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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 25, 1900, Image 15

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
GRANT IN THE WILDERNESS.
HIS losses n» iIAKING FRONTAL. attacks ON
LEETS ARXT.
To the Editor of The Tribune,
Sir: Mr. E. C. Williams controverts my state
icer.t that "Grant took into the Wilderness an
army fully three times as large as that which sub
jected him to a series of such terrible defeats that
in th» course of one month he loet more men than
Lee had bsVsß the campaign with." and for this
purpose be quotes the statement of General Grant,
that the Army of the Potomac numbered about
118,000. while Lee had not less than SO.OQO. He also
quotes a statement of losses from May 5 to June 12
as 53.259. He festal that Grant met any defeats in
the Wilderness.
I resp*ctful'.y submit that Mr. Williams has made
the common mistake of comparing statements made
about one thing with different statements made
about another. I tock all rr.y statements from the
remarkably accurate history of James Forbes
Rhodes, and they can all be verified by reference
to Volume IV. pages MO. 44L 447. Mr. Rhodes's
ststeoer.ts are supported by conclusive authorities.
It Is true that th© "Army of the Potomac" alone
entered the Wilderness with about 11«,000. But it
was reinforced, while flgr.tlr.tr. by 50,001 or 60,000
rr Mi Grant therefore "took into the Wilderness"
about 170.000 men.
It may be true, that. Le« had under his command
sutog-ether 50.000 men, although no evidence of this
can be found. As he detached enough of this force
to defeat the "Army of the James," with a loss of
ever 6.000. it is clear that he could not possibly have
used more than 55.000 men directly in front of
Grar.t. s^nco less than 25.000 could never have ln
fiicted a loss of 6,000 upon their enemies.
Mr. Rhodes says: "The loss of Grant from May
4 to June 12 ... was 54.929. a number nearly
equal to Lee's whole army" (IV Rhodes, p. A". 4
Cent. War Book. IS). This statement may be de
pended on. •
Grant's carnrwicn in the vrilderness, taken as a
whoie -with reference to his ultimate purpope. may
fairly be called a victory. But in detail it consisted
c* a series af attacks which he felt himself com
pelled to make upon his enemy's front, in evry one
cf which direct attacks he was defeated. He loj*t
"7 665 men in the first two days' battle, without
gaining a position. He lost over 10/»00 at Spnttsyl
vania, without gaining pround. He lo*=t about 7.CkjO
men at Cold Harbor ir. little more than twenty min
utes. In every instance he was compelled to aban
don his direct attacks and to turn L^e-'s flank.
Meanwhile, a separate- branch of Grant's army,
operating to the southward. wa= ijnominiously de
'eiited under Butler with a 1of«= of 6.< WO men.
I cm not criticisim? General Grant's plan of cam
paign. The very point to whifh attention was
ca*.:r>d was th? parallel between the American cam
paign of 1804 and tbe African campaign of jMX>. In
botn case* the enemy occupied impregnable posi
ttona upon which all front attacks -ilutcly
'a'ied In both cases, after the failure of ->nt at
tacks the Sank? of tbe enemy were Turned It was
these" turnings of his llantc which compelled Lee to
re"-eat and which enabled Grant to advance. It is
cr-i i*e rossible tr.at in neither case cculd the en
emVs flanks have been turned without a previous
fearful sacrifice of life in direct attacks. I do not
t re«uaf to elt in Judgment upon Grant, although
very able and military authorities have severely
condemned h:s Virginia campaign and at that
t<— e officers who were Caged at I old Harnor
told me that Grant was considered by the troops
to be a butcher. I never did agree with that opin
ion but there never was any doubt that bran, s
deliberate policy was to destroy I^ee's army by per
sistent hammering, aith'>ug'n he fores that he
must sacrifice two Northerr men for every aouth
erner put out of combat. /his was P rot^W>- the
c-'v war in which the war could be brought to a
successful end. anj Grant, by pursuing this m ap
?Zt£ S^frfi^n^eSFul* re^f
other generals did In agaWg no jg£&g&
New-York, Feb. 20. 1300.
COMMON LAW MARRIAGE.
TEE rWSBO BOX- ABOLISHING IT CRITICISED
AS INSUFFICIENT.
VSTUiS common law
narVia-es ought to receive the hearty support of
e;tTone n«ere«ed ir. social morality, and its pro
vS-s for certification and registration are of spe
**£ ■ Us provisions published in
your issue of February 20 it Is not. however, clear
tfc-t j- would furnish the protection clergymen most
fji" that which the community needs against
xS carelessness, or rse. of a few not too con-
SSE^SSSne? the person performing the
TT.-m m B » r-erforrr.'.-? tne
.narrtace ceremony must be the tSSTJBSgeyt '" S
fi~e«B cf the parties, ar.d of the lawfulness of their
proposed union. He may. if he suspects anything
wrong pm; them on oath: but what does that
•sweat to? The fact is, a. clergyman is apt to be
the most unfit person possible to judge of the legal
status of utter strangers who come to him seeking
vis services in the matter of marriage; and the
burden thus thrown upon a conscientious minister
<■ ace w^'r* *c ci:rht not to be obliged to bear, nor
?3ou£luch a door-be left open to lack of
T1"T 1 "- grelr State cf New-York is fifty years behind
♦*V*&jT» 'n her marriage laws. The newer States
EsE&ff BysaSs? sssasass
sghtea« : °l?, er
a man
- c-o to tr.e clerk o. the
Fsr^ct Court in the county in wnich his tended
w^'- lives and procure a license. If either of the
carries is & minor, it must be so stated in the
£ce-*« and tbe consent of their parents certified.
Oc-ryisen are prohibited, und'-r penalty of a heavy
£ne las I remen •-- HMD :rom performing a mar
rlar- ceremony for anybody wno does not come
proVia-d with a license: Old with -ach dm its a
fi ? r.k ■- Be filled out and returned to the clerk of
the court m - issued it, thus insuring registration.
Moreover, before any clergyman can legally per
-orm siaxriage ceremonies he must depos:: with the
c^erk of the District Court a certificate of his
ordination. ,
Vone of these provisions are - - ■ some: the re
spo"sibi!ity for determining :he legal qualification
cf parties intending marrtff« Is placed where it
belongs with an official qualified by local knowledge
and le^al powers: the riphts of families are safe
guarded and the clergymen are protected. \\ hy
c*n we not have some such iitw In the Empire
Etate? J. 3 D.
New- York. Feb. 20, 1900.
ES* CASE OF WAR WITH ENGLAND.
WHAT 'WOt'LD THE DRIED BTATBB DO TO DE
FEN-D THE NICARAGfA CANAL?
To the EdiJtr of The Tribune.
Sir: In F. "VT. Seward'e interesting article on the
Philippines published in Wednesday's Tribune I
find the following-:
"Yes. but that very neutrality." we are told.
"leaves the canal open for a hostile fi><-t to go
through It to attack our Atlantic or Pacific coasts
Of course it .... the sani.j ection rait;l'..
be urged against the oona it«elf, which is also a
neutral waterway. But our ne-ns cai use It. too.
What ar they going to bo doing while the hostile
fi«et Is comin»r across thrr-e thousand miles o. B'a.
O'jr naval stations at Key West and han l''"jin
r-;«co to «=av nothing of our ue.v ones in the \\ eft
Indie's, are considerably nearer than any European
one.
I *hauld like to ask Mr. Se-vard one question:
Suppose the ca*. of a war with England. What
are we to do when Great Britain, under the neu
trality clause of the treaty, sends a cloud of
battleships down to the Caribbean, and what are
our Pacific Ccast cities to do?
To be sure. In order to do this Great Britain, as
Mr S«ward well says, will have to come three
thousand miles. But won't she do that instead of
coir.jr through the Euez Cana!. and to the .savins
cf some seven .thousand miles by utilizing an
American canal built by our Government? .do not
pretend tc solve this canai problem on the instant
But it does seem to me we ano •- have th<s r.=..t
toast up fcrtlf.catlor.s. And I should judge these
would not b* put up a: both ends, or at^ejtner end
but rather in tne interior, say half »*>. ™-J er «
heavy ru-i could eink an enemy attempting to go
th?ou*h in time of war. There seems someth ns
not devoid cf humor in the thought that the
United States shaU bulid a canal to bet^ced at
the disposal of s far (reater r.ava. Pp««, our
eceny in case of war. Thai specimen of National
m**r.iir.:!r.'.*y wou.d excel any display of the virtue
1= ladlTKiual lives lascrtbed In history.
Tarrytown. N. V . Feb. 22. l>Ju M. H. B.
THE BOERS' GENERALSHIP.
To the Editor of The Tnbane.
Eir: In tnlte of aU that has been eaid of the
superior generalship of the Boers by your various
correspondents, how do they account for their en
tire failure to accomplish their avowed Intention of
capturing Ladysmlth and Dr. Jameson. Klmberley.
and. aisore all, Cecil Rhodes and Mafeklng?
For weeks, not to say months, they had undis
puted possession of the territories surrounding these
beleagured towrr.s, m which they could do, and
d.a. Just as they '■hone, with the aid of the finest,
b*st equipped and mcit modern guns and cannon,
fcmple time and opportunity to make their own ar
■acjre'? yet they nave signally fslhui In each
«cd every instance.
Their principal successes have been attained by
tbe means of decoys and ambuscades, aided by the
•*cJt»efcS bravery of the British troops.
And cow at the end of four months what have
they to show as the result of the much lauded
foresight and strategy of "Slim Piet" and nis con
frere*? A- CECIL G. VERNE I*.-
New-York. Feb. 20, IS-JO.
JOURNALISM AND JURIES.
To th» Editor ci The Tribune.
■rt Tn» recent trial it an individual for murder
ftt the first degree end verdict of guilty by ft Jury
**"<tteoUjt "superior In intelligence," after a. long,
' ; ,« C cx mln «ioa of eT.lfier.ce eubmltted
7™uv pr uinabl y »• convtodng to the public »en
k^v, * a lD thl3 »tance the press, becoming
both judge and Jury la tnelr self-sufficient ability,
ignore tha correctness of the jury's verdict and set
up a plea of "not proven." As a result the public
is led to thtnk that the convicted man Is Innocent.
without seeklnr to question the verdict of this
aeeTf*°tn tt a t - of the PubllcP übllc P™ 9B ■ nd individuals. I
modern i™ *f,P ecla attention to the tendency of
trials^nrt ? n 2i' lsm t0 throw contempt upon Jury
carcruflv Ji erdlc 8UstalIle(1 or proven by evidenco
r*rht" «r.*f V n ln court - where th defendant's
I' anVn. » fUlly .^ uarded - To what does this tend?
th£» ir^SP found by a Grand Ji ' r y of twenty
trta' n ll?Z Nt ; vn judlcfd men. followed by a
t? h^.i, jury ot twelv nien admirtedly acceptable
*S» ™.u prose cutlon and defendant, cannot prove
miTrifJi I- Or ii n n°£ ence ot * h « Prisoner, then the
quicker we abolish both courts of Justice the bet
te New-York. Feb. 19. 00. THOMA9 STREET
r« THIS "REPVBLICAX"t
SOME QT'ESTIOXS FROM A CAPE TOWN
WQXAM FOR DR. PAEKHURST.
To the Editor of The Tribune.
Pir: It is with grief and disappointment that
an American In the Transvaal reads the extract
in The Tribune of Dr. Parkhursfs Thanksgiv
ing Day sermon. That a man who has been so
oonsplouous for dear thinking, who has ren
dered such Bignal service to the present g»n«»ra
tlnn of your.g«r clergyman in the great denom
ination he represents, should have lapsed Into
Fu^h confusion of thought in regard to the Boer-
British war is lamentable. He says: 'It the
Americans of to-day felt as the Americans of
177. f-!t. the great body of American citizen
ship would rise in grand protest against the
snuffing out of republican independence In
South Africa."
"Republican Independence" — two words dear
to every true American heart, hut in the case of
the Transvaal controversy absolutely mislead
ing. In name only does a republic exist in the
Transvaal. Does a republic persistently dis
franchise two-thirds of its adult male white.
population, keep them disfranchised, and frame
laws for disfranchising th^ir children?
Does republican independence permit the arbi
trary imposition of taxes on this twn-thirds
majority of unrepresented citizens, taxes which
are cunningly contrived to fall on this class
alone, which are so excessive as to render all
but the richest mines unworkable, which render
the necesaarie? of life dear beyond all reason,
and which enormous taxes, worst of all, do not
benefit the Transvaal, but go Into the pockets
of a few people? Was that the American spirit
of 177<'."
Does a republic m minority tax a republican
majority for an enormous secret service fund?
Does a republican minority tax an unenfran
chised majority, forbidden to carry arms, to
build and equip huge forts which at a moment's
notice can be us^d against a defenceless people?
Dofs not republican independence Include the
freedom of the pr»ss and the right to hold pub
lic meetings?
Does it not insure trial by a jury composed
of one's peers?
Can a true republic permit Its President to
dismiss Its judges, reverse their decisions and
command its Legislature to pass a law declar
ing dkat the judges were not entitled to test
the validity of a law by its agreement or con
flict with the Cor.stitmin °
Can an agglomeration of one hundred thou
sand people, American. English, Germans,
French, endure for any tengtb. of time Imposi
tions like these? Is not the righteous Intuition
of the civilized world against It?
And when, in the face of facts like these, a
clergyman of keen thought talks about "snuffing
out republican independence," does he not
thereby put aside something of his directness of
it? For one does not 'snuff out" great
forts, vast armaments, splendid cavalry and
artillery, and the strategic skill of some of the
finest mercenaries in the world (who, Dr. Park
hurst should know, are thiß time with the Boers.
not with the British;. One attacks them and
takes ffiem slowly, painfully, and solely and
D the name of truth, righteousness and
justice.
A sufficient answer tc many people is Presi
dent Kruger's oft repeated assertion, "We do
not want the Outianders. we did not ask them
to come; this is our country, let them leave it
if they don't like our ways." True enough. He
does not want them now, but he did want them
j-jst after the London Convention, when, wish
ing to raise money, his secretary was instruct
ed to write from the Albemarle Hotel on De
cember 21. I^B,'J: "This Government will view
with satisfaction the development of properties
on which c mceaaionfl have been granted." and
he assured the companies that they could count
on Government protection. Then the penniless
President desired the Outlander. Now the
millionaire President would like the Out landers
to leave the mines they have fairly bought and
fairly pa:d for, which they have spent tens of
millions sterling in developing, and which have
made Mr. Krfiger and his oligarchy rich o mill-
Ions; he would like them to leave these mines,
to his ar.d their further delectation.
And this a Christian minister describes as a
■'sanctified muliyhnegs inherited from Dutch
ancestors who fought the Spanish Inquisi
tion." Is there the slightest parallel between
fighting for liberty to worship God according to
the dictate of one's conscience and fighting
for extortionate taxation without representa
t; >n? And is fighting England at the close of
the nineteenth century- the same as fighting
Spain at the close of the sixteenth century"
Further, is it republicanism when a railway
scheme is to be floated that four-fifths of the
:. lture shall rrc*i-'» presents for their fa
vorable votes, and the eminently Christian
President make the candid confession of his
prm'lpies that he "saw no harm in members
taking present?" ?
Every Monday morning in Johannesburg sees
thousand Kaffirs too drunk to go to
work. They are drunk on the vilest liquor ever
manufactured or sold. A law was framed re
stricting Its pale. Mr. Kruger. an ostentatious
total abstainer, denounced the law as Immoral
"...-cause it deprived a number of honest people
of a livelihood "
- a republican government in time of
■ y hold up a train, rob It of
£500,000 In gold, and appropriate the same to
Its own v
. .id up to Almighty God hands soiled
ry and corruption, and with a tongue
foul with falsehood and treachery ask and
expect His favor, and shall a Christian minister
rail that "sanctiried obstinacy" ami "better
Christianity" than that of thus*- who are fight
ing them"' STELLA M. SEYMOUR.
Capt Town, Jan. 12" ttOft
TAXES ON BONDS.
THE FTRANAHAN BILL'S PROVISIONS IN P.EGARD
TO TRUST COMPAKIES ACTING AS TRUSTEES.
To the Editor of The Tribune.
Sir: So far the discussion of the expediency of
the Stranahan bill has been almost entirely de
voted to the principles involved. The bill is so
Important and so far reaching that I think its
administrative features should be well understood
by those affected before they decide for or against
it. Some lawyers have expressed the opinion that
Section 25 of Article 111 Is unconstitutional on the
ground that it impairs the obligations of con
tracts. Briefly stated, this section requires trust
companies which are the trustees for the owners
of bonds secured by mortgage on real property
situated in whole or in part within this State to
pay all taxes due the State upon the mortgage.
To the trust company is given a lien upon the
bonds and coupons belonging to the bondholders
for the reimbursement of the taxes so paid, with
interest at the rate of 6 per cent- The trust com
pany may enforce this lien by Judicial proceedings
provided in the act.
II any bondholder makis an assignment to the
trust companj of so much cf the principal and
Interest accruing upon his bond as may be neces
sary to pay his tax as It becomes due, and pays
tv the trust company in money any tax alreudy
paid by the trust company, he shall not be prej
udiced in any manner by the trust .-ompaiiyu lien.
\t the time that the bondholder makes the
assignment the trust company must stamp upon
the bond and coupons a memorandum of the
assignment. As there are one billion dollars'
worth of bonds or more which are affected by this
act and aa tht-re are probably nearly one hundred
million coupons the tank of collecting these bonds
ana stamping each coupon is one of considerable
m a tt S has d been •ugg-«*e d that a loreign bondholder
Jnnot be forced f to make this assignment, and if
there is doubt upon this point trust companies
£?.v *hrlnk from making the payment of taxes
Quired section provides, however, that if
♦£1 tr.f«t company fails to protect the mortgage
s^curit^ fo? &• benefit cX Urn bea4i»i«Urs It
NEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 2R. 1900.
3oWl)aTi\(^Som%L%Q)n&
SPRING RIBBONS
FOR 1900.
THE PRINCIPAL FASHION FACTOR FOR THIS SEASON.
You must use them
FOR MILLINERY, FOR DRESS TRIMMING,
FOR LINGERIE, FOR DECORATIVE PURPOSES.
Is it not important to purchase the proper kinds ?
DANEELI/S is the acknowledged mart for Ribbons, keeping always a larger as
sortment than any three of the most prominent retail houses on Manhattan Island.
Our "Special Ribbon Sales" are noteworthy as everyone knows. This sale will prove
of more than ordinary merit.
BLACK SATIN BACK VELVET,
BLACK TAFFETAS, and BLACK LIBERTY SATINS
that cannot fee duplicated at the price by any one. We mention two particularly good
values. *
45,000 yards of four and three-quarter inches wide Double Face Satin Ribbon with
cord td^tt a very rich quality and a charming assortment of colors, light and
pastel shades predominating, really worth 50c yard, we will offer them
to our customers this week at. . . . , . . «28C. yard
Another remarkable bargain shown on Centre Tables will be an accumulation of
NARROW FANCY RIBBONS, from %of an inch to 2 inches wide, at SC.5 C . yard
or 50c. piece.
Broadway, Eighth & Ninth Streets.
shall be responsible to any bondholder who may be
■Z" eyed by such failure.
It ha already been stated that the trust com
pany may enforce its lien upon any bond by
judicial proceedings as hereinafter provided. The
judicial proceeding provided are ingenious and
Interesting. If a tax is not paid prior to the first
Monday In March the bond and the mortgage are
liable to seizure and saie, and It shall be the duty
of the court to issue a warrant or warrants to any
BherifT or other person commanding him to seize
all de! • and ob'.ipations secured by mortgage,
together with the mortgage security therefor.
Tiie twelfth paragraph of the thirty-first section
provides that "At any stage of the proceedings
the Court shall have the power to issue special
warrants for the seizure of any paper, writing or
writings evidencing; a debt or oblipai. or mort
gage security proceeded against or upon which the
State has a "lien and it may also, on proper ground
made ther°for. issue warrants authorizing the
search of any building, safe or place within the
Stato for such paper, writing or writings."
I have endeavored fairly to state part of the
method provided in the bill to se-ure the payment
of the mortgage tax. i am wei! aware that I have
done this imperfectly, for the bill is too carefully
and closely written to be described in fewer words
than the bill contains. It ought to have careful
study and thus far I have found few per» who
had "more than superficial knowledge of the details
of the bill. LAWSON PL'RDY.
Secretary New-York Tax Reform Association.
New-York, Feb. 9, 1900.
AMERICAN VIEWS OF THE WAR.
AN ENGLISH OBSERVER FINDS A PREPONDER
ANCE OF SYMPATHY FOR ENGLAND.
To the Editor of The Tribune.
Sir: For some time I have been, studying the
feeling of the American public and press on the
South African war question, with the result that
I have no hesitation in inclining to : the opinion that
the greater weight of sympathy Is with the British,
and I note with satisfaction that by far the greater
percentage of expressions of pro-Boer sympathy
emanate from the second rate and, sensational type
of newspapers and the more- Ignorant portion of
the community.
That there i 3 a profusion of legitimate and un
prejudiced criticism— even among the pro-British
party— undoubted, and such criticism entirely
coincides in most Instances with the criticisms of
the British public That there is in certain quar
ters a strong pro-Boer feeling cannot be denied.
In England where pro-Boer feeling exist 3 its
origin is traceable to the influence of Transvaal
agents and a judicious application, of fhe Trans
vaal secret service funds. If its origin In this
country is not traceable to the same cause I quite
fall to see why it exists.
Whatever may be the cause the fact remains
that everything that can be said or suggested to
Britain's discredit Is made as nruch of as pos
sible; her misfortunes are gloated over; she is
described as the bully, the oppressor cf two poor,
weak little republics, and her obje< t in carry!-.^ on
the present war Is said to be solely one of greed
for territory. Correspondents who nave asked for
information as to the cause of the present war in
South Africa have b**n told that it was a war of
conquest. Mr. Chamberlain's speech his been
quoted as an authority for the statement that
it is a war of conquest.
If those who cannot understand why there is
war in Africa would only take the trouble to study
the facts for themselves it should not be a difficult
matter for them to find an answer to the question.
The best way Is to refer the Interrogator to the
terms of the convention; or. if preference be given
to quoting a politician's speech on the subject, let
the whole speech, rather than extracts from it, be
quoted. To put it briefly, the convention was to
the effect that the Boers received their indepen
dence on their strict agreement to allow British sub
jects who choee to live in their country the same
franchise rights wltb themselves, and also under
took to leave all foreign intercourse in the hands
of the British Government. It was the persistent
and determined way In which the Transvaal Gov
ernment ignored these terms that ultimately
brought about the crisis. Through a long period of
years, and even up to the last minute, the British
Government was exerting every effort to bring
about a pacific settlement of the question; in fact,
not ur.;:. President Kroger ultimatum was re
ceived in London and his troopd had overrun Brlt
ish rrltory did the British Government take any
serious and hostile ptepst. The cause for which
Great Britain is to-day lighting in South Africa is
the cause for whi.-h she baa ever been th rhnm
pion—the cause of risrht and Justice: equal rights for
all me' It is one with which, to Judge irom the tone
of the American press, the American Nation most
heartily sympathizes. ! take It that If a colony
of Anglo-Saxons from Am* . (instead of from
England) were settled In any purt of the world and
wore subjected to the same sort of unjust treat
ment find their rights ignored in a similar manner
the American Nation would speedily set abou..
ricb/Unir the wrong and would probably not have
so much patience and forbtaranco with those who
were wrontdnE- them as has been in evidence in the
British negotiations with the South African ,Xl-public, Kl-
public By the quotation of only an ex'.ract from
Mr Chamberlain's speech it has been made to ap
pear that Britain's sole object in entering upon the
war was the conquest of the republics and the as
sertion of British supremacy in South Africa,
whereas it can hardly be, doubted that "the contest
'or supremacy" to which M-. Chamberlain referred
is for the supremacy of right over wrong and Jus
tice over injustice.
Of course now that war is in progress, there Is
no douot that it will be carried on until Britain's
supremacy of power is also asserted, and no aouht.
either that when that er.<i is attained - stab.c anrf
lust form of government will he established, under
which ill men and nationalities will have equal
rltfhss But had the Transvaal Government grant
ed such rights this disastrous war would never
have found a place In history. I fail to see bow
the fact that Great Britain took up rh» cause of
the Outlanders. with a view to securing them,
their rights and Just treatment, can possibly be
construed and quoted as evidence of her deslrei for
co-quest; nevertheless, this has been done 'W hat
would Americans have thought if the British had
attributfed her actions in the. Philippines to the
same motive? During the Spanish- American War
it must be admitted that the British public and
press w«re In no way lacking- la hearty expressions
of sympathy with the American cause, and in no
single instance could an example be found to ihow
that the opportunity had been used as a means of
voicing expressions of hostility and contempt; what
ever criticisms may have been made had at least
the merit that they were based upon the facts and
had some claim to be described as just.
I have travelled for se%-eral years on this side of
the Atiantlc. and have many times li -ard ex
Dressinns of hatred of England, Eng!» men and
everything English, but up to the present time
have failed to discover a substantial foundation Tor
such hostile prejudices. It is grattfjrt] to reaiizu
that thtt feeling between ti. two countries is Im
proving, enp».-ia.lly a.r. r ttM better cla.sses. A.
the same t!mf it is galling to know that so much
animosity still exists, especially wnen It is borne
in mind that It Is not always bused on htstlce anil
th« truth. ARTHUR G. BEACH.
New-York, Feb. 21. 1900.
PEERLESS BSOE CO. ASSJGXB.
The Peerlees Shoe Company, manufacturers of
women's shoes at No. 430 West Fourteenth-Ht.. has
made an assignment to James Fleming. The presi
dent of the company is Arthur Kenny, who has
been Identified with the shoe, trade for many yean.
The present company was Incorporated In Sep
tember. 1898. with a capital stock of $25,000, and
succeeded, to tho business of the- Arthur Kenny
"GRAND RAPIDS
FURNITURE"
An exposition of what is beau
tiful, refined and chaste in fur
niture is found in our building
devoted purely to GRAND
RAPIDS FURNITURE. Co
lonial dining room pieces — Bed
room furniture of simple or
carved design — Library and Hall
furniture in old Flemish oak —
Chairs — Desks — Tables, in
great array.
GRAND RAPIDS
> FURNITURE CO. IrTOri)orated
155-157 West 34th St.
r ;y."
Shoe Company, which made an -rnm^r.t on
March 15. IS9B. The Peerless Shoe Company had
no ratinsr at Bradstreet's. Hast'.ns-s & Gleaaon,
the attorneys, say ti; - the liabilities ai about
rr.ooo.
RETIREMENT OF DR. 6. W. WIRREX.
HI3 SERVICE A3 AN* ORGANIST EXTENDED OVER
FtFTT-FOVR YEARS.
The announcement was made a few days ago
that Dr. George William "Warren was to retire
from his po?t as musical director at St. Thomas's
Church at the end of the church year. Probabiy
no one associated with -rious or church muslo
in New-York C!ty, or perhaps In the T"r.!:ed States,
i 3 better known that Dr. Warren. lie has done
much to elevate the taste for music of this kind.
Dr. Warren has WTltten church hymns that have
been widely sung. Thirty y-ars ago he wrote
two, one to the words "Come, Holy Spirit,
Heavenly Dove," and the other a setting for Top
lady'a "Rock o' Ages," that have become classics.
He bepan his career a3 organist fifty-four years
ag-o, playing at St. Peter's Church, in Albany, in
1546. Dr. Horatio Potter, afterward . -.op of
New-York, uncle of the present Bishop, was then
rector of St. Peter's. In IS4S Dr. Warren wer.t to
St. Paul's Church, in Albany, playing- under the
rectorship of two clergymen who afterward be
came bishops— the Rev. Dr. Kip. now Bishop of
California, and the Rev. Dr. Starkey, now Bishop
of Newark. In IS6O the rector of Holy Trinity, In
£!ro'-.!::yr.. Dr. Littlejohn, now Bishop of Liong
Island, secured his appointment as organist of his
church. He played there nearly ten years, being
succeeded by Dudley Buck, who Is there to-day.
When the Rev. Dr. Morgan was about completing
the new St, Thomas's Church, at Flfth-ave. and
Fifty-third-st.. and was prepariner for Its opening-,
he selected Dr. Warren for musical director and
organist. He played at the first service October 6
IS7O. and has remained in that office for thirty
years.
The music in that church has had Ugb f.irr.
under Dr. Warren. In term of service he has
perhaps, a record equalled by few.
In ISOS the orpranists in New- York and in I*3
immediate vicinity tendered Dr. Warren a service
a: St. George's churoh in honor of hip twentv
fifth anniversary. Bishop Potter took part in che
ceremony, made an address, and, on behalf of the
orpranists. presented Dr. Warren a loving- cup
Dr Warren's name will he a familiar , rf by
reason of his compositions. Many of his hymns and
carols are well known all over the United Stares
Twenty years ago the Harpers published a. volume
or hymi written by him; and "when the Rev Dr
Tucker, a life-long friend, was preparing hi/ now
we,! known hymnal Dr. Warren presented him
with the scores for a number of hymns • -ludlnE
"God of C\«.r Fathers." ''"
Dr. Wari«n's musical abilities are not confined
to the orgran: he- is a. pianist, and has composed a
number of popular pieces for the piano Besides
these employments. Dr. Warren has been orsranis
for ten years at Columbia University which" save
him the degree or doctor of music. It is understood
that he will retain his connection with the de
partment of music of Columbia University Or*
of his sons. Professor Richard Henry Warren hi'-j
attained .prominence as the director of music in
fa^ Bartholomew's Church, and the other. Major
Charles Elliott Warren, is an assistant to the
president of the Lincoln National Bark in thta
MEETING OFXEW-A USTERDAM DIRECTORS.
WAIX STREET THINKS THE OMPant will
APPLY PART OF PP.OCEEDS OP BOND SALE
TO PAYHEXT OF INTEREST.
Frank S. Hastings, a leading director of the New-
Amsterdam Gas Com] said yesterday that he
knew nothing about the object of the meeting- of
the Board, to be held to-morrow at th© office of
August Belmont & Co,, not even what bonds it was
purposed to certify and issue. He had received a
notice to attend the meeting; and on Monday he
would be bet! informed on the subject. The view
which found most acceptance in Wail 9:ree- ves'er
day. however, was that tne New- Amsterdam Coir I
pany was not oversuppiied with ready money and
5? a: a: c , ast parT of the Proceeds or the sale of
the bond issue— supposed to be the S2 s<>> .'»v> ew
corsolidated 5s now in the treasury— would be an.
pl:ed to the payment of the $87,500 semi-annual in
terest due on March 1 on the $3,500,000 «j Der cert
consolidated debentures of the Equitable Gas Lig™
POLICE GUARD 1 itOTORMAS.
BT3TANDERS THREATEN TO DO HARM WHEX A
GIRL 15 KILLED IN AMSTERDAM-AYE.
LUUe Nagle. five years oM. was sent across Am
sterdam-aye, at Sixtieth-st. for a loaf of bread
yesterday und on h. r return she was caught by a
southbound electric car and killed. Her "brother
WHile, was wuiting for her in the door and saw
the accident. He ran into the saloon, where their
father. Johi Nagle. tends bar, and Informed him
Natrle ran out and the police gathered up the body
and curried it home.
The bystanders rushed at the motnrman In a
race, but the police kept them back. The con
ductor, Edward Clark, twenty-eight years old of
Broadway and One-hundred-and-thinleth-st. and
LDe motorman. James D. K earner twenf v"Jrhr»»»
ypars old. of No. 4G5 West Thirty-fourth-st were
arrested and escorted by several policemen 'to th*
West Sixty-eight h-st. station, and ; 'remanded
to the Coroner. "imuiaeo
The police Bald that the motorman could not h«ln
the accident, aa the child ran directly In front i?
the car. l ™
H.JUftmm&jfo
MONDAY. FEBRUARY 26th.
PLAIN COLORED DRESS SILKS,
A
COMPRISING DOUBLE WIDTH FRENCH POPLINS. CREPE METEOH
IMPORTED LOIISISE. AND CREPE GAUIOIS.
ALSO ARMURE SYLPHIDE. TAFFETAS DIAMANT. .
MOIRE NEiGELX. SATIN REGENCE. MERVEILLELX AMAZON.
BENGAUNE. VELOURS PANNE, ETC
IMPORTANT OARING OF
8,000 Yards SATIN REGENCE (Evening and Pastd
colors), desirable for House or Strtct wear.
Heretofore $1.50 per yard, at . . $|.00
MISSES' and GIRL'S DEPT.
LATEST DESIGNS IN DRESSES. JACKETS. WAISTS. ETC IN A
VARIETY OF MATERIALS. SUITABLE FOR
EARLY SPRING WEAR,
INCLUDING MANY EXCLUSIVE STYLES AND ADAPTATIONS
FROM PARISIAN IDEAS.
800 SAILOR SUITS AT VERY LOW PRICES.
Striped Percale Suits, sizes 4to 10 years, 95c*
Striped Galatea or Plain White Duck, with
combination trimmings, sizes 4 to 10 years,
$1.75 and $2.25
NEW SPRING STYLES OF RQYS' CLOTHING.
In Double Breasted and Three Piece Suits of Bice Serge,
Fancy Worsteds, Mixed Cheviots and Cassimeres.
SAILOR AND MIDDY SUITS. RUSSIAN BLOUSE SUITS.
Top Coats of Cray Cheviot. Tan Covert Cloth and Whipcord,
WASHABLE SAILOR AND RUSSIAN BLOUSE SLITS
SHIRT WAISTS, BLOUSES. HATS AND CAPS.
INFANTS' FINE WEAR
For SPRING and SUMMER.
HAND MADE DRESSES CHRISTENING ROBES WRAPPER*
LONG CLOAKS WALKING COATS. REEFERS,
HATS. CAPS. BONNETS,
AFGHANS, BASSINETTES. HAMPERS
Every Requisite for Complete LAYETTES.
SPECIAL OFFERING OF | ACF CURTAINS.
Nottingham Curtains, Per Pair. *1.48 & *3.25
Ruffled Bobbinet $f - ft $7 |ft $? _
Curtains, Per Pair. I*sI * 50 ' lAO & 2''s2 '' 5
Irish Point Curtains, Per Pair. *2.75 &$ 4 25
Lace Vestibule Panels, 40x50 inches, nr r , $io;
Reduced from $LSO and $2.50 Each, to y;3C * ** l OD
ART OBJECTS AND DECORATIVE WARE,
BRONZES. CLOCKS AND ART PORCELAINS
AUREUAN. JAPANESE BRONZE AND PAINTED LAMPS.
CARRARA MARBLES. BRONZE FIGURES AND BUSTS
At Reduced Prices.
300 Pieces of Delft Pottery for Cottage Decoration,
*1.50 to $25.00
33>3 Less than the Regular Prica.
—Abo-
Limoges Enameled Vases, . . *3-75
Cut Glass Bowis ••'•*• 3.50
Cut Glass Bon-Bon and Olive Trays, '* . .50
Cut Glass Celery Trays, • . • 3.50
eighteenth Street, nfeeteeirr) Srrm ji4 Slut) Atem
s

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