OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 11, 1900, Image 17

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1900-02-11/ed-1/seq-17/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 5

TRA^S-ISTHMIAN CANALS.
A -ANT ENTERPRISE WHICH HAS IN
TEKESTED ENGINEER? FOR
CENTURIES.
rojoot of separating the continent? of
ad South America, and establishing free
on between the Atlantic and Pacific
by a ship canal through the Central
,Kznenca.n isthmus, is by no means of recent ori
'.«■_. A survey of the vaileys of the "hagr^s
jUrer and the Rio Orange was made by Flemish
—tin^" early in the sixteenth century, and
<xploratiGns with the same object in view were
aoor. after made slews; the courses of the San
Juan ar.d Coatzacoalcos rivers. From 1528 until
tie present intermittent Isthmian canal fever
has preyed upon the minds of engineer?, capi
talists and diplomatic schemers in both'hemi
SHIP TRAXSPORTATIOX ROUTES ACROSS THE AMERICAN ISTHMUS
Panama, Nicaragua and Tehuantepec-Their relation to the world's commerce.
ipherea. Numerous surveys have been made;
& score or more of routes have been selected,
each Ireln^ pronounced by its advocates incom
parably preferable to ail the rest; and a vast
amount cf romance and speculation en the sub
ject has been indulged In, without, until very
recently, any definite result. But the rapid
growth of the States of the Pacific Coast, closer
■rcmrnercial relations and increased trade with
the Philippines, China and Japan, and other less
important causes, have at last made the long
creamed of canal a necessity in the view of
many people; and the scheme has been denuded
cf aJI romance and speculation, save such as
Awell among- ••• mathematical calculations of
extractors and engineers. The number of pro
posed routes has been reduced to two, which,
cddly enough, were the first chosen more than
tiree centuries ago — at Panama and Nicaragua.
Tcr each of these Fpeolal advantages are
claimed over the other, and upon each it is
proposed to construct a maritime highway of
etireiy different character.
Minutely detailed descriptions of the two
resits have from time to time been made public.
The accompanying maps have been designed to
present to the readers of The Tribune a view
«J their most prominent geographical features,
■k the relations borne by them to each other
Md to the commercial interests of the United
fcates and to the world at large.
THE PANAMA TIDEWATER CAXAL.
The Panama route, it will be seen by refer
«ace to the principal map, is in the immediate
rJciruty cf the railroad now in operation between
Panama and Aspinwall, .-.d lies wholly within
the United States of Colombia. Its general di
rection is from northwest to southeast, along
the raJleys of the Chagres River and the Rio
Grande, at which point the Isthmus is only
forty-two or forty-three miles wide. It is pro
posed to pursue the. heroic course in construct
in? thit canal, and run it from ocean to ocean
«t tidewater level. Passage through the moun
tain rar.ge thEt fonr.s the backbone of the isth
aas would be effected by a tunnel, in which two
full rigged clipper ships may pass each other.
Cf course, no lift locks will be used, but as the
tides at the Pacific rise twenty feet higher than
tho»e of the Caribbean Sea, a compensator tide
feck r.i:i have to be built at each end of the
Sreat trans-isthmian ditch.
Numerous objections have been offered to this
route. It is said that the climate Is so deadly
that the laying of *ach sleeper on the Panama
Railroad cost the life of a workman; that the
lEct rains, aggregating nine or ten feet an
"y, and the torrentlike stream of the Cha-
B^e* vill fill the canal with silt and debris: that
ssttthera terminal is la ■ region of perpetual
s*. where excessive towage will be required,
le the northern pert is the very home of tor
:oes; that the cast of tunnelling the moun
ts will be too great; and many similar
rges are made. Despite all this, the cor
ny expresses enthusiastic confidence of su"
'■■ . The estimated cost of the canal is only
>.OOO.OOQ, for which subscriptions are re
*<i from all parts cf the world.
THE ROUTE BY LAKE KICARAGUA.
-■M Efcccnd route indicated on the map is that
■y way cf Lake Nicaragua, and the San Juan
**»er. along: the boundary cf Costa Rica, and
through the territory of the Republic of Nica-
Ii Caa. a region made famous by the daring and
**& of Walker, the filibuster. The general di
"SMon cf the route is from east to west. Be
**slag at or near Greytown, on the Caribbean
****. the cana! is to be dug for a distance of
**t?-three miles to the San Juan River, above
*• Junction of the Rio Grande Carlos, the
* B * r etr*am bearing too much silt to allow the
cf the San Juan River below that point.
*^cc t tc line of navigation will be up the
Juan, which is a thou£and feet wide and
***7 feet deep, and of constant and gentl*
*•*• li Lake Nicaracua. in ali this distance
ijf 3 ClC * :an l 0 lake there will be from six to ten
Wt C f about ten feet each. Lake Xica
fiU. is a fine inland aea, 110 BMlei long- by
,l, lR £-&> ulds, and from 3O Teet to 150 feet deep.
*L. ''** ffcet al>ov « the eea level. The canal
t ' ~~* "Cl cross the lake to its vrestern shore,
~-> e:zt t< i n and two-third miles from the
*Vlflc Oiean. fere the hills rise 134 feet
, c t! ie lake, rendering a. deep but short
■ r-tr -t Ile '-*-ssai-y; after which the canal will
"a th* tidewater by an easy descent
°u«h i £y«t«. m O f t^j locks, of ten feet
and not i«ss than H.Otfit feet apart- Tne
-tern terminus wiil be at Brit<, A! each end
?? f *»«» caßal aa artificial harbor v.i!l have to be
*a:fe .* h m tein* no natural harbor at Brit".
* Ilu^ * a % at Gr«?ytown, formerly one of the
M«aV a ta<i coast . ha* become en badly silted
■■■M^f Js*""" except for email craft. The ea-
I O^.* 0 ' 1 for 'h« entire work i« & T5,000,0(tO.
-.-cticzia have b«a made to ihl* route, on
merce On th» nth!^ i? obstruction to corn
milSing the 1-Ilp £« !t is urged that b >-
Chieros Toute'thft^il 11 be no more lhan b >' thfe
n-m^reclud^ ', the ****** Bize of the loclu
ful, and that whii^ mr ns tlBt 18 emln «n">- health
are from ?he y A°tT n and df vlnva3l
Panama "rout 'TiT. X,™ '» tl! " outlet of th?
1-cted by »dm J » Nicaragua route was ue
5=325
RELATIONS OF THE ROUTES TO COMMERCE.
6 h T^s"hat°L the W ° rld °of ,. immu! s P-Jectfon
tween the Atlantic of the United State, and iv
R a a C China"'; tn P*** ° f SouVh :
ita. China. Japan. Australia and the islands of
tne Pacific, either of the two routes across the
lnthmus would possess great advantages in point
of distance over the tedious and often perilous
journey around Cape Horn, which is now the
only means of communication which does not
necessitate the unloading and reloading of car
goes. This fact will be the more evident when it
is stated that the distance from New-York to
San Francisco via Cape Horn is 15.672 miles,
and via Panama 8,067 miles, a saving of 9.613
miles. A proportionately great distance is also
saved between New-York and Yokohama or
Kong Kong-. The advantage in point of distance
of the isthmian over the Cape Horn route to
European commerce Is Immense, effecting a sav
ing of more than seven thousand m!'e« each way
in the Journey between Europe and the Pacific
coast of South America.
Upon one map are shown the advantages and
disadvantages of the several trans-isthmian
routes with respect to each other. In relation to
American commerce. It Is evident that the
further north i route may be placed, the shorter
will be the distance by it between the Atlantic
and Pacific coasts of the United States. This
circumstance is. of course, intensified by the
spherical form of the earth, causing the distance
between any two meridians to increase as they
approach the equator.
The Caribbean termini of the Panama and
Nicaragua routes are about equidistant from
any cf the Atlantic ports of the United States.
On the Paciflc coast there is a difference of over
six hundred miles In favor of the latter.
JOSHUA GREGG ASSIGNS.
HA? BEEN IN THE FURNITURE BUSINESS
FOR MANY YEARS.
Joshua Gregg, in business as Joshua Gregg &
Co., dealers m furniture at No. 253 Slxth-ave., made
an assignment yesterday to Clarence C. " : ICihhln.
Mr. Gregg has beer, in business many years, and
was generally supposed to be wealthy. The busi
ness was originally established at No. : Bowery
many years ago by his brother. Robert Gregg.
who retired in ISS3. Joshua has carried on the
business since. In the trade Edward J. Leonard
was supposed to be a partner, but he sa.'d yester
day that he never was a partner. He had. however,
the powers of a partner and acted as the manager
of the business. Mr Gregg- was not at the store
when a reporter called there yesterday. Mr. Leon
ard said that he could net say anything about the
assignment as he had not known anything about it
until an hour before. He said he did not know the
cause and could give no figures as to liabilities.
The assignee will take possession at once a::, make
an ' inventory. The store was closed yesterday
afternoon. , TTI „
Mr. Gregg has been ill for some time. His lia
bilities are estimated at over tlO&.OOO and his as
set* are thought to be large, consisting of a etock
of furniture and carpets and outstanding accounts
He was for many year* at the northeast corner of
Flfth-ave. and Fourteenth-st. He moved to No.
253 SJxth-ave. about fifteen months ago.
COPPER JXVESTMEST /v MEXICO.
The prospectus cf the Greene Consolidated Copper
Company, which is to be found in this issue, brings
before the public the Cananea Copper Mines, of
Sonora Mexico. This company makes some strong
Etatements as to the value cf Its property-prospec
tive a 1a 1 - well as immediate. It is --what
novel to find a new mining stock placed upon
the market directly by the locator and owner with
out the intervention of underwriting syndicates or
prom,-- The company has placed its property
upon a paying basis, it Is announced. The large
acreaje and the great number of mine? owned by
H*H2$S! teHtesrssK mm
i"-o the treasury of the company for m-
CESTRAL BLAST FOR AXE AKD TOOL CO.
Ptttiirar*; Feb. tJsttoOS are In progress
for* th. purchase of one hundred acres of land on
the Ohio River, a mile below Steubenville Ohio.
by the American Axe and Tool Company, the pur
pose being to centralize the many widely scattered
. ■. . . stated tha
plants is completed.
PtTiriOXß /V BASKfCi 1-1 >)
TUe Bcfaedules of Morltz Baasf real estate op
eriwr of No. 1« East g venty- 9 ecund- 9 t against
ham a petition In bankruptcy was filed In De
«2Er S creditor*, .how li-Mlltle. of cc.«
Zri» T « ,«?f«e d MurVay SSL fiSt
-^^gt^H^^^^rray 8^
SS^Wrtj dO Quggenhelmer. 113.000;
baclwr. »«*.
William Bogg* broker, of No. U6 Nusaau-K.. ha.«
„S i "^UtiS in bankruptcy. «|tb li.bill.te. of
lioJTi and no asset «
Judge Brown, of the United States District Court,
i appoints Theodore M Taft receiver ■' the
lit! of Own*. M»na«. de«l« '«» ■t'tlon.ry and
£__,-»_•. ** Am. < New JU*6«-««-
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. STTSDAY. FEBRUARY 11, 1000.
BIG nrV 1 YD FOR AMERfr\y COAL.
TWENTY THOUSAND TONS- OF IT GOTNa
ti
ABROAD iCVERY MJ^H.
Twenty thousand tons of American coal going
abroad every month! That hi the conservative esti
mate of one of the best known exporter, In __
city as to the remarkable demand for coal from
this country that has developed abroad While
prlc^a here have iwen increasing steadily because
of a shortage of the supply, due to general pros
perity and lark of carrying facilities, the bis
steamers have been •gout with their holds filled
to overflowing with the precious carbon Coal men
in this city say tha: the high price and the scarcity
of coal here are In no way due to the sudden de
mand for American coal abroad, but consumers
may think that this la hardly logical It would
certainly seem that If the aforesaid twenty thou
sand tons of coal were kept to the American mar
ket there would be less of a shortage and the de
mand might be satisfied more readily. Coal men
however, aver that the mere fact that Prance Ger
many and ports on the Mediterranean. Baltic and
Black seas are receiving American coal Is an ab
solutely independent proposition so far as the home
supply is concerned.
It was learned yesterday that for the last three
months there have been steady shipments of Amer
ican mined coal to those foreign ports. Inquiries
are constantly being- received by agents of the
large coal companies In this city, and it is believed
that even larger orders will be booked as soon as
there la any indication that the orders can be
filled. At present it Is possible to fill them only to
a limited extent, as the demands upon the rail
roads have been so large for the carrying; of all
kinds of freight that it is impossible to bring the
supply of coal from the mines. The coal that la
being ■hipped abroad, it is said, Is largely for In
dustrial purposes, and it is not believed here that
the foreign government? are directly interested. It
Is Intimated, however, that It may be possible that
some of the coal eventually Snds its way into gov
ernment storehouses.
The demand for American coal Is attributed
largely to the shortage of coal from the Cardiff
and north country miles, including Newcastle. Two
principal reasons are assigned for that shortage.
One is that there have been prosperous conditions
in England that set the mills ana spindles humrninsr
as they have been for some time in this country".
Anothsr reason is that since the great strike cf
the Cardiff miners last year, when more thai: liXty
thousand men quit work, the min^s have not been
able to put forth an output sufficient to make u^
for the lost time.
Many of the foreign countries are largely, almost
entirely, dependent upon the Cardiff mines for their
coal. Some comes from Australia, a little, of In
ferior quality, from China and Japan. In addition
to the shoriaE'; in Kngiand owing to tne causes
cited above, it is believed that the war has caustd
a lot of the coal that ordinarily goes into trade
channels to be diverted for the Government supply.
America, as usual, was turned to when there was
need for help. I_"p to a few months ago what coal
was exported from this country went principally
to Cuba and Puerto Rica A little went to thf>
Transvaal. To-day inquiries are cumlng from Rus
sia, Spain, France, Germany and the Netherlands.
The high Cardiff prices stimulated thu coal busi
ness in England .and it affected in the same way
the American market.
Heretofore the tarift* rates on vessel freights have
been agair.M American ports as compared with
Cardiff ports, but at present It is said that the
rates are about equal, and this has been of benefit
to the American trade. With a shortage all over
the world and a larger demand than for many
years, the importers of coal naturally turned to
this country. There was a shortage here, too. but
the American exporter is pretty apt to find a way
to meet any kind of a demand when there Is the
right sort of inducement in Fight. The high prices
in Europe made the opening for American coal,
and even with coa! "way up" in this country it
was possible to sell at figures that met the de
mands of the European markets. Coal merchants
say that It la impossible to tell now whether the
present demand for American coal will be a perma
nent one or not. They think, however, it will cer
tainly continue for a long time. It has been
brought about by the peculiar conditions existing
abroad. with a war on England's hands there is
reason to believe that American coal will be wanted
on the other for many mouths. '
RUSSIA'S GREAT NEED OF COAL.
St. Petersburr Feb. 10.— The deficit In the supply
of native coa! is estimated at one million tons,
The Government has already given Immense orders
for Welsh coal, and Is trying to place other orders.
BAXK CASHIER ARRESTED.
Thompsonvllle, Cor.n.. Feb. -Robert E. Spen
cer, the cashier of the banking 1 firm of R. D. &
Robert E. Spencer, which Sled a petition in bank
ruptcy in the United States Court at Hartford on
Monday with liabilities of about $105,000, was ar
rested to-day on a charge alleging the misappro
priation cf the specific amount of $000. Spencer
was released on bonds of $1,000. A hearing will be
held on Monday.
William Hiltlitch, sr.. the complainant, alleges
that the bank, through Robert E. Spencer, loaned
»he sum of $£00 on a note, and subsequently sold
the paper to Hildjtch. Later, the complainant
alleges, the borrower paid th tt WOO to Spencer, Who
failed to turn it over to Illlditch or reimburse
him.
The arrest occasioned considerable excitement
as the latest development in the somewhat serious
failure of the ..king firm.
l.Lt- DMOi -i.
-ction of B t
motion of !•■ '
THE PJiiyT CLOTH MARKET.
Fall River. Macs., Feb. 10 (Special).— Broker* re
port that there has been good business in the local
print doth market this week. The opening was
not marked by a strong demand, but in a few days
there W«J an Increase and in the last two days
great activity. In two days there were sales of
175,000 piece*, and It !:; estimated that the total
-ales for the week will reach 3G0,(W0 pieces. The
demand was most urgent for wide good:*, and as a
result of the presence of bo many buyers for this
grade the price moved up an eighth of a cent.
TIM wi.ie odd." went well, but the n-piUrj were
not taken to any great extent, so that the syndi
cate had little work In that line. Still the t Hiding
wan fairly steady with them, and no eascmsu to
„,.11 wa« displayed, aa all thii product is well cow
1 meted ahead for time. The change in cotton
urlces served to strengthen the cloth market some
what Increased bu_i: is expected In a short
>tnu- ' There is a scarcity of any grades of goods
•imunK the converters, and they are beginning to
tome into the market a#aln. Th« demand for fancy
weaves continues a* good as ever, and th«. mills
cn _ «d on them are running night and 'lay.
~,r r iic the strenuous objection* of the labor union*,
v&icb fcava brought on* concern into court.
rorxT vox blueceer's roMTuyt.
Bat- U-.vNT A 810 SHARE . ■ '
It waa learned from George D. Dean, of the law
firm of Dean & Jt>hamisen, of Nos. -* and 2S East
Fayette-st.. Baltimore, that Count Gebhard yon
Blueher. grands--n of the -warrior of Waterloo
and the only surviving member o£ his family. Is
not dead, as has bi-cn reported, but Is ill __ in a
hospital n ot far from this city. Mr. Dean waa
aeen at the Sinclair flouse in this city yestt-rday
morning. He came North to meet the Countess.
Yon Bluchers wife, who lives in East One-hun
dred-and-slxteenrh-st. The Count cam- to this
country many years ago, served in the Civil War,
and married Ella Ohlsen. a nurse, who attended
him during a sickness. About two years ago the
Count left her and ber two daughters. The
Countess heard from her husband several times,
but the last letter she received was in October.
1393. Slr.ce that tlm* she has learned that her
husband has lnlierited $:i*).iM/i anii a cattle at
Wletzow, in Germany. She> then b^gan a search
for her husbamt. which proved fruitlrs.s. On Feb
ruary .'. she received a letter from Dean _ Johann
**n. telllnff her that they were empowered to col
lect her husband's inheritance, and also sayir.i?
that they knew where he was. and If she desired
to write to him she might send the letters to them.
Countess yon BlUcher did not answer this letter,
so Mr. Dean came 10 this city to se<r her.
"1 left Baltimore to visit the Count." he said
to a reporter, "and decided to see the Countess
while I was in tht... vicinity."
"Then the Count is not far frcm this city?"
suggested the reporter.
Mr. Doan smiled, and after a moment's hesitation
said h« could not answer that question. ,
"la he' in a private sanatorium, as reported?"
"No; he is in an institution. It is not a private
one."
"Is he mentally unbalanced?"
"Xo. he's sick."
"Is it true, as reported, that you are to receive
one-fourth of the (200.000 that is sa'.d to be coming
to him?" asked the reporter.
"Y*-s, those are the terms," answered Mr. D*an.
"Do you know why the Count left New-York In
the manner reported?" Mr. Dean was asked.
"Not -positively." was the reply. "'I understand
that he was not making- enough money here to
enable him properly to support his family."
"What was the nature of his employment here?"
"I think he was a watchman."
Mr. Derm said that tin Count Is a man about
sixty, well educated and had a fine sense of honor,
and had already made a will by which he dis
posed of his prospective inheritance. This will,
Mr. Dean said, was in the custody of his law firm.
He refused to say who the devisees were.
"Is his wife provided for in the will?*' was
asked.
"I must decline to say anything about that,"
was the reply.
THE ANTRIM CASE.
MRS. JONES AN' STVETT LEAVE NASHUA, FOR
THIS CITT.
Nashua. N. H., Fob. 10.— Mr. Helena Franklin
Jones and William M. Swett, the persons alleged
to be connected with the Antrim mall case, left
this city this afternoon for New-York, after de
positing $1,500 each for bail. Mrs. Jones stated
before she left here that Swett who says he is her
manager, is not responsible In any way. She al
leges that she alone comprises the Brookside Sup
ply Company and the Silk Company, whose
transactions gave rise to the charges. Swett.
however. In the presence of his attorneys, says
that he is able to prove that the company is a
genuine one. and has always acted up to its agree
ments.
THE TRADE IX CHICAGO.
Chicag-o, Feb. 10 (Special).— Corn led everything
else here to-day, going up %C with the pit crowded
and with an enormous export business under way.
May open i at B%c sold between 33 3 4 and 34~<<J
3-iSe and closed at 34^c. February closed at K'-jc;
July, ZS^'gC. Seaboard exporters had very heavy
buying orders in the futures here at the opening.
It was said Philadelphia and Baltimore took a
million bushels of May In the first few minutes.
This was the taking In of hedges against cash
sales. The export business from here direct was
about 500,000 bushels, and It was figured that over
a million bushels had been sold for expert over
night, mainly through Baltimore and Philadelphia,
It was probably largely a spurt to catch the old
cut rates which expire to-night, and pretty cer
tainly the big ca9h business done will go to the
seaboard on the old rates rather than the new.
Philadelphia and Baltimore have b«?en dcirg a
large business all the week, keeping It under cover
as far as possible. The bull speculative crowd
here. Patten, Cudahy, Tpe-go-Smith and others,
helped the market along as tar v possible. St.
Louis covered on a large scale. It has been short
on ccrn for two months. Liverpool was JJ to ht'l
higher. Clearances were 4^3,000 busheis. Receipts
were 496 cars, with uoO estimated for Monday.
Samples were lie to '^c higher. Corn stocks hays
increased this week about a million bushels. Coun
try offerings were light over night. Mild weather
!s advancing and roads will be bad. It Is expected
the demand before long will spring up for corn to
go into vessels prior to the opening of navigation.
Cables estimate that Argentine will have 15,000,000
bushels less 'or export than last year.
Wheat advanced '•. to %c., helped by the corn
strength and by unexpectedly firm cables. May
opened at GS'^. sold between 6% and \ and 6S sa,5 a ,
and closed at M% to 68^ cents; February closed at
<X 3 ,i cents; July. C3>i to GS^i cents. Liverpool waa *i
to fsd higher, although there had been a decline
here Friday. World's shipments will be less than
CGCO.OOO bushel?, agair.st over 8,000,000 bushels a year
ago. The visible supply will decrease about 733,000
bushels. Liverpool, Paris And London were all up
a fraction Clearances for the day were £37,0U0
busheis. The speculative trade was light, and wheat
was subordinate to corn. Primary receipts exceeded
last year's 5C5.000 bushels, against 464,000 bushels.
There was nothing done here in a shipping way.
Oats were up May ; closing at 23 787 8 cents; July.
2?: i cents. Oats sympathized with the corn strength!
tut lagged. Their discount under corn to-night is
lOS cents. The talent thinks this discount will in
crease. Receipts were TT2 arm. with ISO' estimated
for Monday. Clearances were 1Q3.000 bushels Srocks
here will increase moderately.
Flaxseed was quiet, to-night's prices practtcally
the same as Friday's, the May and cash $1 60; Sep
tember. $1 IS. Receipts at the three points were 9
cars, against 30 last year.
Provisions Just about held their own: they opened
at a decline, but rallied because of the corn firm
ness. It was a" rather quiet day. May pork closed
at Jllll' 1^; May lard. J6 15; May ribs. $SO7& sellers.
There were 20.000 hogs, with 190.000 for nex: week.
Hcgs were Zc lower.
CHICAGO STOCKS.
(Furnished by "CTalkpr Brothers, No. 71 Broadway.)
: High. ; Low. Ctoae.
Atn»rit*un I-tnsr-*<l JT>\ I I"*,
do preferr*.! i .ITS, , 57U r <T V
Chlcai;:. Union Traction....! iv.v. : -iji^
do preferred 7f>>^ 7i;i" I 7di,"
Diamon.l Match 3-7'- IL"7 127'"
il"tropolitan Ele\ated pref. SO* Til'i Ju J
<*o *■ !»■:•% w;>, | BCi
National Biscuit ."is 1 *. 87-14 38»s
do preferred W, " 93 I ~
Nati< nal Steel 4y'-4 | -l^i 4D'i
FATAL STORES.
The niiiik-: rf-ma.ine.l arm. with a go.*! Jobbing demand.
Prices were unchanged. Export JtmanU at Savannah
good. Q.Mtatkms follow:
TAP.— Regulars. SI 85; tar. nil bb!s. $3 SO.
SP;UITS TrP.i'EN'TI.VK-atifg ;!!;<..,■.
ROSIN — ''oiKraon to good. stralne«l. Jl i£,gsJ 70; X
$175; F. $lSt); <;, »1 S3; H. J2: I. $2 10; K. *!' 20; 12.
fj CU; N, $3; W <i. »S TO; \V \V. *i 1:>
STOTC OX HAND.
R'-f in 5T.029 bt;».
b'pirits turjieniinv , U.OHii b'ols.
Tar i.y^j bblsl
Charleston, Feb. 10. — Turpentine firm. 4t S."te. Rotln
firm, unchanged.
Savannah, Feb. ltt. — tfpiri:* turpentine firm. ste; sales.
77 bb;«; exports. :£». R-o«ln rtrm; receipts. U. 174 btils
sales. :..17S»; exports. 1.738; H. 918365! 90,
Wilmington. Fn:b. 10. — Spirits turpentine Srrc. 31334'ic.
Ilcsin ti.-m. »1 .X"s*l 4i>: receipti. T.k: bbls. CruiJe turpen
tine firm. FZiiWZ Z; rectripta, bbls. Tar nrm. *1 ;:t), re
ftlpli. 2iO bb!«.
t ist LIBERTY LITE STOCK MARKET.
Cast LJbeity. K-t>. lij. — L'a.ti:t* «tt*>i> : extra. J.".
?•'. S3: prime, ti 25fc$S fci; comreun. S3 So. lU.R*
eieady; mediums. *3 2f»CrS5 2". : hehvy VorWera. jj lin
J.*> 20: liyht Yorkers »n<3 pigs. *^>©J5 U»; henry hogs *o lt>
#*j IB; rcugrha. *3 3">Ss4 75. Rhf-ej. »t««dy; choice watban
JiUU&$5?5; ecmmun. |3fr|4; chulc* lamba. J"Si|7 15;
cuinmuti to root], SijJjT: \-eal cvlvea, * 7 u ■"■">• ■ '•'
EUROPEAN PRODI 1 ! MABKET.
Liverpool. Feb. 10 — {"losing: ' \Vbeut — (Spot firm; Xo 1
California. » 1 . . - «s M: No 2 reJ WrUlern winter, ■;» id
Corn — Spot Rrm; American mixe<l, new. 2m «ij; u o old
3s SS futmea firm; Februaty. 3» 7 T »a: M*rtb. S» 7"» a"
May. 2s 754. Pea* — Canadian. o« "lii Hups' kl Loul
don (Pacific Onasti dull. t3 li)»Jr£4. Flour— St. L,m a
f&sey winter firm. 7s 3d. EfMf dull; extra India m-ss BUa'
prime mess, 7-s ttJ. pork firm; prime mrsa. VFaatam!
3d. FT«m». abort cut. 14 to 1«"> Ib. nrrr., 4*« td. Iwird
linn: prltMl Wtawm, In tlercts, 31a 3J; American rrtired
In paiis, ;aj nj. lirtcon flrtr. : Cumberland cut. ti> So n,"
STsrtu: »hort rih. is to 23 Ib. 3S««id; long clear mMdW
light. SO to S." Hi, SOa; lunif clear mVldlea, fceavy, 23 tl > 41)
Ib. :::.-•:-.. nhort dear back*. 11l to IS Tt>. 22a ft] ■ clear
bellies. 14 to Ii Ib. SAa (M. !?hoc!der» — Square, r> »o ?i
n.. rtrm. 84a. Hatter — JTtnaat ami (aod L'oit-d Blatn nosn
ln_l (.•hrpse firm; Arnerlran finest white. .17», Jr> ,- 1' „]..' i
SU*. Tullnw atronar; prime <ltv. 2Tis; Australian. In Ur'
«l'.n. ih* <M. 1 ..m .p w | oil— Hull refined, Mjy •Aum«'
■Many. -2a M. Turpentine— Hptrlts atmna. 41- :<■ : Jl M »in-'
••»>- Jli. firm. :.» 10 Ud. i'airuiaum — U«no«il. TSi Ut "
STOCK VALUES FIRM.
GOOD DEMASD FOR BOXDS.
BA.VK STATEMENT FEAI BAVX
LNBION.
.
Am C & P 16' 2 Mi 4Z\ — %
American lee 42 s * — l t ' Mexican i'ent 12
Am -Smelting ■- +VMK& Tpf XiX —'1
A:n Lins— tl IJH 'National Biwult.. IS 1-*1 -* —**
Am Tin Plate... 34S t North Paciflc 5a —V»
Am Sijjrar Kef. ..11H T » -}-%\ do pref. 744
Am Bifi: Wire.. 57*» — S Nor & West 25«S — 4
<lo pref. S*3 —Si Jo pref 12*
Am Steel Hu<.p.. 4rt ! -i — T,|Xa'.ional !?te^l 41» — H
A:n Tobacea li»7S — "«;N V Ont &■ \V 23"i
At Top & S y. .. 2f»S — »i]N T Centra* ...134S —*i
•iv pr»f C2 T , — V Pacific Xzll 41 — 4
Anaconda 44* i —HI Peo Gas & r HI7 — H
8.-w.-k:yn H T... 7.: 1 * — '^iPresse.i S; C r.5 3*3 * —**
Ba!; & Ohio «1V — "t'Penn R P. 102** — fc
•Jo pref 77 -j- 4: Republic Hteel 24 T « — H
CP.I &: Pac Vjh — >,: Reading lat pref.. .".« - —
Chic Bur & Qj-.-l-^'i — *» ' do 2d pref 2>S — H
CM tSi P 1224 — SSouthern Paciflc. 33 s *
Chic Ot West.... 14 : Southern Ky IV% — H
CC C & .St U. . «>4 — 'i : Uo pr*f . M — 1
C'fcen Jk Ohio 23*^ — *»,St J&(J J « —
Col Fuel & Iron. 45U jSt L. A S W 11 ! i
Con Tobacea 34 1* —l * do pref 27 '» —'%
Con Gas 13:5 s * ~lV£>t L.& =? F U ■■' 3." 4 — '-»
Col Mid pf 2G — 4|Tenn C& I lOV — ■-»
L) & It O lllH — 4 Third Aye R R...H"* 1-*1 -* — 1\
Erie 1.-t pr«f 3G4 — 4 Texas * Pac 1«4
Federal Steel 5.14 — Union Paciflc 4.%
Glucr.»e Ref 37 -f 4 i do pref 764 —
Great North f?--1-"&4 — •:U 3 Leather 13 s * —*i
Int Paper 24 | do pref ■""» — 4
Illinois Central.. ll24 — Union Tel.. 83 — %
Ixmla & Xash... W% + H;W & L.E 11
Slanhattan P7 1 * —4j dr> Ist pref -I.
Met Street Ry...17S -J- 'siWabash pref 2o\ — >
ilir.n *Si L . . . ■. — UlWis Cent pf i 3 — 4
BONDS.
A T i P F A 4s. 534 — 4 Mcx Cent Ist tne. 25H 4- «i
B& O 34s Sj."> —fc do 2d lnc 124 -t- S
■'-■> 4<t 1O:)H —Si North Pac 3s «7 4-' H
Bkir. \: E lsts.. OH i ', S: I, 4 I Jl si> lll T i — 4
Cent Pa 345... hS4 — 4 St US W lsts... ■-» — 4
Jo 4s «s*» — I*! do ils s!»'* + 4
Ch!c T " 4s !)34 — UiSoulh Pac 4s *.T4 — H
Col & So Ist 4s. H4\ — **: Union Pac 4s 1044 — hi
Erie lat gen 43.. 71.* -r *» ■
THE DAY'S OPERATIONS IN STOCKS. :
The general market was dull and strong, and j
a bank statement showing a decrease in surplus
had no adverse effect upon sentiment or prices.
Extended comment on the bank state me:. will
be found in another column. Stocks that enjoy
an international mark did not sell off. despite
the gloomy reports from South Africa, traders
in London and in the local market apparently
holding the theory that the third reported
retreat of General Buller was this time strat
egy rather than a defeat. But the stock
marke: cut loose from the influence of South
African war developments some time ago, and
values are not likely to go down even on a crush
ing British defeat. Consolidated Gas and Third
Avenue stocks were strong- features, and in the
stocks where declines were made final" prices
showed only fractional concessions. Commission
house:-- were moderate buyers, and shorts cov
ered their contracts, doubtless scenting danger
in remaining short over the double holiday.
Dealings were not large, but they were fairly
well distributed, and in many cases represented
buying by substantial interests.
Reports from the commercial agencies in the
week show that the country's Industries are
still exceeding in output the records for the
sairio time in any preceding year. New busi
ness is not quite &9 large a3 last year, due In
great part to the inability of manufacturers to
accept it. Old orders are being worked off, and j
prospects indicate that all industries will have
all the business they can handle throughout th»
year. Caution in the Wall Street and industrial
mark- has not been succeeded by unwise spec
ulation. Cotton Is advancing In response to the
growing belief that the crop will fall short of the
demand, but the price of wheat sho^s scarcely
any change. It is a noteworthy fact that with a
light demand for wheat and a dec:-. in the
grain trafflr m January of over CO per cent from
January, 1899. railroad earnings made the best
showing in January for any month since the
early summer, and better than in any January
on record. A big movement of traffic and higher
rates explain th* gain, but the significant feat
ure of the exhibit is found In the fact that the
gain waj inad>? in the face of a heavy decline in
grain traffic.
"The Financial Chronicle" shows in Its issue
this week that the failing off in the grain re
ceipts the present year at the Western primary
markets has been of large dimensions. "OJ
wheat the receipts for the four weeks en.lin^
January 27, 1900, were but 10.763,429 bushels
against 17,140.,").'!') bushels in the corresponiine
four weeks of li>i«>. and of cprn th* deliveries
were 1.".2<^,703 bunhels. against liS.T'JD.Tao bush
els. There was some increase in one or two o?
the other cereals, but, taking wheat, corn, oats,
barley and rye together, the r^eipta for th-?
four weeks were but 41.',i-{.".47r> bushels th«
present year, against 60.45i.0G0 buabela in 1S9O"
In other words, there was a contraction in this
item of traffic ir. the amount of 18,500,000 bush
els." The current earnings of American rail
roads are sufficient reason for bull predictions o^
American stocks.
The usual weekly tab!e of price changes for the
more active stocks follows:
I Saturday | Saturday, I Xet
I Feb. 3. | Feb. 10. ! change.
American Car & F I !«'. l,;-, \
American ?m.-:t'.riir I 414 42 1 , 4. %
American Ste«-l & Wire | S7S Z7\ I - _
do preferrt-i | JM^ O.T ! — 3*3 *
American t*teel Hoop | 474 4t>4 ! — \
American Sugar Ref Co. ..I n.".-s in» T * i —t\
American T:n Plat*' pref..! *24 i S2 1 - I
American Cotton Oil j ::+-3 I 34 s ! | + 4
American L.in«eed ' 15 1.">4 I — ■ +
do preferred ! &&\ j 57*4 | - 1
Anaconda . .' ! 4O 1 * ' -u---» -^ 3H
Atchifon j 2i>H I 21'S I + 4-
Atchisor,. Top &S F pref..| t3S j H24 I >-
American Tobacco Co | 1034 I Hit 1 - . — 4-4
Baltimore and Ohio | ti24 ' Rl*i I _ >i
do preferred j ~ti\ I 77 -i- »*
Brooklyn Rapid T:-anslt...j 754 ! 73* 2'^
Continental Tobacco ! 3.T 3*3 * 344 1 — H
do preferred I s«4 K>\ — ««
Central of New-Jersey | 117S 117 — S
Chesapeake A Oht ■»• I 2i»4 -Jit^i — i,
Chicago & Gr»at Western..! 1:54 | 14 | - *»
d,> preferred A j 77 \ , 77 — %
do preferred B I 41 | 4! | —
Chicago & North » "si-m . . . i 18.T4 I !<i2 i l\i
Chicago XI A Paciflc I i-.ni 4 1 10M , —14
Chicago Bur & Quir.cy 1 1244 1244 i
Chicago Mil &St Paul 1 1204 1224 i + 2
Chicago Terminal pref | ST S» ■ — 1
Chicago .St P M and O I 1224 11>» ', — 4»i
Cleveland C C 4 St Lr.uis. I >n\ «(»4 I — :4: 4
(VnsoliUated Gaa I 1»1 lvi;: 1 * I ij\
Colorado Fuel & Irun I 4>". i « 4T.4 | —14
Delaware & Hudson | 117 113 ' —2
Del Lack & Western I 17S | 1~ I — 1
Denver jt !!!•> Grande f *18 l.«*» -I- 1H
do preferred t C»*« ) 724 — 22 1 *
Fetierul Ste<-1 1 G5 1 * i 5". 4 — l »
do prefer: c.l I «s'a I 75 — 4
Kockintr Valley t 34 4 ' ?.44 J- 4
dc preferre<l ! 61\ I mm 1 * j —1
General Electric ■ ! 12s 127 [ —1
<":iuci>«e Sugar Refining | 57 *57 | 4- 14
Illinois Centra! I »112 112 ■ — 4
ic-aa Central pM I 324 | 54 \ -v 14
1.-t^rnati. r.al I'aper C 0....' 24** 24 ' — ■"*
do preferred . . . ." 1 >'i» »K«4 '■ — 4
Lculavill* & Nash'-ille ' 71»4 ! N>4 ' —1 H
Laclflda Gas I 79 I 77 ! — 2
ITexiran Centra! | 11% ■ | 12 I + H
Mexican National 4 4 ,
Manhattan ! B8»» ! — 14
Metropolitan Stre-t Ry I 1724 | ITS | - s'-s
Missouri Paciflc | 4J-5. j 4."»% !
Xrssouri. Kan £ T<-x pf...i XTS ! 3:54 I — H
National I-'ad • 2U4 i 274 I — 1
National Sterl I 4'J 4U •
a j preferrr-I nr. j m 1 — 1
Northern Pacific Ky I .Vi- | 53 t — 4
d.> preferred 7.'!** j «T44 ( — 4
N V Central & Hudson ! 1."U4 | 1244 | + 4
North American | 1 i r « ! 144 j — s
Nortclk &. W«:^rn.. ! 28H \ 2^4 | — '2\
do pref^rr*Hl ! 714 i *~-*» 1 —24
Ontario * \v>?:--rn i 224 | ZJ'r. ! -~ *»
J'aciflc M;iU I 4;; 1 * f 41 ! —Z\
Pennsylvania ! 13<t*» | 132"* !
i People** r,as I-i^ht Co I li>74 ! 107 ' — T »
Pitts CC* St Louis j 71 «iS4 j — ji.
Preyed Steel '"ar ! 68 i ST.** | —24
Heading ! l?i* I 1«S | + »,
do la* preftrred M ( 54 J
Ay, 2d preferred ! 204 2sH | — "i
Republic Sleel & Iron j 2T. 7 i 24% — J
. dY> pref erre<l ! &» \ «S 4 — 14
Southern Railwar ! 12U 114 ' — S
do preferred I W;4 6* — 4
Southern Parlflc I 3SS 3^+ — S
: Si Liv:» & Sm Fraaclaco. | 1«>*« 11 — S,
St Louis Southwestern i 11^ 114 _ i 4i 4
'lo preferred I 2S l A | 274 — 14
Ttxas i!k Paciflc i I<J=» I 184 -t- 4
i Third Avenue R R ! 1H> 5 « 1 lm>4 4- 4
7e::r.r*.«ee C^u»l i. iron ! u» a^^ —
Union P;u:if..- I 47 * i | 40 T, +' «U
do pretend ! T54 : T«4 -f 1
United Slate* Rubber 1 ra> S3 __t
Cnltcd btatwi Leather. v:..l uj»i j it,* 4. i %
do preferred ' '« I 73*% — H
rniun lias P»per 1 23** | 244 4. 1^
Western Union I »«•* | fUI — S-^
Wheel A: L«l»- Er.e 24 pt. t 2T 4 » ! r» -r" H
Wisconsin (Vntrat pr*;f ! 4» 65 4-5
W.ibuah pr<?Jer:rJ I 21 2o\ > t
Total «aJ^ fur tne w*elc 3.« M.*<>
Tutal In precrtflng »»*k 2.5i0.r:5
TliK DAY'S OPERATIONS ;\ l{OXl»S.
GOVERNMENT BONDS.-Markrt steady. Final
quotation* follow:
BM. A •!<!•■! I n , d A^tn
V. S. ex 2». r«.l"-4 ,— 1}; =*■ **. Ja2:..re 8 134 1»4«»
V. S. as. re«...J«W4 |»> J *.H. 4». M2S.cou.i:t4 134»*
U. s. a-. c. ; u...uni*. io»;i tr.s. r>». iuo4.re» us\ 1134
V. 3. Sm. small, f J J» U.a B*. laot.coS 112. 1134
r.3. 4. luuj.r-*. UJj J »J«]Dl.t. of C. J-«3.,u: -
I.?. 4».1W*7.e0u.114<l 1134!
RAILROAD BONDS.— Market firm. Total sales
amounted in par valu* to n.fISQ.OOO^ ajfalnst f1,572.-
COQ on FrMnv. The h*aYi»»t di-ahnfs wrr* In the
Atcht»on adjustment 4a Baltimor*. and Ohio 34*
and is, Bulti— or* and Ohio (Southwestern division
Si^e). Central Parlflc S4s and 4s, Chicago Terminal
Transfer 4a, Mexican Central Ist and M •on*
Northern Pacific 4s. R»adlnj? general 49. St. Lcui'
and Iron Mountain s*. St. Louis Southwestern 3d*.
Southern Paciflc 4s, Union Pacific 43 and WabMb
debenture Bs.
AMERICAN SECUIHTIE3 ABROAD.
London. Feb. 10. 2 p. m .— Th* market for Ameri
can securities opened lower on the news from Sooth
Africa, but near the close reacted sharply and
closed steady. Tracing was light. Last prices
were: Canadian Pacific. 9*%; Erie. 12%: Erie first
preferred. ;J7S: Illinois Central. ll."A*: Union Pa
cific preferred. 7^-: Si. Paul. l^i: New-York Cen
tral. 1".T4: Pennsylvania. CS& Reading, o*-*: North
ern Paciric prefem^d. "«*»: Atehison. 21 V»; Louisville
and Nashville, KJ: Grand Trus.it. S. and Aa»
cunda, :>',.
B ALES \T THE STOCK EXCHAXGB.
RAILBOAD AM» OTHER
::„. A»_. Mii
Albany ok - .- ... — — : — ; — . I'jii I — I :
Adams Express.; — f — { — — 113 |11«H
Am Or & fdry! Ms! »»»! 1«H l*Hl I«» 1«S! 2?»
< . ■rt-t •« -H-n aa»
American Ot»U..! — j — — — il-45 133 j —
Araer Otron Oil; — — — — ! 84^ 35 I —
di pref — — — — vS3 ; IMbl — —
Aiiier Dist Tel..| — — - — 27 !31 -i —
Amer Express...! — — — — 147 jl» — -
•AM AUi:in*..l «Hs «ii «i' 8 1 * «» «ri *•»
*i» pr«f i 27V 27V, 27\ 27*i-27 } 2» as.
•Am Smelt & R.\ 41^; 42 :41 42 ; 4l»i 42 SCO-
Mo pref II :tt! 91 ; •2 »i ias ••••
American Spirits ', — I — I — ! — I 2| 4|
Am S;l & Wire. 1 57V 57*. 5P,' 57S 67V 37V « "18
do pr*f ! MW 9SV »3 ■ M f HZ '. 83>»i 33>
•Am Steel Hoop' 4«S «V, «4 4«V *>H! 4«j;, 2J»
•io pref ■ m\ V> . "«-»V **V MV -% «SS
•An Susor Rer.'loa : a lllU'lOU^'llCVlloVlll L 22.52*
•do pref | — I — ( — I — [113 1118 f —
Am Tel 4 Cabt^.i — — ,— — S*» jSW —
•Amer Tin i'latei 34H 34, 34^, 34V, 31 • 1 34V; 625
Mo pref j ft!!,! 82W »CV 92V SO t 83 I no
Amer T.-bacco. . il'JfeV l ! *> r -» '• > 7 l - I"7'— ' lu7 V ", 3D T7&
<Xo pref ;i36 i IZK ;X3G 13K j 13H |140 ! ■1
■Anaroaia , 44%' 44\ M% 4+S 44%- 4-Hii 325
Ana Arbor i — S — J — j — tIT II | .
<!» pref i 4«V 47 | 4«V: 47 ! 45U! 47 3S»
Arch Tcp *S F; 3>S 3*S 20u; a>»»' 2<>S i^Si 310
do pref i 63 ; «a ; B^S: tS%\ S^V "XT*' 3,229
•Amer Linseed.. j 10V, ISSi 15V: 15Vi 15^ li^' «25
•d.» pref : SJ«V &*\ i*V, S*V: 37V, "•» »>
•Amencaa Ice..: 42V 42V 42V. . 42V 42S 42"% *»
•vlo pref • 7SV T^ 1 * 75V 75V.! "8 j '*'-* ■
Ba:: &. .3Jiio ' «1V Bl", *nS «V' «** 61Vi 2.475
<Jo pref ; 7«V 77 : 78-, i 77 |77 I n* 1.700
EitNT.Upf;- i — i — ! — I<* I — i —
•B-k!ya lUp Tr. ; 73 ! 7TV 72S 73V: 73 : 73Ul fc«IO
B'klyn fn las. : HsV 1454 t4S lI4S ,14.V-,'130 m
Brenjwick C 0... — i — i — I — 12Vi 14
Euff R & Pitts. — — I — ! — 5"» : »
do pr-f I — ! — I — i — $*>"&«
Bur C R * Xor. ! — \ — I — ! — |1« ! —
Canada South... ' — ; — ; — j — 49 j 4&-.
Canadian PaclSci —!—!— — 06H »7 I
Capital Trac Co.* — ; — • — ' — _' J ■ j
Tentra! cf N J..117 117 ;1!7 '117 11-i :117 ] 1»>
Ch«^ & Ohio : »V 29'i^ 29H 2O», ! 2&», .•i 40©
Chic Bur & Qy. 124--- 124", 121* 124 ! - 12* V -•-» Z.7ZO
Chic G« Wwwrji 14 I 14 1 14 I 14 IT",: 14V «M>
d.. 4p c deb..: fc7V S*H' ST^jl BJB4 «7»» B*>i,] 225
do pref A i 77 i 77 1 77 1 77 j 77V T7V 10©
do pr«"f It i — : — I — — ! 4O"» ; 41 j
Chic Con Trac.l — ! — ! — - ! Jt ! W
Ch InJ A Lou:s. ' 16*.: ISH; l«*-a W-i' 1* ' I*4' 210
do pref ; __;_;_j47,4»| —
CSI Mil A St P.. 12=---'l=r» 1224 122V122H 122 »»! 6.12S
do prof — ' — i — i — '171W' 172 [
Chic & N-rtirw.; — I — ' — I — il« • 1«2 I
do pref i —•_'_;_ :is.«i ;an I
<~hic tt I i Pac. Htf<N 10«H 1*» :108: 108 ICB lIC9V 1-COS
Ch 5t I* M & O. : — — — : — 117 !119 I
in pref 173 172 172 172 !l7f> iISO J 200
Ch:c Terra & Tr. 12 : !2i- 12 : 12V H 5 -! 12 1 *' 22»
da pref ■ 3.S 139 i 33 i3B- (» I 3S^| 130
ccch &st v ecu 6OV eoVi «o^ ««i! cosl *»
do pref 1 — — I — I — 1«5 !l0» I
Cle-r L. & Wheel! — ! _____ %!
do pref i — i — ! — i — ! 54 : 54V
Ov .« Pitts irtdJ — — — — !1S« — j
C>l Ci I D Co. • — I — — — ! i%i a —
do pref ! — i — i — I — i 2V —
Co! Fuel & Iron.; 45V 45%: 43 i 43 * —44 46 X.GO
do pref < — ! — — ! — !1215, : 122 '
Colorado Mid.... 1 — ■ — ! — i — 1 V+\ 1O
do rref ! M : 28 \ 2S : XI ! 2h ' 2S~, 2W>
Cb:cra<lo ?oi:tli..! 5V 5U 1 Hi] 5V S«4 ."•S **
do Ist pref | 43 ; 43 ; _ 43 ! 42V 43 ! M
do 2d pref ! — j | — \ — — '.' [ '~t
[*H C * I.! — — — — 115 I — I
Co.ti Table ! — I — i — — i 165 I — '
Coajo'. Gas !193V1»4 193 193*4*133H 134 «\£6O
Cos Coa! cf SM. ' — I — ! — t — !45 ! — I
•Cent Tobacco...! 34 ! 34V 34 ! IUV 34' V 34^' 543
•■io pref ; SS\ K>?4 Ss*i sS^' 85V ST'V' 1»
Del & HudMJF...' — : — ' — ; —ill 113 j
Del Lack & \V.\ _____ !177 ;17»
Den * Klo Gr. .' a> 120 ' V**- 19%; !»>,' tß%] 3P-.
do pref ' 12% TT-.' 7T*' 7T-*' 71 \ 7r s | 1O
Cca If &Ft D..1 — i — I — ! — 13 118
do C ref j — ■_!_:— I SB f — {
•Dul So S 4 Atl! — ' _ 1 — t — I 4V »_
•do pref ' _ I — I — — 12^f 13V
Qjttth Aye Rj-.l — I — I — I — !375 1 400
Er'.e Rallrc-art. . . — ! — I — I — i 12=i ! 13
do Ist pref ! 36^ 3«>i 3«V 3«S; 37 i 37H[ 4H>
do 2.1 pref ,20:20\20 !20j » ' 2os»j US)
Cva.l9 & PH..!— ; — ! — : — '■ 47V 47V.
do pref I — I — ! — I — I ■.- V 93 |
Ert» T-l & Tel. llMnimovilO»4'llo%;lf»Vll"S 3*
Federal Steel....! ST.V CSHI 54V B»tt' 55V1 553»| 9,V»>
do pref ! 75V 73V 75 i 75 1 74V 75 I TIO
Oenera: Electric^ —:—!—!— IrSRiIET j
Glucose ! 57 .57 i 37 ! 57 I Srt** 57 387
da j>ref I — M — I _ I _ j .». I<>l {
G: Xorth«rn pf. 1139 V 158V 159V IS&V K!> '.!***• *25
il B C&Otn C 0..! — j — ! — ! ■— 111 l 113 1 .!
Hociir-s Valler-I — • — ' — I — I*• ****]
_*_■_« ! — —
Homeittalte I — }— t — i — •€3 — '
Illinois fe-.tral..!lUV U2V II2V M2V«- M - "' MO
do L#a«e.l Linei — ! — I — ! — ' SJ7 ;102 j
lat Pap<-r C 0..- 24 24 I 21 '24 ! 234 24V 10t>
dr, pr »f : — ■ — i — I — j m ' _«, —
•In: Silver — : — ; — I — I » : 1«»
I^w-a Ceatral '■ I2t» VS^\ 12',! 12H ! 12Vi 12 I*'1 *' 420
>'.o pref ! 54 ! 54 i 54 ! 54 ! 54 > 54V 320
Kana & Mich...! _____ 1*
iC <: P & G rctai — i — — i — 8 I 3
Keok & Dcs M. ! — ' — — i — 3 ! 4
■io pref I — I _ _ I — ils il7
•X A Pe-n Mnsr.l M I .50 .30 I .50 I — { — to<»
:-:n'-;lt - bcrker Ice! 37 -37 i 3tf I 36 I 32 j 4*> •i
do pre? : — — 1 — 1 — I*H I«M __ -
Lcdcde Gas i — ! — I _ ! — ! -- ! 79 —
t!o pr^f I— — I _ ! — !9« 110 l —
I. E A Western.! — ! — I — ! — ! ...
j.re' i «3 ! S5 ! 85 t 85 ! KSV _>
'... S « Mi-:?i So. ■ — ! — I — ! — U»4 i2lt> —
Lone Island ■ — ' — i — ' — i sft i 53 . __.
U,:::* 4 Nash...: 90% 50%: 90»i ; STi 1 S<>**' 91 4?*
••Jan Sea-'h ' — ' — ' — ! — I 7 i 10 -
I ill Cor] sref.rl — ! — ! — 1 — i K. ! 75 t
•Met Street Ry;|l7S»J 175'.17S 1179 ITS : 179 ! ; •»■ .
•Uet W B Hlei-.i _ I _' " ! — | — I 27ii; .- J
, _ - .
"-n.a- CeatrUl lTii 12! ii 12 ! 13 ! 12 1 12^* »TO
>tes Sat tr err.: — ! — i — ! — ! « I V*\ —
MtefciFU Cent-.i — i — ' — | — !IH> ' — [ —
V.:r.n ißt Loots] 64 V W'i! 64' i! «4 1 4' >K\ «>»} 2<»
in 2.1 rref i — I— 1— > — ! 83 ! 95 —
e«p.*ssm!,- — — ■ b%! is j
<:> pref I — ; — ; — ! _ '52 5« !
HoKan&T^x..: 1«»* 10% imf 10^' 1»V 1114 Jnft
io v~T ! MS I 335! 33 1 33i«: 33 \ 33\< *»
aOannti i-s.-!f,c. ! 4«i«l «S^l 40V 45" s *Z\- 46 j I■ I
Mobile & Ohio.. — ! — i — i — i 13* 44V
U rrta & EJsaex. _!_)._!_ IS4H'IS«»
•SaS r.s^iil. ...' 38>,» 35U.1 x«n,> Jg^ 35% 2V* 1 Sl*
•do rref ' 9-TV »3 7 /.i »=% S^, MV 95 ! IO
•Xatlona! !#ad..i — ' — ! — ! — I 2«V 27V
•dri pref ! — L— ; — ! — IXOS^ItM I
•rational Ste«:.! 4DH- *V% 4SV 49 ! 4*\ 43 I 5.890
•Jo pref ;9S'. 96 !96 !96 !JH '»7 j 1»
X»w Cer.: Coal, j - i — : _ ) — I SH ! +0
■51 T Air Braice^ — I — i — I — jl3O 133 —
N T C*H P.-.!l34 J 3'l34Vl34Vl34H';ia* t i'i3s arm
N'TO. *5t L! — ! — I — I — n i 13>,<
do Ist - -_- ! — I —I — I — I -. '73
d- 2d pref i _____ . ■
S T Lack _ — ■.! — ! - ! — f-r \tn US'! 1
V T N H _ H.I — I — ! — I — '212 .3M j
S V Oni & WVi 235! 23»ii 23S 1 23, 23. 23H' 77rt
Vorth Am» Co.! — i — t — ! — ' 14V« ; 14S! —
Norfolk * Weit.! 2SV- 2SV 2Sii ! 2*V i*V,' 2SV 4.210
d(» pr»f ! 72V! 72V. 72 V* 725 ! 72"»: 72V l.Slt>
>:.->rthem Pa-Mftc! BSWI 53 V s 52H' 53 153 ' Z3>+\ 3.22;>
do pref ; 74S' 73 ! 74-: 74V 74U 74\! 65«
c-.ta-;-> Mining, i — I — I — i — | » | 9 1
Pew Mar-.r-etts.| — I — i — I — J 1»V 21
d. pref — I — — — !33 ' «"»
Paciflc Coast ! — ! — ! — ■ — •' '■ " -
*o Ist prrf....' — ! — I — I — S3 !*5
5* 24 pref ' — ! — I — I — «3V- «4
Pmclfle lla.ll ! 41 !41 ! 40\\ 41 4f>\] 41H 1.433
•P.cr.sylvar.H .. 1.T3 !133 ! 13TV «2»i ' 132** 132% I L»O
•lo suh rct«. ..' — i— . — 1 — ;l"W.»i — J
Pe--. C. a! - — ' — ! — ! — 139" : — j "
Pocrla A EaM..: — , — — \ — *' *S;
IVo I»-c & E.v..' — ! — — I — I ...
P»o Ga» *C CH IfITTH 107H11C7 UC7 !r>7 '107 V. 1.250
•P AW Df nna,} -,!—!— ; — !l» 15
•• CCh& 5t L.J 69 i 69 I tSSV f CSV, <^* ;7* > am
PFt w"* C irtdj — i — f _ i _ !>«;;_
r-ess-d SU Car.: 55**1 55%! 55»»' ZZ\< 55^! 5* • ■
d-> pre? ' — i — •• — i — ; *7 ■ Ss
r -I! Palace Car. — ! — I — ! _ !l!« j 1W»
Cuicksllver ' — ' — i — ! — ! J'l 2H — — .
.'.» pref I — I — ! — 1 — ! 8 1 »>,
•Irepub I & Stl. 2i<-~> 24 r » 24V 24V 24V 24', MR
Mo praf ' «H. «»V^ e»V ! «&V> «* : «W ! 12
r.eadinjr ■ ~ ' — I — [— ' Il*I 1 * ! I*4!
«1> Ist pref I TjH t cn;t 55^ srt . 5« ' 5»,' 1.064
do 2J pref ! 2»^! 2S-V' 2S»V : 25%1 2S ! 23 40»
Ran At Sara I — ! — j — j. — !IW> ! —
R>.» Or W«»t.ra.'! — i — .'— i — ! 43 ! 50 .
4t» pref : — I — I — 1 — I «5 (90 — —
"a* W * u«..' — ! — 1 — I — : ■ ! — — —
.-:. t ;-:•; c .:«••. m mm
/..> Ist pref 1 — ' — i — f — 1 45 I 4tvV
d.> 2.1 pref ! — ! — 1 — I — I 15U I l«tj
- ■ :. .4 San Fr..' — j — ' — I — ! I«>H \(fi%
do Ist pref I — f — I — I — ( 68V 71
d. 2J pref * »V K^l ?~>\\ 33H 1 ST-Vj 3« 10ft
=t U.UI-. soutiiw' 11V ll'il iml HVi Jl»% l»fc WO
do pref •..; 27Si 27H! ST«i! 27V! 27V =S , 10©
.=Slver C\»rtf» '. — : — i — i — I 5W»i « I
Sixth At* Ry. ..! — — I — 1 — !20»> | —
P»C Co' 39 i 33 I SSV 3»\ ! Z»\l S^i *.4«3
Southern Ry X ;12 ! 11V 11T»' H T «! 12 Mi
do pref 50 ! M I 65V. 58 i 53V; s«»i S»
•"asdard R* TJ _ — I — S _ **! 9
Ter.n Cc»l & 1.. &5V 9^i' 9SH> JO\! KH\ «* •»
Ttxas & Pictfle.' I6V- IG\'< MS 1«S l«i 13* »©»
d-. Land Trust — < — I — : — i 13 ! 14 J
Th:r<l At* RR. 9S4lol»i' 98V 100 11 * 1 K*>V I^l 10.420
Tol * O Central: — : — ' — ; — J 20 I 23
<lo cref I — i — i — I — J 4O I 50
Tel Peo it West. 1 , — ! — — I — _ !— '
Tn-la Qty R Tr. I—l —I — — _ — '
•C s r.our AM. '— 1— 1— — — 20 I
•io cref ! — I — — — — { » .
- ■ ■
Mo praf — ! — ! — — 75*! TT-%\ -— -
Cataa Paciac.i BO ! SoY 43H? 4»%i 49V 5» t ASM
d.-> pref I 78V 7flS' 7t3V 78H 1 **"» 7"H "*>
C ■ Exprex _\_l— — i47i43
T 8 L**ther...i 1«V I«» J«l I'^i J«* IT*\ «•
•■to pref '7d 7d ! 75", ' 75% 75V *f« 4«O
C 9 Rubber ; — , _ i _ ! — 1 S7 I 38
dj pref UO2 ; 102 i 1OH» 101 't^^lolSi!lC2 ! ■
• W.ibiah I — i — I — ! — t T\»i 7V
.lo pref ! 21V 21HI 2OSI 3&\ ; 3l>V 21 t >00
Wrl!*-F»nri» ....I — ! — I — • — '123 12S I
Weft Vn! u n Te'.. ' K«i! «3\: S2H! M XT%- «'*! rs»
•Wr.^rl ALK..! 11 I 11*.' I(^' 11 1 |M * " I -. ...
■ * i
•U.. 2J pref....i M I ... 2* 1 27V 2S>» »•
•Win Cent n«w.. ' — ,_._;_: Ihi,- H»t,
•:... pn-f ! 3i»»l U 1 81 ! U ; U ! 53S ITS
Total mles f<* thy day 1tt7.3C3
•rn!!*ted.
UOXEY AXD MJCM [ v
MONEY RATES.— Money on mil, _S per coat
Thai money. *<_-V* per SSSM for sixty days, 4<MV&
9«r ■-<•><{ 'or three, four and six mon'.ns on railroad
collateral Commsreta. pa#ar. «<St sir «•&! Ist
5

xml | txt