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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 04, 1900, Image 15

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COREAN IHNISTBB GOING.
CHIN PAX YE SOON TO TAKE HIS NEW
POST IN FRANCE.
_ . . ,- 3l ~ciaD.-The routine atmos
. Washington, Feb. 3 CW^a^ ,9, 9 disturbed. The
,here of the Core" » transferred to
Minister, Chin Fak «• "J Ye will shortly leave
France, and. with Mrs. and dJscret i on
Washington for his new r —^ which began with
marked his four years - Corean dress and ancient
the transition period rro toilet and modern house
customs to the European Q , d Corea _
keeping. There » Kingdom of the Great
Land of the Morning _ )s Fllpping . awar . n
Ch3*^ P'^^Vay m , that the royal edict
was on Hew Year ' "" _ ' n]) , T . of Cores to be shorn
mm t forth COJSljaa^:'*^, n ing braids coiled on the
cl their •"=! ***""• * nc _ :
MINISTER PAX CHUNG TANG.
First Minister of Corea to the United States.
• top""c* the head, their pride for ages and almost
as sacred as the religion of their ancestors. The
King himself set the exsjnple. But It was none the
less a sacrifice for his subjects. The spirit of dis
content grew Into rebellion, and Indirectly had no
ems:; part Is the revolution of that time.
S*yr Dana began with the treaty of 1882. when
the doors of the Hermit Kingdom were opened,
elowlr and cautiously, to the new world. Six years
Imter the first Corean Legation came to Washing
tor. It was to throw oft the grasp of her power
ful neighbor, China, that Corea sought the friend
ship of the United States. Early In January, ISSS.
the M:r.:.«:' '■ Pak Chur.e Tang, accompanied by
c retinue of secretaries and attaches, presented his
credentials to the President. Their dress, neither
■ Chinese nor Japanese, and, above all, their curious
hats, made them conspicuous figures everywhere.
Their gentleness and simplicity and the fact that
their Gjvernment had turned to this country for
support la asserting Independence of China won
the rood will of official circles. The Minister was
a dignified and reserved man. who had filled a
place in the Corear. Council similar to that of
Secretary of the Interior in the American Cabinet.
Besides the Corean secretaries there was the Ameri
can secretary. Horace H. Allen, the present Min
ister of the United States to Corea.
A PERMANENT HOME BOUGHT.
The Minister of Corea remained in the United
Elates less than a year. He was homesick, too
homesick to Star any longer, and he obtained per
mission of his Government to return home. There
he was appointed Prime Minister of the Council.
Secretary Te Cha Tun was appointed Charge
. '4* Affaires. - Mr.- Te. as he was called, looked like a
_. bcr. with his slight figure and youthful face. But
' he proved to be very much of a man. and an a.c
complished diplomat. It was while-he was at the
head of the Legation that the Corean Government
■was persuaded to buy a Legation residence at
Washington. Mr. Ye was quick to see the ad
vantages possessed by representatives of govern
ments nntat residences over those moving about
from ore furnished house to- another. He bought
a line Souse, which under any circumstances would
'" be a good investment, and at the same time gave
to the Legation of Corea a certain prestige over
the richer and more powerful Legation of China.
Little Mrs. Ye. with her sweet, attractive face,
was a clever woman and a social inspiration at the
Legation. When, with the wife of another Secre
tary, on arriving in Washington, she was urged by
Mr. Allen to hold to the seclusion and customs of
Corear: women, she smilingly Ignored the advice.
With the air cf the Xew World, Mrs. Te imbibed
the spirit of freedom and promptly cut loose from
ancient customs and traditions. She had wonder
ful adaptability, soon adjusted herself to the eti
quette of social life, and learned English with sur
prising facility. Mrs. Te decided to give up the
Coreaii dress. ' When she was told that the bright
ellks and fiowing robes were more picturesque and
becoming, she smiled, making no protest. But one
Easter moraine she walked into the Church of the
Covenant wearing the daintiest Easter bonnet and
eprlng gown of latest fashion, looking, if not so
: picturesque, as pretty a? ever. Mr. Ye was with
.. her. quite transformed by a spring suit of gray
doth and high silk hat. They became regular vt.-
•p. YE cj;a rum.
wao **■ Charg* d' Affaires of the First Corean
L *sa.tlon at Washington.
An£n"£ ParP a r : a > tn - i 8 i:hjrch - and when the "little
*h"r"h^V& £ Came they carried it to the
w"-e a h,™ Coveaa at for the christening. They
£t> d»u2sf r yoan 5 couple until the death of the
oCo™ S u r - A few months lat*r they returned
iSraSSiite?™* the memory of their charming
THE SECOND MINISTER.
One Charge 4 # Affaires succeeded another, and
"to several years Corea sent her second Minister.
rJL, aa °m. who presented his credentials in
i-ebruiry, uw. Mr Boh was no stranger in Wash
b-t n " wher * he had Previously passed two years
th« S?» :.da had ii remarkable care young.
li the" na-if «» L ha , d f. had a remarkable career, and
gest •••£ c. , hls llf " were written It would eug
-ars U;fure the young
«n» at TwT i* 11 •*"« f rom his country, having been
fey OMiSLr^f^ in * d/>,d />, that Soh li was Pom
d day that Soh Kwan Pom
*a*£*m T ll r h £L llf V nd found safety in Japan.
iwSS; Pernaps, be turned his face to the
hr?D^lh l*if- and came to Washington with th«
«^oj-^e t nL hrOUgh the legation he would "ecurS
r-'-^.j."'' ; ' : ' " :"': "' nl ? co «ntrymen here were
:..*::.." .. '' .. ' ''' "'' : . ' ;:< '; ' - "X!i- '] h Igh
•■it; hiH
em. At
■ • ;tu of Edu
£h*H« *he Perfected his knowledge of the En K
«f lE£ *?*"'-» ■ ' * n * ' ' lai quesi ■
*^.-w2n K SS? I ?5£U 4 ln BpUe ot ****™-
•erSL tK*«^ tee Sf,SSr' t0 the ro™* man from
« Mjcea to return to Corea and tako tha
f Minister of Justice. When he left Wash
ington some of his friends predicted that he would
return within two years as Minister of Corea.
The prediction wan fulfilled to the letter. Mr. Soh
was progressive, and heartily approved his sover
eign s radical measures for European civilisation.
He was a student, a man of literary ability and a
good deal of a philosopher in his views of life.
Unfortunately he did not wjrve his Government
long at this pest. Another political turn In Corea
put the Conservatives In power, and his successor,
who has now been transferred to France, was ap
j.i>inted. Soh Kwan Pom never returned to Corea.
His death in Washington, surrounded by Amer
ican friends. Is a matter of recent history.
THE TRADE WITH ASIA.
GREAT DEVELOPMENT IN COMMERCE
WITH THE FAR EAST.
Washington. Feb. —A report on our Asiatic
trade prepared by Frank H. Hitchcock, Chief of
the Foreign Markets Section of the Agricultural
Department, shows that there has been a great
development of American trade with China and
Japan in the last decade. Record figures were
easily reached in the fiscal year 1899, when the
value of the merchandise exchanged with these
two countries, including the port of Hong Kong.
reached $57,305.«55. against only 546.294.167 in 1889.
The four years following ISB9 witnessed a steady
increase that Inally culminated *in 1533 with a
record of $G0,251.356. the highest up to that time.
In the fiscal year 1894, In which American Im
portations were greatly curtailed as a result of a
prevailing financial depression, the trade dropped
to 151.313.149, and thereafter rose steadily by leaps
and bounds.
Of the $.cT.3d6.688. c T.3d6.688 valuation placed upon the trade
of the United States with Japan, China and Hong
Kong during 1899. J47.515.033 represented the imports
into the United States and $39,490,653 the exports
from this country. The excess of imports over ex
ports amounted to J8.524.352. In 1889 the Imports
were valued at J35.196.GT0 and the exports at $11,037
497, a difference of $24.099. '73. These figures show
that in the decade ended with 1899 there was a gain
of J25.393.156. or 256 per cent, in exports, while the
increase in Imports amounted to only $12,618,365. or
36 per cent. In the last few years, in fact, the Im
ports disclosed an actual falling off. the value for
Mi being $1.1 W. 131 less than that for 1896. which
was recorded at J48,979,166. This country's exports,
on the other hand, more than doubled In the three
years succeeding 1896.
RESUI/n IN A DECADE.
During the years 18S9-99 Imports from Japan ad
vanced from $16.657.99'J to $26,716,493. and the exports
from t4.819.555 to $17264.65?, In the last few years
there was a remarkabie growth cf exports. From
$7.689.n85 in 1896 the value of exported merchandise
rose to $13,255,478 tn IS9T and to $20,388,420 in 1898. The
value for IS9O. $17.2fii.fi?S. although somewhat lra«
3TKS. TE CHA "Tens. . . .
Wife of the former Charge d' Affaires, Corean Le
gation at Washington.
than that for 1898. was larger than any previous
record.
In commerce •with China during 1889-99 there was
a sain of J13.293.168. The increase occurred al
most entirely in the export trade, which advanced
frcm 8,791.138 in 1889 to $14,493,440 in 1899. Imports
for 1899. amounting to $18,619,268, were only slightly
larger than in ISS9, when a value of $17,028,412 was
reported. The exports to China, like thoee to
Japan, showed ar. exceptional growth in IS9<, 1898
and 1899.
Trade with Hone Kong, although less Important
than that credited directly to China, was almost
doubled during 18S?-'9&. Exports for 1899 were
$7,722,525, as compared with only $3,686,384 for 1883.
The imports were considerably smaller and showed
marked fluctuations. In 1889 they were valued at
51.450 2C6 bur these figures were not equalled again
until 1399. when a value of $2,479,274 was recorded.
PRINCIPAL GOODS EXPORTED.
Exports to the countries mentioned consisted
chiefly of cotton, cotton goods, kerosene oil, wheat
flour and manufactures of iron and steel, the value
of these five classes of articles exported aggregat
ing in IM nearly 80 per cent of the total exports
to China, Japan and Hong Kong. Japan took
nearly all the raw cotton, while cotton manu
factures went quite as largely to China. All three
took kerosene oil in large quantities. The exports
of wheat flour almost trebled during the decade,
exports from Japan actually rising from 19,677 bar
rels in ISS9 to 161.&4 barrels in 189 S. while Hong
Kong in the latter year took 939.053 barrels, against
378.634 In ISS9. China's direct flour importations
were small.
The sain in exports of iron and steel was rapid in
1896 1597 and 123*. most of the exports going to
Japar. which Took $? .195 .152 worth in 1898. out of a
tote, for the y^ar of *3.7!?.9fi7. For ISB9 the iron and
steel exports t the three places named were only
$513,212. Generfcj y speaking, it may be stated that
the' figures dhow that the gain in Asiatic exports
has been nearly all made in the last five years.
Aside fr< m the five classes mentioned, the chief ex
ports have been paper, alcohol, tobacco, leather,
lubricating oil, lumber and scientific apparatus.
Of the import?, silk and tea made up 70 per cent of
the total. Japan sending most of the former and
China most of the latter. Silk imports were $23,
959 935 In 1898 rd tea imports $5.856.536. In that
year the Vnlted States imported $16,453,406 worth of
raw silk and $2,068,668 worth of silk manufactures
from Japan, while from China came $7,506,409 In raw
Bilk and only $125,906 in silk manufactures.
MOUTH OF THE ORINOCO SURVEYED.
THB DOLPHINS WORK OF MUCH BENEFIT TO
NAVIGATORS.
Washington, Feb. Captain Southerland, com
manding the Dolphin, which has Just returned from
the Orinoco River, reported at the Navy Depart
ment to-day the results of the work of that vessel
in surveying the mouth of the Orinoco, which has
long been a source of danger to shipping. The ex
perts pronounce the Dolphin's survey of th« bar at
the mouth of the Orinoco a perfect piece of marine
hydrography. The vessel made MB miles of sound-
Ings, and 868 soundings were taken on the bat.
The result was to demonstrate that for six months
of the year the bar is Impassable for vessels draw
-•is: man than 14 or 15 feet of water, and even
•with less draught great care must be exercised.
From June to December Inclusive, however, the
bar will easSlv pass vessel* drawing IB feet under
proper direction. The distance from the four
fathom mark to the land is twenty miles, and on
[wo-thlrds of the bar the land is not visible To
make the bar safe for navigation will require a
complete set of buoys.
AMERICAS CONSULAR SERVICE ADMIRED
GERMAN MERCHANTS HOLD IT IP afl A MODEL
TO THEIR GOVERNMENT.
Washington. Feb. 3.-The United States Consular
Service has excited the envy of the German mer
cantile world, and, according to ■ report to the
State Department by United State. Consul Gunther.
at Frankfort, they are making a strong effort to
have the German Consular Service recast on the
>ir>»« nf the American service. He inclosed a me
moria? addressed l, v the Merchants' Association
of Berlin to the German Government. In which the
iinit^d States Consular Service is referred to as
is".". -iillv v '"till to commerce and as bearing rich
fruit - i-
VALUE SET 09 DEWETB CAPTURES.
Washington, Feb. 3.- The Secretary of the Navy
has transmitted to the Supreme Court of the Dis
trict of Columbia 1 copy of the report of the Board
of Appraisal and Survey which was convened at
Cavite June 6, 1638. to place a value on the prop
erty captured by Admiral Dewey's fleet In Manila
Bay. The estimated value of the captures is $828.
141. The largest Items In the statement ar* 'ship
and boat equipment. $241.n6f1; ordnance material
542,234, and fuel K0.568." This appraisal was called
for v Evidence In th» suit brought by Admiral
Dewer for prlzo money.
XEW-YORK DAILY TEIBFNE. ST T NT>AY. FEBRFAHY 4. 1900.
The Annual Statement
of
The Mutual Life
Insurance Company
of New York
appears on the last page.
This is the largest Life Insurance Company
in the World.
It is purely mutual and all its accumulations
belong to and are held for the benefit
of its policy-holders exclusively.
Its assets are over Three Hundred and One
millions of dollars, and it has over One
Thousand Millions of Dollars of
insurance in force.
PENSION BUREAU DEFENDED
COMMISSIONER EVANS ANSWERS THB
CHARGES AND URGES A GENERAL
REVISION OF THE LAW.
Washington. Feb. 3.— The Commissioner of Pen
sions. H. C. Evans, was heard to-day by the House
Committee on Invalid Pensions relative to pension
legislation. In view of recent hearings of Grand
Army delegations and others Interested in pel
tne hearing to-day attracted more than usual in
terest. Mr. Evans expressed the belief that the
time had come for a revision of the pension laws.
The two general laws had become complicated by
so many decisions and constructions that he be
lieved it to be essential to have a general revision
in order to aret at the real meaning of the iaw and
the desires of Congress for the pensioners. He
had therefore recommended a commission to revise
the pension laws, and he believed such a body
could do its work and report to Congress by next
December.
Mr. Evans was asked as to cnarges that some
special examiners who Investigated widows' claims
aaked Insulting questions. The Commissioner vig
orously denied these charges. Ke reaJ the regula
tions of Commissioners Black and Tanner on the
subject of Inquiries, and his own instructions to ex
aminers to avoid any indiscretion. In connection
with a charge that Improper questions had been
asked of an aged widow, Mr. Evans read the re
port of the examiner denying the charge and
declaring there was not a word of truth in it.
The Commissioner said it was impossible to frame
any law without having special cases arise which
might cause difficulty. He was asked why the local
medical boards told pensioners that a favorable re
port would be made, and yet favorable action did
not follow at the Bureau. The Commissioner ex
plained that the local boards are forbidden by the
rules to make their findings known; but the mem
bers were human, and naturally were swayed to
some extent by local feeling. Moreover, he said,
the Saw Itself caused difficulty, by requiring not
only the medical diagnosis but a g-eneral estimate
or conclusion, and these did not always agree.
Mr. Evans spoke of the Intelligence and ability
of those In charge of this work. As to delays in
appeal cases, he said, about four thousand were
passed on last year, and in only about three hun
dred of these was there a reversal of the original
ruling. Some of the delay had been caused by
wholesale appealing of cases on printed blanks.
Mr. Evans expressed his personal advocacy of
Juet and liberal pensions. He remarked, also, that
usually there were ten mistakes against the Gov
ernment to one against the applicant, and that the
latter was quick to call attention to the mistake in
his case.
There was absolutely no truth, the Commissioner
said, in the charge that Spanish war claims were
being held up, as he had given special instructions
to advance them.
The hearing brought out much other detailed in
formation on the administration of pensions affairs.
At Its conclusion the committee unanimously adopt
ed a vote of thanks to the Commissioner and tn
acknowledging this Mr. Evans said he was "al
ways glfui to have the sunlight shed upon the
workings of the Pension Office."
GUNS FOR RUSSIAN CRUISER HERE.
SHIPPED AT HEAVY EXPENSE TO MAKE THE VES
SEL. READY FOR SERVICE.
Washington, Feb. The Russian Government
has shipped to this country from Russia every bit
of ordnance that will be required completely to arm
the swift cruiser now being finished for it at the
Cramp yards. The fact may be significant that this
was done at heavy expense, in order that the ship
might go to sea thoroughly prepared to defend her
self In the event of hostilities involving the Rus
sian Government before she reaches home. The
guns have already arrived in this country, and are
stored in the Cramp yards.
The requirements for the trial of this ship, which
will soon take place, are the most severe ever
known in any navy. She must maintain a speed
of twenty-three knots an hour for twelve consecu
tive hours under natural draught.
#
THE MARYLAND SENATORSHIP.
POLITICAL MOVE TO PREVENT GORMAN* FROM
BEING A CANDIDATE.
Annapolis. Md., Feb. 3 (Special).— A sharp political
move was made yesterday which if successful will
prevent Arthur Pue Gorman from being a candidate
for the United States Senate in 1902 to succeed Sen
ator Wellington, and will also enable Senator Me-
Comas and the other anti-Wellington Republicans
to prevent Wellington's re-election in the event of
the next Legislature being Republican.
A bill was Introduced in the House to re-enact the
old Eastern Shore law, which the Republicans nulli
fied after the election of Wellington. This statute,
which, it has been claimed, if brought to the teat
would never be held by the United States courts
as constitutional, requires that one United States
Senator from Maryland shall bo chosen from the
eastern and the other from the western side of
the Chesapeake Bay. Gibson was the last Eastern
Shore Senator. To have himself elected Wellington
set aside the old custom. The present Republican
members of the Legislature now advocate Its re
enactment and ostensibly are back of the bill. It
is also Intimated that Governor Smith, the rising
Democratic leader who in three years bai been
State Senator. Congressman and Governor, is lay
ing his wires for the Senatorshlp two years hence.
He Is now on the best of terms with Gorman, but
there are rumors that a contest for supremacy is
imminent.
If Gorman's friends and the Democratic majority
support this bill, which as yet Is doubtful, it will
mean that he will never be a candidate again for
the Senate. The strictly partisan legislation now
being enacted by the Democrats, such as giving the
Governor power to appoint county school commis
sioners anil treasurers and the appointment of po
lice commissioners for Baltimore City, will give
Smith a greater power in patronage than that of
any previous Governor of Maryland.
Governor Smith now seems to have supreme con
trol of the Democratic majority" in the Legislature.
Murray Vandlver. chairman of the State Committee
and recently, elected State Treasurer by the Legis
lature Is Gorman's representative down here, but
he Is also In close touch with Smith. The Repub
licans seem more anxious for the passage of the
re-enactment bill than the D«mocats. A mutual
friend of Gorman and Smith said this evening that
they understood each other.
The flght on the School Board Reorganisation bill
in the Senate lasted until 2 o'clock yesterday morn
inir when Bryan (Dem.), who had been opposing
thebill with the Republicans, decided to stand with
hi* party, and the bill passed Its second reading. it
will give the Governor the appointment of ninety
Kcho«>l commissioners all over the State. He can
«lao if ■• sees fit. make the appointments without
the advice or consent of the Senate. The Republi
can leaders bitterly denounce It as a scheme to
strengthen the Democratic machine.
COMMERCE COWEyTIOy COMMITTEE.
At the State Commerce Convention called by the
jjmr-York Board of Trade and Transportation and
held in Vtlca on October 10 and 11- a permanent
State Sxtcut'.Tt Committee was appointed, to be
HUDSON BAY SABLE
Muffs, $30, £50, ST.". ?90. 5125, $175.
•,: -.- - •
Scarfs, Collarettes, Capes and Mantles corre
sponding prices, all subject to special discount of
13 per cent.
C. C. SHAYNE,
Manufacturing Fur Merchant,
42d St., between Broadway & 6th Aye.
Note — I do not sell blended or darkened Rus
sian or Hudson Bay Sables. They have a mot
tled, shabby appearance after being worn a short
time, and don't give satisfaction.
known as the New-York State Committee on Com
merer-, to be continued after adjournment for the
purpose of carrying out the objects of the conven
tion. The convention contented Itself with general
declarations in favor of the improvement of the
State canals, believing it to be uvrtrlse to make
more specific recommendations pending the report
of Ooveraor Roosevelt's Canal Committee. As that
committee has now submitted its recommendations
to the Legislature. John D Keman as president
of the State Commerce Convention has called a
meeting of the New-York State Committee^ on
rce for February 7 in the rooms of the New-
York Board of Trade and Transportation.
COJF7ICT LABOR IX SOUTH CAROLINA.
IT IS PROPOSED TO USE PRISONERS FOR IM
PROVING THE STATE ROADS.
Columbia. S. C, Feb. 3 (Special. -The disposition
of convicts is again receiving the attention of the
South Carolina Legislature. Tears aeo. after a
bitter fight, the system of leasing convicts to rail
road contractors and phosphate miners was abol
ished. The State purchased several large planta
tions and has been raising cotton on an extensive
scale, but with indifferent success. Convicts not
used on these plantations and in the hosiery mills
in the penitentiary buildings are leased to farmers.
There is such general demand from all sections of
the State for better roads that much consideration
is being given to various propositions looking to
the State undertaking the work of reconstructing
her main thoroughfares w!t:h convict labor. Within
the last few years several counties have availed
themselves of a new constitutional provision, and
utilized short term convicts on county chain gangs,
to the great betterment of the roads.
There are now two hills pending in the Legis
lature bearing on this subject. One provides for
the sale of the State farms and the other for leas
tng State convicts to the counties at $4 a month
each, the counties bearing the expense of guards,
food and clothin?. This bill also prohibits convicts
being leased to Individuals.
It has been found that the prisoners employed
en th( i ■ and other outdoor work are
more healthy than those kept in the prison walls,
where the mortality is heavy. The Penitentiary
Committee recommends the appropriation of 110.000
to heat the main building. There were sixteen
from consumption In this building during
the last year ami eisht from spinal meningitis.
The cell?, with no doors, but iron gratings, open
on a corridor extending the length of the granite
building:, the ends of the corridor being open to
admit north wigda.
Most of the women convicts are employed la the
hosiery mill.
BOOKS OF THE WEEK.
A DEFENCE OF POESIE. By Sir Philip Sidney. 32m0,
pp. 191. (Cassell & Co.)
CETVRES COMPLETES DE MOLJERE. 12mo. pp. «47.
(Henry Frowde. )
OUTLINES OF THE COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY
AND MORPHOLOGY OF ANIMALS. By Joseph La
Cont"?. 12mo, pp. 4'jo. (D. Appleton & Co.)
TEAR BOOK OF ART SOCIETIES OF NEW-YORK.
IS9S-'9!>. Bvo, pp. 163. (Leonard Scott Publication
Company.)
NORTH AMERICAN FORESTS AND FORESTRY. Their
Relations to the National Life of the American People.
By Ernest Bruncken. Sro, pp. 2t'io. (G. P. Putnam's
Sons.)
A HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH POOR LAW. Vcl in.
From 1534 to the Present Time. By Thomas Mackay.
Svo. pp. 61T. Betas a supplementary volume to "A
History of the English Poor Law" by Sir Gecrga
Nicholls. (Q. I' Putnam's Sons.)
REINCARNATION OR IMMORTALITY? By Ursula N.
Gestef-?ld. svo. pp. 183. (The Alllanea Publishing
Company.)
EPWORTH LEAGt'E HANDBOOK FOR 1900. 82mo pp.
96. (Eaton & Mama.)
EPWORTH LEAGUE BIBLE 111 Hill— By Edwin A.
Schell. First Series. 15*00. I2mo, pp. 36. (Eaton &
Ma::
THE METHODIST YEAR BOOK. 1900 Edited by A. B.
Sanford. 12mo. pp. 10U. (Eatun & Mains.)
NATURE'S MIRACLES. Familiar Talks on Science. By
Ellsha Gray. Vol I— Earth, Air and Water. 10mo.
pp. 243. (Fords,^Howard & Hulbert.) ■
THE PASSING OF THE EMPIRES. SW B. C. to 330
B. C. By G. Maspero. Edited by A. H. Sayce. Trans
lated by M. L. MeClure. With maps. thre« colored
plates and numerous Illustrations. 4to. pp. xlt. S3*.
(D. Appleum & Co.)
OLGA NETIIERSOLE. A Collection of Pictures repre
senting M:-a Nethersole In tome of her most notable
Impersonations. (R. H. Russell.)
THE TEARS OF THE HELTADES; OR. AMBER AS A
GEM. By W. Arnold Buffum. First American, re
printed from the tnird English, edition. Illustrated.
12mo. pp. ixiil. 110. (G. P. Putnam's Sons.)
FIFTH REGIMENT. INFANTRY. MD. NAT. GUARD.
X. 8. Volunteer. A History of the Regiment from.
Its First Organization to the Present Time. Illus
trated. Svo, pp. 304, (George A. M<-efcins, Baltimore.
Md.)
HOW TO GAIN HEALTH AND LONG LIFE. By P. M.
Hanney. 12mo, pp. 114. (The Haz»l Pure Food Com
pany.)
MARY PAGET: A ROMANCE OF OLD BERMUDA. By
Minna Caroline Smith. 12mo. pp. 320. {The Mac
raillan Company.)
WHAT A YOUNG HUSBAND OUGHT TO KNOW. By
Sylvanu9 Stell. lGmo, pp. 300. (The Vlr Publishing
Company.)
THE NERVOUS SYSTEM OF THE CHILD: ITS
GROWTH AND HEALTH IN EDUCATION. By
Francis War:: r 12mo. pp. 233. (The Macmlllan
Company.)
WANDERINGS OF FRENCH ED AND OTHER
STORIES. By J. Adeiard Rene. 16mo. pp. 172.
(Wrisht & Co.)
AUTHORS' BIRTHDAYS. Third 9. Ties. By C. W. Bar
rteen. Itao, pp- <*«". (Syracuse. N. V.: C. W. Bar
deen.)
PYRAMIDS AND PROGRESS: Sketch from Egypt. By
John Ward. With an Introduction by the Rev. Prtv
fnssor Sayre. rSuuare Svo. pp. 2SS. (E. A J. B.
Youns & Co.)
THE MAN WITH THE HOE. By Edwta Markham. With
Notes by the Author. Illustrated, ltimo. np. 47
(The Doubleday & McClure Company.)
SHAKESPEARE THE MAN. An Attempt to Find Tracei
of the Dramatist's Character in BtS Dramas By
Gcldwin Smith. Iftmo, pp. 60. (The Doubleday &
McClure Company.*
A MAN'S WOMAN. 1- Frank Morris. 12mo nn 2S&.
,Ti Doubleday & MrCluro Company.)
WHIST American Leeds and Their History. With a.
Review of Later Innovation* in the Onme. By Ni h
clas Uruwse Trist. 10mo. rp- 13S. (Harper A Bros.)
HEALTH V EXHRCISE. In Three Parts. By Hobert H
C.rwne. Illustrated. lrtmo. pp. Mi (Harper te.
WITH SWORD AND CRUCIFIX. By Edward S Van
Ztle. Illustrai-i 12mo, pp. a*. (Harper * Bro« >
THE LIFE OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN-. Drawn from
Original Source* and Containing Many Speeches Let
ter* and T«l««ra m * Hitherto Unpubllihed. bY iS
M. Tarbell. In two volumes. Bv<x P n. V oL .' xl»
Com V 01 ' 11, *** «8. (The DouWe^» > * Mcc Sri
s.3Utman&€&
"RARE ANTIQUE <RUGS. I
A number of choice examples of Ghi
ordes and Coula Prayer Rugs, particu
larly desirable for Collectors, together
with several Choice Persian Silk Rugs
will be offered on MONDA V, FEB
RUARY sth, AT EXCEPTION
ALLY LOW PRICES, as follows:
GHIORDES and COULA RUGS, formerly
$125.00 to $300.00, at
. $85.00 to $J 75-00
PERSIAN and TURKISH CARPETS,
original prices $150.00 upwards, at
DECIDED REDUCTIONS IN "PRICES.
PERSIAN SILK RUGS.
$165.00, 5275.00, $750.00
Formerly $250.00 to $1,200.
and
$850.00, 52,250.00, $2,750.00
Formerly $1,200.00 to $4,500.00
ORIENTAL T>EFT. mm floor.
MONDAY, FEB. sth.
Ceasarian Embroideries, suitable for Cuahion Tops,
Covers, etc, formerly $4.50 each, at $2.75
Table Covers, in Ceasarian Embroidery, soft
color effects, suitable for Library Tables,
Hangings, etc., about I Hx2 yards,
Formerly $19.75 each, at • $10.50
Phulkaries, suitable for Curtains, Draperies, Wall
— Hangings, etc,
Odhney, $4.50 Ha2ara> $5.75
Damascus Brass Hanging Lanterns, suitable for
Oriental Decorations, Hall Lights and desirable
for use in Summer Homes, 3 sizes,
$2.25, $4.90, $5.75
Half Regular Value.
100 Solid Antique Oak Screens, filled with select
Cotton Print Fabrics (full size),
Formerly $3.75 each, at . . $2.45
200 Down Filled Cushions, 24 inches square,
covered in East India Fabrics,' «< a^
Each. * lv *°
SILK DEPARTMENT.
New and Exclusive designs in
PRINTED SATIN and TWILLED FOULARDS
in rich qualities are now on sale,
representing the latest Parisian ideas for the
Summer Season of 1900.
LADIES' CAMBRIC NAINSOOK and LAWN
UNDERGARMENTS
(OF DOMESTIC MAKE)
Trimmed with Laces and Embroideries in New
and Choice Patterns. Complete selections
are now shown, comprising,
Bridal Sets, Dressing Jackets, Train Skirts,
PRINCESS PETTICOATS,
Combination Suits, Chemises, Night Robes,
Corset Covers, etc
Orders taken for Complete Wedding Trousseaux,
made in workrooms on the premises.
MONOGRAMS. CRESTS AND HERALDIC DEVICES.
€i9btettttft St. Witueifb st nd sixt* **■*.
«i

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