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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 08, 1900, Image 12

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12
WESTCHESTER COUNTY.
NKW-ROCHELLE.
/Major Dillon was absent, and President" Herbert
A. Quaekenbush presided at the .. Common Council
meeting- on Tuesday night. Bids were opened tot
;$69,T3255 6 per cent certificates, to pay the first In
stalment on the paving of the streets. The cer
tificates were awarded to W. J. Hayes & Sons, of
Cleveland. Ohio, for $74.<>57. The $26 000 of sewer
certificates, i which were advertised In December
-but were .not sold, will be readverttsed. Bids will
be opened on Mar. I A contract for erecting a
fireproof vault in the new City Hall was awarded
to George Galpano, the only bidder, for J3.2W. a
resolution, offiered by Alderman Burke for the
or-eninc of Prospect-st.. was adopted unanimously.
Mrs. W. H. Hamilton died from apoplexy yester
tlav at her home. No. 7* Main-st. She was the
widow of W. H. Hamilton, the basso opera singer,
who died In Los Angeles. Cal.. three years ago.
Mrs. Hamilton was about fifty years old. and leaves
a. daughter. Mrs. U D. Huntineton. jr. The funeral
■will be conducted by the Rev. Dr. C. F. Canedy. of
Trinity Episcopal Church. , , .;'-■
Belief Engine Company held its annual ele"tlnn
and dinner on Tuesday night. .lames Ross, chief
of the Fire Department, was toastmaster. The
newly elected officers are Aujrustine Smith, fore
man C. B Dunkel. first assistant: V. F. Martin^
second assistant; George M. Davis, secretary and
treasurer.
PORT CHESTER.
-'Three little girls, who gave their name? as Ruth
Russell and Maud and Lillian Avery. were com
mitted to the Westchester County Home for Desti
tute Children, yesterday raorninp. by Justice Wake
field. They we're arrested by Constables O'Brierf
•nd Hlckey. who found them In a barn owned by
Chester Brown, where they had slept on Monday
night unknown to the owner. The parents of the
children said they were Incorrigible. Maud Aw
Is ten years o'.d. nd Ruth Russell and Lillian A\er>
■are e&ch twelve. .. . .
WHITE PLAINS
-•'The Board of Supervisors has Instructed counsel
to appeal from the judgment obtained by Martin,
Brag & Co. against the county in their suit to re
cover payment for work done In connection with
the new hospital at East View. On recommenda
tion of the Judiciary Committee the Board voted
not to allorv bills presented by justices of the peace
for the service* of stenographers and interpreters.
Silas D G.-cpory and James Parent were appointed
superintendent of Golden's and Wood's bridges,
respectively, over the Croton River, Supervisor
Eari (Republican), of Yonkeis. moved to adjourn
•until Tuesday next. Supervisor Lent (Democrat)
of East Chester, moved to amend by adjourning
until Monday, adding that it was customary for
the Board to meet on Washington's Birthday and
as Washington was as good as Lincoln he failed
to see why the Supervisors should not meet on
February *-■ The amendment prevailed, after
-wVch Mr Ear! referred to last year's proceedings
and discovered that the old Board had not met on
Lincoln's Birthday.
Joseph B. Lee and the members of the Good
Roads Committee are in Albany attending the con
vention called by State Engineer Bond for the pur
pose of advocating appropriations by the Legislat
ure The local supervisors hope to obtain a suffl
cient appropriation to enable them to begin the
construction of two highways this spring.
PEEKSKII.L.
The village Board of Trustees has passed the
buoget for n*xt year, as follows: Fire Depart
ment. SUM; Police Department, $2,500; Board of
Health. »'■"; wewenge, $1,500: office and contingent,
$S.SC<O. and street lighting, $5,500. Two special appro-
I^ristions will r* submitted to the people-$3,500 for
t y, e pu lot and the erection of barns and
- for the village carts, horses and tools, end
$2 s'<o to st**l cells In the village jail. In addi
tion to this total of $22,000 there are the highway.
: Water 3oard sinking funds, which
the budget to over $40,000. The Board
complaints from Dr. J. W . Bennett
and Mr.-. Jessie A. Murden, a dressmaker, who
allege that they are injured by the roping off of
th^-ir Uouses on account of the danger from the
»a'is *f the burned Depew Opera House, which
have been allowed to stand for ten days. The
matter was referred to the Board of Health. Per
mission was given to JuHub Fleischmann to erect
pif-rs and approaches in Louisa-st. for an $8,000
bridge which will epan the railroad tracks and
extend fronn L,ouisa-st. to the Fleischmann plant.
WHITE PLAINS.
The Village Trustees are considering amendments
to the Water and Sewer acts in order to permit
the corporation to extend Its service to the outlying
districts. The municipality owns both the water
and sewer systems.
Ow : ng to the scarcity of water in The Bronx Bor
oueh the locomotives on the Harlem Railroad have
been drawing largely on the local water supply.
Under a new contract recently made between the
railroad company and the Water Commissioners
XBOO OUO gallons ot water was furnished to the com
pany by the village in the month of January.
MOUNT VERNON.
Michael and Petro Patrone, the Italians who had
a fight on Tuesday night, in which a revolver load
ed with poisoned cartridges was used, were ar
raigned before Judge Bennett yesterday morning
and hela in $200 ball each for trial on Friday. The
Italians, who are cousins, make counter charges of
murderoup assault against each other. Michael
Patrone Bays his cousin has made seven attempts
to kill nim] and that he loaded the revolver with
poisoned bullets for self-protection. In the struggle
on Tuesday night he accidentally shot himself
through the hand, and yesterday his arm was
fcwo'.len from the poison, which Police Surgeon
Newell says is bichloride of mercury. Holes had
be*n drilled in the cartridges, and they had been
filled with the poison. Patrone said that he had
poisoner* the cartridges because he waa not a good
marksman and wanted to make sure that he would
tda purpuer. On Tuesday night It was stated
that a quarrel over an invention was the cause of
the feud It i* now ea;J by pome of the Italians
that Michael recently changed his religion, and that
h'f cousin who if a fanatic, sought to kill him
When he found that he could not win him back.
Mr? i^ouisa Frances Riwe. seventy years old^
•er of the late Rev. Richard Sluyter. died
\ay at the home of her grandson, Henry C.
"Bank* No. 4** Warwick-aye.. Mount \ ernon
Hf-ijrhT- Mrs Rowe was the mother of Mrs. Shep
parJ Barks, the wife of a New-York lawyer. Mrs.
Banks died in December and Mr. Banks in January.
Mrs Arria Bomer Rollins, wife of Frank S. Rol
lins a Nf-w-York business man. died yesterday at
her' homo, in I^ring-ave.. Pelham Heights, Mr.
Rollirp was twenty-«=lx years old. and was born in
Boston. She had been married about one year, and
left a young child.
FAVOR COMPULSORY TOTING.
THE CENTRAL REPUBLICAN CLI'B APPROVES
THE PASSAGE OF A LAW TO
fet THAT EFFECT.
By a unanimous vote at a well attended meeting
to Cer.tr*>] R»publ!can Club last night indorsed
r»*o:uiionF favoring tbe passing by the Legislature
of a measure making it absolutely imperative for all
citi«*nF to register and vote.
The resolutions in question were flrst presented
at a meeting of the club on December 18 and were
referre.l to the Political AffairF Committee. In gen
eral th<? resolutions favored a bill by which every
voter should be obliged to cast a ballot, even if it
were blank, and suggested that all negligent voters
should be obliged to serve the State to some extent
for their neplfct: that some advantage should be
given to those voters who performed their duties:
. ■. That all panels of Juries should be drawn first
from among those who failed to vote, and that such
juiors- should be limited to courts that pay only a
nominal sum for jury service.
Th«- committee was also askeri to take under ad
• ment <i recommendation to modify the Civil
Service iaws. providing that applicants for official
place* who had per:<<rmed thf-ir public duty should
en a small additional rating over those who
Y.Sii't in <n negligent, and also to consider whether
persons who w<-re required to secure licenses for
business purpoi-es should, in addition to being citi
have voted at the previous election.
Alderman Ellas Goodman piesenU-d the report of
the Political Affairs Committee, which was favor
able to the resolution*. Som<- discussion followed
in which it was pointed out that while the proposed
measure might not present the best solution of the
problem, it would at least provoke discussion that
mipht lead to good results. The resolutions were
ther adopted unanimously. Copies of the resolutions
will be sent to the Governor, the Mayor, the mem
bers of the Legislature and the members of the
Munirlpal Assembly. Frederick C. Lawyer presided
at the rntetlng.
UEX FOR THE CRUISER ALBANY.
TO BE TAKEN TO ENGLAND ON THE AUXILIARY
CRUISER PRAIRIE.
Norfolk, Va...Feb. 7 (Special).— 223 men, who
• have been collected from several different points
and held aboard the receiving ship Franklin at the
\ Norfolk Navy Yard for some time past, were to-day
: taken aboard the auxiliary crulaer Prairie. She
arrived from Baltimore this morning and coaled
r here for her voyage to Elswick, England, where the
•rrnen will be transferred to the newly completed
. cruiser Albany, slater ship to the New-Orleans
" The Albany Is one of the Brazilian warships nur
; chased on the stocks at Armstrong's shipyard at
: the outbreak: of the Spanish war. The securfne' Wr
tven the small crew required for the Albany was
. no caey matter at this time, when the big battle
, Bhlps Kearaarg* and Kentucky are Just ready for
,coma:iseion!ng. The Kearsarge is expected at th
,- Norfolk Navy Yard on February 20 for that purpose
TWO RAILROAD if EN KILLED.
Chicago, Feb. 7.— ln a tog to-day two switch en
gine* on the Wisconsin Central Railroad had a col
■ss. llaion at Franklin Park, two rwltch men being
!#^. another sustained" what Is thought are fatal
- juries and a fourth receded severe injurtea.
HOME NEWS.
PROMINENT ARRIVALS AT THK HOTWLR
ALBEMARLE— Don M. Dickinson, of Detroit.
FIFTH AVENUE— H. C. Rhodes, of Columbus,
Ohio. MANHATTAN Robert Colt, of New-Lon
don. MAJESTIC— J. Farrell, of Philadelphia.
NKTHERLAXD-Mayor Conrad Dlehl of Buffalo.
WALDORF-Rlchard' P. Olney. of Boston. ex-Sec
retary of State; General H. S. Hawkins, U. S. A.,
und Mayor Josiah Qulncy of Boston.
WHAT IS GOING ON TO-DAT.
Molineux case, before Recorder Goff.
Special Grand Jury's Investigation.
Nrw-York Yacht Club election, clubhouse, even
ing.
Reception for Admiral Dewey, Union League
Club. Brooklyn, evening.
Silk Association dinner, Delmonico's, 7 p. m.
Annual election of American Institute, No. 19
West Korty-fourth-st.. 10 a. m. to 8 p. m.
Rapid Transit Commission meeting.
Annual dinner of Architectural League, No. 215
West Fifty-seventjit-pt., 7 p. m.
Legal Aid Society. Assembly Hall. United Chari
ties Building. 8:15 p. m.
NEW-YORK CITY.
The Rev. Robert Erskine Ely will deliver a series
of six addresses on Sunday at 4:30 p. m. In the
Madison Avenue Baptist Church, beginning Febru
ary 11. His general subject will be "Christianity
and Social Reform."
The League of American Sportsmen will meet at
the Marlborough Hotel next Wednesday afternoon.
G. O. Shields is the president.
The fourteenth annual dinner of the Irish Revo
lutionary Brotherhood veterans will be held at the
Sturtevant House on March 6.
George P. Brown wIH deliver an address on "The
Value of the Doctrine of Evolution In the Teaching
of Children" at a public meeting of the Society
for the Comparative Study of Pedagogy at the
School of Pedagogy of New-York University, Sat
urday, at 2:30 p. m
The regular monthly meeting of the Board of
Directors of the Merchants' Association of New-
York was held yesterday afternoon at the rooms
of the association, at which officers for the year
were elected, as follows: President, William F.
King; first vice-president, John C. Juhring; second
vice-president, Alvah Trowbridge; secretary. John
C. Eames: treasurer, Charles H. Webb; counsel,
James B. Dill.
The twenty-third anniversary of the Industrial
school of Pilgrim Congregational Chard, Harlem,
will be celebrated to-day, when there will be an
exhibition and sale of articles made by the pupils.
The third annual bazaar of the Grand United
Order of Odd Fellows will be held on February' 12 to
28. at No. 158 West Twenty-ninth-st. The order is
raising funds to build a hall.
The Society or Medical Jurisprudence will meet
on Monday, at 8 p. m., at Xo. 17 West Forty-thlrd
st. Dr. Hamilton Williams will read a paper on
"The Coroner's Physician at Work."
The Patriotic Republican Club, No. 248 East
Seventy-eighth-st., will have a Lincoln's Birthday
meeting on Monday at Its clubhouse.
The annual meeting of the Legal Aid Society will
be held tc-nlght at S:la at the United Charities
Building, Twenty-second-st. and Fourth-aye. The
meeting te called for the purpose of receiving the
annual reports of President Briesen, the treasurer
and the attorneys, and for the election of a new
Board of Directors.
The New-York Library Club will hold a meeting
to-day at No. 309 Havemeyer Hall, Columbia Uni
versity, at 3:30 p. m. The programme will Include
a discussion of the question of joining the proposed
movement for obtaining cheaper postage on library
books. On that question R. R. Bowker, C. A. Nel»
son and A. E Bostwick will speak. Among other
subjects will be "Difficulties of Systematic Train
ing of School Children in the Use of Library and
of Reference Books," by Miss Agnes Wallace, of
the Cathedral Library, and "Talks with Pupils
on Reference Books and Books to Use in Con
nection with Studies," by John C. Sickley, of
Poughkeepsie.
RAILROAD INTERESTS.
CONSIDERING SHIPPERS' PROTESTS.
MANY HUNDREDS! OF TYPEWRITTEN PAGES TO
BE READ BY THE CLASSIFICATION
COMMITTEE.
The Classification Committee of the Trunk Line
Association met yesterday to consider the numer
ous complaints made by local and Western ship
pers at a public hearing on January 22 last relative
to the classifications in freight matter for 1900. The
meeting was held behind closed doors, and lasted
until late in the afternoon.
After the adjournment Commissioner Goddard
said that the committee had been carefully con
sidering the grievances of the shippers. Mr. God
dard said:
There was submitted by the shippers an immense
amount of documentary matter, each shipper hav
ing considered it necessary to submit a vast
amount of typewritten statements, together with
his complaint, in the way of substantiation, the
aggregate, when it is remembered there were sev
eral hundred complainants represented, making
no slight task to read it. But each complaint
will receive careful and complete consideration,
and where it is found that Injustice or hardship is
caused by the new classification, if it is within the
power of the committee to remedy the existing evil
it will be done.
The committee has gone to work earnestly on
this matter, and will stick to it ten hours, and
probably more, each day until It Is completed
Just when that will be !s hard to say. It may be
finished at the end of a week or ten days, or It
may require twice that long.
NEW SOUTHERN PACIFIC CONNECTION.
PLANS FOR ROUTE FROM SALT LAKE CITY
EOUTHWESTWA RD.
Chicago, Feb. ".—"The Record" to-morrow will
say that plans for a costly piece of construction
work that practically will bring about another
transcontinental line are being made by the
Southern Pacific Company. A line from some point
in Southern California to Salt Lake City or to some
more westerly place on the Central Pacific is in
mind, and the building of a part of It. unless some
thing unexpected happens to change the plans, will
be begun in the summer.
Last year the Southern Pacific had surveyors at
work laying out the most desirable route south
westward from Salt Lake City to a connection with
the Southern Pacific in California. It is said that
the company has made arrangements whereby the
Carson and Colorado road, which extends from
Keeler. In the eastern part of Southern California,
to (arson City Nev., In part will be used as a link
pLMfIVwKi sed '."IT S igh Of s clalß of the Southern
Pacific, while not desiring to discuss the matter for
publication admit the essential features of the
scheme. They will not say where the termini of
the line will be. but they have admitted that an
application for a right of way has been filed in the
Government Land Offic-.
That the Carson and Colorado is a party to the
scheme is regarded as certain because of the fact
• that D. O. Mills, who is practically the sole pro
prietor of the California -Nevada line, recently *h£
elected to the directorate of the Southern
The Carson and Colorado Is a narrow gauge
road and in order to bring it up to the require
ments, it would have to be made a standard gauge
line with much heavier steel than that now used
Much money will have to be expended In condition
ing the line for transcontinental traffic but the
promoters believe that the necessary improvement
can be made at much less cost than would bo re
quired in building a new line. The company it
is said, has decided to build the eastern link' of
the line from some point near the middle of the
Mills road, crossing Nevada in the most direct
route possible to Salt Lake City. From Salt
Lake City, transcontinental traffic could be
handled over the Rio Grande Western Into Denver
whence several lines operate- to Chicago. ■'-■
BIG ERIE MORTGAGE TO SECURE RENTALS.
The Erie Railroad Company yesterday placed on
record at the Register's office a general mortgage
for $1,750,000. made in favor of Temple Bowdoin
banker, of No. 23 Wall-st., to secure the rental of
freight cars and locomotives. The railroad entered
into an agreement with Mr. Bowdoin last Decem
ber for the renting of one thousand steel freight
cars of 100.000 pounds capacity and fifty consolidated
freight locomotives to be delivered by him as he
received them from the builders. The company
pays an annual rental for this rolling stock of 80,
000. The mortgage Is made to secure an Issue of" 6
per go) 4 bonds payable within seven years the
money being used to pay for the rentai of the loco
motives and earn.
MOBILE AND OHIO DIRECTORS..
At the annual meeting yesterday of the general
mortgage and debenture holders of the Mobile and
Ohio Railroad Company these directors wer»
elected: J. C Clarke, C. C. Cuyler, W. Butler Dun-
? an J « H " Fay v Adrian jj B elln, Jr., T. E. Jevoi.s
J. H. Maaaon. i S. Rogers, W. Einlen Roosevelt
ftfofflfyftTß*^ 8h * p * r4 * ****** " d
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBrTNE. THI'RSPAY. FEBRUARY 8. 1900.
PAPER MEN PROSPER.
ANNUAL. DINNER OF THE STATIONERS'
BOARD OF TRADE A SUCCESS.
There is nothing stationary about the Stationers'
Board of Trade. It keeps going right ahead, and
especially since the McKinley Administration came
Into power has made such strides as never before.
At the annual dinner of the Board at the Waldorf-
Astoria last night the president. Henry C. Baln
bridge. testified to this fact In a pithy speech, part
of wlilrh Is as follows:
A dinner or social reunion this year Is peculiarly
appropriate. A little more than a year ago our
Board was almost prostrated through the defalca
tion of a trusted employe. It Is right that we
should rejoice that we have lived through it. that
we ha.ye enjoyed the most prosperous year In our
history, paid our debts at maturity and carried
over a handsome surplus. A rather unpleasant
feature whs that we hare had to pay a tax of $73,
due, I am afraid, to the Inexperience of the presi
dent and trustees In making out an annual report
which showed a surplus. One of the trustees, who
Is also an officer of a stock company, has offered
to make out our next annual statement, and as he
Is a man of experience in such matters we shall
probably escape the tax next year, even if we are
as prosperous as we were last year. It Is right
that we should rejoice over the year of prosperity
which we, in common with all other Industries,
have enjoyed. Never have our mills and factories
been busier, our work people more steadily em
ployed or better paid. The demand for the products
of field and factory have come from all corners
of our own land, and our export* to all quarters
of the globe have exceeded those of any year In
American history, due in a measure to the fact
that we have had plenty and to spare. It was also
due to the fact that American quality is making
a market for Itself, and American products In
paper as well as in other goods have found a
market at their own price by reason of American
superiority in quality and style.
Other speaker* were the Rev. Dr. D. Parker Mor
gan, John A. Taylor. ex-Judge Talntor and an
ex-presldent of the Board, Charles T. Dllllnghajn.
Among the 106 diners at the other tables were
J. Walter Spaldlng, Edwin H. Loveless, the hon
orary secretary of the Board; Patrick Farrelly,
O. C. Boorum, David A. Tower, J. Fred Acker
man, Charles A. Appleton, Eberhard Faber and
C. S. Hlggins.
PLEADS GUILTY OF PATRICIDE.
GEORGE W. SHAN TO BE SENTENCED TO MFE
IMPRISONMENT.
George W. Shan, twenty-one years old, a dental
student, who on November 13 last killed his father,
George Shan, by shooting him In the head in his
room at No. 1,125 Park-aye., pleaded guilty to
second degree murder yesterday morning, in Justine
Fursman's court. He will be sentenced to-morrow.
The penalty is imprisonment for life.
The District Attorney said there was no use try-
Ing to secure a conviction for murder in tho first
degree, as the State would flnd it impossible to
prove premeditation.
HE WANTS TWO PENSIONS.
AGED POLICEMAN SERVED ON TWO FORCES. AND
THINKS HE DESERVES THEM.
Hubert Oberly, a retired policeman, more than
eighty years old, caused papers to be served on
the Police Board yesterday In a suit he has
brought In the Supreme Court to compel the Police
Comml?fcloners to grant to him two pensions.
Oberly has served forty years and more on the
police force. He has had seventeen children, and
served in two wars with credit, and thinks he de
serves two pensions.
Oberly was on the police force In Brooklyn prior
to the consolidation. He was pensioned on April
1. 1886, on $500 a year. He was reappointed as a
Park policeman soon afterward. He was then
receiving his pension and his salary as a Park
policeman. In January. 189S, after the consolida
tion, the Police Board mad* him select which he
would do: Receive the pension or serve as h polire
r.ian on salary. They said he could not do both.
Oberly dropped his pension. A few months later
he was retired on n pension of $700 a year, and
now he sues for his first pension, with arrears
since January 1. 1898. Up alleges in his complaint
that he was forced to surrender his first pension
and did not do it voluntarily.
Detective Mulvf-y won a similar suit against the
Department. Mulvey was a detective-sergeant.
and was retired on a pension of $1,000 a year. He
then became a police captain in New-Vtrecht.
When the consolidation occurred he was brought
into the Department. The Police Commissioners
refused to pay him a pension and a salary. He
brought suit and received judgment.
MAX WITH A PICKAXE BLOWN UP.
HAD STRUCK A DARK LOOKING OBJECT TAKEN
BY DREDGERS FROM ff U IV HESTER CREEK.
A scowload of earth brought up by dredging ma
chines In Westch«"Uer Creek was taken to the City
Island Bridge ve«terday to be dumped. It was
frozen, and a number of men were put at work
breaking it up with pickp.xeF. Amonc them was
Bryan Harring. Harring's pick struck a hard,
black looking substance that at first he thought
to be a bowlder. He hit it s»veral hard blowf.
and at the last the object exploded, throwing the
earth in all directions. Harring was blown into
the air. thrown upside down, his hands were se
verely lacerated, his left eye was blown out and
his face was burned and scarred by the force of
the explosion. He was taken to Fordham Hospital.
His condition is said to be serious.
Two theories were advanced by the police. One
was that the explosion was caused by the bursting
of a British shell left In the water since the
Revolutionary W:;r. Ahout a year ago seventeen
thousand pounds of dynamite, was stolen from a
Harlem contractor, and was sold in lots to Italian
contractors. The police think that some of the
Italians were soared and threw the dynamite into
Westchester Creek, from which the earth came.
The police will try to learn whether It is probable
that other laborers will have eyes and hands
blown away by a mysterious dark substance.
OLD BOND LITIGATION DISMISSED.
CASE INVOLVING A TRANSACTION MADE IN IS7I
FINALLY riSPOPED OF.
Judge Coxe. of the United States District Court,
yesterday dismissed the bill of complaint In the
suit brought by James L. Montgomery against Ed
ward R. McDermott and others, concerning the
ownership and right and title to bonds valued at
$21,000, which have changed through many hands
since April 6, 1873, when, it Is alleged, James Mc-
Henry. of London. England, got them from
Charles Day. The latter transferred his Interest
in the securities, which were finally traced to Mc-
Dermott and his associates.
The bonds had some connection with a $2,000,000
land scheme organized on October 2, 1871, of which
S. M. L. Barlow and Charles Day were the trus
tees. The trustees have been dead for many
years and the litigation over the bonds which
Montgomery claims was in the State courts before
It got into the United States Courts.
Dismissing the bill of complaint Judge Coxe
says, among other things: "In brief, it Is thought
that the Court is constrained to hold that this is
not an ancillary action, and that no other ground
of Federal cognizance Is stated."
SENATOR BARD'S ELECTION CONFIRMED.
CALIFORNIA LEGISLATFRF3 FAVORS BUILDING OF
A PACIFIC CABLE.
Sacramento. Cal., Feb. 7.— The Senate and As
sembly met In Joint session to-day to ratify the
election of Thomas R. Bard to the United States
Senate, to succeed Stephen M. White. After the
usual preliminaries, Mr. Bard was declared elected
Senator for the term which began March 4, 1899.
The Assembly to-day adopted the Joint resolu
tion relative to the building of a Pacific cable. The
first section of the resolution reads:
Resolved. Sy the Senate and the Assembly Jointly
that our Senators in Congress be Instructed and
our Representatives therein be required and urged
to vote for and use all honorable means to secure
the passage of a bill requiring the laying of such
cable, and also requiring that the table be made by
an American company in the United States.
ANOTHER EFFORT TO BE MADE.
The Sing Sing firemen, thinking that th« vote by
which the appropriation of 15,000 for an electric
fire alarm was defeated was not a fair expression of
the sentiment of the taxpayers, only a little over
half of whom voted at the election last Monday,
have called a public meeting for Monday evening to
make arrangements for holding another election.
c
LAWTOX'fi BODY PASSES PITTSBURGH.
Plttuburg, Feb. The funeral train hearing th«
remains of General Lawton arrived here at 6:10
p. m., and started for. Washington at 7:30 p. m.,
after the party had eaten supper. A good sized
crowd had gathered at Union Station to show
respect to the dead soldier and sympathy for hit
family, but no arrangements had been mad* for
their racaptloa. All it wall on th* train.
fft* pUNT^pINEpbBNITURB
Special Designs for Special Needs.
People of tnste, with original ideas in regard to
furniture, MB us your wants.
If your rooms have Irregularities that require
p.M-ulifir (ifslu'iis; if you wish to select at our
stores desirable features from several styles nnd
have them oombined: if for any reason you wish
your furniture to be absolutely unique, our de
tifrns and. our factories are at your service.
Come to see what an inspirer of artistic ld*is
our furniture is and you will surely
"BUYOFtme MAKER*
Gjeo. C. Flint Co.
43. 45 and 47 WEST 23? ST.
NEAR BROADWAY.
factory: 154-and 156 west I9?STfi£ET
WOOD SUSTAINS LUDLOW.
RECONCILING CONFLICTING CLAIMS OF AU
THORITY IN HAVANA.
Havana, Feb. 7.— A meeting was held last night
between Governor-General Wood, General Lud
low, the Military Governor of Havana, and Civil
Governor Nunez, with reference to the matter
of the municipal budget, which under General
"Wood's order with reference to civil affairs
Nunez asserted he had a right to Inspect, not
considering it proper that Havana should be an
exception to the other cities of the island. Gen
eral Ludlow's powers, as given by the President,
invest him with rights over the municipal
finances of the city, and, consequently. General
Wood sustained General Ludlow. Governor
Nunez shook hands with General Ludlow, and
the former told the correspondent of The Asso
ciated Press that they had requested the Secre
tary of State to announce whether he had any
rights as Civil Governor, or whether he was to
be a dummy while General Ludlow was in
reality Civil Governor. General Ludlow say a
he has no desire to interfere in any manner with
the rights of Governor Nunez, but he has cer
tain duties to perform, which he must neces
sarily carry into effect. Before taking any fur
ther action Nunez will await the reply of Secre
tary of State Tamayo.
General Ludlow denies a statement recently
published in the United States to the effect
that he had been challenged to a duel by the
editor of a Havana paper and had refused to
reply. To begin with, he received no challenge,
and. in the second place, the editor referred to
is a person to whom he would not have thought
of replying had a challenge been issued. In
order to prevent a continuance of the vilification
to which he and other public officials have been
subjected In the columns of the "Luoha" Gen
eral Ludlow appealed directly to the Governor-
General, who decided that, in his official ca
pacity, he could not interfere, but readily agreed
to use his personal influence. To-day General
Wood held a private interview with the editor
of the "Lucha," with apparently satisfactory re
sults, as the evening edition did not attack the
Military Governor.
The women of the Maine Memorial Associa
tion have decided to ask funds to decorate the
wreck of the battleship on February 15, the
second anniversary of her destruction.
General Wood has named General Mayia Rod
riguez as president of the Institute of Cuban
Veterans — men who were crippled in the war —
at a salary of S'-'.fiUO.
Michael J. Dady says that his presence in
Havana is due entirely to private business. He
does not consider that the recent action of the
municipality regarding his contract affects the
legality of his contention, believing that the
validity of the contract is assured under the
terms of the Treaty of Paris.
Robert P. Porter arrived here this morning,
accompanied by Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph P.
Sanger. Director of Census. He says he will get
down to hard work immediately and endeavor
to arrange a satisfactory tariff.
CENTURY -INTERNATIONAL TRUST CO.
It is expected that the final arrangements for the
consolidation of the Century Trust Company and
the International Banking and Trust Company will
be consummated next Monday. The report that
Amzl L. Barber will become president of the con
solidated company is said to be premature. While
it is quite certain that he and his friends will con
trol, doubt la expressed that Mr. Barber will find
time to devote to th^ presidency of the company
It is practically settled that th«* consolidated com
pany will operate under the charter of the Inter
national company, which Is of a special and per
petual character, but that it will take the name of
the Century Trust Company.
A CONVICT rOBEMATH DISPLACED.
For ovtr a year the printing department at Sing
Sing Prison hn? been In charge of a convict printer
who is serving a sentence for grand larceny, and
who has instructed other prisoners In the printing
trade and has published the prison paper, "The
Star of Hope." The other convicts recently have
made several complaints to Keeper Alexander Van
Wart, who has i-harpe of the discipline of the
printing office, and as a result the convict foreman
has been removed and John W. Flynn, a printer
from Po.-t Chester, has been appointed in his place
The convicts said that their fellow prisoner as
sumed too much, and that he was more exacting
and expected more than an outside foreman
FRESH TRADE DEVELOPMENTS.
Egypt already has cane sugar factories, but is
ahout to conduct experiments with beet sugar.
Rltaro Hirota. a representative of a leading firm
of iron and steel merchants in Japan, has recently
visit!-.] Pltt«bur<f to study the steel mills there.
He Fays that Japan will soon erect and operate
her first steel mill The plant belongs to the
Government, and Is being established at Time
tatnura. Province of Chikusen, in the heart of the
co.il district. The ore will be brought by water a
distance of five hundred miles.
The American Consul-General at Cape Town
says that the duty of four cents a pound on for
eign meats his been suspended by the Natal and
Cape Colony governments, and an Immense amount
of Australian meat is coming Jn. Even when it
pays r duty Australian beef Is cheap enough to
displace the domestic meat in the market
Nothing of this kind is imported into South Africa
from the United States, and the Consul-General
evince* surprise.
Aluminum wlrfs are in use in several places
in this country for the transmission of electricity,
owing to the high price of copper. It has been
found, however, that when a splice is made it Is
necessary to solder the Joint Instead of merely
twisting the ends together, as is done with copper.
"The Electrical Review" describes the method em
ployed In Hart foul, where an electric light plant
relies on aluminum.
The paper mills of Maine were seriously embar
rassed by a lnek of water last fall and early In
the winter, but recent rains have filled the
stream* nicely.
Th*T9 has been some talk recently of a United
States tax on electricity generated in Canada and
transmitted to this country. And It has been hinted
i hit the. Niagara Falls Power Company might
object. Second Vice President Raiklne. however
has informed the Treasury Department that thli
is not the case. The directors of that corpora
tion ha\" unanimously voted that such a tax Is
not required for the protection of American In
dustry. !
The process of mercerizing cotton is apt to shrink
it. and a number of r?:eit patents cover methods
of overcoming this tendency. One of the latest
of them provide* for conducting the operation
while the yarn, or thread, is tightly wound on
spools Doubts have been #xpressed regarding th«
feasibility of the pUn. however.
Announcements.
E. A W. DRESS SHIRTS. E & W
Perfect In every detail.
MARINE INTELLIGENCE.
MIMIATt'RB ALMANAC.
Sunrise 7 :Ot Sunset B;28' Moon sets a m 2 !» Moon* a«« ■
HIGH WATHR.
A.M. — Saivfy Hook S:o9[Qoy. Island 8:41 !H«M G« t# 880
P.M. — Sandy Hook 4:08iOov. Island «:40iHadl Oats fI:S9
INCOMING STEAM ft RS.
TO-DAY.
Vessel. . From tint
™ rr ' ' l •;■•• Liverpool, January 19 ... Mediterranean
A/»h«n1«ta.n. ...... Gibraltar. January 21 —
Wordbjr Hambuif. January 21, .... MM _—
Ajrm*nu...,. l Stems, January 19. ........... IV' 1 *
Cotton Goods.
2500 yards Imported Zephyrs.
Fine, sheer fabrics, various col
ors, novelty weaves.
Suitable for Shirt-waists, Gowns
or Children's Dresses.
25 cents per yard ;
Valnr .".<> rent*.
James McCreery & Co.,
Twenty-third Street.
3.mnecmrntß.
FMPII7F THEATRE. B'way * 40th St. Evs.. 8:30.
LI IT il\L Matinees Wednesday A Saturday. 2:15.
XTRA MATINBE LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY.
EM co R M E P^ A ,r BROTHER OFFICERS.
Si,, Criterion Theatre, B * E V,f 1 -
Matlness Saturday and Monday at 2:13.
MAUDE ADAMS ! THE LITTLE MINISTER.
Mat. on Monday instead of Wed. next weak.
r ABPTPT? THEATRE. 33th-st. A B way.
lr.A«.«.i»..i\. , Ex-rs.. 8. Mat. Saturday.
XTRA MATINBE LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY.
WM. GILLETTE „££:>■ SHERLOCK HOLMES
14 A menu en THEATRE. B'way & 24th St.
mMUIOUn Oils Evenings. 8:30. Matinees. 2:15.
' ' Charles Frohman's Funniest Farce.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY. SATURDAY & MONDAY.
Th re ß CDHALIE I CO., DRESSMAKERS.
d A T?FiT?"V THEATRE - 2 " tn St. * Madison Are.
\JAHUCjJ* Extra Matinee Monday.
Last 2 weeks. . Evgs.. 8:20. Matinee Saturday.
MRS. LANGTRY— THE DEGENERATES
Mrs. I>anittry recites "The Absent Minded Beggar."
f% A I Wl A B way & 30th At 8:13
II fl I ¥ X Daniel Frohman Mgr.
I* n■■ I W Matinees Wed. A Sat.. 2.
Extra Matinee Hon.. Feb. 12.
"Received with undoubted favor."—
"Realized highest expectations." — Journal.
••Will run through the season." — Times.
THE AMBASSADOR.
A New Society Drama, by
"John Oliver Hobbes. "
"Extraordinary cast." — Journal.
I AsTllssJ 4tn Aye * 2M - At 8:»
I Yl§r IIM Unniel Krohmnn Mttr.
bVb I Via Will MATINEE^ THURSDAY * SAT.. 2:15.
CHARLES FROHMAN PRESENTS
The Surprises of Love.
EXTRA MATINEE LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY.
British King Antwerp. January 23 Phoenix
Taunc LJvrpool. January 27 White Star
Chicago City Swansea. January 23 Bristol
Xn'tof St. G«orge.. Antwerp, January 23 O S A Aust
TVrfteste Glbralta. January 24 Austro-Hun
Flaxman St. Lucia. January .To. . .Lamport A H
Trave Bremen, January 30 N O LJoyd
H. H. Meier Bremen, January 27 N G LJoyd
Hlldur Curacao. January 30 Red D
Athesla Hamburg. January 25 At Trans
Kara St. Lucia. January 31
Cha'mette New-Orleans. February 3 Morgan
FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 9.
Graf WMdersee Hamburg;. January 28 Hamb-Am
Livonian Glasgow, January 28 Allan -State
Bolivia Gibraltar, January 28 Anchor
Island Christlansand. January 28..Soand-Am
Montcalm London. January -7.. At Trans
Semlnole Jacksonville. February B Clyde
Naeoochee Savannah. February 6 Savannah,
SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 10.
New -York Southampton. February 3. . .American
Ontario Hull. January 27 Wilson
Planet Mercury Dundee. January 27 Arrow
Alamo Galveston. February 3 Ma.; lory
Blela St. Lucia. February 3.. Lamport A H
OUTGOING STEAMERS.
TO-DAT.
Vessel. For. Line. Malls close. Vessel sails.
La Champagne. Havre. French 7.-00 am 10:00 am
Matanzas. Tampico, X V Sc Cuba 1:00 pm 8:00 pm
El Mar, New-Orleans, Morgan 3:00 pm
Santiago de Cuba, Guantanamo. N V 4
tuba 1:00 pm 8.-00 p m
Anchorla, Glasgow, Anchor 10:00 a m 12:00 m
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9.
New-York. San Domingo, Clyde 1:00 pm 8:00 pm
Erna. Jamaica. Tw-edle 1:00 pm 8:00 pm
Colorado, Brunswick. Mallory 3:00 pm
Ircquols, Charleston. Clyde 8:00 pm
SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 10.
Luranla. Southampton. Cunard 9:30 am ':00 pm
Fuerst Rlsmarrk. Naples. Hamb-Am.. 9:00 am 1100 am
Statendanv Rotterdam. Hoi Am 8:00 a m 10: no a m
Patricia. Hamburg. Hamb-Am 2 - 3O c m
Buffalo. Hull. Wilson .
Patrta. Naples. Hamb-Am
Ponce. San Juan. N V & P R 11:00 am 1:00pm
Mfxlro. Havana. NY A Cuba 11:00 am 1 :0rt p m
C. of WaKhiniston. Nassau. NY* r.ll'.nOam 1:00 pm
Allf-Rhany. Jamaica. Atlas 10:OOam 12:0O m
Alps. Hayti. Atlas 1O;OO a m 12:00 n»
Newlyn. La Plata. Norton 2:00 pm 4:rtO pra
El Norte. New Orleans. Morgan 3iV>pm
Knlckerhrcker. Now Orleans. Cromwell 3:00 pro
HwiH GalMiaa. Mallory 3:oopm
SHIPPING NEWS.
PORT OF NEW- YORK. WEDNESDAY. FEB. 7. 1900.
ARRIVED.
Steamer Barton (BrV Underwood. Cardiff January l.«. In
ballast to Barber A Co. Arrived at the Bar at midnight
oth.
Steamer Kensington (BrV Albrecht. Antwerp January
27. with mdse. 35 cabin and 437 steerage passengers M
the International Navigation Company. Arrived at the
Bar at 2:20 a m.
Steamer Peninsular (Porr>. Bettencourt. Lisbon January
24 and St Michaels 37. with mdse. 3 cabin and 1»4 ste»r-
Bge passengers to G Amslnck A Co. Arrived at the Bar
at 12:30 a m.
Steamer Fuerst Bismarck iGer). Barends. Genoa Janu
ary 2.'. and Naples 27. with mdse and passengers to the
Hamburg-American Line. Off Sandy Hook at 9:34 p m
Steamer Tmjan Prince <Br>. Eagleton. Leghorn Janu
ary 11. Genoa 13. Palermo 1« and Naples 19. with mdse
4 cabin and 334 steerage passengers to J C Seager A Co.
Arrived at the Bar at 1 a m.
Steamer Restormel iIW. M»rlln. Seville January 18 and
Cadiz 20. with mdse to Fumess, Withy A Co, Ltd. Ar
rived at the Bar at 4.30 p m.
Steamer Hyanthee ißr>. Grlndeod. Caps Town. C G H
January 9. via St Vincent. C V, 24, In ballast to Barber
A Co. Arrived at the Bar at 9:30 a m.
Steamer Alabama (Br). Gwatktns. Pernambuco January
11. Maceln 16, St Lucia ST. with sugar to A Lueder: ves
sel to Funch. Edye * Co. Arrived at the Bar at 2p m.
Steamer Dominic (BrV Forbes. Manaos January 19 and
Para 26. with mdse to Booth A Co. Arrived at the Bar
at 8:20 a m
Steamer Alllanca. SktPlngs. Colon January 31, with
indue and 5 cabin passengers to the. Panama Railroad
Steamship Co. Arrived at the Bar at 11 p m 6th
Steamer Alps (Br). Klrby. Cap* Haytl January 19. St
Marie 21, Port -au -Prince 22. Jeremin 24. Aux Caves 28
Jacmel 27. Savanna la Mar and Black River 30 and
Kingston 31. with mdse to Ptm. Forwood * Kellock.
Arrived at the Bar at 8:15 a m.
Steamer Harald (Nor). Utne. Port au Prince January
23. Petit Goave and Miragoane 24. Jeremle 25, Aux Cave's
26. Jacmel 27. Santa Martha 30. and Inagua February 2
with mdse and 2 cabin passengers to the United Fruit
Co: vessel to the Cameron Steamship Line. Arrived at
the Bar at 0:45 a m.
Steamer Nueces. Risk. Galveston January 31 an.l Key
West February 3, with mdse and passengers t.> C H
Mallory ft Co.
Steamer Knickerbocker. Post. New-Orleans January 31.
with mdse. and passengers to E S Allen.
Steamer Iroquols, Kemhle. Jacksonville February 4 and
Charleston R, with mdse and passengers to Wlillam P
Cly.la A Co.
Steamer Guyandotte. Hlller. Richmond. Newport News
and Norfolk, with mdse and passengers to Old Dominion
Ss Co.
Sandy Hook. N. J.. Feb. 7. 9:30 p. m.— Wind east
light : cloudy and hazy.
SAILED
Steamers Hansa (Oer>. for Inaxua, etc: St Paul. South
ampton' Trinidad (Rr), Bermuda: Yemassee. Philadel
phia; Germanic (Br), Liverpool: Westemland (Belg),
Antwerp; Athoa (Br>. Colon; Htspania (Swed>. Inagua
etc; Indranl (Br>. Baltimore; Jamestown. Norfolk ami
Newport News; Seneca. Havana, etc: San Marcoa, Gal
veston; Thordls (Nor), Singapore, etc; Cametena* (Br).
Para, etc. . -
United States transport McPherson. Porto Rico, «tc.
■ THE MOVEMENTS OF STEAMERS.
FOREIGN PORTS.
Liverpool. Feb T— Steamers Cevle (Br). Mcol New-
York. \
Southampton, Feb 7— Arrived, steamers Alter (Ger),
Peterman, New-York for Bremen (passed Hurst Castle
at 6:35 p m); St Louis. Passow. New-York (passed
Hurst Cartle at 10:06 p m); 2:30 p m. sailed, steamer
Lahn (Gen. Pohle (from Bremen), New-York.
Plymouth. Feb 7. 7:30 p — Arrived, steamer Pretoria
(Gen, Karlowa. New-York for Hamburg.
Bcllly. Feb 7. 11*6 a Passed. . steamers Bt Louie
Paasow, New-York for Southampton: 11:30 a ra Pretoria
(Ger), Karlowa. New- York- for Hamburg.
Lizard, Feb 7. 9:30 a m— Passed, steamer Aller (Q*rt
Petermann. New York for Bremen. . *"•".
Kln«a!e. Feb 7— Passed, steamer Hogarth fßrt Tavlor
New-York for Manchester. * iaylor>
Movllle. Feb 7— Sailed, steamer Astoria ißr) W»,1»
worth (from Glasgow). New-York (and proceeded)
Rordeauj Feb 4— Arrived, steamer Cllurnum ™'
Mace. Paulllac for Ne» York.
t Michaels. Feb 7— Arrived, steamer Ntustrla <TY\
Sagels. Marseilles for New York Sail*! February &
steamer Mora (Br). from Huelva for New -York
Huelva, Jan 30 — Sailed, steamers Sigurd (Dan) for
Baltimore; 31st, Frode (Dan), for New To r *"**'• lOT
leghorn. Feb Arrived. steamer Victoria (Br>
Bridge., New- York via Marseilles, etc. '"""a inn,
Calcutta. Feb 2— Arrived, steamer Orwell (Br). Olbb
New York via Bombay.
Rout "New^Y Feb « Mil*** • le » n ' ir Langbank (Br).
Rout. New Y( , rk
.•.'*• ' b 8— Balled, steamer Homer fßr> Ca.li->*an
(from Santos) New York
Bt Lueta Feb «l — Ballad, steamer Wortlrworlh <Bel*l,
OrHiajn (from Rio Janeiro). New Toe*. °"» worf * «"• *
On arriving home don't get
into a smoking jacket of the or
dinary kind— slip into a Tuxedo.
You'll get all the negligee at
home feeling of the smoking
jacket ; and be soothed with the
conscious virtuousness of having
paid your wife a compliment and
being correctly dressed for dinner.
$16 to $27. '
The more formal tail coat suit
$30 to $50 — and even- other dress
requirement for man or boy.
Rogers. Peet & Co.
850 Broadway, cor. Leonard.
669 Broadway, cor. Prince.
Thirty-second and Broadway-
"Amusements.
ARION SOCIETY.
CIIA.\D MASQI'GRADE BALL.
MADISON SQUARE GARDEN.
FRIDAY. FEB. 9. 1900.
Tickets $10 for lady and gentleman; extra' ladles h-4.
ets *5: may be obtained at Arlon Hall SJ»ht.^S-a
Park aye headquarters: Hanf; Br-«.. comer S^di^
aye. and 58th *" . < .*<-;»- A Katzenmayr 2O Übert-J ■*"■
AMERICAN „ «£ *8t hA ve Eves. 8:«.
THE PIRAT^^oW^Z^CEr I*"*1 *"*
-Next Week— MARITANA (In English)?
ACADEMY OF MUSIC. . .,.;- g, tear-
Matinee, Uncoln's & WashlngW, B!nhdly, P^*
mo h vth. WAY DOWN EAST.
Prices 25—50—T5—1.00. Mats. We* & «at.. 2. Eve.. 3:10.
BROADWAY ™ EAT 41st St. & B-way.
a: Matinee Lincoln's Blrthdav F»h'v is»i.
THK GREAT ~C3 TT> TVT TTTf-r-,
BIJOU. B'way & Mia st. Mat. Sat. only Eve «15
MATINEE LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY— LAST 2 WEEKi
TVF AY IR.'UUTT^r SISTEi » mart.
***** * *1» ■■ li PwasM 2.224 Mad. 3<j.
OACI MfJI'V ****■ hmril Mat. Saturday:
.V^V-", 11 " v - / • Engagement positively closes Nxt Sat!
F.mcu» London Co. In The Belle of N. Y.
NEXT MONDAY— Ist time. "The Princess Chic."
CARNEGIE LYCEUM. Fe°b a i2thf^ra > M:
w.,^ r t> d a Feb' y 12th. a» »:Sa
Major J. B. Pond announces the most successful man of
the hour, who cam talk as charmingly as he can write.
MR. ERNEST BETON THOMPSON.
On "THE PICTURESQUE- SIDE* OF WILD -aStJIALS **
Stereoscopic views of photographs and iketcJieataSsai
from life. Reserved seats for Children. 30c. ; Adults, t ' <V>
■o arranged that Children and Adults can occupy «eaS
together. For Sale at the Hail.
f THE WORLD I!» WAX.
Ml SEE. I The Wonderful CIVEMATOORAPS.
1 ♦ Hear the Neapolitan Orchestra.
■f^TAIA.^ THEATRE. Bway * 2Stl» Bt.
m^&]/nV J THEATRE. Mats. VT-4. St SaX
i*T/ty% Evgs.. 8:15. Mats. Wed. * flat,
£JF" The COUNTESS "CHIFFON"
Special Mat. Men. (Lincoln's B*4ayX. - -
GRAND LOHS MANX * fUR I.IPXIJ La
OPERA THE GIRL IN THE BAP.RACKS.
HOUSE. Next week— "SHEXANDOAH." i-U\
HAMMERSTEIN-8 VICTORIA M * tfc 3*3 * •» 4
42d St.. By &7th Aye. » 1 UiVIA. '. — -1- ■ B*4*A,
«ySo smoking; or drinklnc at matinees. j
CHRIS AND THE WONDERFUL LA3CP. }
50c. I Admission to Promenade I 50c.
HERALD SQUARE THEATRE.
i~"has B. Evans. Prop. Bvs.. 8:30. Mats. Wed. A $*.■-.
DAVID BELASCO'S «s™r HAUGHTY ANTHONY,
?•'-" 2d Month. Special Mats. Feb. 12 and 22.
H*HI.EM < FRANK DANIELS. > Eve.. S I*.
OP. HOI SE. < in THE AMEER. ? Mat. Sab
Nut w'k: James K. Hackett In Ruwrt of Hentsau.
IRVING PLACE THEATRE. MAT. SAT.
The great "ALS ICH WTEDERKAM."
HIT. Sequel to "At the White Horse TaTerß."
1/ f"| a T l ll'O • ontlanona Pfrfnrmanc*.
KM N S >|X * mk *
f\kl I II V EDWIN MiI. TON ROVIF.
HINES 4 REMINGTON. PRESS ELDRIDGE.
DOLL.IE MESTAYER. GRAZER & HAZEL
ROUND NEW YORK IN 80 MINUTES. | £>
With FOIGERE and The Great L\FUTTTE.
KNICKERBOCKER. Evjj.. 8:20. Mat. Sat.. 2:13.
N. C. GOODWIN | on lnt T S TiW
>lAXI!NE ELLIOTT w?w«S-eSST"w ?w«S-eSST"
EXTRA MATINEE Lincoln's Birthday.
METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE.
GRAND OPERA SEASON 1S8»-19OO.
Under the direction of Mr. MAURIGB GRAXT.
This Aft.. Extra Mat. of CARMEN. Mmes. Calve *a 4
Suzanne Adams; MM. £a!eza. ancf Campanazi.
Fri. EVg. Feb. ». at 8. IL, TROVATORE. «— —
Nordtca and Mantelll. MM. Campanarl and P:ppel.
Sat. Aft.. Feb. 10. at 1:45. Double Bill— DON PAS
QUALE. Mme. Semhrlch: MM. 3cotti. PtU-Corai an*
Ba.llßij.HC. Conductor. Manctnellt, Followed by CAVAIi-
LERIA RUSTICANA. Mrr.ea. Calve and Maatelll: aOL
Campanart and Saleza.
Sat.- aW«, Feb. 10. at 8. at Popular Prices—TAKX
HAUSER. Mmes. Susan Strong. Olltsks and Peray; MV.
Van Dyck. Bertram and Planc,on.
Sun. Ev'k. Feb. 11. .at 8:15. . Grand Popular Concert.
Soloists: Mines. Nordlca. Mar.tell! and Suzanne Adams;
MM. Evan Williams and Plan<;on and Petacholkolt Vio
linist, together with Met. Op. House Orchestra and
Chorus. In addition to a miscellaneous concert Tt ia»'~it*s
STABAT MATER win be performed. Conductor. SUf.
MandnelU. . •
M^n Ev'ir. Feb. 12. at S. AIDA. Mines. Emu OfflSj
and Mantelll: MM. Scottt. Planc,or. and Sales*.
Wed. Ex's, Feb. 14. at 8. I.A TRAVIATa Mad 8«a
'--rich; MM. Ckmpanarl and fallen* i.
Frl. BVf. Feb. 16. at S. LOHENGRIN. Maw. Emma
Eames and Schumann Heink: MM. Van Dyck. Bertraa
and Ed. de Resike.
WEBEOI PIANOS USED.
METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE.
f DER RING DCS 11— 11 NO. 1
(In Its Entirety.)
I FIRST CYCLE) EVENINGS. •
Tue«. EVr. Feb. 20. at S:3O. DAS RHEINOOUQ. " .
Thur». Ev^g. Feb. 22. at 7. PIE WALKUERE. ,
Tues. Ev'ic. Feb. 27. at 7. SIEGFRIED. .
Thurs. Ev'K. ilarrh 1. at 6:4 i. OOTTERPAMiIERUNti.
' The sale of season tickets only will continue until Sal.
Ev'k. Feb. 10.
Pale of seat* for single performance* for any of abo*«
works begins Mor.. Feb. 12. at 8 a. m.
MEXnELSSOIIX HALL.
TUESDAY AFTER->OO.>, Feb. IS, at 3 o'clock.
FRIEDA SIEMENS.
Reserved Seats. $1 .». Jt ••'<>. S«chuberth» 23 Union Saiai*.
L. M. RUBEN. Manager.
II linn IV HILI. THEATRE. «d St. & Lex. A*.
mIIKKAI Matinee KTerr Dny, 23«".
UiUIIIIHI This Week— The Lost Paradise.
™ NEW YORK, mJLTSm&M*
BROADWAY to TOKIO. M^ST'
Eve.. 8:10. Mats. Wed. * Sat.. 2. No smoking at mattaees.
PV^TOR'S • CONTIXt'OCS SHOW.
SCATS tO A 30 CE.VTS. DAY AND MCUT.
" LEROY 4 CLAYTON. MR. i MRS- HUGHE3.
WAtDOHP-ASTOHIA, Main HI ■ MM
%%A ANNUAL EXHIBITION
IMKKIt WATER COLOR SOCIETY
Bapn Monday. Fsl». 5.
DAT AND EVENING FOR 2 WEEKS ONLY.
WALLACK'S
Matlne* Monday. Feb'y *»>> 'Lincoln s Birthday).
OLGA NETHERSOLE IN SAPHO.
14th St. Theatre. MM 6th »> Mats. Wed. * taa,
BPBCIAL MATIN LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY.
MR. CHAI.NCET OLCOTT
■n "A ROMANCE OF AThLONS,"
Ccctnrco axib iiUctings.
ANNUAL ELECTION OF THE AMERICA*
* x institute Feb. «th. at 19 Weat 44th_»^ _*»**
op« W a. m. u» 1 aw m. DAVID PBTTIORX^ *Wt»

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