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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 08, 1900, Image 1

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V oL LIX-..N 0 19.448.
BULLER AND GATACRE FIGHTING
BRITISH CROSS THE TUGELA ON MONDAY AND SEIZE
A POSITION ON THE BOER RIGHT.
ROBERT? AND KITCHENER GO TO THE FRONT.
News fmm British sources announce^ the recrossing of the Tugela on Mon
day by General Buller at two drifts and the capture of a high hill on the extreme
righ: of the Boer position at Brakfontein. The hill was held against a determined
nt of the Boers to retake it.
From the Boer headquarters at Ladysmith it was said the British had been
driven back across the Tugela with heavy loss at one drift; at the other drift the
hill held by the British was declared to he unimportant.
Fighting: began yesterday morning at Sterkstroom, General Gatacre's head-
HVters in Northern Cape Colony, and was still in progress at nightfall, with the
rcf lit not known at Cape Town, whence the news came.
Generals Roberts and Kitchener have gone to the front from Cape Town
Henry Labouchere. M. P. for Northampton, England, was assaulted and a
peace meeting he was addressing in Northampton was broken up.
In the House of Commons an amendment to the Address in reply to the
h from the Throne recognizing the independence of the Boer Republics
red by John Redmond, was rejected — 3(58 to 66.
BULLER MAKES PROGRESS.
POLOS A POSITION NORTH OF THE
RIVER DESPITE EFFORTS TO DIS
LODGE HIM.
lOpyr!#rtit: MX». by The Nev-York Tribune.)
[BT CABLE TO TB~E TRIBUNE]
London. Feb. S. 6 a. m.— Trustworthy Intelli
gence ha* at length been received of General
Buller's movements. Hie third attempt to re-
Hey? Ladysmith began early on Monday morn
ing with a Mat made by the Eleventh Brigade
in the form of a frontal attack. This was
toward Potgieter's Drift, and was carried out
under cover of a heavy artillery fire, seventy
two guns beinc In action at once. The operation
having apparently been successful in drawing
off a considerable number of Boers, paved the
way for the main attack to the right, Hiidyard's
brigade crossing the Tugela at Schiefs Drift
and sizing the kopjes facing the river at Vaal
Krantz. The British further advance has been
for the time being prevented, but the Boer at
twrt on Tuesday to recapture the kopjes, which
would suggest that the seizure was of conse
quence, was repulsed.
One agency estimates the British losses on
Monday at 250. but obviously this figure is sub
ject to correction. Boer accounts of the fighting
tend to show that the British lost heavily at
Pjnt r>rlft, where the' feint attack was evidently
maoe, but they admit that Buller's forces -.were
*Bce«s*ful In obtaining a position on one small
kspja"on the Molen Drift side. This seizure is,
however, stated to be of no importance. Only
floor Boers were said to be killed, but such an
estimate sounds ridiculous, as the fighting must
have been severe.
JCothlng further Is known as to the advance
*t present, but General Buller's latest attempt
to reach L*dy«nith has apparently begun well,
and future developments will be awaited with
profound interest.
Up to the time of cabling the War Office had
BSt any information for publication as to the
progress of events. I N - F -
ACTIVE ALL ALONG THE LINE.
HOSTILITIES IN SOUTH AFRICA RE
HJMED ON A SCALE OF MAGNITUDE.
[OsfllWlT 1900: by The Kew-Tortt Tribune.]
(BT CABLE TO THE TBIBUXE.]
London. Feb. 8. 1 a. m.-General Robertas
campaign has opened with unknown objective
points and the concentration of his forces care
fully concealed, but with signs of activity and
unity of purpose all along the line. The reinforce
ments which have reached him since he assumed
command at Cape Town are estimated at over
20,000. and there has been a large increase In
the number of guns. The battalions landing
within three days have been rapidly cent to the
front and many changes in the transport ser
vice have been introduced. A marvellous
amount of work has been done during the weeks
when he -was reporting from day to day that
the situation was unchanged. The time for ac
tion has come, and there is evidence that a sin
gle mind controls the operations in four widely
separated districts, and that four distinct armies
are carrying on the war in accordance with a
definite, preconcerted arrangement. It is a cam
paign so superior to the strategy which has been
going on in newspaper offices for the last ten
d;.yf that the most ambitious military writer is
content to watch the march of events under
'"Bobe's" direction.
RUMORS FROM THE FRONT.
- The results recorded at midnight on official
authority were hardly commensurate 'with the
activity displayed in so many directions, but
there had not been time for anything more than
a partial resumption of hostilities. General
Bailer had recrossed the Tugela on Monday
t'ternoon. This was admitted at the War Of
*** tarly last evening. The news had already
'••*•« Fleet Street to that effect from Lou
fenco Marques, with the additional details that
*&c crossing had been effected at two drifts and
that it had been covered by a tremendous
artillery are. One Boer rumor represented that
•*c British had been driven back at one drift.
But no serious fighting was reported on Tuesday
town Dutch sources, although the artillery had
**«> hammering away throughout the day. The
Preie dispatches from Natal had been stopped
•t the fighting line, and the only detail which
••'** allowed to come through from Durban was
*°* fact that General Duller had ordered a hun
dred additional stretchers from the coast.
The War Ofn>e had no details for publication,
kot there was no attempt to disguise the real
•bjtct'of the movement. General Duller had
•Parted for Ladyemith and probably by the
attest direct road from the drifts commanded
by the naval runs on Mount Alice and Zwart
Kop. The best information obtainable was that
he had crossed at Potgieter's and at Skiet drift,
•ewer down, and was advancing on the two
•■Ms leading through a more open country
than that around Eplon Kop, the distance to be
Continued on second pa.gr.
"tt? HOME AND ABROAD "BON VTVANTS"
' fc •«•'- ■-= MOET & CHANDON WHITE SEAL
i''ACJNE ii deservedly popular excelling all
•"•«■ brmdi in zichn«M of Quality.— Advt
BRITISH SEIZE A HILL.
BULLER'S ARMY MAKES A SUCCESSFUL
LODGMENT NORTH OF THE TUGELA.
Spearman's Camp, Feb. 7. 6 p. m.-General
Buller began the advance for the relief of Lady
smith on Monday. The naval guns opened at 7
in the morning, and a feint attack was made In
front of our position. Three battalions advanced
toward the Brakfontein. with six batteries.
At eleven the Boers opened with artillery fire
and sent several shells among the British in
fantry, wno ret i re( j an hour later
Meanwhile a vigorous attack was made on the
extreme right, where the engineers expeditiously
constructed a position. Several pieces of can
non, hidden among the trees on Zwart Kop.
bombarded heavily. The British infantry ad
vanced and the Boers were entirely surprised.
At 4 o'clock a high hill, a continuation of the
Brakfontein. had been taken. The operations
were excellently planned. The name of the hill
taken is Krantz Kloof.
The bombardment of the Boer position was
resumed this (yesterday?) morning. The Boers
worked a disappearing cannon from the high
Doorm Kloof range, on the right of the captured
hill, but the British shells exploded its maga
zine, and the gun was put out of action until
late In the day.
Musketry fire was Intermittent until the af
ternoon, when the Boers made a determined ef
fort to retake the hill. Reinforcements rushed
up cheering, the Boers were repulsed, and the
British advanced along the ridge.
London. Feb. S.— A special dispatch from
Spearman's Camp, dated Wednesday, February
7, say a:
Our further advance Is at the moment pre
vented, as the Boers enfilade us from their po
sitions on Spion Kop and Doorm Kloof. Our
Ca .« UaUle6 ' althou eh estimated at 260. are
trifling, considering the great importance of the
movement just concluded.
"The Standard" has the following from Spear
man's Camp, dated February 7:
The force under General Buller is again ad
vancing to the relief of Ladysmith. and after
two days of severe fighting it may fairly be said
to have made a good first step on the road to
the besieged town.
The movement was begun at an early hour on
Monday morning by way of Potgieter's Drift.
The Eleventh Brigade, forming a part of the
Fifth Division, under General Warren, made a
feint attack upon the kopjes immediately on our
front. The assault was delivered at the outset
under cover of naval guns on Mount Alice and,
subsequently, under that of field batteries.
The infantry advanced steadily toward the
Boer intrenched positions at Brakfontein, and
kept the enemy busily employed. While this
diversion was being made the remainder of the
infantry told off for the attack, who had biv
ouacked on Sunday night under Mount Alice,
moved along at the foot of Zwart's Kop in the
direction of our ripht.
A pontoon bridge was thrown across the Tu
gela by the engineers under the fire of the en
emy. The first battalion to move across in the
forenoon was the Durham Light Infantry, of
General Lyttleton's brigade. They advanced
against Vaal Krantz, which lies on the most di
rect road to Ladysmith, and, after two hours'
splendid work, they got within charging dis
tance of the Boers.
The first of the kopjes was carried by them at
the point of the bayonet with the utmost gal
lantry. Almost simultaneously the First Bat
talion, Rifle Brigade, cleared "the second kopje
and, after moving across the long ridge, they
bivouacked on the spot.
The feint attack at Potgieter'a Drift, having
served its purpose In preventing the concentra
tion of the enemy at the critical point, the 11th
Brigade fell back to the river.
In the course of the operation both the in
fantry and the artillery had been subjected to
a severe shell fire.
Yesterday (Tuesday) at 4 o'clock in the after
noon, the enemy, encouraged doubtless by their
success at Spion Kop, endeavored to recapture
the position taken by ufl at Vaal Krantz. They
were beaten back, however, with loss.
The work accomplished so far has been mag
nificently done. The shell and Maxim fire poured
In by the Boers has been extremely severe, but
our josses are. comparatively speaking, small.
BOER story OF THE FIGHTING.
Boer Head Laager, Ladysmith. Feb. Since
yesterday the British with naval and other guns
have bombarded our positions on the Upper
Tugcla. The troops crossed the river at the
Pont and at Molen Drift with the object of
storming our positions. At the former General
Burger beat them back, and they recrossed in
great confusion. The fighting continues at
Molen Drift with the Standerton and Johannes
burg commandos. There were no casualties on
our side. The cannonade was the fiercest yet
experienced. There was a continuous roaring
all day long. This morning It recommenced with
an increased number of guns.
Further reports of yesterday's fighting at the
Upper Tugela River show that the British lost
heavily at Pont Drift, but took an unimportant
position on a email kopje on the Molen Drift
aide. Four Boers were killed. The British loss
is unknown. They are still in possession of th*
kopje and the big guns have ceased firing,
BATTLE IN GAPE COLONY.
FIGHTING ALL DAY YESTERDAY BETWEEN
THE BOERS AND GATACRE.
Cape Town, Feb. 7,-Flghting began this
morning at Bterkstroom and is now In prog
ress. No stalls have been received.
MOKT * CHANDON'S WHITE SEAL CHAM
t£ports4.-Ad*t-
NEW-YORK, THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 8. 1900. -SIXTEEN PAGES.-^Th^BSSSi^-t^
BONDS PROVE ACCEPTABLE.
AUGUST BELMOXT'S PLAN SUITS RAPID
TRANSIT BOARD.
SECURITY OFFERED IS CONSIDERED BET
TER THAN GUARANTY COMPANIES
COULD POSSIBLY GIVE.
In oar Judgment, as business men, the
security which the Rapid Transit Hour il has
agreed to accept from Mr. McDonald la far
better than could be famished by any Rnar
anty companies in existence.
ALEXANDER E. ORR.
CHARLES BT3WART SMITH.
The Rapid Transit Board accepted by a unani
mous vote yesterday the plan of financing the
tunnel contract which was submitted to it by
August Belmont & Co. on behalf of the success
ful bidder, John B. McDonald. It differs in
many details from the plan approved by the
Appellate Division of the Supreme Court when
the bond was reduced from $15,000,000, but it
differs for the better, In the opinion of the Com
missioners, and they anticipate no trouble in
obtaining the court's assent, and that speedily,
to the new proposition. Here it Is:
New-York, February 7, 1900.
To A. E. Orr, President Board of Rapid Transit
Commissioners.
Sir: Conforming to the understanding arrived
at with the sub-committee of your Board at our
conference yesterday, we now beg to lay before
you the plan which Is proposed to enable Mr.
McDonald to qualify and execute the contract
for the construction of the Rapid Transit Rail
way:
First— We are about to organize a corporation
under the laws of this State with a capital of
$6,000,000, subscriptions for which have been already
secured, and which is payable as follows: Twenty
per cent upon organization. 20 per cent on May 1.
1900, and 20 per cent on November 1, 1900, and the
balance as called. This company is to enter into a
contract with Mr. McDonald to promote the con
struction of the work under his contract with the
city, furnish the security required to be given by
him and finance his undertaking. A copy of the
proposed certificate of incorporation and of the con
tract to be made with Mr. McDonald is submitted
herewith for your inspection.
Second— Your Board is to make application to
the Appellate Division to modify its requirements
concerning the bond to be given to secure the con
struction of the work by striking out the provision
requiring justification by the sureties in double the
amount of liability assumed by each and by re
ducing the minimum amount permitted to be taken
by each surety from $.r,0»,000. r ,0»,000 to 5250.000.
Third— Mr. McDonald will furnish the continuing
bond in the sum of $1,000,000 witn sureties who will ius
tlfy in double that amount, and the company will at
tne same time deposit with the Controller securities
to be approved by your Board of the value of 11,000,
000, which, so far as may be necessary, me city
shall apply in payment and satisfaction of the
bond in case any liability shall arise thereon. Your
Board will then < nueavor to procure the passage of
an act of the Legislature amending «he Rapid Tran
sit act by permitting the deposit of securities satis
factory to your Board and of the value of $1,000,000,
in lieu of the continuing bond, and upon the passage
of such amending apt you will accept the said
securities as a deposit in :ieii of said bond, and will
then cancel and return the bond.
Fourth— The said corporation so to be formed will
execute as surety Mr. McDonald's bond to secure
the performance of the contract for construction to
the amount of $4,000,000. which will be accepted by
your Board. The additional amount of said con
struction bond— namely, $I . ooo,ooo— will be furnished
by the other sureties to be approved by the Board.
Fifth— The said corporation will cause the $1.000.00 ft
cash required by the contract to be deposited with
the Controller.
Sixth list of the subscribers to the stock of |
the pair! corporation so to be formed will be sub
mitted to your Board, to be approved by it. "
Seventh— As additional security to the city said
company so to be formed" -will cause the beneficial
Interest In the bonds tc ho required of suli-con-,.
tractors to be assigned to the .city. So far >\£' maj*,
be necessary the contrast between, the -city and Mr."
McDonald shall upon the request of the Board.be
modified in accordance with this provision.
Eighth— said corporation will cause an addi
tional $1,000,000 In cash, or the equivalent In securi
ties, to be deposited with the Controller on or be
fore January 1, 1901: such- 11.000.000 to be held by
the Controller as additional security for the per
formance of the obligation of the sureties upon the
bend for construction.
If this plan meets with the approval of your
Board, and if the Appellate Division shall grant
your request to modify the requirements of the
bond as above stated, we shall be prepared to
carry out this plan.
AUGUST BELMONT & CO.
The Board adopted these suggestions without
a dissenting vote, and at once passed the fol
lowing resolution:
Resolved. That th» president of the Board be
authorized to communicate to August Belmont &■
Co. the appioval by this Board of the terms of
thpir letter of to-day, with such modifications of
detail, if any. as may be approved by the presi
dent; that the president, with such committee of
the Board as he may appoint, present to the Legis
lature the proposed bill referred to in the said let
ter, and that the counsel of the Board be directed
to apply to the Appellate Division for modification
of the stipulation given by the Board upon that re
quirement of the Appellate Division.
After the meeting was over the Commissioners
explained some points that were not wholly
clear, but refused firmly to divulge the names
of the men who are to become stockholders in
the construction company with Mr. Belmont.
These names, they said, would come out later
and would bo found to be among the best in the
city, financially considered. Their names are
known to the Commissioners now, and are satis
factory. Rumor places on the list J. P. Morgan.
Winslow. Lanier & Co.. Vermilye & Co.. and
several others of that stamp. It will be noticed
that Mr. Belmont agrees to put up $I,oim'i.imm)
of securities and considerably more cash than
Is called for in the original contract, and that the
goodwill of the guaranty companies is retained
by allowing them to furnish $1,000,000 of the
bonds referred to in Paragraph IV.
LABOI'CHERE ROVGIILY TREATED.
HIS PEACE MEETING BROKEN UP AND HE
HIMSELF ASSAULTED.
Northampton, England, Feb. 7.— The announce
ment that Henry Labouchere. Editor of "Truth"
and Liberal Member of Parliament for North
ampton, would address a peace meeting in the
Northampton Town Hall this evening drew a
noisy crowd of opponents, who swarmed upon
the platform and smastied the chairs.
Mr. Labouchere's arrival was the signal for
renewed attack. The promoters of the meeting
wf>re forced off the platform, and chairs were
hurled into the body of the house amid cries of
"Ood Save the Queen!"
Mr. Labouchere was struck in the head, but
was n.>t seriously injured. He managed to make
hiH exit, escorted by the police.
A number of other persons were hurt, though
not seriously.
Ultimately the opponents of the peace meeting
gained the platform, and declared that North
ampton had joined York City in repudiating the
critics of the Government.
LEYDS QUITS BERLIN IN A HUFF.
CHAGRINED BECAUSE EMPEROR WILL
IAM WOULD NOT RECEIVE HIM.
Berlin, Feb. 7.— Dr. Leyds leaves Berlin very
much dissatisfied because of the refusal of Em
peror William to receive him, his. chagrin not
being sensibly mitigated by an Invitation to
dinner from Herr yon Weuei. Minister of the
Royal Household. He now expects to go to St.
Petersburg when the weather moderates.
A large number of Britons living In Berlin,
under the age of thirty, have received orders
calling them home for military service.
TO ASSIST SIR ALFRED MILNER. ~
London, Feb. 7. — H. P. Nilson, the Legal As
sistant of the Colonial Office, will start for Cape
Town on Saturday In order to assist Sir Alfred
MHner, the British High Commissioner, in the
legal problems confronting him.
DRY DELICATE AND DELICIOUS IS THE
brand of MOET & CH\NDON WHITE SEAL
CHAMPAGNE, now being cold in this market. No
other wine compares with It.— Advt. • .
FASTEST TO SOUTHERN RESORTS.
Via Perm. R. R. from New-York, *:5A a. m..
without change to Miami and Port Tampa Quick-.
rat to Georgia re»orte, Florida,- Havana. Naasau,
"■Florida. Special" 12:25 p. m. Express 8.28 p. m.
> ,jTiy Atlantic Coast Una, 330 Broadway.-AOvu •
VAST POWER OF CONGRESS
PRACTICALLY UNLIMITED IN DEALING
WITH NEW POSSESSIONS.
POLICY ANNOUNCED BY REPUBLICAN MEM
BERS OF THE HOUSE INSULAR AF
FAIRS COMMITTEE.
[BT TEI.KRHAPH TO Tnß TRIBUWB.]
Washington, Feb. 7.— The Republican mem
bers of the House Committee on Insular Affairs
held a long conference this afternoon to consider
and discuss the conclusions reached by a sub
committee of their number on the question of
the power of Congress and the limitations, if
any, upon tha* power In the matter of govern
ing territory belonging to the I'nited States; the
political status and civil rights of the civilized
inhabitants of such territory, and the practical
interpretation of this power both as to the gov
ernment and status of the people. This sub
committee was comnose.l of Messrs. Tawney, of
Minnesota; Moody, of Massachusetts, and Crum
packer, of Indiana, and they made an exhaustive
and thorough investigation of the subject, in the
light of all the executive and legislative acts
and Judicial decisions bearing on it. The con
clusions reached by them, which formed the
topic of discussion and basis of consideration
in to-day's conference, were In substance aa
follows:
First— That the Constitution and laws of the
I'nited States do not extend ox proprio vigore
to territory outside of the area comprising the
States that are united, and that the power of
Congress to govern such territory is unlimited,
except by those fundamental limitations in favor
of personal and property rights expressed in
the Constitution but which exist by inference
from th," nature ami spirit of the Government
and the principles of liberty on which it Is
founded.
Second— That the political status and civil
rights of the inhabitants of such territory. In
tho absence of treaty stipulations, are within the
power of Congress, subject only to the funda
mental limitations above referred to; that the
mere exercise of this power over territory pre
viously within the exclusive control of the ex
ecutive department of the Government will not
confer upon su-h Inhabitants a political status
different from or any civil rights other than the
status and rights created by the legislation en
art ed by Congress in the exercise of this power.
Third— That from the beginning, in the absence
of treaty stipulations to the contrary. It has
been uniformly held by both the political and
Judicial branches of the Government that such
territory is the common property of the States,
ami has always been so treated; that it is not a
part of. but belongs to. the United States, and
that the political status and civil rights of the
inhabitants thereof, beyond the status and rights
conferred by the treaty of cession, have been
only such as Congress has seen fit to create
within the limitations heretofore mentioned.
In support of the foregoing propositions, the
sub-committee submitted an array of precedents
which was overwhelming. All the majority
members of the Insular Committee were present,
and the discussion was full and general. It
.was unanimously decided that any bill relating
to the government of Puerto Rico or the Philip
pines reported by the Insular Committee would
be framed in harmony with the principle
enunciated by the committee. This position was
not reached without some difficulty, but was
finally agreed to by all the members after the re
su'ta of thf thoro!,\£h and painstaking researches
of Messrs. lawney. Moody and others were ex
plained and advocated by them.
This action was significant not only because
of the importance of the subject, but also on
account of the prominence, ability and influence
as legislators of the members who compose the
majority of the Insular Committee. They are
Mr. Cooper (chairman), of Wisconsin; Mr.
Moody. Mr. Cannon, of the Appropriations Com
mittee; Chairman Hitt. of Fniv-isjn Affairs:
Chairman Payne and Mr. Tawney, of Ways and
Moans; Chairman Hepburn, of Interstate and
Foreign Commerce; Chairman Loud, of the
Post office Committee; Chairman Babcock, of the
District Committee, and Judge Crumpaeker, of
Indiana.
TO PROBE JUDGE'S ACTION.
CITY CLUB WILL INVESTIGATE JUSTICE
FITZGERALD'S APPOINTMENT OP
CARROLL AS RECEIVER.
By a resolution adopted last night at Its reg
ular quarterly meeting, the City Club, at No.
10 West Thirty-fourth-st., grave notice of its in
tention to take Justice Fitzgerald to task for
appointing John F. Carroll receiver for the
Brooklyn Wharf and Warehouse Company. Ac
cording to J. W. Pryor, secretary of the club,
an attempt may be made to impeach the Justice
if fact* warranting this action can be disclosed.
The resolution, which was offered by Nicholas
Murray Butler and unanimously adopted, is as
follows:
Resolved. That the president be requested and
authorized to appoint a special committee of five,
with power to add to their number, of whom the
president shall be one. to take such public action
as in their judgment is justified in view of the
.statement ac to the recent action of Mr. Justice
Fitzgerald in the matter of the application for
the appointment of a receiver for the Brooklyn
Wharf and Warehouse Company.
MR. PRYORS STATEMENT.
J. W. Pryor, secretary of the club, said con
cerning the action:
The resolution was based upon a statement by
President Wheeler H. Pe.-kham before the club.
Mr. Peckham said that the facts he stated were
not within hl.s immediate personal knowledge,
but had come to him from such sources that he
feit safe and justified in saying that they are
true. All the parties interested in conserving
the property of the Brooklyn Wharf and Ware
house Company agreed that they .' would like
appointed as receiver the United States Mort
gage and Trust Company, but that counsel for
the parties realized that it was necessary to
recognise that political considerations would
have some weight in any appointment.
All agreed upon Hugh J. Giant as a man who
would meet the political requirements, and make
an honest and able receiver. Counsel went be
fore Justice Fitzgerald and unitea in asking for
an order appointing Mr. Grant. The Justice took
the papers. That night Mr. Grant received a
message that Justice Fitzgerald would be at
home that evening. Mr. Grant did not call. The
next morning, without giving any warning to
the parties or their counsel. Justice Fitzgerald
appointed John F. Carroll receiver. Counsel
thereupon united in amo >n for the dismissal of
the action, and their representations were such
that Justice Fitzgerald was compelled to issue
an order discontinuing the action.
WHAT MR. PECKHAM SAYS.
"This Instance proves." said Mr. Peckham.
'as far as one instance can prove, that the testi
mony of many Supreme Court Judges before the
Mazet Committee that political considerations
did not enter into applications for receivers and
referees was not true. The presence on the
bench of a m in who is obviously actuated by
political considerations and appoints a receiver
against the Joint protest Of the parties inter
ested is a menace to the community."
Francis E. Lalmbeer. who was assistant coun
sel to the Mazet Committee, said:
"The Incident gives a more correct Idea of the
EVERY HOl'K A TRAIN.
Leaves Grand Central Station for Buffalo and the
Weil; 150 miles of the Hudson River; 92 miles of
hawk Valley; unsurpassed scenery ; perfect
track, by the New-York Central. Trains Illuminated
by Plntwh Light.— Advt.
CHAMPAGNE DRINKERS ACCUSTOMED TO
drinking a different brand than MOST & CHAN
DON WHITE SEAL will be BurpHsed at the re
markable excellence of -WHITE SEAL, compared
with other brand*.—
influence of politics upon Judicial action than
was given by the testimony of judges before
the Mazet Committee. Here Is a Judge giving
one of the most lucrative positions th»t COM
to a Judge to the practical head of Tammany
Hall— Mr. Croker being away and Mr. Carroll
second to him in command. Of course, we can
ccme to but one conclusion."
The committee appointed last night has full
power to act, and may call a special meeting of
the club to hear the result of Its investigations.
Mr. Pryor could not say anything definite about
what course the club wiU take.
The Tribune last night got Justice Fitzgerald
on the telephone, and he said that any statement
that he had had any communication whatso
ever, of any kind, nature or character, with Mr.
Grant before the warehouse company action
came before him was absolutely false and
wickedly untrue.
CANAL TREATY DISCUSSED.
MR. MORGAN URGES RATIFICATION-OP
POSITION IN THE SENATE.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE TIUBCXE.]
Washington. Feb. ".—The provisions of the
Hay-Pauncefote Isthmian Canal Treaty were
discussed for an hour and a half this morning
by the members of the Senate Committee on
Foreign Relations. Senator Morgan, of Ala
bama, the former chairman of this committee
and now the head of the Committee on Inter
oceanic Ctnals, was asked by Chairman Davis
to give a general history of Central American
canal projects , and to explain the relation borne
to such projects by the new British-American
treaty. Senator Morgan is recognized as per
haps the leading authority in Congress on all
questions relating to the construction of an
Isthmian waterway— an enterprise which he has
championed for years with enthusiastic devotion
and .:. By. His opinion of the new convention
was therefore easterly sought by his colleagues
on the Foreign Relations Committee, on whom
the duty will fall of advising ratification or
rejection. The Alabama Senator's statement to
the committee showed him to be in entire sym
pathy with the spirit and purposes of the treaty
just concluded, and he urged its prompt ac
ceptance by the Senate without qualification or
amendment
In Mr. Morgan's view the Clayton- Bui wer
Treaty was a material obstruction to the build
ing of an exclusively American canal across the
Isthmas of Darien. and the removal of that
obstacle by the conclusion of a supplementary
compact was both prudent and necessary. As
to the neutralization nf th^ new waterway. Mr.
Morgan considered that policy the only practica
ble one. inasrr.vch a* the canal had to be cut
through foreign territory, and was only in the
most fanciful sense a continuation of this coun
try's "domestic coast line." Chairman Davis
acquiesced in Senator Morgan's views, as did
most of the otl, -r committee members present.
Though no action was taken to-day, it seems
probable that the treaty will be reported with
out any attempt at amendment.
Considerable opposition to the ratification of
the Hay-Pauncefote convention in its present
form is reported to exist in the Senate. Some
Senators are said to wish to defeat the new
treaty because it recognizes the validity of the
Clavton-Bulwer agreement. But the reply is
made that nothing the Senate can now do will
annul the obligations of that convention; that
the Buchanan Administration admitted its
vitality in 18(iO, and the McKlnley Administra
tion has now recognized its binding force in
1900- and that no appeal on the Senate's part
from the judgment of the .executive branch can
now upset 'he British claim that the provisions
of the* Clayton-Bulwer Treaty have never an
nulled themselves automatically.
Two other points of objection are raised. One
is that the canal is not to be fortified and held
in the military control of the United States; but,
or. the other "hand, military experts here main
tain that no fortifications are desired at the
entrances to the canal, its use and control in
time of war depending rather on the naval
bases in the Atlantic and the Pacific which com
mand it.
A<? for the necessity of protecting commerce
in transit through the canal from revolutionary
or other disturbances in the Central American
Republics, supporters of the Hay-Pauncefote
convention declare it gives the United States
ample power through the provision that it shall
"police" the proposed interoeeanic highway, and
they do not believe that its opponents can mus
ter strength enough to defeat the treaty.
NO NEGOTIATION'S ABOUT ALASKA.
London. Feb. 7.— The officials of the United
States Embassy deny that any negotiations in
regard to Alaska arc proceeding between Lord
Salisbury and Joseph H. Choate, the United
States Ambassador, or that a concession of a
free port in Alaska Is included in the Nica
ragua agreement, as cabled from Washington.
A question will be asked in the House of Com
mons Thursday as to whe'her Great Britain
has relinquished all her rights under the Clay
ton-Bulwer Treaty in respect to the Nicaragua
Canal, and if so what compensating advan
tages if any have been secured in exchange.
Owing to delay in printing, the text of the
Hay-Pauncefote convention was only Issued by
the' Foreign Office to-night.
GERMANY'S CONSENT NOT ASKED.
Berlin, Feb. 7 —ln regard to the cabled report
that the I'nited States and Great Britain are
trying to obtain the consent of Gcimany and the
other Powers to a Nicaraguan agreement, the
Foreign Office here says that as Germany was
not a party to the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty. Ger
many has no political interests in those part?
and no right to expect either th° United States
or Great Britain to seek to obtain Germany's
consent to ;i Nicaraguan agreement.
The United States Ambassador. Mr. White,
says tho United States gave no compensation
whatever to Great Britain, and most assuredly
gavo neither land nor harbors in Alaska in ex
change for the abrogation of the treaty.
WORK OF ENGINEERS NEARLY PONE.
Managua. Nicaragua, Jan. 18.— The englneerlrg
divisions of the Isthmian Canal Commission expect
to complete their work In Nicaragua, with: the ex
ception of a few borings, before February 15. 1900.
so that th? report of the Commission can be ready
In a short ti..n-> after the engineers complete their
work of surveying the canal ;-v.ite.
It is understood here that the Nicaragua** Gov
ernment will appoint arbitrators on its part for
the purpose of settling the differences existing be
tween ft and the Maritime Canal Company, of
Nicaragua. In connection wl'h the charter to con
struct a canal across this Si-ue. It is thought,
however, that these arbitrators will not be an
nounced until the last day of the tlmo limit named
in the concession. The opinion is expressed In some
quarters that the Government will object to the
arbitrators selected by the company, who are < itt
zens of the United States, on the ground that the
company should, according to the laws of Nica
ragua, have named only citizens of this country.
TERRIBLE HEAT IS 00071 .4 V ERICA.
FO MANY 1 \THS FROM BUNSTROKE THAT THE
BVEN' ■ AYKEB GRAVE DIGGERS
M STRIKE. »
Buenos Ayres. Feb. 7 —The terrible hoat continues
There were 26" sunstrokes Monday and 187 yester
day. The fatal cases show a dlmunitlon, but many
bodies are decomposing at the cemetery, owing to
the strike of the grave diggers for higher wages.
The malic crop* are scorched and promise only a
small yield.
Montevideo. Feb. 7.— Numerous sunstrokes have
occurred here, many proving fatal. The malse crop
la almost totally lost.
chan. DRINKERS Now DRINKING
MOET * < HANDON U in
duced to drink any other ihampa.
THE ROT BFRINOS OF ARKANSAS
Ownid and controlled bj V. S. Government Ele
fnnt HotoU. Arltngion and Eastman. Oolf. Ad-
Uii »• U T. Ha*. Manas- il.i 1 . for bOokUt. -AdvC
PRICE THKEE CENTS.
TAYLOR HESITATING.
REPUBLICANS URGE HIM NOT
TO GRANT DEMANDS.
HE MAY NOT DECIDE BEFORE MONDAY—
ANOTHER CONFERENCE POS- r^ S
SIBLY REQUIRED.
[BT telegraph TO the -raisers.]
Frankfort. Ky.. Feb. 7.— lntelligence not la
the least more definite is obtainable to-night
than at this hour last night regarding Governor
Taylor's intentions Beyond the fact that at 10
o'clock to-night he had not affixed his signature
to the Louisville peace conference agreement,
practically nothing of a satisfactory character
is known. All of the signers of the agreement
continue firm in their belief that Taylor eventu
ally will yield and thus prevent bloodshed.
A Republican in close touch with Taylor said
to-night, immediately after coming from the
barricaded State House, that he believed Taylor
would sign the document next Monday, which is
the date limit fixed by the Louisville conference.
To-night Taylor Is In consultation behind Ma
barricades with ex-Federal Judge Barr, Colonel
W. C. P. Breckinridge, Judge Yost, and several
other of the ablest lawyers In Kentucky.
The popular belief is that these attorneys not
only are using all of their persuasive powers
to influence him to sign the peace treaty, but
also that they are preparing an elaborate state
ment setting forth the legal and moral conten
tion of the Republicans, and that this, while
agreeing to surrender the offices, yet will show
that the surrender is made only to avert ; a
blcody conflict and to restore peace and order
to the State.
WILL HAVE GOEBEL LAW REPEALED.
It is understood that tha main cause of Tay
lor's refusal to sign the document is his fixed
determination to wring from the Democratic
mrnagers the solemn pledge to repeal the ob
jectionable features of the Goebel law, when his
action makes possible a resumption of legisla
tion in the Capitol. It is- known that the Demo
cratic conferrees at Louisville agreed to this
proposition, but the proposed concession has
aroused such outspoken opposition among the
hotspurs of the Democracy as to have given th«
Republicans cause to believe that the Legislat
ure will not in any way modify the Goebel law
even if a promise so to do Is made a part of
the final agreement.
The rank and file of the Democracy here to
day resent, with bitter Imprecations, all sugges
tions looking to the least modification of the
Goebel law. "That proposition is an Insult to
the memory of our murdered leader," said Chair
man Poyntz of the Board of Election Commis
sioners. 'If we should change one word of the
laws bearing Goetel's name it would be taken by
the world as a confession on our part that the
Republicans and other antl-Goebelltes are right
in their claim that the Goebel law is to blame
for all the trouble in Kentucky."
It is a curious fact that nobody here feels any
interest in either faction of the dual Legislators*,
Few of the Democratic members were in Frank
fort to-day. They, axe . collecting In Louisville,
for a meeting there to-morrow. ?The Republic
cans in session at London are attracting TT>~flfT
tention whatever in this part of the State.
PROTEST OF REPUBLICAN LEGISLATORS.
To-day they sent to Governor Taylor a round
robin protesting violently against his yielding.
Their voice, like that of the Democratic legisla
tors, when they get at a safe distance from
Frankfort, is for war and massacre. The minor
State officers elected on the ticket with Taylor
to-day visited him In a body and urged him not
to sign the peace treaty. Messages have been
pouring in on Taylor all day. from Republican
organizations in various parts of the State en
couraging him to stand firm in his refusal to
make the concessions being pressed upon him.
But despite all of these warlike aspects the
conviction has become lodged In conservative
minds that Taylor will yield, and that the real
'danger point was passed when Goebel died.
The opinion is general among Democrats that
in the improbable event of Taylor declining to
step aside the Democratic programme after this
week will be one of "starve out." The plan will
be for the Election Commissioners to meet next
week and declare all the minor State officers
who ran with Goebel entitled to the places now
held by Republicans. This would complete the
dual State Government. If this is done it is be
lieved by the Democrats that the bondsmen of
the Republican Treasurer and other bonded offi
cials would hasten to have their names stricken
from the bonds. Without these bonds the offi
cials concerned could not transact business. •
ANOTHER CONFERENCE MAY BE HELD.
TERMS OF AGREEMENT NOT PUBLISHED IX
FULL- DEMOCRAT IC LEGISLATORS
IN LOUISVILLE.
Louisville. Feb. ".—The existence of a hitch
In the peace negotiations and speculation as to
its probable duration occupied the minds of poli
ticians t^> tho exclusion of everything else to
day. That another conference between the rep
resentatives of the two parties may be necessary
befort a final agreement is reached was Indi
cated by the summoning to Frankfort this after
noon of Republican attorneys who have all along
advised the leaders of that party, and some of
whom were present at Tuesday night's confer
ence. These included ox-Governur Bradley, A.
K. Willson and David W. Fairleigh.
The last named was said to b<- out of the city.
The others took an afVrnoon train for Frank
fort. They would not talk of the negotiations,
not being advised as to the particular points
Governor Taylor wishes to discuss with them.
The Republicans of this i-ity are not agreed as
to the wisiiom of dosing the negotiations on the
basis of the agreenv n Tuesday
night. Postmaster T. H. P.ak-r and some other
Federal officers think th<? sacrifice should be
made in the interest of peace, while the press
and the anti-Admiuiatrat'.< n faction of the city
believe the fight shouM be kept up. The
or Davis faction, held a meeting to-night, at
which resoluti« na were adopted urging Governor
Taylor not to sign the agreement.
AGREEMENT MAY NOT BE SIGNED.
Lieutenant-Cn -rnor Marshall said this after
;at so many protests were being made by
the Republican* against the terms of the peace
agreement that he was doubtful if it would be
signed. He added:
The terms of the agreement as published a*«
taken to be literally correct, while such Is not
the case. There have beta several errors ta
the published statement. The Republican meet
ing at ill to-night is on the idea that
the agreement has been published, but it has
n«H been given out correctly.
Lieutenant- Governor Marshall was one of fh*
Republican members of Tuesday night's ons
: ■ of the signers of the agree
ment. He said he was not at liberty t-> dis
cuss t f the document fur: r I
WHY ORDER ANY CHAMPAGNE BUT THE
very beat? MOET A CHANDON WHITE SEAL
heads the list of champagnes consumed is - th«
world,— JU*u

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