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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 10, 1900, Image 1

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V ot LIX-..X 0 19,445.
THE BRITISH IN RETREAT.
QgNERAL BULLER'S FORCES SAID TO HAVE ONCE MORE
RECROSSED THE TUGELA RIVER.
THIRD ATTEMPT TO RELIEVE LADYSMITH A FAILURE.
According: to a dispatch from the Boer camp near Ladysmith. General Buller's
third attempt to relieve Ladysmith has failed, and his troops have retreated south
p-'the Tugela River. The War Office neither confirmed nor denied the report.
General (natacre reported that his force repulsed the Dutch at two points and
■sjaHisbed outposts at Pen Hock and Bird's River.
The retirement of Sir Hector Macdonald's troops from Koodoosberg Drift
vas not regarded as a defeat, the advance being considered as a reconnoissance.
A dig atch from Pretoria said that Colonel Plumer's force was driven back
by the Boers after an attempt to storm Ramonsta.
PREPARED FOR THE WORST
UOXDON* DISPOSED TO CREDIT BOER RE
PORT-MACDOXALD'S STRANGE MOVE. ;
(OpvriFti* MB: by Th* ft* Tosh Tribune.]
JBT CABLE TO THE TRIBUNE. I
I/sndon, Feb. 10. (5 a. m. — The country Is still
In if ' rise as to the Issue of Sir Redvers Bul
ler'B third attempt to advance to the relief of
l*dyEmHh. Up to a. late hour last night the
TTtr Office professed to have no knowledge of
any retrograde movement, and the statement
iaa(Je by Mr Balfour in the House of Commons
that General Bailor was not advancing from the
position occupied on Wednesday cannot be con
sidered to be of a reassuring character, as it
neither confirms nor denies the report emanat
ing- from the Boer laager outside of Ladysmith
of ssisl Buller's retreat. There is a general
ter.i!cr.ry this morning to believe In the accu
racy of the report, but possibly the small force
holding the river at Molen Drift was retired,
bb4 this rr.ay have been regarded as meaning
the withdrawal of Buller's whole force to the
bjsH bsnk off the river.
Beetor Macdonald's movements are still
=ible. According to "The Post" his
operation? were directed from headquarters,
lbly meaning: they were ordered by
L r >r^ Roberts. "The Timee" correspondent con
firms R* jter's statement that orders were re
ceived osi Thursday for Macdonald's whole force
to retire to Modder River, and adds the Ftart-
Bnr information that the position was easily
IpMstS. He does not pretend to understand
the meaning of the order to retire, which, how
erer, has not yet been officially reported.
I. K. F.
THE WAR OFFICE SILENT.
BEPORT OF BULLER'S DEFEAT NOT \
CONFIRMED.
JCVipjTlElit- 1900: by The New-York Tribune.
[bt CABI-r TO the TBIRrNK 1
London. Feb. 10, 1 a. m.— The most startling
tsnouncement last evening was Reuters dis
patch from Lourenco Marques with the brief
statement from the Boer camp outside of Lady-*
Bjpttk that the British forces had retired on
Thursday across the Tugela River after aban
doning their positions. The War Office at mid
tighi neither confirmed nor contradicted this
report, but left it an open oueFtlon whether Sir
Rf-dvers Ruller's third attempt to break through
the it** line of defence had failed and the
coils amund Ladysraith had been tight-ned.
The newrpaper offices until midnight were with
out ppecial dispatches from Natal, but were ex
p*.-tinK th»m before going to press. There were
so tidinps In Parliament, where the debate on
the E££r<"s=s in roply to the speech from the
Throne teas going on at a late hour.
The BiJcnce from Spearman's Camp since
Wednesday reemed to corroborate this Boer
Wepram. yet it was hardly credible that the
TVar OHW would boM back the news of a re
treat aft»r Pretoria had announced It. One ex
tft&ation, based on semi-official information,
*» that the Boer report might refer to the
withdrawal or a portion of the force at Pot-
Eieter's Drift, or to changes in the brigades oc
curring kopjes -je'.ween Bpton Kop and Doom
berg. This was not satisfactory to those who had
Jearnf-d to place confidence In Reuters dis
fcttehes from Lourenco Marques. These have
usually been remarkably accurate.
OMINOUS LACK OF NEWS.
There was an ominous lack of news from
*atal. and the War Office failed either to ex
plain what was going on or to relieve the public
caeasiners.
ls;r<i Roberts's campaign remains an inscruta
tie mystery. He has gone to the front with
Lord Kitchener, and the foreign military at
taohfs have started from Cape Town to Join him
there, but nobody outside of the innermost
circk-s of the War Office knows where the front
I*. Extraordinary pains have been taken by the
censor to conceal Lord Roberta's destination,
ana the only message given out from him for
ttveral lays omits any mention of the place
fro* which it was sent, for that would supply
* Cl * v to the direction of his main movement.
yte distribution of the reinforcements, amount
*-£ to over twenty thousand men, has been art-
U: y concealed, «<> that the new concentrations
- ■** unknown.
*** theories of the military writers for the
**» «*«;..<-■ i.rii! Lord Roberta's campaign are
** npon the slenderest possible inferences.
Gectr *l Kelly-Kenny was reported a fortnight
**° to be at Rosmead, and from that rumor it
J* been generally assumed that the Sixth
tfeion would co-operate with Generals Gat
*** »nd French ;n clearing the Orange River
•Strict and opening the way for the in
,_***lcn of the Free State on the lines
" General Butler's original plan. General
acker has also been reported at Modder
RJver . and that has been the basis for
1Mb * r theory that the Seventh Division
*>M follow him; that Kimberley would be re
y* 1^ 1 and that the army would march across
• ' country to Bloemfonteln with mule and ox
-^neport from Modder River.
MOTHER THEORY OF CAMPAIGN.
•• third theory has assumed that the Free
■*» wr, u i,3 be Invaded from the Orange River
t*in *' B * !mont> Fauresmith and Bprlngfon
th - . ng the immediate objective points, and
fo ■ Catting of the communications of the Dutch
afly* 8 nn ° W South of the river being the strategic
****- This, like numerous other theories,
-**"'"*** on •.<-< oud (taut*
C j**_ COLD" now with
JAYKE'B EXPFCTORANT.-Advt.
BRITISH TROOPS RETIRE.
BCLLBB RECROSSKS THE TTV.KLA-BOER
ATTACK SUCCESSFUL.
Boer Head Laager, Ladysmith, Feb. B.— The
British who were in possession of the kopje at
Molens Drift abandoned it after a bombard
ment by Boer cannon this morning, and retired
across the Tugela Iliver to their former position.
A desultory cannonade is K<>ing on at the Tu
gela this morning, but otherwise everything is
quiet.
Feb. 7. — An armored tra'.n yesterday made a
sortie from Chieveley toward Colenso, and land
ed 2.<KH_t British troops on the right of the Boer
position. The Boers immediately crossed the
river and made an attack with rifles and artil
lery, forcing the withdrawal of both the train
and the troops to Chieveley.
The fighting on the X'pper Tugela River lasted
until 8:8(> yesterday (Tuesday) evening. Par
ticulars are lacking.
Firing at both Colenso and along the Upper
Tugela has been going on since 5 o'clock this
morning.
BULLER'S ATTEMPT FAILS.
GERMAN CORRESPONDENT SENDS WORD OF
BRITISH DEFEAT.
Leipsic, Feb. o.— The "Neuste Nachrichton"
prints a dispatch from a correspondent who
says that General Fuller's third attempt to re
lieve Ladysmith has completely failed.
CONFIRMATION" OF RETREAT.
London. Feb. 10. 5:15 a. m. — A dispatch from
Spearman's Camy, dated yesterday (Friday)
noon, says that owing to the B^er cross fire
and the Impossibility of intrenching Vaal
Krantz General Buller's force withdrew.
"The Financial News." which publishes this
dispatch, suggests that General Buller has not
yet actually recrossed the Tugela.
VAAL KRANTZ UNTENABLE.
London, Feb. 10.— London accepts as true thb
Boer statements that General Buller has failed
again. Theee statements were passed by the
British censor at Aden, and are read In tho
light of Mr. Balfour's announcement in the
Commons that General Buller is not pressing
his advance.
Winston Churchill sends a mf?*\ze that Vaal
Krantz v. as impracticable for the guns which
were needed to support a further advance. His
dispatch leaves General Buller on Tuesday night
sending a fresh brigade to relieve the tired hold
ers of Vaal Krantz.
METIIUEN'S SOLDIERS IN ACTION.
BOER FORCE ATTACKS AND DRIVES BACK
THE BRITISH.
Koodoosberg Drift, Feb. B.— The Boers yester
day made a determined attempt to driv.- the
British from a hill commanding the drift.
Mounting two seven-pounders at the northern
extremity, they shelled the position intermit
tently the whole day. The Seaforth Highlanders
gained a position on the rocky summit and
kept up a sustained rifle fire, but suffered some
what from the Boers' shelling. A battery was
sent and succeeded in silencing the Boer fire.
Meanwhile two companies of the Argyll High
landers, advancing along the plain in a west
erly direction, found the Boers intrenched at a
small drift. A sharp engagement followed, last
ing the whole day.
General Macdonald now only required sufil
cient troops in orde. completely to surround the
Boers. General Babington was dispached from
Modder River with a large force of cavalry and
two batteries of horse artillery, but failed to
reach here, although he started early enough in
the day to enable him to get here early this
afternoon.
This morning General Methuen ordered that
the combined force should retire upon the Mod
der River, a movement which is now proceeding.
The British losses in the fighting on Wednesday
were fifty men killed or wounded.
London. Feb. {». — The dispatch from Koodoos
berg Drift does not say whether General Bab
ington finally Joined General Macdonald, but
the word "combined' seems to indicate that he
did so.
GATACRE'S TWO VICTORIES.
DUTCH REPULSED AT TWO POINTS AND
OUTPOSTS ESTABLISHED.
London. Feb. O.— A War Office dispatch from
Lord Roberts, dated Thursday, February 8, con
firms the reports that General Gatacre has re
pulsed the Boers at Pen Hock and Bird's River
and that the security of both outposts is estab
lished.
In regard to General MacrlonaM's operations.
Lord Roberts does not mention the formers re
tirement to the Modder River. He says:
Macdonald wap dispatched to prevent the
Boers blocking the main drift at Koodoosberg,
and successfully established himself at KoodOOS
berg in spite of the determined efforts of the
Boers to dislodge him. At Macdonald's request,
Babington was sent with reinforcements On
February 7 Babington threatened the Boers
north of Koodoosberg. while another force drove
off the Boers southward.
The dispatch concludes with the statement:
The enemy have now evacuated their position
and none are in sight
STILL PHBLUNG KIMBKKLKY.
London, Feb. 10.— "The Times" has the follow
ing from Klmberley, dated February S:
Th e Boer big guns shelled us all dny yester
day, l' ut n ol) ody was killed.
GENERA] CLEBY INVALIDED.
IyOn don. Feb. 10-"The Dally Telegraph" an-
BjotWOS* that General Clery Is on the way to
England, Invalided.
THK STANDARD RAILROAD OF AMERir A
maintains thf nm-M service between" ' V « w^° r \and
NEW-YORK. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1900.-SIXTEEN PAGES.-* t^KSSS**.
ROOSEVELT TO SEE PL ATT.
BELIEVED THAT GOVERNOR WILL TUT
A QUIETUS OX VICE-PRESI-
DE XTI
[BT TELEGRAPH To im: Tr.lßt NT..]
Albany, Feh. U. — Governor Roosevelt stated to
day that he was going to New-York to-morrow
for the purpose of making an address to the
members of the Tenement House Commission
and its supporters. He will also have a chat
with Senator Platt at the Fifth Avenue Hotel
to-morrow afternoon.
It Is believed here by politicians that the main
Object Of Governor Roosevelt in going to New-
York ji>st at this time is to put a stop, through
Senator Platt. to th^ persistent attempts on the
Part :>f Republican politicians In Washington
and also In th's State to bring about his nomi
nation for Vice-president. These gentlemer, it Is
thought, arj not so keenly desirous of Gov
ernor Roosevelt's nomination for Vice-Presl
dent as they are to retire him from the list
of Republicans who may be nominated for Gov
ernor in this* State this fall.- A good many of
S-nutor Platt's followers seem to he engaged
in this "booming"' ot Governor Roosevelt for
Vice-president. As has been previously stated
in dispatches to The Tribune from this Place,
Governor Roosevelt does not desire the nomi
nation for Vice-President, but undoubtedly
would be pleased if he should be renominated
for Governor.
NOT TO BE SIDETRACKED.
He plainly does not wish to be sidetracked for
the Governorship by being nominated for Vice-
Prtsident. The duties of Governor are pleasant
to him and he has become greatly interest. 1 in
the affairs of the State of New-York. The du
ties "I" a Vice-President are not congenial to
Mm, and he is absolutely sincere in his opposi
tion to the apparent movement to nominate him
for the office.
Henry C. Payne, of Milwaukee, it is suspected,
is leading a movement in the West in favor of
Governor Roosevelt's nomination for Vice-Presi
dent, and Senator Lodge, of Massachusetts. Gov
ernor Room velt's personal friend, is urging his
nomination in the East.
Senator Plntt months ago was publicly oppos
ing Governor Roosevelt's nomination for Vice-
President, but lately there is a suspicion here
that he has encouraged the idea, desiring to
nominate either Benjamin H. Odell, jr., or Tim
othy L. Woodruff for Governor. Governor
Roosevelt, in th<> opinion of his friends, is much
too independent of Senator Platt to please the
latter, and they argue, therefore, that the latter
is intriguing to bring about the nomination of a
"machine" man for Governor. Mr. Odell and
Mr. Woodruff are declared to lie of this type.
Governor Roosevelt also has gained considerable
political strength, in the opinion of his friends,
among the organization Republicans since lie
brought about the confirmation of Francis Hen
dricks as Superintendent <>f the Insurance De
partment. Senator Platt, being in Washington
all tho time recently, it is said, has lost consid
erable influence among tho organization Repub
licans, and is conscious of it. Such a man as
Mr. Odel! or Mr. Woodruff, if Governor, would
hold to him that support.
Governor Roosevelt, it is argued, will make it
plain to Senator Platt to-morrow that he does
not desire tho nomination for Viee-President.
WOODRUFF AND HIS BOOM.
SAYS HE HAS NOT ASKED ANY OF HIS FRIENDS
TO ITRGE HIS NOMINATION.
Lieutenant-Governor "Woodruff . said yesterday
that he wanted to contradict a Billy report that h»
had opened headquarters at the Waldorf-Astoria
with the object 'if working up a bocm for a nom
ination to the Vice-Presidency. lie declared that
he hod not been making efforts to get to the front
as a candidate for Vice-Preslderit, and had not
asked any of hfs friends to urge his nomination.
SENATOR PLATT SEItE.
S.-n.itor Platt crime to this city from Washing
ton last evening, arriving at the Fifth Avenue Ho
tel aliout 8:30 o'clock. He declined to talk to r.ews
paper nun who met him at ih. hotel about his ex
pected talk with Governor Roosevelt to-day, except
to say that he did not expert to meet the Governor
until late In the afternoon He would not talk
about the reports that his friends have been en
couraglng s movement for the nomination of Gov
ernor Roosevelt for the Vice-Presidency.
Chairman Odell, of th<- Republican State Commit
tee, who had a long talk with Senator Platt after
his arrival at the hotel, s;ild last evening thai he
thought the Senatoi and Governor intended to have
their talk at the hotel. Mr. Odell declared that be
>ii.! N.it know what subjects would be discussed.
Few members of the Legislature were .'it the hotel
Inst evening, ami Mr. Odell was the only politician
of prominence who talked with Senator Platt after
his arrival at the hotel. It is expected thai thin
will be a gathering of Republican legislators and
politicians there this afternoon.
GOVERNOR'S REQUEST TOXORED.
HE IS ASTONISHED AT TIIK ACTION OF THE
TRUSTEES OF THE SOLDIERS 1 HOME IN
SUSPENDING COLONEL SHEPARD.
Albany, Feb. 9 (Special).— Governor Roosevelt
was astonished this morning when he heard that
the trustees of the Soldiers and Sailors' Home, at
Hath, had suspended from office Colonel Charles
O. Shepard, the commandant of the home. Only
yesterday the Governor had requested the trus
tees not to take any action in regard to Colonel
Shepard until an Investigation now in progress
in regard to his administration should be com
pleted. Moreover, Deputy Attorney- General
Mason had gone to Hath for the express purpose
of informing the trustees of the Governor's de-
Fire in the matter.
Governor Roosevelt and Attorney-General Da
vies feel that the letter and not th<» spirit of the
former's request was followed. Governor Roose
velt this evening stated that he had requested
Mr. Philbin, one of the members of the State
Board of Charities committee which Is conduct
ing the Investigation, to have its work completed
by March 1, as upon that date he (the Governor)
Intended to nominate six person? for trustees of
the Soldiers' Horn*.*.
Governor Roosevelt has stated that no one
would be appointed as a trustee who was not a
veteran of the Civil War. This rule will bar out
Frank Campbell, -if Bath, the chairman of the
Democratic Stnte Committee. One of the strange
circumstances of this affair has been an attempt
Dy eminent Republicans to have Frank Camp
bell retained as a trustee. Governor Roosevelt
clearly purposes not only to change the compo
sition radically of the present Hoard of Trustees,
but also t<» provide a new commandant in the
person of Colonel Andrew Davidson, Deputy
Ht:Ue Treasurer. Governor Roosevelt stated
frankly to-night that he should support Colonel
Davidson for the appointment, believing that he
was a cool headed and sensible man who could
administer the affaiis of the home in a credit
able manner.
RIOTING /V MARTINIQUE.
MINERS ATTACK SEVERAL KILLED.
Fort de France. Martinique, Feb. 9— "There
have been grave happenings here. A mob of
about twelve hundred miners has since Monday
last been preventing the harvesting of sugar
cane. The movement Is extending and troops
have been sent in all directions. An Infantry
post of twenty-five men was attacked and fired
on Its assailants, killing nine men and wounding
fourteen. > .
In the Commune of I,e Franc.. two incen
diary tires have occurred on plantations.
FAST TIME TO ST. LOUIS. ''
I^eave centre of New York City— Grand. Central
Station— l:oo P. M.. arrive St. Louis 6:56 P. M. next
day by New York Central. No excess fare. Trains
Illuminated by Pintoch light.— Advt.
A LIE, SAYS THE ADM
LATEST YARN ABOUT TROMI
AGUINALPO HIT HARP.
L GOSSIP.
REPORT OF PEWEY'S REPRESENTATIVE
WHO SAW THE FILIPINO LEADER BE
FORE THE WAR WITH SPAIN.
I have never by Word, act or .Intimation,
cither prmonnlly or through a representa
• tlve, conveyed to Atcninnldo or any of lit-.
' RHHorlnten the nimaranre that the nlteil
••mi. « Government would recognize Filipino
Independence.
—ADMIRAL. DRWEY.
The foregoing statement was made by Admiral
Dewey in the most emphatic tone last night.
! This declaration was brought forth In a dis
| cussion concerning the repeated assertions that
Admiral Dewey while In the Philippines con
sulted with Agulnaldo and told him that the
United States Government would recognize the
\ independence of the Philippines. The statement
was elicited principally by an article hearing
upon this subject which was sent In to The
Tribune yesterday for publication. The article
! was shown to the Admiral in his apartment at
the Waldorf-Astoria last evening after he had
dined. With him at the time was Mrs. Dewey.
The Admiral read the article carefully. It Is
! as follows: •
Senators Lodge rind . Hawley. of Massachu
! setts and Connecticut respectively, in the United
I States Senate at Washington, on Wednesday
j lart, created a scene by giving the lie to a
statement by General Aguinaldo that Admiral
Dewey had recognized the Filipino Republic.
j The following letter from 11. W. Bray may
: throw some light on the subject which even
Admiral Dewey will not dare to dispute. E.
Spencer Pratt. Consul-General of the United
States at Singapore, in a Senate document
j dated April f.'S, 1808. described Mr. Bray as "an
i Engllßh gentleman of high standing, who, after
fifteen years' residence as a merchant and
planter In the Philippines, had been compelled
by the disturbed condition of things resulting
i from Spanish misrule, to abandon his property
and leave there." and he states in the same dis
patch that this Mr. Bray acted as interpreter
between General Aguinaldo, himself (Consul-
I General Pratt) and Admiral Dewey. The inter-
I view with Admiral Dewey took place at Hong
! Kong, that with Consul-General Pratt at Singa
pore on April 2t>. IS'.iS. and Mr. Bray thus
'. writes:
The State documents lately published furnish
: food for reflection by Americana generally, who
value their National word of honor pledged to
General Aguinaldo .n ..ingapore, on April 26. by
( the American Consul-General in my presence, while
i acting as interpreter.
It is undignified and unworthy of a great Nation
to be guilty of puoh duplicity, and now pay the Con
! sul had no power to offer any such thing. As a
matter of fact, th«» Consul did not offer It of his
own responsibility, but acting under Instructions
of Ad ml ml Dewey.
In the first Interview the conditions of General
Agisinildo's policy wore clearly stated, submitu-i
to \>\\y. and the Ntter cabled his acceptance,
. requesting Agtiinald') to proceed with every pos
: sib!.- haste Lo Hong Kong. I was roused from my
bt I at mi.lnleht by the Consul to look up AgulnaWo
ami communicate the telegram to him. In order
thai he mic;ht catch a stenmer leaving at davllxht
I in the morning. It Is no use to argue that Dewey
• had no authority, because from the State documents
published In in April, 189}, we learn that Devey
had instructions to use his discretion, and.
agreeably with his discretion he brought back
ARUlnaldo to Luzon under the promise of inde
pendence. W-hHe Consul WlMmin. of Hong Kong,
supplied him with several -armies of arms and
ammunition. No amount of official or diplomatic
denial can alter these *$%&£&£ w BRAY .
When Admiral Dewey had read the article, he
said impressively:
I have some reports, documents and state
ments before me which I intend, upon my re
turn to Washington, to submit, fo the Senate
Committee on Foreign Relations. It Is better,
however, to strike this lie as It arises, and I
will answer the charge as It comes. I never
saw this man Bray. I never knew him. I never
heard of him except as a disreputable adventur
er In the pay of the Philippine Junta.. So far as
this story concerns me there Isn't a word of
truth in it.
Admiral Dewey then took up a report which
he had before him. It was typewritten, and
destined to go to the Senate. It was made by
Lieutenant It P. Hall, chief engineer of the
Petrel. It was a voluminous document, and set
forth in detail all negotiations which Captain
Wood, at that time in command of the Petrel,
who acted as Admiral Pewey's representative,
had dealing with the Philippine Junta in Hong
Kong. Lieutenant Hall set fort.: how the Fili
pinos, through a banker named Levy. asked for
an interview with a representative of Admiral
Dewey. The interview was arranged, and Lieu
tenant Hall kept the appointment. In his re
port he tells In detail of the meeting; who at
tended it and what was said. The salient point
I made by Lieutenant Hall Is concerning Agui
naldo'S attitude at that time. This interview
was at Hong Kong, on April 0, 1808.
"When Aguinaldo was asked, so Lieutenant
Hall, who is now at the Brooklyn Navy Yard,
reported, what part he intended to take in the
war which seemed inevitable between Spain and
the United States, he replied that he had made
an agreement with the Spanish Government to
leave the Philippines; that he had received a
promise of a sum of money for so doing, a part
of which money had been paid, and he didn't
care to break his word or take any part In the
probable war between Spain and the United
States.
"I never had any dealings with Emilto Agui
naldo." continued the Admiral. "You see. I
never even called him 'General.' You see now
just where the matter rests. I want you to nail
this lie hard. You can say as coming from me
that it is absolutely false."
DFWET CALLS ON VAX WYCK.
THE ADMIRAL INTRODUCES HIS WIFE TO
THE MAYOR.
Admiral Dewey, accompanied by Mrs. Dewey and
Lieutenant Caldwell, thp Admiral's secretary,
called on Mayor Van Wyck nt the City Flail yester
day afternoon. The Mayor was in his private office
when the A'lmtral and his party arrived. He came
out immediately, and received his visitors in the
public office
"I have been telling Mrs. Dewey of the good time
you gave me when I was here before," said the
Admlrnl tc the Mayor, "nnd I wanted her to come
her.- to meet the man who did so much to make
It pleasant for me."
The Mayor assured the Admiral that he was de
lighted to meet Mrs. Dewey.
While the Mayor /was talking with the Admiral
and Mrs. Dewey a crowd congregated outside the
Mayor's office waiting for the Admiral to come out.
After a few minutes' chat the Admiral said: "You
must call on us when you come to Washington."
"I shall be delighted," said the Mayor.
After shaking hands with Secretary Downes the
Admiral was about to take his departure when he
turned to the Mayor and said: "We want to get
you married."
A crowd followed the Admiral across City Hall
Park, and a tramp stepped up and spoke to him.
The Admiral's hand was ween to go to his pocket
and pass something to the tramp. There was no
policeman in light.
Mayor Van Wyck called on Admiral Dewey on
Wednesday at the Waldorf-Astoria.
The clerks, stenographers and United States
deputy marshals In the General Postofflce and
United State* courts In the Federal Building all
gathered In front of Postmaster Van Cott's office
yesterday afternoon when they learned that the
Admiral and Mm. Dewey were In the building. They
called dimply to pay Mr. Van Cott a short and
friendly visit. As the Admiral, with his wife, was
going downstairs to his carriage he was loudly
cheered, and Deputy Marshals Herrman and Adler
shook him warmly by the hand.
BRIGHTER OITTI/OOK FOR THE ARCH
l/ouls Wlndmuller, ehnlrman of the CanvitHHtng
Committee of the Dewey Arch Committee, yester
day received a letter from James Speyer, In which
he saya that, aa the ommlttee leemi to be mak-
ATLANTIC CITY. N. J.
Hotel Berkeley, directly on the Beach, reopens to
day. Same Management.— Ad vt.
Ing slower progress than was expected, he hns
decided to raise his subscription from $1,000 to |2.0n0.
-Mr. Wlndmuller said list night that the outlook
for th<-> arch had brightened since the concert In
Carnegie Hnll a few nights ago. Many subscrip
tions have been received from unexpected sources,
while others have Increased their subscriptions. In
some cases doubling them.
EDWIN R. HOLDEN RESIGNS
WILL RETIRE AS VICE-PRESIDENT OF
THE LA( KAWANXA.
Since the resignation of Samuel Sloan, less
than a year ago, from the presidency of the
Delaware, Laokawanna ami Western Railroad
Company practically all of his chief subordi
nates in the management of the road have fol
lowo.l him Into retirement. One prominent offi
cer retained his post, Vice-President Edwin R.
Holden. but yesterday it was learned that he.
too, had now offered his resignation, to take ef
fect on March 1. His action is entirely volun
tary, however. It ts declared by directors of the
company, the considerations assigned by him
as prompting it being his sere — he is about sev
enty — the unsatisfactory condition of hi." hf-alth
and a desire to withdraw from active busin -ss
life. Mr. Holden has been specially charged
with the management of the company's coal
business, but for some time much of th« work
connected with this department has been turned
over by him to a son. who Is al«o in the employ
of the railroad company.
The Vanderbilt interests are influential, if not
predominant, in the Larkawanna company, and
long before tho retirement of the venerable
Samuel Sloan from the presidency last March,
at which time he was made chairman of the
Board of Directors, It was generally understood
that plans were in contemplation for radical
changes in the management and policy of the
road. similar to th»» changes carried into exe
cution In the New-York Central on the election
of S. R. Callaway as president of that great
corporation. The first step in the consumma
tion of these plans was taken when William
H. Truesdale, then first vice-president and gen
eral manager of the Rock Island road, was
elected Mr. Sloan's successor as president. Mr.
Truesdale. who is a man in middle life, of vigor
ous health and with energy and aggressiveness
usually regarded as characteristic of Western
railway managers, is understood to have been
the personal choice of William K. Vanderbilt
for the presidency of the Lackawanna.
The men occupying executive offices in the
railroad's management had long been associated
with Mr. Sloan and had grown old with him,
and very soon after his retirement from active
duty they, too, began to sever their connection
with the road. The first resignation was that of
Andrew Reasoner. for twenty-eight years super
intendent of the Morris and Essex Division, who
died only a day or two ago at the age of sev
enty-six years. In April Frederick H. Gibbens,
the treasurer, who had been connected with the
company since 1869, sent In his resignation, to
take effect on June 1. Willis D. Hasrer. general
purchasing agent, who had been in the Lacka
wanna service for thirty-four years; John Mc-
Kenna, chief detective, with a record of twenty
four years' faithful service, and W. R. Storrs,
manager of the coal department, who had been
employed by the company for many years, sent
in their resignations in May.
In the next month William F. Hallstead. of
Scranton, the second vice-president and general
manager, who had been connected with the corn
pay since its organization, tendered his resigna
tion, which. It was said at the tlm<?. had been
requested, although Mr. Hallstead denied thi*
report. William F. HoUvlll. general passenger
and ticket agent, who had been in the employ
of the Ln.ekawar.na since 1800, resigned his
place in July. Besides the resignation of of
ficials, of . which a partial list has Just been
given, many employes In the rank ; nd file of
the service were discharged, so !ar.re a propor
tion of them being men well alon.tr in years
that th» charge was made that an as:-' limit had
been fixed by the new management, who. it
was declared, had resolved to retire every man
over forty-live yean old. This char.?-?, howe^rr,
was promptly declared by President Truesdale
to be untrue.
Mr. Holden, it may be noted, retired from the
Board of Trustees of the Consolidated Gas
Company at the annual meeting of that cor
poration la.°t month, his place being filled by the
election of William C. Whitney.
BLOWING UP THE PALISADES
LARGEST BLAST YET ATTEMPTED TO
r.V. FIRF,D IN A FEW WEEKS.
After a few weeke of rest the vandal? of the
Palisades have again resumed their operations,
and the destruction of the famous cliffs goes on.
Immediately after the holidays the quarries of
the Carpenter Brothers, a short distance north
of Fort Lee, were closed down In anticipation
of a severe winter. The weather, however, hav
ing be^n so mild, the] have reopened the quar
ries and are continuing their work of demoli
tion.
Besides the u*>ual dally blasts, the quarrymen
are making preparations for another large
"shot." Four tunnels are being burrowed into
the face of the Palisades, in each of which tons
of dynamite will be placed. When the tun
nels are finished all four will be discharged si
multaneously.
According to the boss blaster, Hugh Reilly,
the blast will be the largest yet attempted. It
will be several weeks, however, before the tun
nels are finished and the "phot" tired.
A NEW CANADIAN ROAD.
GREAT UNDERTAKING TO TRANSPORT
GRAIN FROM THE NORTHWEST.
Montreal. Feh. 0 (Special). — The Quebec and
Lake Huron Railway is the name of a new and
most ambitious railway project, behind which is
a large amount of American capital. This com
pany proposes to build an air line railway from
the mouth of the French River, on Georgian
Bay. to Quebec. This will run far north of the
existing settlements, but will, it is said, give a
grain route from the Great Lakes to a seaport
two hundred and fifty miles shorter than the
Perry Sound and Great Northern Railway,
which is to be completed this year. The com
pany Is to build a iine whose grades ami curves
will allow a modern locomotive to haul at least
fifty loaded wheat cars. Immense elevators will
be built at each end. Most of the capital behind
the scheme is frrvm Michigan, the chief pro
moters being S. F. Angus, of the Detroit. Ann
Arbor and Ypsilantl road; W. L. Holmes, presi
dent of the Detroit Telephone Company, and
Frederick W. Hayes, president of the Preston
Bank. Wealthy New-York and Quebec people
are also Interested. A charter has b">n applied
for. The cost Is estimated at $!'.">.< HlO,o» mi.
ADMIRAL MELVILLE AT XEWPORT XEM'S. !
Newport News. Va,. Feb. » (Special).— Rear Ad- ',
mtral George W. Melville. Chief Engineer of the j
Navy, accompanied by W. H. Bailey, of the Ameri- I
can Steel Tube Company, of New- York, arrived In '
the city thin morning from Richmond, where an
Inepectlon was made of th« wor on the torpedo
boats under construction at the Trig* yard. The j
Admiral went Immediately to the shipyard and
spent sever il hours inspecting the plant and the
naval work under construction, accompanied by
Captain Peter A. Reariek, senior Inspector of I
machinery at the shipyards. After making a com
plete tour of the y&ra and an Inspection of the |
war vesseia buiWng there. Admiral Melville de- :
voted pome time to an examination of tHe battle
ship Ssarsarge. which win go in commission
here on February 20. The Adm'ral left to-night for
Washington by steamer. j
EVERY LUXURY. EVERY COMFORT
that one can Imagine is to be found on the Penn
for^nicairs^th^WeVt^Sve 0 ' 11 * w mOnUnI
PRICE THREE CENTS.
TAYLOR STANDING FIRM.
DAY OF CONFERENCES AT FRA>TC
FORT, KY.
AGREEMENT WILL PR'IB\BLY BE SIGNET>-
M\NY REPUBLICANS TO SEE THE
GOVERNOR TO-DAT.
Frankfort. Ky.. F*"^>. o.— Governor Taylor *M
not s'gr. the Louisville peace ajrreem^nt tn-day.
He announced, moreover, that he had no inten
tion of doing s*o for some time, and did not
know whether he would sign It at all. On the
other hand, tho Democrats were confident that
he would affix his si;rnatur» to th<» document.
This has been i day of conferences in Frank
fort. They were in full nrtng fr ni WM In the
morning until T>.3» at nigh', and outwardly
nothing tar.trli.le resulted from them. The situ
ation to-night !<= to all appearances exactly
where It «a« when the peace agreement was
first submitted to Governor Taylor. On the
morning train from. Louisville rame the Repub
lican at:ornev«, David W. Fair'.eigh and Judge
John W. P.arr. both of whom were members
of the Loulsvir.e etmferesKe on the Republican
side. Immediately upon arrival Mr. Fairleigh
called on Senator Blackburn at the Capitol
Hotel, and after a few u..rds with him went.
in company with Judge Barr and General Dan
Limlsay. to th° office of Governor Taylor.
A conference was held there from 11 until 1
o'clock, when an adjournment was taken. Later
in the afternoon Samuel J. Roberts, of Lexing
ton. Internal Revenue Collector for this district.
came to Frankfort in rsspeass to a telegram
from Governor Taylor, and was closeted with
htm for som» time. Shortly aft.-r .'1 o'clock Gen
eral Lindsay, Judg- Barr. Mr. Fairleigh and T.
L. Edelen called at the executive office and at
once went into a conference with Governor Tay
lor. This conference lasted until Belt p. m. In
the mean time the Secretary of State, Caleb
Powers. Attorney General C. J. Pratt and. later.
Adjutant-General Collier entered the Governor's
office and took part in the deliberations.
GOVERNOR EXPECTED TO SIGN.
About 4 :.''»«> p. m. Governor Taylor and Secre
tary of State Powers came out of the Governor's
office and held a long whispered conversation
outside the door. Governor Taylor then re-en
tered the room and Mr Powers left the building.
"The Governor will not sign the agreement,"
said Mr. Powers, as he walked out the door.
Further than that, however, he would say noth
ing.
At .":rSO p. m. tho conference came to a con
clusion. It was Impossible to learn the result
of the protracted debate. Every one of those
who took part In the conference preserved a
sphinxlike silence in regard to what happened
behind the Governor's door, absolutely refusing
to discuss the matter in any way. From the
Governor's office General Lindsay, Judge Barr.
Attorney Fairlete-h and Mr. EdrfCfl went at
once to General Lindsay's office, where a brief
conference was held, and the course of action
to > ..■> pursued waa liscussed. and shortly after
li o'clock Judge Barr and Mr. Fairleigh took
the train for Louisville.
This rT fining Governs* Taylor held a long con
versation over the telephone with W. C. P.
Breckinrldg?, at Lexington. Later he repeated
his assertion made in the afternoon that he
would not take any action on the peace agree
ment for the present.
Late to-night the situation was somewhat
changed. Adjutant-General Collier was again
called Into Governor Taylor's office about S
o'clock, and was in consultation with him until
a late hour, but would say nothing as to what
transpired. From other and authoritative
sources, however, it was learned that decision
had finally been reached, and that the peace
agreement probably would receive the signature
of Governor Taylor Inside of twenty-four hours.
Two Democratic members of the Legislature
put in an appearance this afternoon, the first
who have been seen In Frankfort sine? the word
was given, nearly a week ago, for all of them
to keep where they could not be readily reached
in case it was determined by the Republicans
to arrest them and take them to L. r 1 >n. They
were Representatives Weatherford and Egbert.
It was stated in course of the afternoon that a
guard of soldiers had been sent to all irains to
catch su'h members as might determine Is come
to town, but this was denied stoutly by General
Collier and Colonel Williams.
TO CONFER WITH GOVERNOR.
Governor Taylor spent last night at the home
of a friend In Frankfort, having left the Execu
tive Building for the first time since the
Goebel assassination. It was late in the morn
ing when he reached his office. It is regarded
as probable that a general meeting of the Re
publicans will be held to-morrow to consider
the peace agreement, as adopted at Louisville.
For the last week Governor Taylor has been
receiving telegrams by the hundred from all
parts of the State urging him to stand firm
and not surrender anything.
He has sent a lar^e number of telegrams to
all of those who have for the last five days
showered him with advice, to be in Frankfort
by Saturday morning. What his lr.ter.tions are
is not known, and he will say nothing regard
ing them. It Is announced, however, from a
source a little less authoritative than the Gov
ernor himself that he desires so hear the ob
jections they have ts the agreement.
DEMOCRATS MEET IN LOFISVILLE.
TIIST HAVE QUORUMS OF BOTH SENATE
AND HOUSE. AND TRANSACT BUSINESS.
Louisville, Ky.. Feb. I).— The Democratic mem
bers of the Legislature met here to-day, having
present in each house a quorum of the total
membership. J. C. W. Beckham made the an
nouncement this afternoon that he is prepared
to protect the legislators from arrest. Thess
developments of to-day mark the first steps tow
ard carrying out the plans announced on Sun
day last by the Democrats to set up a State
Government here that have bssa taken since
those plans were interrupted by the peace nego
tiations.
Boom commotion was caused among the letris
lators this morning by reports from London and
Frankfort that warrants were about to be
sworn out for the arrest if enough Democratic
men. bers to make a quorum for the Lesrislature
now snestteg at London. When to.d of this
Beckham said:
"No member oi the Legislature who comes to
Louisville need fear arrest. I stall not allow
any member Of the General Assembly to be ar
rested."
When asked what measures would be adopted
to prevent such arrests, should they be at
tempted. Beckham replied that he was fully
prepared to protect the Legislature and to ar
rest any persons who interfered with Its mem
bers. Further than this he would make no
statement.
It Is known, however, that since the appoint
ment of General Castleman as Adjutant-General
arrangements have been made to provide a d»
fvnslve force, ample for the safety of the Demo
cratic State officers.
The legislative sessions to-day were held In
the courthouse, the Senate meeting In the
Chancery Court room, and the House in the
County Court room. Twenty Senators, one more
than a quorum we«e present when Senator
Carter called the Senate to order. Regular busi
ness was taken up where It was dropped at
Frankfort. Resolutions from the General As
sembly of Texas. In memory of Goebel. were
read, and an appropriate response was made.
Resolutions on the death of Goebel were then
adopted, and. in respect to his memory, the
Senate adjourned until to-morrow. i .... •
Two sessions of the House were held In the
course of the day. without a quorum. In the
evening, however, thirty-three members, two
more than necessary, responded to their names.
The Texas Legislature's resolutions of sym
pathy ware read, and a committee was appoint
«d to draw up resolutions on th» - death c*

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