OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 24, 1900, Image 12

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1900-02-24/ed-1/seq-12/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 12

' :./- IS
BAD TENEMENT HOUSE EVIL
COMMISSIONER KELLER SHOWS THAT
THEY COST THE PITY OVERMUCH.
KB SATS IT WOULD BE MONET SAVED FOB
CHARITIES AND CORRECTION TO CON
DEMN UNSANITARY ONES.
"The city should see to It that tenement houses
are made 60 healthful that persons who get sic*
In them need not be taken out In order to save
their liven: and the city should see to It that over
crowding In tho tenement houses should cease. in
order that those who must live in them may be able
to preserve their self-rspect. If the city would
epend a little more to prevent disease it would
save much that In now spent In curing sickness."
So cald John W. Keller. Commissioner of Char
ities, at the Tenement House Conference of the
Charity Organisation Society last night. Mr. Keller
had Leei Introduced as "a partial man and the best
Charities Commissioner New-York has ever had."
end the eubj?et allotted to him was "The City's
Duty Toward the Tenement House Question." He
carried the audience with him from first to last,
and his sentiments wore warmly applauded. Mr.
Keller said among other things:
I am not an expert In tenement house reform. I
do not know as much about tenement houses as l
wish I did. My interest in tenements did not de
velop until about two years ago. when I was ap
pointed Commissioner of Charities. Then so many
: persons from tenement houses applied to me for
help that they were forced upon my attention.
The city of New-York pays for public charities
about $5,000,000 a year. By far the greater part of
that large «=um Is expended on the hospitals, ex
pended in making sick people well. And those who
have to be cured through charity come mostly
from the tenement hcuses. It has occurred to me—
aside from th« question that It Is more humane to
prevent sickness than to cure — that if the city
should devote more money to stamping: out the
causes of sickness it would not have to spend so
much in counteracting- disease.
On Randall's Inland to-day I have something like
one thousand children from the tenement houses
and rr.arv of their mothers. All the hospitals of
my department are overcrowded. It is Impossible
even to keep the consumptives by themselves, as
Should be done. Now. why are so many New-
Yorkers ill and run down? People who live in
bouses where they can breathe good air and sea
the sun shine on their bedroom walls daily do not
come to me. but only those who live in the per
petual gloom of tenement houses. More than £0
per cent of my Juvenile wards are Jews from the
East Side, and most of them are suffering when I
get them either from sore eyes or sore heads.
What Is the city to do about it? It seems to me
It should first investigate the cause, and, having
found that, eradicate it. I am not a building ex
pert. It Is not for me to fix the rules for tene
ment house building, but it is for the city, by its
building code, to lix the law so that in future no
Improper tenement house can be built, and
wherever they have already been erected to con
demn them.
&S 'he tenement house produces disease on the
one haid, so it produces immorality on the other.
If there were more room and less crowding- in the
tenemen' houses there would be less of crime in
\v-Ynr'<. I state a general proposition, which
is that if the cause found in tenement houses, both
of disease and crime, were removed, the city would
have to spend much less for healing and for pun
ishing. I do not want you to think that I advocate
paternalism. By no means: but I think the city
should look upon this question as a business propo
sition, an economic proposition. And looking at It
thus it will be recognized as a paying investment
for the city to sir- that every tenement house is so
healthful that when a man gets sick in one it will
not !■' necessary to move him away in order to
save his life, and to see to it that the tenement
houses afford enough room and freedom from over
crowding to allow those who must live in them to
preserve their self-respect.
After the applause which followed Mr. Keller's
remarks had subsided Mrs. Roland C. Lincoln, of
Bofton. read a paper upon the advantages of hav
ing women collect the rentals of tenement houses
by personal visitation.
EAST BIDE FAMILY DOUBLED IX SIZE.
FOUR CHILDREN COME TO THE HOME OF FRAXK
WEIRD AND HIS WIFE AT ONE TIME.
The modest little butter and egg store at No. 250
Eaft Fourth-st. did not compete with its rivals last
evening. Frank Weird, Its owner, had locked the
door and gone out to seek a quW place for think
ing. At 11 o'clock in the morning his family had
suddenly increased from four to eight. Four hits of
babyhood — a idrl and three hoys — had come to his
three room fia.t, which is in the same building as
ills store.
One of the children has died, and it Is not prob
able that the others wll! live. They weighed
scarcely two pounds each. The mother is doing
Well. The neighbors ir. the block who heard of the
newcomers went to take a peep at them. The
babit-s were snugly wrapped in blankets before the
Stove.
This is the second case of quadruplets Dr. Fried
man has had in his practice. The others gave El
drtdge-M. some passing fame, but they were still
born. This physician has attended In the East
Side neighborhood the births of triplets at four dif
ferent times. One of these casts wa.s In Cannon
et. aiiout three years ago. and attracted wide at
tention among the medical fraternity. At the age
of five months the youngest underwent a surgical
operation, and afterward had pneumonia, but sur
vived br-th, and is now aliva. The others died of
dysentery.
"It Is in the crowded population of the East
Bide." Dr. Friedman says, "where there are at
least five hundred people in a block, that so many
of these uiiUKual Mr.ths occur."
"SMOKER' OF AX ACTIVE SOCIETY.
V XXVIITH APSEMBLT DISTRICT REPrBLICAN CLUB
f KNOWS HOW TO KNJOY ITSELF.
That active organization, the XXVIIth Assembly
District Republican Club, held its second "smoker"
of the season at its rooms, No. 767 Sisth-ave.. last
night. On March a it will have its second annual
dinner in the West Side Lyceum, at which Governor
Roosev. It will speak, and on March 23 It will give
a vaudeville performance in the same place. This
club has about four hundred members. Henry L-.
Btlmson. Elihu Root's law partner, is chairmm of
us Committee on Membership; Colonel W. G. Hates,
of the "Ist Regiment, is its House Committee chair
man; James TV. Perry, the district leader, is chair
man of its Committee on Political Action; Walter
G. Oakman, vice-president of the newly Incor
porated Rapid Transit Subway Construction Com
pany, is r.ne of its ex-presidents, and Assemblyman
Oherardi Davis is the chairman of Its Finance Com
mittee.
!Ehe feature of tho "smoker" last night was a dis
play of s=tereopiW,n pictures of Army life in the
Fhiiipp'neir. accompanied by a running le.ture upon
them by the men who took the photograph** on
the spot, Messrs. Andreae and Reeves, formerly of
the I'nited States Signal Corps. Refreshments were
served after the lecture. The attendance was large
of the club are: President, M Dwight
Collier; first vice-president. Richard J. Lewis- sec
ond vir-e-presidont, B. Aymar Sands; third vice-
Sresidr-r.i. j. Bayard Backus; recording secretary
opeph Oatman; corresponding secretary, William'
C. Wilson: treasurer. Henry W. Taft, and serg^ant
at-arms. Patrick Nulty
TROLLEY CAR PASSEXGERS SHOCKED.
ELEfTRirjTT IN THE WET FLOOR— ONLY TH^SE
INSILATFD BY RI.BBERS ESCAPE.
Chif-apo, Feh. 25.— Fifty passengers on a Halstead
et. stoetfte -ar w«^re shocked by electricity last
evening. A panic followed, but nobody was seri
ously h'jn. Two pai-M-iiiErers felt the effects for
some time after, but w«-r«- able to move about
Ftancf. At Polk-st. the passengers
wearing rubbers werr- niUHfcM to see the others
suddenly jumping about. Conductor Crawford was
collecting fares when he leaped from the floor and
said that netdles were passing through his legs.
The floor of the car had become thoroughly
ooaked with water, and na4a a good conductor
for the etectrtcftjr. Wom.-n and children felt the
shock, and were panic-gtrioken when sevwml m. n
*«(■ thrown from th. -ir fceC The car w;is stopped
by aome one pulling the trolley pole from the wir<\
cutting off th<- electricity. An Investigation showed
thi t thr- insulation of a — 4 re connected with
th<- h«-atir.K apparatus had fallen off, allow
ing 'tif- coppei wire tn come in contact with tht
water-eoaked floor.
FJ 1.-HARO'S MOTHER MAY SEE HIM TO-DAY.
The mother of Antor.lo Ferraro, who will be ex
ecuted Monday morning, is expected to visit h*-r
son at King Sing Prison to-day. Ferraro says he
Is tiot afraid to die, and will receive no spiritual
consolation from clergymen. The other condemned
men in th<- prison know thit the hour for Fer
rarc'a ex. cation has been «-t, and they dread the
time when he will be told to get ready for the
electric chair.
QUEENS AND RICBMOSD TEACHERS' PAY.
The Board of Estimate yesterday voted $117,000
to Queeng and $43,000 to Richmond to make up
deficiencies In the ecboo! funds of last year, so
thai the teachers of these boroughs can get the
calaxies long overdue. The remainder of the bual
s«u w&a routine.
~Afosolutely Pure —
For the third of a century the stand
ard for strength and purity. It makes
the hot bread, hot biscuit, cake and other
pastry light, sweet and excellent in every .
quality.
No other baking powder is "just as
good as Royal," either in strength, purity
or wholesomeness.
Many low-priced imitation baking powders are upon the mar
ket. These are made with alum, and care should be taken to
avoid them, as alum is a poison, never to be taken in the food.
HOME NEWS.
PROMINENT ARRIVALS AT THE HOTELS.
ALBEMARLE— Dr. J. W. Bond, of Providence.
HOLLAND— Charles S. Hamlin, of Boston, and ex-
Congressman James W. Wadsworth, of Gender.
HOFFMAN— Assemblyman Louis Bedell, of Goshen,
N. T.. and Norman E. Mack, of Buffalo. MAN
HATTAN—WiIIiam McEchron, of Glens Falls, and
G. S. Quincy, of Boston MARL-BOROUGH— J.
Frank Supplee, ex-Mayor of Baltimore. NETHER
LAND—James J. Hill, president of the Great
Northern Railroad. WALDORF— Edwin S. Cramp,
of Philadelphia; State Senator Frank W. Higplns,
of Olean, and State Senator T. E. Ellsworth, of
Lockport.
WHAT IS GOING ON TO-DAY.
Congress Postofflce Committee, Board of Trade
and Transportation. 10:30 a. m.
Intercollegiate Athletic Association, Fifth Avenue
Hotel. 2 p. m.
Princeton Club reception, clubhouse, evening.
College of the City of New-York Alumni Asso
ciation dinner, Hotel Savoy, 7 p. m.
Tenement House Conference, Sherry's. 8:30 p. m.
Actors' Fund meeting, noon.
Physical Education Society. No. 308 West Fifty
nlnth-st., 8:15 p. m.
NEW-YORK CITY.
The Rev. James A. O'Connor, of Christ's Mis
sion, this city, has been Invited by the Presby
terian Ministerial Assr elation of Montreal to con
duct a series of meetings In that city, beginning
to-morrow.
Governor Charles S. Thotnns of Colorado called
on Mayor Van Wyck and Presi l^nt Guggenheimer
of the Council at the City Hal! yesterday.
The thirty-second anniversary of the Harlom
Branch of the Young Men's Christian Association.
No. 5 West One-hundred-and-twemy-flfth-st., will
be celebrated on Monday at S:ls p. m. J. H. Can
neld, librarian of Columbia University, and Will
iam H. Sage will speak.
Eight of the twenty-four young men who took
the competitive examination yesterday for an ap
pointment to West Point from the Vlllth Con
gress District, represented by Congressman
Rlordan, stood the test. They will now take an
examination at West Point, after which the suc
cessful competitor will be announced.
Elijah P. Brown. "The Rams Horn" man, will
tell of his conversion from Infidelity to Christianity
to-morrow at the West Side Auditorium, No. 318
West Fifty-seventh-st.. at 4 p. m. Miss Carrie
Bridewell will sing.
A. Henry Savage Landor will deliver for the
third time In this city his Interesting Illustrated
lecture on "The Forbidden Land of Thibet" In
Mendelssohn Hall on Friday evening, March 2.
Elbert Hubbard. Editor of "The Philistine," au
thor and maker of rare books, and owner of the
Roycroft shop, in East Aurora, N. V., will make
his first appearance in New-York a.c a lecturer in
the Astor Gallery of the Waldorf-Astoria on Fri
day evening, March 9. His subject will be "The
Work of the Roycrofters."
The Rev. Julian K. Smyth, pastor of the Church
of the New Jerusalem. Thirty fifth St . east of
Park-aye.. will preach to-morrow morning on "The
Bible Account of the Fall of Man: Is It True? Is
It Immoral?" A series of midweek services is to
be held at this church on Wednesday afternoons
at 4 o'clock, beginning on February 28.
A delegation from the National Sculpture Society
called on President Guggenheimer of the Council
yesterday and presented to him a portfolio con
taining a series of prints of the Dewey Arch,
erected during the celebration.
The Rev. Dr. Donald Sage Maokay will deliver a
lecture on "Scottish Life and Humor" before tho
Amity Guild of the Knox Memorial Church, No.
405 West Fcrty-flrst-st.. on Tuei-day evening at 8
o'clock.
AX ARMISTICE IX XEW-ROCHELLE.
PEBTHOUSE OPPONENTS SAY TUB OWNER OF THIS
PROPERTY WILL INTERFERE.
The persons who have been opposing the build
ing of a smallpox hospital In the Jerusalem Woods,
In New-Roehelle, have agreed to an armistice.
They say that J. E. Stohlmunn, of No. 4f,S l'e:irl
st., Manhattan, ownn the property. He objects to
his tenant's subleasing it to the Board of Health
for building a pesthouse, and Intends to break his
lease, which contains a clause that no trees shall
be cut or buildings erected on the property with
out the consent of the owner. Health Oflirer Peck
said yesterday that if Hiich action were taken, the
Health Board or Common Council could have the
property condemned und appropriate It to their
use.
The pavilions will be completed to-day, and the
two colored persons who have smallpox will be re
moved to them. Some of the residents of Jeru
salem are making threats that, in spite of the
armistice, the carriage containing the patients will
never reach the hospital.
The people of New-Rochelle are Indignant at the
reports that there are twelve cases of smallpox In
the city. Dr. Peck said positively yesterday that
there were only two casea, and that the three
other colored persons who were exposed to th«
disease on January 28 were not likely to take It, an
the disease usually develops within fourteen Uaya
after exposure to H
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUTE. SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 24. 1900.
ROYAL BAKING POWDER CO., 100 WILLIAM ST., NEW YORK.
WESTCIIESTER COUNTY.
SING SING.
The primary of the Republican party for the
nominations for village officers will be held to
night. The Democratic primary is called for Mon
day evening.
MOT' NT VERNON.
Charles H. Heinsohn. who lately resigned as chief
of the Mount Vernon Fire Department, married on
Wednesday night Misp Emma Malnati. The cere
mony took place at the home of the bride's sister,
Mrs. Morgan Oakley, No. 38 South Seventh-aye.
PORT CHESTER.
The police here have a suspicion that a band of
thieves has been operating In Port Chester and in
Brooklyn Horses and vehicles have been the
favorite plunder of the thieves, but th°y have also
taken robes, harness and other articles. Nearly a
dozen horses and wagons have b<»en stolen recently.
BEDFORD.
The funeral of Glriron Reynolds, who died at
Long Ridge on Thursday, will be held at hlB
mother's home In Bedford Village to-day nt 2
o'clock.
MOUNT KISCO.
The marriage of Miss Ada Garrison to Mortimer
Cronk. both of this village, which took place sev
eral months ago, has just been announced to their
friends.
WHITE PLAINS.
Surrogate Sllkman has approved the will of
Jotbam Tompkins. who died last fall, leaving all his
property to his physician in Greenwich, Dr. J. J.
Burnell. The will was contested by the Miss.s
I "mpkins, of White Plains, on the ground of
unf J" e .lnfl»pnre. It is expected that an appeal will
in- Bled in a few days.
MOLISEUZ STUDIES TESTIMONY.
MR. WKKKS DORS NOT KN"f>W WHBX PETITION FOR
HBW TRIAL WILL BE MADK.
Roland B. Molineux yesterday spent nn unevent
ful day in his cell in the condemned men's quar
ters at Sing Sing Prison. He read and studied the
testimony takon to him on Thursday by his father.
He applies himself diligently to that task. The
prison authorities .«ay that the most of the testi
mony that Molineux has Is that given at the trial
by Harry Cornish.
Nothing is known at the prison of any change
to be made in Molineux's counsel In the procedings
for the new trial. Bartow S. Weeks said yesterday
that he did not know when the petition for the
new trial would be presented to the Court of Ap
peals. The application, however, would not be
made for several weeks, as the case could not be
ready for the printer before a month.
General Molineux arrived in Sing Sing last even
ing and visited his wife and daughter-in-law at the
Miller house.
Cornelius V. Collins. State Superintendent of
Prisons, was at the prison yesterday afternoon on
an Inspection tour and visited the condemned men.
He stopped at Mollneux's cell and asked the prison
er how he was getting along. Molineux said that
he was as happy as a man could b*> in his place
It was the first time that Mr. Collins had seen
Molineux.
BOY DISAPPEARS M 7777 BAVK CHECKS.
Thomas Bain, a merchant at No. 532 West Twen
ty-second-st., gave his office hoy. Bert Phillips, fif
teen years old. $175 In checks yesterday afternoon
to deposit at the Gansevoort Bank, Fourteenth-st.
and Nlnth-avf. Tho boy disappeared. A general
police alarm wan sent out for him.
THE FIRE RECORD.
WISCONSIN VILXJU3B NF.ARI/V DKSTRiiYEI)
Baraboo, Wis., Fab, at.— Beren business houses
were destroyed by Bre at Wonewoe to-day. For a
tim>- it seemed probable that the entire village
would be burned. The loss amounts to $80,000.
GIRLS KNKANGEKKD IN l'K< >V IDKNCE.
Providence, R. L, FH>. 23.— Fire broke out under
a counter on the ground floor of the Paris House,
the big store of I-. I) Newell & Son, at Westmin
ster anil Eddy sts., at 2:3'> p. m., and spread almost
Instantly through the four stories of the building.
The glriH in the upper stories barely escaped sav
ing a f-w Of their personal eff.*-t«>. The loss Is
estimated at $100,000,
MASONIC TEMPLE BURNED.
I^ondon, Onl., Feb. 23.— Masonic Temple here
was destroyed by fire to-day. The Great Northwest
ern telegraph office, Shea's wholesale liquor store,
the head office of the Northern Lire Assurance
Company, Parke & Puniem, barristers; Routh
Brothers, C. F. Turner and F. 11. Butler, brokers;
Keene's Furniture Company, the Orand Opera
House, R. O. Dun & Co.'s and the Dominion I*. an
and Savings Company's place, are all In ruins. The
loss will bo near)/ {200,000.
RAILROAD INTERESTS.
D., L. AND W. MEETING.
At a meeting yesterday of the newly elected
Board of Managers of the Delaware, Larkawanna
and Western Railroad Company the resignation of
E. R. Holden as vice-president and sale agent wa6
accepted, to take effect on March 1. but his suc
cessor was not chosen. Samuel Sloan was re
elected chairman of the Board.
CODMAN'S OPPOSITNON WITHDRAWN.
Boston. Feb. 23.— "The Transcript" this afternoon
prints an Interview with President Cod roan of the
Fitchburgr Railroad, in which the president aaya
that he has decided to give up the attempt to op
pose favorable action by the stockholders of the
road upon the proposition to lease the Fltchburg
to the Boston and Maine. Mr. Codman «ays that
his action is due to a belief that the State's common
stock will be voted In favor of the lease, and that
there could not be a sufficient number of preferred
shares s -cured to overcome the effect of so heavy
a vote supporting the change.
STOCK OF NORTHERN CENTRAL. INCREASED.
Baltimore. Feb. The annual meeting of the
stockholders of the Northern Central Railway was
held in the company's offices to-day, and ratified
the proposition to increase the number of shares
frcm 150.362 to 240,000. at $50 par value a share. By
this action the capitalization of the company Is
Increased from J7.5i5.i00 to $12,000,000. It is proposed
to allot the new stock to the amount of 50,000 shares
to the present stockholders at the rate of one-third
of their holdings, at $70 a share. This will realize
$3,500,000, which, with $430,000 now In the hands of
the company, will be sufficient to pay off the $1 126,
dSeTu?/* 86 dUe Apr " *■ and the -' m - 000 mortgage
The directors «- Ie ted were A. J. Cassatt, John P.
Green Harry Walters. J. D. Cameron, Luther S
Bent N. Parker Shortridgr*. Charles E. Push SI
U tV not ' i U: yi V* M / cVe a * . Michael Jenkins. R
M, Prevost, A. Loudon Snowden and B. F New
comer The Board organized and elected V J
Cassatt president; John P. Green, first vice r>r«.«i
dent; ( harks *&H& H Push, second vice-president: t
M. Prevost. third vice-president; Samuel Rhea.
fourth vice-president; Stephen W. White secretary^
and A. W. Hendrix. treasurer. secretarj,
PLATEGLASS SHOWER AT THE BRIDGE.
TWO PANES FROM A TWELFTH STORY WINDOW
DASHED TO THE ROADWAY.
A larpe sheet of plateglass. a quarter of an Inch
thick, came crashing down against the curb at the
entrance to the south roadway of the Bridge at
Park Row at 7 o'clock last night. Large and small
pteces of glass slid and bounded along in all di
rections, scattering as far as the stairway in the
centre of the approach.
The astonishment of the police and pedestrians
had only begun when another light of the same
kind of glass came down in nearly the same spot
Policeman Butler, who was on post, as well aa
every one who heard the crashes, ran to. cover
under the structure, and looked up to try to see
where the shower came from
Butler learned that the two panes of glass two
feet square, had been blown out of a window on
the twelfth floor of the Pulitzer Building at No °1
Park Row. One of theae had been already cracked
and was patched up with paper. Nobody was hurt.
BURGLAR F/.YD.ST SAFETY IX A BALOOX.
WALL STREET BROKER ALLEGES THE PROPRIE
TOR PROTECTED A MAN WHO ENTERED
HIS HOME.
Charles H. Bonn, a Wall-st. broker, called at
the West Thlrty-seventh-st. police station last
night, and said he had just surprised a burglar In
his home, at No. 154 West Thlrty-eighth-st. He
gave chase, and said the man took refuge In a
saloon at Seventh-aye. and Thlrty-elghth-st. The
proprietor of the place gave the thief a refuge, and
declared no man could arrest him while in his sa
loon. A detective was sent to investigate. The
matter was also referred to the police of the West
Thlrtieth-st. station, as the house is in the Nine
teenth Precinct. Mr. Itenn said It was not the first
time his house had been entered by thieves In the
last few weeks.
Announcements.
E. & W. . Drtf.s Shirts. E. & W.
Linen of special weave.
Muscular pains, eruptions, burns and all skin afll'e
tlonn cured by OREVrVS OINTMENT. •««•<»-
PARKER'S HAIH BALSAM la life to the hair.
MAR IN E INTELLIGENCE.
MINIATURE ALMANAC.
Sunrise B:4O|9unßet 6:47 Moon risen a m 2:49|Moon'a age 24
HIQH WATER.
A.M.— Sandy Hook 2:22 Oov. Island 2:54! Hell Qate 4:43
P.M.— Handy Hook 2!401Q0v. Island 8:18|Hell Gate .V.i>7
IXGOMING STEAMERS.
TO-DAY.
Veesel. From Una.
Thomaa Anderson... Gibraltar. February »....«....———
Munchen Bremen. February 11 N O Lloyd
lvydtn* «i Ehlelda, February 8 Norton
Just to "top-off" with—
An Oxford Derby Hat
. Popular gray — the newest hat idea.
All the Spring shapes of black derby s.
Blue Pearl Alpines f $3*
.;', Heweat Spring Overcoats— ready,
$10.00 to $30.00.
Stores open this evening.
Three ~ „ , _
BROADWAY Cor. St.
CKUAJJWAY Cor. Canal St.
Stores. Near Chambers,
181 BROAD WAV
688 BROADWAY.
723 SIXTH AVENUE
I|sr^ V m T*s pNE Furniture
. ODD CHAIRS— RARITIES.
Here and there in our grand gathering are
pieces so unique that no connoisseur can pass
them lightly by.
Notice this Roman chair, with double cres
cent form— the seat and arms and upturned arc,
the supports downward curving.
Or this bit inlaid with pearl, rarest of chair
gems; or this Henri Deux chair. Any of them
would be a delightful addition to your room.
Bargain time now.
"BUY OFTHB MAKES'*
Geo. C.FLint Co.
a -43. 45 and 47WEST23?ST^
* NEAR BROADWAY.
FACTORY: 154-jANO 156 west l9?STRcrr
"Greatest Trunk Corner
la America."
HAMILTON'S
«3D ST. A 6TH AT.
Buy Trunks Where
Tranks Are Made
S TBARS" GUARANTEE
WITH EACH TRUNK.
Kansaa City Savannah. February 16 Savannah
Menantlc Lelth. February 9 Manhanset
Colorado Hull, February 10 Wilson
Wells City Bwansea. February 9 . ..Bristol City
Pennsylvania. Hamburg. February 13 Hamb-Am
San Marcos. Oalvejton. February 17 Mallory
Buffon St Lucia, February 17. Lamport & Holt
H 'inner St Lu<Ma. February 17. Lamport A Hr.lt
Comanche Jacksonville February 21 Clyde
Thlnsvalla Christlan-.and. February 9..Scand-Am
Florida Dantzlc, February 7 Cosmopolitan
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26.
La Normaxdle Havre, February 17 French
Rotterdam Rotterdam, February 15 .Hol-Am
Alexandra Copenhagen. February 8 Seand-Am
El Norte New-Organs, Februi>-y 2© Morgan
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2ft.
Kurrachee Gibraltar. February 8 Union Clan
Flowergate Gibraltar. February 8 .. BarbS
Barlby Gibraltar. February 12
Abana St. Lucia, February Ib'.V.V.W.
OVTGOIXG STEAMERS.
TO-DAT.
Vessel. For. Una. Malls close. Vessel Balls.
Campania. Liverpool. Cunard 8:30 am 12:00 m
Aller. Naples. N G Lloyd V. 9:00 a m 11 00 am
Spaarndam. Rotterdam. Hol-Am 8:00 am lO^Oara
Phoenicia. Hamburg. Hamb-Am 1230 Dm
Mesaba. London. At- Trans ft : ooam
Marengo, Newcastle, Wilson _ B
British Queen, Antwerp. Phoanlx
Mexico. Havana. N V A Cuba 11:00 am 1:00pm
de *\, Haytl. Atla " 1000 a m 12:00 m
Adirondack. Kingston. Atlas 10.00 a S 1200 m
Maracalbo Puerto Rtco. Red D 11:00 am 1:00pm
NeustHa, Naples. Fabr* v
SSZSLJZLFV*' Lamport * H01t.... T:0O am 9KX>am
Algonquin. Charleston. 0yde!... "..1 1100 am iooSS
Algonquin. Charlei,ton, Clyde. . . . .! !. _ m l™*™
Louisiana. New-Orleans. Cromwell.... 8 : ouom
Lampasaa. Galveston. Mallory 8 00 r»m
El Monte. New-Orleans. Morgan JjioOpS
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20.
Sobralens*. Para, Re,! Cross _
TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 27.
Commanche, Charleston. ClvJe.... __» .j«-_
El Mar. New-Orleans. Morgan....;::; InO m
Pretoria. St. Kltts 12:30pm li|» p m
SHIPPIXG NEWS.
PORT OF NEW- YORK. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 23. 1000.
ARRIVED.
wuh #a^f r El:r :' ipnn . <Br) - rtl0 ' London Februsxy S.
£%?££ .° 3% "p'ra Oc Tnai^ on Company. ArrlvS
c.e e rn e .rr u Al:er (Ger) - Petermann. Bremen February 18
and Southampton U. with mds«, 112 cabin and 883
ateetac ■ paw nFerS tO Oeirtchs & do. .arrived at the BaJ
at 4 . i.» 111 1 mi.
Steamer Th rnhili (Br). Annlson. hence February 21 for
Havre and Dunkirk, with general mdse. Returned to
£!•» fr>r 7 v'"'v '"' having sprung a leak In No 1 tank.
b^Va?e k r : "a^ rr:<r L'S»iK«d totatt * oon " ldor
Steamer Parana (Br>, Enrlght. Madeira, February 8, In
ballast l passenger to Norton & Son. Arrived at th«
ivir txx. o a m.
iK Ste l L Kln(c Fr r, tlerlck <Br). Baker. Prorrefo February
18. with hemp to w D Munaon. Arrived at the Bar at
4 a m.
Steamer Belvernon <Xor>. Xanvn, Port au Prlnc* Feb
ruary 7 Petit Goave and Mlragoane 8. Jeremlo 9t Aux
Caves 11, Jacmel 12. Santa Maria l« and Inagua 13. with
fruit and 1 passenger to United Fruit Company. Vessel
to the Cameron Se> Co. Arrived at the Bar at 12:20
p m. ™ ™
Steamer El Mar. Boyd. Orleans February 17 with
mdse to J T Van Sickle.
Steamer Catania. McDonald. Mobile February 18. with
mdse to Hollander Ss Co.
Steamer Evelyn. Parse, Norfolk with coal to Miller
Bull A Knowlton.
Steamer Hamilton. Boas. Norfolk and Newport News.
with md.«e and passengers to Old Dominion Ss Co.
Sandy Hook. N J. Feb 23. 9:30 p m— Wind no" .west.
twenty-eight miles; cloudy.
SAILED.
Steamers Astoria (Br), for Glasgow; Ardandearg (Br).
Singapore, etc; Princess Anne. Norfolk and Newport
News; Colorado. Brunswick: Marengo (Br). Newcastle E;
Dawn' (Nor). Progreso.
THE MOVEMENTS OF STEAMERS.
FOREIGN PORTS.
Lizard. Feb 23. 12:08 p m— Passed, steamer La Gas
cogne (Kr) Poncelet. New- York for Havre.
Dunnet Head, Feb — Passed, steamer He<kla (Dan),
Thomsen. New-York for Copenhagen, etc.
Hamburg, Feb 23 — Arrived, steamers Patricia (Qer>
Lelthauser. New York; Feb a, Astrakan (Br). Davies
New- York.
Copenhagen, Feb — Arrived, steamer Nicola! II (Dan).
Mlchelsen New-York.
Rotterdam. Feb 22— Sailed steamers Deutschland
(Gen. Bchlerhorst, York; Maa^dam (Dutch). Hakker
New York.
Havre, Feb 23. midnight — Arrived, steamer La Oas
cogne (Fr). Poncelot, New-York.
Paulllac, Feb 20 — Sailed, steamer Bordeaux (Fr), Blan
qul (from Havre), New-York.
St Vincent, C V, Feb 22— Arrived. steamer St Dunstan
(Bri. Fortay". New York, for I'ape Town. elt\
Ponta Ferrarla. Feh 23 — Passed eteamer Trave (Ger),
Chrlstoffers. New-York, for Naples and Genoa.
Fayal, Feb 23 — Arrived, steamer Lord Warwick (Br),
Rawllng, Genoa, etc, for New- York.
Snares, Feb 21 — Passed, steamer Thordla (Nor). Wll
helmsen. New-York for Singapore, etc.
Gibraltar. Feb 23. l» a m— Arrived, steamer Columbia
(C.en, Vogelge^ang. New-York for Naples and Genoa
(and proceedeu).
Genoa, f^> 23— Arrived, steamer FUrst Bismarck (Ger).
Barends. New- York, via Naples; Fv-ti 21, sailed, steamer
Marco Mtnghettl I Itali. for New-York.
Naples. Feb 21 — Arrived, steamer Tartar IVlnce (Br).
McFarlane, New-York, via st Michaels.
Messina, Feb lfl — Sailed, steamer Roblnla (llr). Lash.
New-York.
Malta. Feb 22 — Passed, steamer Agnpanthua (Br).
Davits. Calcutta, etc, for New-York.
Smyrna, Feb — Sailed, steamer Cabral (fir). Kelly.
New- Tors,
Cape Town. Feb 18 — Arrived, steamer Auchenarden
(Br), Peat, New-York, via St Vincent. C V.
Manila. Feb 23 — Arrived, ship Ellen A Read (Br).
("linn, Ncwcaatlo. N ■ W.
Coronel, Feb 22 — Sailed, steamer Queen Margaret (Br).
Carrie. New-York.
Para. Feb 21 — Arrived, steamer Cametenso (Br), M" -
Ktnile, New-York.
3t ' Lucia. Feb 21— Passed, steamer Betlanoch (Br>.
Robertson, Me Janeiro for New-York
LIVERPOOL COTTON MARKET.
Liverpool. Feb. 23, 4 p. m.— CottiKi— Spot quiet; prices
IV SIM higher; American middling fair. sHd: good middling.
5 S lrt-1. middling. &<*d: low middling. sd, good ordinary.
4 IS lid: ordinary, l\.|. The sales of the day were S,m«>
bales, of which 00 wore for speculation and export and
included 7.2 i») American. Receipts. 13,000 bales. Includ-
Ing 12.000 American. Futures opened and closed steady
at the advance. American middling I in c February,
9 2 tWd seller*; February and March, 4 63.A44 sellers:
March and April, 4 60-446 seller*. April and May, 4 50-«4d
a-mnacmcntgi
EMPIRE TH RATH E. "~~ ITwar i j-. v "*
MATINEES TO-DAT * WBDXBBDAT 8l *
BROTHER OFFICERS
SXiS.-.' CRITERION THEATRE, *"**«|g
Matinees To-day A Wednesday at 2:1.*, *"^
Claude Adams 1 The Little Minister.
GAR RICK the AEN &.*\£**m
Wm. Gillette ,£ >i!! y , Sherlock Holmes.
MADISON SQ.l&ir^S?^*^
MATINEES TO-DAY & WEDNESn^" 1 - 2:U>
CO., DRESSMAKERS
GARDEN THEATRE. 27th-.t. A Ma,l|, OB . aT *
_._ ' niirge>t Kind of a Hlt."-R>raM. c
Chart" 7:40. MATS. TO-DAY A WED. t«
Charles Frohman'a HFSPTC SI7E" ini'iiim.
lit tii Production, HEARTS ARE TRUMPS.
nil I Y'Q } ' vv * aoth st At '**
UAL I l^ T)rln; "l ta**4ajr ft "? Manar-r
■"■" ■ *# Matinees WerJne^day A Saturday... 2?ti
!The new society play, "ta 4
acts, by John O|lv»r H-iM**,
wl-h the full strength of f. vr.lti
Frohman's Stock Company
THE AMBASSADOR
LYCEUM " ■• Aye *■*>•"»•«■•■ -*■£.
I f IjtlllTa l>:1 " 1 '* 1 I'n'l'mnn >i =P .
*■ ■ **»**IIIMATINEKSTm:r{SDAT*BAT..2 14*
CHARLES VROHMAN PRESENTS
THE SURPRISES OF LOVE.
•••Next >londny, Charles Krnhmnn'a London
Comedy Co. In "MY DAt'CHTER-IN-LAW.*
iMT DID HI 42d St. A 9th Aye. —CASTLE SQ. OP. COL
AmhnluAN mat. to-day. MASCOT
Prices 25. 50. 75. 11. NEXT WEEK— RIGOLETTO. *
ACADEMY OF MUSIC. Hrh St. A Irving PL
&£ I "WAY DOWN EAST"
Prices 2J-50-75-1.00. Mats. To-.lay & HV,., 2. Eve.. 8:1(X
bijou I AUNT £~£ ~
A CREAT I A Triumph Artistically Musical.
?."/,,>.. J HANNAH iS
BROADWAY* THBATRHL 41 St. A B'wa/
OTOR.AT " U S^? A VrTO^
success ±3-£j_CSr -IE3. U JbC.
CARNEGIE LYCEUM.^)
Tuesday Afternoon. Fob. 27. at 3:30
ERNEST SETON-THOMPSON.
"I'ERSO.VAI.ITV OF WILD A.MMALS."
CASINO ! LAST WEEK Dot Onej
TIIK LAST MATINEE
PRINCESS CHIC! TO-DAY! tOM t
« 1 THE WOBI.D I* WAX. *
I EDEt New Groups To-day.
I MISKK. I The Wonderful CINEMATOGRAPH
♦ ■*• Hear the Neapolitan Orchetra
s»y, m THEATRE. B way and 28th 8U
OlJryXJ' Fv*s.. 8:13. Mats. W»l. & Sat.. 2:13.
«r ■•'•* LAST MAT LAST NIGHT.
M'IL.IL.IE: PIPL
NEXT ' li/^n irCI/ A I Assisted by
MONDAY. ! MUUJboKA. ! JohnE. Keller*.
Hon.. Tues. A Wed. Bvgs. and Wed. Mat.. "Mary
Stuart"; Thurs.. Fri. A Sat. Kvga.. "Marie Antoinette"!
Sat. Mat.. "The Ladles' Battle." Seats on sale.
-
SPSrSI IN OLD KENTUCKY. **
HOtSE.S Nxt. Wlc— Rogers Bros. In Wall St.
HAMMERSTEIN'S. UIPTfIDIA LAST WEEK,
42d St.. B'way & 7th aye. f 10 I Unlfl Ev.8:30. Mat.To-daj.
i-So Smoking or Slinking at Matinees.
CHRIS AM) THE WO.NDEHFI'L LAMP.
."Or. | Admission to Promenade | oOc.
mSSHkm SSH k \ NAM'SELLE 'AWKINS
feb. go. \ ™th JOSEPHINE HALL.
HERALD I MATINEES TO-DAT * Wad.
theatre:. I DAVID I NAUGHTY ANluOril
THEATRE, i BELASCO'S HAUOiI I I AN IBW
Monday. March 6. MADAME BUTTERFLY.
HARLEM [ HENRY .MILLER j 8:18.
OP. HOT ! In The Only Way. | Mat Tit-tag?
Nxt. Wk. : Andrew Mack in The Last of th* R->hao% •■
IRVIN(t PLACE THEATRE. Mat. Tb-&^
"ALSJCH WIEDEBKAM" 1 ££&
KNICKERBOCKER. Ev.8:20. Mat. ATo-dayJjsi*
N. C. GOODWIN iK^^^sSk
MAXINE ELLIOTT | Ws^&33B*W $^&338*
_ Henri French, Ida Fuller. The Oil lan a.
Truly Shattuclc. Arthur Nelstone A Minnie Abbey, othaosi
MATINEE TO-DAY. Gen. Adm.. 50c "*~*^-
U C ITU'S Continuous Pcrfonnaaoth
IV C. IIH IN MR - & MR;S - SIDNEY DREW.
«■■■ ■ ■■ W THORNE A CARLETON
BLANCH RING. DOLAN 4 LE.VHA?.r.
SMITH A COOK. COMBO* A McDOy AUX
H,GHCLis%\A*Bt*VVVt>tV»k"m*rtK\it.^VtVi<.V
t.iMAt steaiacoMCtA'WM'xujfc&aik&LtMuuß&i^.
METROPOLITAN OPERA HOT'SB
GRAND OPERA SEASON IS6&-1900
Under the Direction of MR. MAURICE GR4TT
TW» Aft. at 2. L'AFRICAINE. Mme*. Nordica" and
Clementine De Vere; MM. Scottl. E ■'. da Reszke Plaa
ooa and Cornubert (debut). ~ *
To-ni»ht at S. at Popular Prices. AID.V Mmes. Emma
Same* and Olitzka; MiL Perottl. Dufrlohe and. Cam
panarU
Bun. EV'g. Feb. 23. at — GRAND POPULAR CON
CERT. Soloists: Mmea. Suzaane Adams and Zelle da
Lussan: Mme*. Susan Strong and Schumann-Helnk- MM.
Seoul, Bars. Oeelller together with Met. Op. H >«■* Or
chestra. Conductor, Prut.
Mon. EV'g. Feb. 2«. at 8, LA TRAVIATA. Mai'*.
Sembrich; MM. Campanarl and Sallgnac.
Tues. EVg. FW>. 27. at 7 precisely, third performance)
of first cycle- of Der Ring <!e^ Nlb^lungen — SIEGFRIED
Mmea. Nordlca, Suzanne Adams an i Schumann-Hetzlc':
MM. Dlpp«l. Frledrlchs, Breuer and Van Rooy. Conduc
tor. Paur. .
Wed. Ev*j;. Feb. 28. at 8, Mozart's Opera. LE NOZ2S
DI FIGARO. Mmes. Emma Eames. Suzann* Adams and
S«mbrlch; MM. Ed. de ReszKe. Pini-CT«I and CampanarL
Thura, Evj, Mar. I. at 6:45 rrecisely. fourth per
formance of first cycle of \<-r Ring I---. Nlbelucgea.
GOETTBRDAEMMEBiXO. Mmes. Nordica. Susan Strong.
Olitzka, - Pevny. Molka-Kell.igsr an>l Schumana-Helak;
MM. Dlppel. Frledrlchs, Muhlmann and Ed. de Reszka.
Conductor, Paur,
Frl. Ev*g. March 2. at 7:30. Wagners Opera. TRISTAN
TTND ISOLDE. Mme* Ternina an.l >.-hamann-H->ln«.;
MM. Van Dyck. Van Rooy an.l Ed. de Keszke.
WEBER PIANOS USED.
MENDELSSOHN II 11. 1..
Second Chamber Mimic Matinee
Tuesday afternoon. February 27. at 2.15
THE KNEISEL QUARTET OF BOSTON
Tickets, !$1.50. at tfehuberth's. 23 t'nlon Square.
MENDELSSOHN HALL.. MR. t.l'imiiß
GEOSSMI TH
Third HamorouM and Maslewl Itecital.
THIS (SAT.) AFTEIIX. AT .1:I.V
Tickets. $1.50 and $1. -.t Schuberth's. 23 Union Sq.
j: Six Symphony Concerts ■
]- for Young People ;
I 1 "WITH EXPLANATIONS DV
I, FRANK DAMROSCH rector J
I , Fourth Concert This (Sat.t Aft. at 2:30
I , AT CARNF' ' HALL.
I. Soloist Mme. SZDIOWSK.I ,
I. Programme: Prelude to "Lohengrin." WAGNER: J
I , Air and Gavotte. BACH; Overture. "Robespierre," ]l
I , LJTTOLFF. ;
i , Tickets at Carnegie Hall bos office only.
j/yy^M^^^My^.M, x^,
Mm.. Ait HILL THEATRE. 42d St. * Vrx. Are.
nn rrsv Matin.-. Even i)»>. j,-.0.
IllUllQ 1 This Week— DIPLOMACY.
the NEW york SKSSSij^S/i*^ Sx-
BROADWAY TO 10K10 ;?^2"
SUNDAY NIGHT S!; E^f
ACTORS' FUND OF AMERICA
An enormous programme of Star acts.
P\STOirs». CONTI.MOIS SHOW.
Seats 20 4 30 cents. D»v »n,l Night.
Fllson 4 Krrol. Emmonds, Emerson i :»aoa
WALLACKS
OLG\ NETHEBSOLE in SAPHO.
\\ \l.l.\i KS— srECI VI..
V. TO-HORROW EVE.
H ANNUAL
7"^ ENTERTAIN
GREAT v4£f£^vMENT.
BILL!
HOST OF
VOLUNTEERS _ S S,
UNCOK 10 RECTjBD
l-ltl» !*t. Theatre, near 6th Aye. M* ll "* l^,}^
Last 2 W^ka of Mil. fll Al \fi:\ O»-CO ri
In "A UOMaNVK OF ATHLON" -*
buyers; Ma>- and June. 4 33-04.1 buyers; Jun» •^sJS
4 .VKU.u-4 M ,M,l buyers; July and All * u ' 1 V u lt*iM a
4 <l*l buyers; August and September. • *- *!l*O-|o»aT
sellers; September and October. A » <»+l b "JToes«ii»»*
and November. 4 13-0U buyar*; November * a * *■— . •
4 buyer*.

xml | txt