilmen went to the Appellate Di
vision, en the rround that they had a right to be
individually represented by counsel, and thi* they
n».i a rig.nt to decline to vote the bond issue re
quired, as they were acting ln a legislative capacity.
Th? Appellate Division denied their applications to
reverse the decision of Justice Fitzgerald adjudg-
Irq them in contempt and fining them 1100 each,
Councilman Van Nostrand asked that the crder
it. his case be reversed, on the ground that he was
unaware that any order had been made directing
that he should vote for the bond issue. He further
asserted that he was not represented on the day
Vfcaa the first argument on the subject was heard
before Justice Fitzgerald, and that the order hold
ing him In contempt was obtained on his default,
and that he never received notice that another
hearing on th« adjourned motion was to be had.
-- x- cc eexmac holds that it was Councilman
' ih^k 11 — J ' s duty t0 'ollow up the proceeding
when tie aaa -ived service of the order calllnjr
on him to show au»«- why a mandamus should not
rV^*^» E M L;' im ,-/ ad al the Papers presented
mm en his *ha!f do not form any defence to the
motion.
PD L/JTir THOSE WHO MAT BE REFEREES
EEXATCR FORD'S BILL WOULD HAVE THE APPEL
LATE DIVISION SELECT NOT MORE THAN
FIFTY LAWYERS OF TEN TEARS'
PRACTICE.
Elate Senator Ford Mi introduced a bill to amend
i ::•• Cote C f Civil Procedure so as to authorize the
Justices of the ■ PBl*la>i Division of the Supreme
wart to select from among the lawyers of ten
J-'ars practice la the Ist Judicial District a
number, not exceeding fifty, who ghal] aPt as ref
c..«*e ..«* la actions pending l n the district. Justice
of the Supreme Court, has declared hlm-
SiVfron^hecounit^'n^^^ that It does not
b Tt V^WpfZ "^SS l refere ~'
o! offi'iai TreVrVe^ f^ U ■• 111 limlt ? h<s number
**„.. ppointnu-nt
'BE PRAIRIE SAILS WITH EXHIBITS.
*HE CARRJEg p AINT - ETATCART. AMERICAX
WOCDS AXD aouacnara FROM navt
RCSOaggfT A!CD ELSEWHERE.
of T SS!n rt 8 CralMrPralric under command
£™5£ VavvT?^' r B N " • "■"■"" trom th
exhibit, fo. the Pari* Exposition The
en more ihfh. fhlß POrt lO Balt «n-.ore to take
-a for SS tS* tb^ cc on Feb ™*nr s win
p^^S aS?^«*^a? r?r ?5 f & th C
S'»t* g» L^f'artment, models rr °™ uVted
natfcM v£i.t. P ?; a MIT; cn S mo^ el » of yachta and
**<* a tar^xhi*ti £ o V eu>ptl2pe and i?alntln~
arxtf FiKhTrirl ? fto. for ,| fc * L>*Partment O f F()r 8t :
ram!' ana fl^h I !? co »ectlon ha« a fln« display of
■sSm rLlii ™ a!! over th * countrj- < h °--<>~.
tTzJ?™ BA ?M* 9MOTTKED.
**„ owcharged into lighters in the Upper
Ntm Wxihnnt
GVTT&&BVRQ WATERFROXT SOLD.
' — — - • .-• a. a.-*. ■ jr A3
A REPORT THAT THE NEW. YORK- CENTRAL
IS THE REAL -PURCHASER.
Negotiations for t«»e sale of the valuable water
front at Guttenbursr are said t-. have been closed
The name of the real purrhaper is kept secret^ hut
the sale was made to. the agent of Wlns'.ow. Lanler
& Co.. the bankers. Th* price paid is understood to
be high. The property has , been ovoed by the
Guidet estate for generations. 1 and It is known that
the owners held out for a big figure.
It is the Impression that the New- York Central
Railroad Is to control the prop«rty. and that it la
the first of a number of purchases to enable It to
exfnd the Went Shore system from West New-
Tork to the Susquehanna tunnel, at Edgewater.
The purchase Includes blx hundred feet of water
front with the riparian rights, and abuut three and
one-half acres of underland.
Some time ago a firm of Western manufacturers
were negotiating for the purchase of the property,
but it Is said they refused to pay the price de
manded, although they made a good offer.
»
SUES QEXERAL CARRIAGE f'OMI>A\Y.
THOMAS .i. MONT<i"6iIERY WAjrra his gTANPIJC.V
AS A STOCKHOLDER SETTLED.
The initial proceedings in a suit In equity wi re
jegun yesterday In the United States Circuit Court
by Thomas J. Montgomery, a r«iM«lll of this city,
against the General Carriage i .urii^ny. organized
in New -Jersey on May 6, 1899. with a capital stock
of $20,000,000 forithe manufacture bare of electric
automobiles. In the papers rH^tl Montgomery says
he is entitled to JLOiiG.&X) of the carriage company's
stock and $300,000 in money, which was promised to
him on May_ 3 last, when he transferred to "Joseph
K. Hoadlt-y. tl>e holder of $5,000.00!) hi the cor
poration's stock, rights for th» territory within a
radius of twfnty-flve miie? from the "City Hall In
the patent Issued on July 2Sv IS3B, for Improve
ments In electric self-propelling vehicles, to Louis
Kriger.
Five days after the formation of the carriage
company, the complainant' says, he received the
following certificate:
This is to certify that Thomas J. Montgomery is
entitled to receive 10,000 shares of stock of the Gen
eral Carriage Company of New-Jersey, upon pay
ment of stamps tliereon, to be delivered oa or be
fore January 1. 1900. and to participate in the sales
of the stock made for the pool before that time at
the option of the holder thereor.
The certificate bore the signature of the General
Carriage Company, by Winfleld S. Jewell, presi
dent, and A. M. Franklin, treasurer. Montgomery
further says that he has always been willing to
fulfil his part of the contract with Hoadley, but
the money and stock promised to him have not
been forthcoming, and they have been refused be
cause the original certificate was Issued by some
one else than Hoadley. He therefore asks the
Court to have his standing as a stockholder in
the company settled and that the stock and money
promised to him for the patent rights which he
turned over to Hoadley and on which he estab
lished the corporation in New-Jersey be turned
over to him »
CMASGEB SEEDED IS THE WORKHOUSE,
THB GRAND .TTRT MAKES RECVnfMBND.VnONS IN
A PRESENTMENT— NO ACTION ON BROOK
LTK RAPID TRANSIT RtTMOHa.
Judge McMahon, in Part I of General Sessions,
yesterday afternoon dismissed the Grand Jury
after complimenting it upon its industry and zeal.
in disposing of 521 cases and returning 351 indict
ments, which Is said to have beaten all records for
many months. ' »•
This Is the Grand Jury that was anxious to take
up the alleged malicious rumors regarding the
Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company. The December
Grand Jury made a presentment in the case, and
Judge McMahon in charging th© January Grand
Jury instructed it to look Into the matter, but the
District Attorney was not ready with the evidence,
and the Investigation goes over to the February
Grand Jury-
The Grand Jury made A *uresentm.ent on the
penal Institutions on Black-well's ls!and. praising
the work of Commissioner' Lantry and Warden
Fallon of the penitentiary, and Warden Fox of
the workhouse. Th« sanitary and disciplinary
arrangements of the prison proper are. in the opin
ion of the Grand Jury, In keeping Tsrith the best
modern methods, and the addition of a new wing
has done away with the necessity of putting more
than one prisoner in a cell.
The workhouaa the^Grand Jury considers re
markably clean and wen managed," although It is
so overcrowded that often four persons are con
fined in one cell, but the Grand Jury feels that
there should be some radical chance made, both
with respect to the persona who are committed to
it and also with respect to their treatment. On
this subject the presentment says:
The term '"workhouse" as applied -to that institu
tion Is a misnomer, because a large majority of the
unfortunates who are committed to that institution
are enfeebled, eick, maimed, helplegs and mentally
defected persons, who should not be subjected to
imprisonment of any sort, and who are more suit
able subjects for a hospital or almshouse than for
a correctional Institution. It is contrary to every
principle of civilized administration that such a
class of persons for no recognzed offence should be
confined In a prison behind baxa and thrown In
constant contact and association "with some of the
most depraved classes in our community. Our in
formation is that the greatest number of Inmates
of rhe workhouse are committed there for rro crime,
unless poverty can be so designated, because the
real ground of their commitment Is their age or
physical debility, or inability to provide for their
own support.
Those who survive such confinement return to
the city and, having no home, are again turned
loose upon the community, are taker, by the police
to the nearest magistrate, who. through a. sincere
desire to afford some provision for them, and hav
ing no other place to commit them to. sentences
them to the workhouse.
The law should be changed, and discretionary
powers should be vested in the Commissioner of
Correction to make proper disposition of enfeebled
or agred vagrants unable to perform manual labor
by transferring th-m to the Department of Chari
ties, so that none except offenders against the law
should be detained ln the vorkhouse, and there
undergo a Just punishment of hard labor as the
law Intends.
Silver loving cups were presented to James S.
Curry the foreman of the Grand Jury, and to the
secretary.
MADE MAGISTRATE POOL BLUSH.
YOUNG WOMAN ARRAIGNED BEFORE HIM WHOSE
FACE SEEMED FAMILIAR.
There was a precipitate ending yesterday morn-
Ing In the Harlem Court tn tha case in which
Carrie George, a pretty girl of seventeen years, liv
ing at No. 143 Lenox-ave., wai charged with dis
orderly conduct, In not moving on at the request
of a policeman on Tuesday night while she was in
a discussion wltrs her mother and brother at Ono
hundred-and-eleventh-st. and Third-aye.
Something had happens at home, and the girl
left there on Friday. Her T.other and her brother
went out to look for 'her, and they succeeded ln
finding her with a girl companion ln Third-aye.
The mother implored her to return, but Carrie re
toa dto do so. Po'lceman- Wechsler. of the EaM
One-hur.dred-and-fourth-st. pc^'ee station, then
came along, and told tlv girl to move on. but she
refused, and the eaaa BTsa explained to him. He
again asked th»- girl to move nway, thr»atening to
arrest h« r if she did not do so. The gtrl persisted,
and the policeman asked rhe mothi-r ir she wished
to prei>r a cfaarcn aamtast h«?r.
Mrs. George paid she div not wish to do so, as she
kr.i-v. t!i.- Magistrate, and she did not caro to have
her daughter in court b« for» him. Tha daughter
also said ah.- knew the -trate, but a» she would
not move away when the policeman requested her
h*> arrested her
The mother was not 'n court yesterday. When
the policeman arraigned hi* prisoner Magistrate
Pool looked at her inquiringly and asked:
"Havt! you been Pore dm before?"
"Oh, no." said the girl.
"llcvfn't w« met somewiierer* said tae Magis
trate.
"That would be telling. Judge." responded the girl
fmlling and dropping ht-r eyelid*
Magistrate Pool b!u«li*>d and the spectator!
— ghad. 11- did not reprove them, but *udd*ni!v
• i <J.-«l the ' »Sr- by saying:
-r-i<r -i< ilo!l.i.>- fine."
Wh^n Magistrate Pool was asked about tbs case
later he saM he t..outht he had amen tht» girl
sonewberr, but could not tell where. He said li"
could not r*-m«-nil.. r ever navlng met lira. Georpe.
THREE XEW CLYDE LIXERS.
The Clyde Line has given to the Cramp Shlp
buiidlnc Company a contract for the construction
of thre<« new stt-iimshlps. which are to be used in
the ccastwlße snd West Indies traoe. The vesseLi
will be 300 feet lons and 30 feet depth of hold.
BROOKLYN NEWS.
THE COMMERCIAL HIGH SCHOOL.
BIRDS. COLER SPEAKS AT THE FIRST
0 COMMENCEMENT OF THE INSTITUTION.
• Th» flrnt class graduated from the n-w Commer
*ial High School, , in Bedford and Jefferson ayes.,
which was established as an independent institu
tion last October, \ received their diplomas at the
commencement exercises held in the auditorium
of in* Girls' High School on TllliSiaj) night.
After an overture by the Boys' High School
(VrnsilSa, Louis Frank Lieder geve the saluta
tory address and spoke en The History of the
Commercial High School." There were also essays
and orations by William Coykendall. Rufus Kirk
land. Charles F. Hollwedel. Charles A. Ward. Jr..
and- Albert M. Shannon.' The valedictory address
was made by Charles Arthur Jaqneth.
After the presentation of diplomas Bird S. Coler
was Introduced by Acting Principal William L.
Filter as the "most able public financier the city
has seen ln two generations." Mr. Coler <*poke ot
the ar.tages of taking up a commercial life to
tlav_ as compared with a few years ago. "Since
UjK." he aald. "the appropriations for education
In this State have increased o0 per cent. We have
certainly made substantial progress, even If we
have not enough to sr" around to-day." He ex
pressed the hope ihat the Legislature would
remedy £»me of the i vlls which exist in the
local department of education He said that the
State of New-York expended nnnually one-seventh
of the total expenses of education in the t'nlted
States.
!'. H. FLTXX'B PLA \s FOR ST. LOUIS.
HE OKKKRS TO SUPPLY WATER TAKEN
KKO.M THE MISSOURI EIGHTY MILES
ABOVE THE CITY.
P. H. Flynn. the well known -ontrartor of
Brooklyn, who is inteitsted In s scheme to supply
water for S;. Lonio, was quoted yesterday after
noon as follows:
I fcceame 'aterested in a scheme to generate
eipctri'.'liy by -.vater power and supply St. Louis
with ater and electno power some i;m> aga For
this t/-;rpos«s •>.•* picked out me only available spot
neur St. Louis, about eighty mil. from the city.
It Is on tho Missouri River, ana therefore above
th« point where the sewage of Chicago empties
into the Mississippi Hiver through the Chicago
Canal, which was recently opened. This eewage
Into the Mississippi River hns caused considerable
anxiety in tho sities along the Mississippi River.
At present St. Louts uses aboal sixty million gal
lona of water a day. anU a;l the water has to be
ti:t«red before It is used. Since Chicago has pol-
I'tted the water the city wants to go to a higher
source for [ts water. The proposition which I have
mo.ie is to give them as much water as they want
up to three hundred million gallons a day from
our power plant supply. St. Louis pays to-day $70
for rach one million gallons of water. We offer
the city water at the rate of $60 for each one
mill'oti gallons consumed, 30 that the city woatd
sav<3 a good deal of mot;ey nnd would get a supply
wh'ch would meet the demands of the growth of
the city. We make the further proposition that
the city can buy the system at any time f»r
$15.000.0<i0. if st. Louis accepts our offer we will build
two strel conduits for the eighty miles to the
point of supply. Tnia would cost about 55.000.000.
The building of our dam for the water plant and
the ptvuring of the rights would Involve a matter
of P. 000.000. or thereabouts. We would use the
fall of the water for the generation of electricity
and we would expert iO supply power for the big
factories in Bt. Louis and the neighborhood. The
mutter has not yet been officially taken up by tne
people of St. Louis, but I expect that it will be
ln a few days.
SUFFOLK COUXTT AROUSED.
PROTESTS AGAINST BROOKLYN'S EFFORT
TO GET WATER WITHIN ITS LIMITS.
Albany. Jan. 31.— A large delegation of residents
of Suffolk County appeared before the Judiciary
Committee of the Senate this afternoon, to protest
against the repeal of a bill passe dthree years ago
to prevent the Borough of Brooklyn from Invad
lng the streams of Suffolk County for Its water
supply. M. T. Griffin, an attorney, was the spokes
man for the party and asserted that to permit
Brooklyn to divert. . the water of . these .streams
would destroy the oy»ter Industry* of South Bay
upon which so many families were dependent for
a livelihood. He said that these streams would af
ford no permanent supply for Brooklyn, and that
both New-York and Brooklyn would eventually
have to go to the Adirondacks or the Great Lakes
for their supply.
Assemblj-man Baun also spoke in opposition to
the repeal, asserting- that It would permit Brooklyn
to pump the vitals out of their property. This, he
said, was what had been done in Queens County,
and there could be no adequate compensation for
suih destruction of their property. He asserted
that there was no immediate necessity for ai addi
tior.al water Bupply in Brooklyn, and this proposed
repeal was but a scheme of a band of speculators.
President Grout of the Borough nf Brooklyn ap
peared as the Ivocate of the repeal. He presented
mapa showing the watershed from which it was de-
Bired to take the water, and said there was. do
possible Injury to the property, because it was in
tended to take only the surplus water. He said
the Population of the (Hatrict affected was only
2G.000, and they were setting up their interests
against all the people of Brooklyn. He ptlrr«d up a
spirited resentment among the Suffolk County rep
resentatives by his assertion that the law which
It was proposed to repeal was In the Interest of the
Ramapo company. in that It prevented them from
going east for their water supply and compelled ,
them to go across the East River into the Hamapo
territory. Neither New-York nor Brooklyn could
afford to go "o the Adiror.dacks for their W3ter
supply and if they ever did it would have to be
done by the State. To get the water from th<»
Ramapo territory would Involve an outlay of $100
000.000 for construction of the viaduct Whj the
who cost of the proposed system on Lon*? Island
would be but about $25,000,000. The repeal of -his
law, he said, would solve the problem of a water
supply for both Xew-York and Brooklyn for at
least twenty-five y«an "
No definite action was taken by the committee.
AM IT YARD NEWS.
THE m.-PGN'T TO ASSIST AT THE TRIAL OF THF
SOMERS-THE PRAIRIE TO SAIL TO-DAY.
Orders have been received at the Navj Yard for
the torpedo boat Dupont to assist at rhe coming
trial trip of the torpedo boat 3omers. The Somers
has been lying at the Navy Yard ever since sh«
arrived here on the deck of an ocean steamship
from Falmouth, England, at the close of the
.Spanish War. She was originally bought from Ger
many, and has recently been completely renovated
al ? retittfd with new apparatus. The Dupont
which will assist in the test, came to the Brooklyn
Navy Yard on ruesday from Newport K. 1., beating
nil previous records hy twenty-two minutes. The
trial trip will be made next week
Chief Yeoman Clark, of the navn! transport
Prairie, yesterday morning while climbin? th? for
ward starboard ladder leading from the spardeck
to the i,'undeck. missed his footing and fell back
on the deck, striking dome boxes. The ship's sur
geon. Dr. S. H. Griffith, found him suffering from
h «pralned ankle and knee and a contusion of the
head.
The Prairie, whi.-h has been iying at the Navy
Yard ror two .veeks. taking on part of V.\c Gov
ernment '-xhiblt for the Parts Exposition, will leave
to-day for Baltimore, where she will receive more
of her cargo, consisting of pictures, sculpture and
electrical machinery. She will leave Baltimore on
February 15. V. F. W. Homan is to be her execu
tlve ofti'-er.
SEEKIXG .1 DEAD BEAMAWB PARENTS.
Charles Van Clecf, nineteen years old, will be
buried to-day in the Potter's Field at Plant City,
Fla., unless W. L. Lowry, clerk of Plan: >'!'..•. geta
word to-day from the family of Van Cleef, which is
supposed to live somewh"re ln Brooklyn. Van Cleef
served as a seaasan un<ier Rear-Admiral Sohley
when he commanded the United States cruiser
Brooklyn In the battle of Santiago. He was hon
orably discharged last .Tune at the Brooklyn Navy
Yard, and for a time lived at the Smithsonian, at
No. 23 Smith-st. Edward Aschoff. son of the pro
prietor of the Smithsonian, who now lives at No.
7<il Hacker.tsack Road, We-t Hoboken. N. J., re
ceived a l<>n»r yesterday stating that Van Cleef
had been killed by a train near Plant City, and
the authorities desired to know if Aschoff knew
the address of the parent! of Van Cloef. Aschoff
replied that he did not, but he thought they lived
somewhere in Brooklyn.
BIDS FOR BORINGS AND \ DISCS.
BrtdgeCommissloner Bhea opened bids yesterday
for making borings end soundings in the river
bed for tlie proposed new bruii<».H iniwß-n Man
hattan aad Brooklyn and Manhattan and Queens.
Before trie Hit. ,an be fixed the nature of the
bottom and sub-strata where it ts proposed to build
the piers muni he ascertained definitely. It Is esti
mated by* the Commissioner's engineers that the
cost of 'be borings and soundings to aa made
under the contraci will be übout $:\),eoo. Bids were
received fro*n Ralph G. Packard a. W. Mitchell.
Munn A Copeland and Barnard Rolf. The lowest
price on tbe bridge ween Manhattan .in.i Brook
lyn w«s submitted by Bernard Rolf. *7.n80 and
the lowest on the bridge between Mantiauau and
Queens by M'ir.n & Copeland. 57.9 M.
A DEMOCRATIC HARMOXY EFFORT.
A DINNER THE PANACEA TO BE ADMIN
ISTERED TO CURB DIFFERENCES
WITHIN THE PARTY.
The National Civic Club of Brooklyn, of which
Edward M. Shepard Is president, will aive a
"harmony"' banquet at the Pouch Mansion, in
Clinton-aye.. on Saturday evening, February
10. The regular Democratic organization of
Kings is acting ln conjunction with the Civic
Club In siving the dinner. The object of the
(fathering-, as defined by a committee composed
of Herman A. Metz and Charles J. Edwards, is
to "emphasize the desire and expectation that
all Democrats will at the coming Presidential
election be able to act harmoniously, effectively
and successfully. The gatherine; will represent
the sentiment of loyal union between Democrats
North and South. East and West, without re
gard to previous differences." •
All the Democratic Congressmen of New-Tork
State will be invited to the dinner. Among
oth.-r Cnn es smen expected to be present are
Rirnardson. of Tennessee; Armond, of Missouri;
Hay, of Virginia vho Is the chairman of the
Democratic caucus; Clayton, of Alabama; Will
jams, of Mississippi, and Ryan, of Penneyivania.
The quests will be welcomed hy many of the
well known Democrats of Brooklyn and New
1 • rk.
DR. BROrGHTOX'B LAST WEEK.
HE WIM. RETI'RN TO GEORGIA -M f N ISTER9
I'K.'IDK NoT Tj SEEK THE HELP dF
<>CTSII)E PAfJTORfI IN THE RE
VIVAL .MOVEMENT
The Rev. Dr. Len O. Broughton whose views on
subjects haw aroused considerable criti
cism, will !eav~ Brooklyn on Tuesday for Atlanta.
Ga.. to rojum.- his work in the Baptist Tabernacle!
which is now m the hands of his assistants. Dr.
Broufchton expects to sail for Europe In May. In
the fall he may return to Brooklyn, he says.
The departure of Dr. Broughton to Georgia is in
r.o way oonnecied wirh the agitation which his re
vival methoJs hay» caused, as he derided several
"•eks a?o to Icav* Ir. the first week of February.
Dr. Broughton w!:: speak at the noonday meeting
la the association, had of the Young Men's Chris
tian Association Building to-day, and on Friday
and Saturday he will address the I o\ luck meetings
In the Le<> 4niUM CongregmtloßaJ Church. He will
speak on Monday night in the Hanson Place Bap
tist Church. o n his trip home on Tveaday he will
spend a day in Baltimore to fill an engagement.
ScMmmelmann, of Denmark, wffl a!»o
speak ar the meeting in the Lee Avenue Congrega
tion] Church on Friday, and on Saturday will give
a talk ai a general rally for young people in the
asaoctatJon hall. At this meetin X the Rev. Theo
dore S. Henderson, pastor of the Simpson Meth
odist Episcopal Church, will also speak.
The Rev. Dr. < ornelius Woelfkin presided at the
noonday meeting In the association hall yesterday.
K. H .Jacobs led the Bong service Dr A T Pler
<on upok» ir. the absence of the Rev Dr J Doug
ias Adams, who had been expected to pr»ach Dr
FierKon appealed to the congregaUon not to adhere
to anybody's atheism, agnosticism or other ism
cut to put themselves * n God's hand*. The bene
diction was pronounced by the Rev Dr D C
Hughes, of thf Pilgrim Baptist rhurrh.
Fifty ministers, representing sixteen denomina
tions, met in the rooms of the Young Men's Chris
tian Association yesterday morning for the purpose
of aiditig in thr present revival movement. The
Rev. Dr. John F. Carson presided. A suggestion
was made that more "outside pastors" be invited to
ioin in the movement. The idea, however did not
meet with approval, and It was agreed that the re
vi\-al should be ielt In the hands of the Brooklyn
pastorß. It was also thought advisable to have a
largp number of evening meetings held in various
parts of Brooklyn. A prayer meeting ol the min
isters, it was announced, wiii be held in the Yonng
Men's Christian Association Building, In Fti'ton-st.,
ot 4:30 o'clock to-morrow afternoon.
A CAS-HIER ACCUSED.
CHARG-D WITH BEING IMPLICATED IN THE ROB
BERT OP AN IISSJIHHIH a OFFICE.
Henry Athing, cashier of the Prudential Insur
ance Company at No. 85 Borden-ave.. Long Island
City, was arraigned yesterday before Magistrate
Connoughton on a charge of grand larceny made by
'■onrad Dykman. the manager of the Long Island
department of the company. He accused Athing
with being implicated In the disappearance of $Bfs)
In rash belonging to the company at>out two weeks
ago. At that elms Athing reported to the police
that while he wag alone In his office two men en
tered, and at the point ot pistols compelled him to
aliow !h^m to go behind the rails, and that they
BtoJe the money and got away. Magistrate Con
noughton fixed bail in $1,500 and held Athing for
f'irther examination next week.
\ir gT CLOSE BAMBLTNQ PLACES.
PREPrDENT YORK ISPT'E? ORDERS TO BROOKI.TN"
IXPPECTORfi AND CAPTAINS.
The Brooklyn police have received specific orders
from President York of ths New-York Police Board
with reference to closing up poolrooms and gam
bling places. It is said that each Inspector in
Brooklyn will be held strictly accountable for the
division over which he ha« jurisdiction, and that
each captain will be held accountable for his pre-
Mn.-t. The .'ommissioner says the Inspectors and
■■aptains must either break up the poolrooms in
heir precincts and divisions or take the con«e
}Uer.ces.
RO<>\[ W.WTEH FOR RECORDS
BURROOATS ABBOTT SUPPORTS COMMISSIONER
WALDO'S SUGGESTION THAT THE HALL.
OF RECORT>9 BE ENLARGED.
The congested condition of the Hall of Records
has caused coilsWßiabKe annoyance and anxiety
and it Is hoped that it will soon be relieved either
by the erection cf an extension to the present build
ing or hy enlarging it by the addition of one or
more stories. The attention of Surrogate Abbott
R>-Kist»»r Howe and County Clerk Huberty has
been called by Commissioner Waldo to the fact that
he is in great need of a place where the business
of his office can be properly attended to, and that
there Is urgent Dead of metallic boxes for safe
guarding the county records axalnst rlre. The Com
missioner suggested that the building be enlarged
and made modern In every reapeot. in the belief
that Immediate relief Is necessary to prevent serious
Surrogate Abbott yesterday sent a communica
tion to Commissioner Waldo, agreeing with htm In
relation to the necessities of the ca»o The Sur
rogute said the records of his court had become
■o voluminous and the floor space so restricted that
he had been obliged to put the records down In the
basement, where the conditions of light heat and
air are not ar all favorable to their preservation
The record rcom accommodations are entirely in
adequate. J
DEATH OF CHARLES H. REYNOLDS.
Charles H. Reynolds, one of the oldest coal mer
chants of Brooklyn, died yesterday afternoon at
his home. No. SlO Bu»hwlck-ave.. from heart fail
ure. He was born ln New- York in 1537. and had
lived In Brooklyn fifty-four years. He was a book
binder by trade, and worked for years with Harper
& Uros. Then he went Into the coal and wo.Td
business. In which he continued to be ud to th»
time of his death. p l tn *
Mr. Reynolds was v member of the Society of
Old Brooklynltes and of the Maoonlc Veterans and
was h director in the First National Bank of
Brooklyn, an Ineorporator and director of the Will
lamsburg Trust Comnany ani a director of th«
Jiushwick Savings Bank. He leaves four sons and
threo dHUßhters. Tho fuatral will be held at his
homo on Sunday afternoon, and the liurial will h*.
In ypress Hills Cemetery. lv
A BIG REAL ESTATE PURCHASE.
S. Clarke Bowen. of Idaho, has bought from
Horace Nichols for about $200,000 the following
property, which ia sl*;ia f rd chiefly In the Twenty
first and Twenty-third wards: Five brick and stone
dwelling kousea. No. C 4 to <30 i.ewis-ave t -orn >r
of Balnhrldge-st.; (Ive stone dwelling houses V
ISC to 192 Decatur-6t.; threu story brick dweli'in..
house. No. oS3 Pacifle-st.; four brick dwe n*
houses, No. f-42 to .'-^ Lexlnston-ave.; five hn-u
apartment houses. No. '*«A to 572 I.*?xln<ton aye •
bi.irs and .lw.-lllnß h.-une. No. 1.877 Fulton .7 '
thre« story dwelling house. No. 4« Chauncev 'lt '■
■tor« and dwelling house. No. «T3 . Atlant:' Vvi":
ntne dwei.inji noun**. No r.74 to 692 H#rKlm#.r -V
and several vacant plots, which the purchaser u4ii
lmprovo ln the spnntf U4Ul * r wlu
NEW-JERSEY NEWS.
Fully a baker's dozen of good men and true
are willing to fill the two vacancies which will
occur in the State Board of Assessors. The term
of Robert S. Green will expire on March 2 and
that nf Stephen J. Meeker on M.irch 10. Among
the most prominent candidates for the succes
sion are Ex-Senator Frederick C. Marsh, of
Elizabeth: General Louis Perrine. of Trenton,
and Herman Schalk. <* Newark. The others are
scattered about over various parts of the State,
and of late have not been urging their prefer
ence, for the reason that it has become apparent
that their prospects of success are hardly worth
considering.
It is known that the Governor has found it
difficult to see his way dear to make a change
from the present incumbents. From his well
known intimacy socially with ex-Senator Marsh
It can safely be said that he has looked with a
gTeat deal of. favor upon his candidacy. Nobody
Is more willln - than Governor Voorhees to do
a favor for an old friend, an as the appoint
ment Is 1 due to a Democrat Mr Marsh would
b»? right in line were It not that ■ number <>t
the influential friend." of the late Governor
Green have urged the reappointment of his »on
for the sake of his father. These requests have
been made In such a way and so earnestly,
upon the ground that Mr Green has b«en a
faithful and efficient member of the Board, in
addition to the other claim, that the Governor
feels that he cannot well, or with propriety.
Ignore them. Aa to Mr Meeker, he is regarded
as a clean and efficient member, and his reap
pointment is quite as earnestly urged as that
of Mr. Green. It Is therefore not af all prob
able that there will be any change in th*> makeup
of the Board. ♦
When, through the efforts of Congressman
Hcwell. an appropriation of $10O,0<lO was securer]
for the erection of a new postofflce building at
Xew-Brunswlck, there was much rejoicing in
that staid old city Of" course, there wa3 some
disagreement as to th» selection of the proper
place f or the building, ><ut that was final:-. over
come, and the choice was made. The purchase
price was agreed upon, and the matter was all
done but finishing, so to speak. The Govern
ment was not. however, ready to pay over the
money until a search of the records revealed that
the title to the realty was clear. Then there
was more trouble, and United States District At
torney Rice was necessarily mixed up in it. He
was obliged to report that the owners of the
site selected for the office building would
not pay the costs of the search. It is admitted
by good judges of real estate, even inclusive, as
Is said, of those who have real estate to sell to
the Government If it should change its intention
and decide to select another location, that the
owners of the site selected obtained a good round
sum for the realty chosen, and the contention of
the Government is that they ought to pay the
costs of the search. Bur they say that they
will not pay these costs, and there the matter for
the prewnt rests. The fact that it Is resting
does not. however, prevent the contest for the
office of postmaster going forward as briskly as
ever between Mr. Russell. Mr. Stillman. Mr.
Banker and others. In the mean time what
Representative Howell thinks of the general
muddle and the reams of petitlous which h» is
receiving he is wisely keeping to himself, doubt
less, as his friend Robert Carson says, because
he is unfamiliar with the supple possibilities
of the English tongue.
FAITH CURISTS r\LL A DOCTOR.
A BISTER SATS THE PATIENT WA3 WITHOCTT
FAITH AND OF CNSOT?ND MIND.
Frederick Weisel. of No. 136 Columbia-st.. Union
Hill, attended the evening- seni-c at the i"h\irf:i of
the First Born, composed of Faith
Bramhnll and Ocean ayes.. Jersey City, on Sunday.
His rambling remarks save ■Ttdoaca of an unbal
anced mind. On Monday he appeared at the home
of the Faith Coitata. adjoining the church. H-?
was frozen from the w.iisr down. The Faith
Cuilata gave him a 'emporan home, but on Tues
day he hecarre violent, and Dr. Bull had him sent
to the CUy Hospital. His condition did not Im
prove*, and yesterday he was sent to the County
Jail, where he will be examined hy County Physi
clan Convene, and probsWy sent to the County
Insane Asylum.
Sister Carrie, who was in charge of the Faith
Curlsts' Home, yesterday. SaM
"'We summoned Dr. Bull. Some people may think
this strange, but we believe that it is best to send
for a physician where the person to b» treated is
without faith. We noticed that WHsel was of un
sound mind, and we had to suppress him. When
he came back on Monday morning we took him in.
Being ('hr!*tlans. we could not turn him away "
TWO MILLIONS FOR \FT\V\RKS ' ITY HALL.
A NEW BILL ATTHORIZING $1,500,000 IN BONDS
AND OTHER ASSETS AVAILABLE.
A bill introduced in the Legislature by Senator
McCarter, of Essex, authorizes the city of Newark
to issue bonds to the amount of $I.s«Xooi> to pay for
a new city hall. The bill takes the place af an act
passed laat year providing for bonds 'o the amount
of $730,0110 for the same purpose, and makes a dif
ferent way of paying the bond*. By the new bill
the bonds are to be not over 4 per cent and are
to run thirty years. Senator McCarter also intro
duced a bill to enable Newark to sel! and Rive title
to a pier property on the Passalc. which ta among
some valuable real estate assets that are to be
sold by the City Hall Commission, ihe proceeds to
go toward the building of a new City Hall.
A new courthouse Is needed, and the Board of
Freeholders Is authorized by law to issue $300,000
of bonds to build it. A proposition was considered
for the city and county to erect a building- tn
which all the offices of both could be located. This
idea has been abandoned. If the Legislature past**-*
the new appropriation bIH the city will have avail
able nearly CoOO.Ow) tor City Hali construction, as
the sale of unused city real estate will net nearly
t1.00H.000.
YO HALL FOR BRYAX I\ PITERsnW
aOVWOi VOORHEES REFUSES THE ARMORY.
AND HF. CANNOT GET A THEATRE.
Paterson. Jan. Munson Force, chairman of
the Democratic County Committee, sent word from
Trenton to William B. Gourley to-day that Gov
ernor Voorhee3 positively refused to give the use
of the armory for the Bryan reception and meet
ing on the evening of February S. Manager Goets
chius. of the Opera House, has refused to lease the
building for riie demonstration, the house b ■•ln*
engaged by a theatrical company.
John Coutade offered the people who are billed
to play in the house next week $l"i»» for the use .->f
the theatre on the night of the meeting. Manager
Waits, of the troupe, learned of the scarcity of
hails in Ptterson. and now demands for the use of
the hall for one night S.".iNi. Mr. Coutade then
turned to the BIJou. but It seata only 1.6»0. and Is
too small.
BRYAN WILL NOT VISIT CAMDEN.
Camden. Jan. 31.— William Jennings Bryan has de
clined to accept the invitation to be the guest of
the Amerlcus Democratic Club at the Temple Thea
tre next week. He telegraphed from Massachusetts
to-night
"IrapoMible to be in Camden; will be at Burling
ton."
The members of the club are much disappointed
as great preparations had been made to receive him
here.
EIPAMIA7S RIGHTS CRAXTEH AT R\YOX\E.
BOILER COMPANT PROPOSES TO REMOVE ITS
WORKS FROM ELIZABETHPORT.
The NVw-Jer«ey Board of Riparian Commissioners
met ln tha Fuller Bull.ting. in Jersey City, yester
day and granted, conditionally, a right to «S5 feet
on the Kill yon Kull. la Bayonne. to the Babcock
& Wllcox ''ompany. of Elizabethport. The com
pany fraposes to remove Its plant to Bayonne. It
manufactures steam boilers, and employe* eight
hundred men. The grant for Ita propo»«d new site
la betwr-!: Hobart and Ingram ayes. The price is
$17,000. ru- company several months a«o asked for
800 JJ et't ' , Th<- ommlwton nxe<l the Price at PO.M.
or $33 a foot. The company y«a«er«ay asked for St
feet at »>»^»t. The price awarded ta at the rate
of about t» " a foot. the condition Is that within
a year the company v , o erect on ths site works
cov«rtng jii.'HW *4Uart feet
THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY „ 1000.
!:
FAGAS AXD DAVIS QUARREL
THE MAYOR'S REFUSAL, TO SION A LIGHT
ING CONTRACT AT THE BOTTOM
OF THE FEUD.
Mayor Lawrence Fasran af Hoboken and P.okavt
Davts. the Democratic "hoss" of Hudson County,
are said to be on the "otits" again, and the faith
ful followers of 'h» machnv and the F.igar.ites ar»
wondering what the result will be. T>»r» was a
t!m-^ when Fasran waged bitter warfare upon
fJavis. and said that he had so ia*»n.--s.-' to irtempt
to ambfla with affairs In Hoboken. He even went
so far as to sussest the organization of a Demo
cratic City Comm. Independent of the r ngiilT
orsanizatJcn. In the summer of ISW mutual frUnaa
suc.-eedt-d ;n; n bringing the two BJ^n together, aawt
they patched up their differences. The siiwiasua
ment followed that Fasjan nr»<» an out and out
regular, and In the fall campaign of that yea* bothi
men appeared on the same pintfonn in Hoboken hi
the lm»r«?'« of th* rrpular ticket. Th^n followed
th« proclamation that Davis was In favor of the re—
noir.!nrti'>n of hi» old tim«- enemy. Mr. Facan. as
tho mayoralty candidate of Hoboken for his fourth;
consc<*utirr term, and Davls's powerful aid in h.itd
!rv the organization. mcludSns some bitter <4nti-
Fainn men. for the regular ticket resulted ia
Finn's eWvtror* ,"
Thr D. mo^ntic machine wa.« jfreatly Interested
\n-t spring In killinjr of the North River HeaCi
Li^rtt and Power Company, which entered Into the '
field ot competition against the North Hudson
Kf at. Light ::nd Power Company, controlled by the»
Shan>y syndicate, which then «>njo>#-d and still
enji-yr. a monopoly In the electric !is;ht - . n r sa.
A majority of the Hoboken Common •/ouncilmen. .
r.-ho iv»-re controlled/ by Davis, froze out the new
rorapany ;.. I made » ttve year street lighting- con- ■
tra.-r with i-e ni,l' roncrrrs. although th" North
Rivpr company offered to furnl-sh liiiht at $&> a llghc
by the year, or TJO iess than th«» North Hudson 1
company. Although Mayor Fapan oppewi the new
company he refrained from sisrninsr the- contract
made with the old concern. He did not veto it.
how.-vrr. and the company Is now furnishing lisht
umler the :<-mu of thii* contract.
It L". Siiid that Dnvis Is particularly hitter against
I'ar.in for nor sijmin*; tbe contract, in view of tha
fact thru th.' machine and tlw syndicate's friend.*
helped '.fci Mayor during his mayoralty campaign.
The IXmo<-ruto "bos?" ha* b*»<»n exceedlntrly u»
oumpiimpntary ln talkins about the Mayor of lats.
A few days aeo he nccuaefi Fapan of beins inter
est-.! in the formation of the Municipal Heat. Light
and Power Company, which has applied to the
Common Council for a franchise, and has made*
p.llurir.i? promise* to furnish li^nis cheaper than
the old company. The Mayor demea that he ha*
anything to do with the new concern.
Mayor Fagan has ■ refrained for many months
from appointing a .-th sasaii • of th^ Polic©
Board to fill a vacancy. Davis Insisted that ex
<'.>un<-ilmJ!'n Anthony Cape'.H. an antl-Fazan man.
should have the place, and politicians in the inner
circle allege that F.-ijcan said he would name his
o'd time enemy. The appointment, however, has
not been made, because the Mayor knew that the
majority in the Council hail received Instructions ».o>
refui»« to cor.Srm any appointment for Police Com
mlssioner othr* than Capellt. .
It is rurr- -- that the Mayor has almost ma«ia
up hi-^ mind that the confirmation of an appoint
ment by him of a Police rnmmlssion-r i<» not
necessary, and in the near future he may decide to
apooint somebody other than Mr. Capelli. who ha=*
been promised the place by Davis. The /asan-
Davis breach is widentesr dally, and the faithful
are wondering what will be the outcome of ex
pected open hostilities between the stalwart
fighters.
TRGI\r, PAYMENT OF KAR CLAIWK.
AN OMNIBUS BILL LIKELY TO BE PASSED Vili.it
THE ITEMS OT VARIOUS STATES.
Washington. Jan. 31 (Special).— Governor Voorhees
has th« aid of Representative Parker In s«*curtnsf
legislation from Congress ro authorise the pay
ment of the 3oarish war claims of New- Jersey and
other 9tatea. The auditor of the "War Department
has objected to soi of the Items, it is nnde-rstoo«L
Whatever the auditor derides to pay will he in
cluded tn an oranibu? rrtsatm to comprise all tha
items of the same c:a.-«i. a* it would stand a bet
ter chance of passing than If included tn separata
bitlS. x.,a-w- '
Representative Hnwell has secured the estah.tar
ment of free delivery at Somervllle. to 5:0 into ef
fect May 1. 19C0.
W A. Britton. postmaster at Perrineviiie. has r»
signed, and Representative H-w-ll has reconuaeaaV
ed as his successor J. W. Horaer.
PREPARING FOR A DOUBLE EXErVTIOX.
Sheriff Reompler of Baasaa County hi making
preparations for the doub> execution on February
9 of James K. Brown and Edward Clifford. The
friends of the latter are still hopeful that H will
escape the fallow?. It is alleged that he is dement
ed and Is also suffering from Bri-hf* disease, and
will die from natural causes if hi? sentence can be
delayed.
EDGEWATER LOSES ITS POSTOFFICE.
Th» poßtofflce which for y?2rs hns been located
at Edjsewater will be removed to-morrow to Pleas
ant Valley, where th? Fort Lee ferry runs. Tha
site is mor° aoce«s!Me. and h*nce better servtca
Is locked for by th<» residents. Postmaster "Winter-.
burn will be succeeded to-day by W. C. Godatrty.
SILK WEAVERS STRIKE AT VFirroV.
Newton. Jan. 31 (Special). — One hundred and aeTw
enty-flve weavers at the Sterling Silk Mill went
en strike this morrJr^ A cut had been made tm
certain grn iep of work -,• -.; the other employes ap
pointed a committee to confer with the proprietor.
Thomas Bently. and Superintendent Matthews t<»'
cbtaln & restoration of the former price. The man-;
agement r&r'-jsed to gmnt the requesr and a 3trike»
was ordered. No union labor is employed it tha
mil!, and the rates are lott.
The ml.l Is owned by the Sterling Silk Mill Com-i
pany.. of Paterson. N. J.. and was established hv
iSB6. A large addition was made to the works la3t
year. The mill has been running on full time tcr
keep up with orders.
EX-FREEHOLDER KILLED.
Brunswick. Jan. 31 (Special.— Ge«rs» Gv
Perrine. seventy-fo'i: years old. was killed by fall-«j
insr cut of his wagon while driving to as hooa.
at Plainsboro. In Middlesex County, last night. Mr.
Perrin-='? skull was fractured. The horse kicked.
Itself free and walked home, a quarter of a mile.
The family started in search of Mr. Perrine. and
found hi* body by rh- ir»adsl«le He was formerly n
member of the Midti'esex County Board of Free
holders and Tax Collector of Monroe Townshipw
He leaves a son and a daughter.
BRICK COMPANY FORMED IN MILLTOTry*.
New-Brunswick. Jan. 31 (Special?.— Articles of li-«
corporation for the Buck hart & Au*r Cora-*,
pany. of Millto-jrn. were filed in the MfcMMaas]
County CTwk's iffl<-- in New-Brunswick, to-tiay.j
The company Is to manufacrure brick. The eorpo-.,
ratora are Henry Bnckhart. Adoiph Aver and John.
Hoax, of Savrevllle. ami Joseph I. Kusier. of,
New-York. T*n» company start!" business wtthu
$ir»,OOrt subscribed ooi cf a«otal cf $iim,oia> capttal,
RAHWAY RECTOR GOES TO TROT.
P.ahwiy. Jan. 21 — Th» Rev. Roderick Pmvcst Co^jhi,
rector of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, announced ta«
the midweek services this evpainc that he would r»-'
sign as rector. Theresiernattoa is to take effect March* :
1. Mr. Cobb has accepted a ca!l from the Fifth Are-- 1
nue Episcopal Church, of Trey. N. Y. and will'
asmjm* charge the first Sunda» In March. Mr '
Cobb has been rector of St. Paul's Church fors
eljfht years. He came here from Crosswtck. and ta
gTeatly liked. **
A WFhhlMr.
East Orange. Jan. a (Special).— Mis* Annie Kath*
trine Sansom. sister of Mr. ai:J Mrs. Char!e» HL
Sar.aom. of No. 37 Mitchell Place, was married tj
Willixra Hubbard Shepard. of Newark, at the- FtrsS,
Congregational Churrr o? East Orange this after- r
noon. The ceremony wa' performed by th* Rev."
Ambrose Wh Veraon. pastor of the church. The
maid of honor waa^Mls* Florence Hodson. and tha
best man ink Hodson. jr.. of HoN>ken. cousins
of the bride. The bride was attende.l by her niece
Ml«s Ruth 9an*om. as a flower girl. The natma
wer. Dr Edward Hill Baldw.n. Clifford Vreeiaai
and Furnan Randolph, of Newark; Frederick HooV
son. of Hoboken. and Gerald Gordon, of Arlington.
Mr. ani Mrs. Shep&rd started I—nMiHalalj on thetr
weddlns trip, and >n their return will live at No. S
Oaborn Terrace Newark.
ROBERT DAVIS ASSOCIATION'S BALL.
he Robert Davts Association had tta annual baU
a«t night. ar.d thousands of politicians attended,
H w.»s h» I 1 at Columbia Hall. Jersey Ctry. th*
largest hall In the city, and It sraa inadequate ta>
accommodate the crush. Every section of th«
county was represented, and politicians of hfajh
and low decree met to pay homage to the Demo-*
cratlc "boas."
IBEEGHAH'SI
T f^ 111 C Cvp * I»«Mjw««I»«. «r
T %-J I ! | ((.n-.tlp.tnin. 4>
T r IL 4 L-4 *-X Slek Uruilaeh*. 4>
I ■-''■ +■
% ■;.; ;. 10 cents and 25 cants, at all drag staras. £

xml | txt