OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 05, 1900, Image 3

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1900-06-05/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

PLEA FOR CANAL BILL.
SENATOR MORGAN FAVORABLY RE
POSTS A RESOLUTION ABROGAT
ING CLATTON-BULWEB. TREATY.
Washington. June 4. — Senator Morgan, from
the Committee on Interoceanie Canals, to-day
favorably reported *he resolution for the ab
rogation of the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty. As re
ported, the resolution reads:
(That the treaty known as the Clayton-Bulwer
Treaty, between Great Brirain and the United
States.' which was concluded on the 19th day
of April. ISSO. is abrogated.
In presenting the resolution. Mr Morgan made
* written report, traversing the grounds for the
, abrogation of the treaty in considerable detail.
ly The report If practically a plea for the House
V.r.s.rafrja Canal bill. In it Senator Morgan
M ys that "if the ■n-Bulwer Treaty stands
jjj fV;^ way of the purposes of our Government,
I it must give way to the paramount law if the
• House bill is enacted into a statute of the United
Ptates." He admits, however, that It is a ques
tion whether it is an obstruction. The effect
*>f the Hay-**auneefote Treaty in discussed in
detail, and the conclusion la drawn that "as to
all that relates to the canal, the Hay-Paunce
' -.- Treaty. Jf It I ratified, terminates and ab
rrtpates the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty." But. he
says, if the Senate should reject the Hay-
Pauncefote Treaty, the startling question will
be raised whether the Senate. In the exercise of
Its treaty making power, can abdicate or para
lyse It* treaty making: po^'e*". "Can one-third
of the Senate by ■ ttlng the Hay-Pauncefote
negotiation, " tie asks, "compel a majority of the
Senate to abstain from enacting the House Bill
because the Clayton -Buiwer Treaty would be
thereby put into full effect as a bar to such
action?**
In conclusion the report says that "If the
Claytnrs-Buiwer Treaty is in force, and if Great
I Britain bo insists, it is the clear duty of Congress
to declare unat it is abrogated. 1 ' If the treaty is
abrogated, the conclusion ■ that the way is
cleared for proposing to Nicaragua and Costa
Rica such terms as may be appropriate for ac
quiring in those States whatever rights and
powers th^y are at liberty to concede to enable
the United States to construct and control the
canal, and also open the way for such a general
declaration as to rhe neutrality of the canal as
shall meet the approbation of the civilized
Powers.
"If this rwoiution ig rejected and the Hay-
IPaunee'ore Treaty is not ratified, we will be
left," says the report, "to the alternative we
Fhould now accept, of declaring that the Clay
tonr-Balwer Treaty cannot stand as a perpetual
barrier, if such is the pleasnire of Great Britain,
against the rights of the United States to con
struct and own a ship canal in connection with
Costa FJ.ca and Nicaragua, to connect the waters
of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The pas-
Ease of the House bill now pending in the Sen
ate should be the step in this indispensable
movement, and the Senate should not permit the
conclueion it may reach on the Hay-Pauncefote
Treaty, which is a minor confederation, to ob
struct the will of the majority of this body in
Its action on the House bill."'
ENGINEERS RETURN FROM PANAMA.
A MEMBER OF EXPLORING PARTY NO - ;
TELLS OF HIS EXPERIENCE.
RlaMCee engineers and other employes of the
Commission to select a route for a canal between
tile Atiaanc and Paciric arrived here from Colon
yesterday 03 the Atlas Line steamer Altai. Most
of the party went on to Washington In the after
soon. E. H. Spiers, of Talpa. Va_, who was one
of the party, was the engineer in chief of Party
No. ft. which surveyed up and down from Cale
oonia northward.
There were six parties in all." said Mr. Spiers,
"and about thirty persons, including the native
btar»ra and seven or eight American officers.
There are no mules in that country, and no beasts
of burden, consequently our stores and equipment
had to be packed by the native Indians. My party
■arfint dowa. last February. Other parties went at
different times. We were so far apart that one
parry did not come in contact with another in the
vtust territory explored aad surveyed .1 our efforts
to find a suit&his route for the proposed canal.
For this reason no one party knew anything of
tr.e accievemf-nta of another, so we of Party Xo 6
only knew wha: occurred to us. and not to "any of
the other parties. Each party had a doctor, "and
I fear thai some of them needed a doctor badly.
Eut not one of my men was taken sick in the four
months we were in the field. The rainy season has
just coitiinftnu^'i, and I presume that much sick
ness w:l] occur down there now. We were com
pletely cut off from civilization, did not hear any
news or receive any newspapers and for four
months were practically dead to the world. As
an employe of the <"omm:s~;un it would not become
me to discuss the expedition in any of its Sfien
t:flc features, but I can tell you that it would
pay any sportsman to go down there for the hunt
ir.g. as he could ba^ more pame in a wee than
taywhere e:s^ 0:1 earth. Dc*r. wild turkey, pheas
tr.ts bear ar.d an eleven-foot snake are the chief
rrey for hunters :n the Panama country.
EEAEIXG FOR IRISH EXCOXYICTS.
COMMISEIONER POWDERLT UO THE ATTORXKT
GEN::: TO PASS ON THEIR CASE
Washington. June 4.— The appeal from the de
cision of the immigration officials at Xew-York
ordering the deportation of '.narr-in and Mul
lett, known as the Irish Invincibies, reached Com-
Kii-sioner-Genc-ral Fowderly to-<3ay. A hearing
has been prar.ted to counsel for these men, to take
Fiice to-morrow, after which It is probable, that
the law questions ir.volved will be sent to the At
torsey-Genera; ior an opinion. It is not likely
tr.at final action will be taken in these cases be
fore the latter part of the week.
COAL SUPPLIES IX THE PACIFIC.
LARGE STOCKS OX HAST) AT AMERICAN NAVaL
STATIONS.
tTaafaineton. Jrjne 4 (Special).— Unless the Chi
nese situation grows graver Admiral Bradford win
thip no more cc&l to Manila this month. He re
ceived a. cabie dispatxh from Admiral Ren to
<say reporting the supply on hand June 1 at the
CavitS station a*> 1S,«SOO tons. At present 30,000 tons
are on the way to that station from the United
Htates In chartered sailing vessels. The American
fleet in Asiatic waters consumes between 5,000 and
€.«» tone a month, and as It takes over three
months to send coal economically to Manila, con
tracts nave to w made far ahead, and a large r<v
hTve «upply nusi be maintained. According to
last o&cial reports the Xavy now has stored at
a m Jrat l p^et aYa VS O^° ■ *0. at Hon ° IUIU
_ .
-VETT RT'LE FOR REGISTERED MAIL
*"" ■Mm It.
■U-ashlngton. June 4 f Special). -Postmaeter-^n
e;al Smith signed an order to-day amending the
ptvtal regulations bo that the lander of a regis
tered letter will be able to recall It after it ha«
-ten cispatcaed from a postoffice. This can only
be Gone, however, through postmasters who can
lcentify the sender. Heretofore registered mail
could be stopped by the sender only before it had
jeft the postofflce. and after leaving a postofflce
" co^Jd not be checked except with the consent
%^J a %l s^, Third Assistant Postm^ter
;.■;.;
OPEXIXG ISDIAX LAXDS TO HETTLEMEXT.
Washington. June 4.— A conference agreement !
«M reacted to-lay on a bill which will open to ;
Ffttiement about two million four hundred thou
**cd acres of public lands. Senator Shoup. of
Idaho, original!}- proposed the bill, opening to set
twancnt the old Fort Hall military reservation In ;
idaho. containing about four hundred thousand
acres. Delegate FJynn, in the H.»u*e, secured an
g"f™!™"g opotfn* a tract of about two million
acres of the Klowa and Comanche lands in South
vc^l Ok:ahorll - ii - The conference has lasted many
totStt: d 'V s ilet ' n stubborn, but as agreed upon
fi£t l» i lands VLiu be opened. The Indians
Zl,,;^Z 1 ,,;^ an allotment of Oklahoma landn of
trl<\ US* d , and sixl >' arres each, with four hun
nOn-r ■ . "'ehty thousand acres to be h-ld in
aa*r ; kLi y th " m - th< " remaining two million
en art-* P ° I *'" w i «> homestead settlers at $1 50
DUFFY'S malaria,
Pff&aT Fevers, Chilis, Coughs,
r UnC. Colds, Dyspepsia of what-
It I : -m ever torn, quickly cured by taking
«lALg DUFFY'S Malt, a table
!•• IJint/aiif spooniui in glass o! water three
•>niOn»*Y times a day. All druggists inti
l% ™ 1 ■ grocers. BEWARE OF IMITATIONS. \
$
1 .
• THE HARTFORD GOING TO EUROPE. I
!
TO BE THE FLAGSHIP OF A LARGE SQUAD- j
; , RON OF TRAINING SHIPS.
j Washington. June 4 (Special).— The frigate
I Hartford, which has just made the straightaway
Wjpsjasß from San Francisco to Newport News, is
to be ordered to Europe to complete the educa- J
tion of her crew, who shipped from the Pacific
! Coast as landsmen under a four years' enlist
ment. Their cruise around Cape Horn gave them
; thing more than a rudimentary knowledge
of maritime life, and after the run across the j
Atlantic they will probably he fit for regular
| warship duty. When the Hartford reaches the
I French coast next month she will be the flagship
i of a squadron of training ships In European
I water? larger than ever before assembled abroad
i by the United Prat-"'. The others will be the
! Dixie, bow on her way to the Mediterranean
| from Manila; the Buffalo, the Essex and the
I Lancaster.
THE MUTUAL LIFE AXD PRUSSIA, j
FAVORABLE REPORT ON THE RESOLUTION \
ASKING THE SECRETARY OF STATE TO
SEEK REDRESS OF THE COM
PANY'S GRIEVANCES.
Washington. June 4 CSpeclali.— House Com- j
mittee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce has
reported favorably a resolution requesting the ,
Secretary of State to take all necessary and
proper steps to secure from the Kingdom of PruF- ,
I sia the redress of certain grievances suffered
through the action of the Prussian Government by :
the Mutual Life .run." Company of New- York. '
The report, submitted by Mr. Sherman, says in
j part:
In the year 18S6 the Mutual Life Insurance Com
pany applied to the Prussian Government for a ;
concession permitting it to conduct in that king
dom the business of life insurance. Following this '.
application a full and thorough examination of the
financial condition of the company and Its methods
of doing business was had by the accredited rep- !
resent ative^ of said kingdom, and upon their report
the concession as> applied for was granted and ac
cepted by the petitioner.
The Mutual Life Insurance Company, upon the
granting of the concession; invested the sum of
I about 1,000.000 marks in a building lr the city of
Ferliri. and expended lsrg° sums of money in t
establishing agencies in said kingdom, and prose
cuted its bupine^p there. During the time since
the concession was granted th<* company has not ;
changed its method? of doing business, Its financial
condition has at no time been impaired and its
I assets have been materially inci-eafied. The com
pany did for rix or seven years prosecute its
business in Prussia under the originai concession,
and such conditions in addition thereto as the j
, Prussian Government from '"in*- to time Imp '!. :
until August. 1895. when its concession was. with
out fault on it? part and because of an incorrect !
understanding "f the facts on the part of the Mm- j
Inters of the said kingdom, revoked and the com
pany prohibited from doing further new business
'n the kincdom.
This aot on the art of the Government of
Prussia has resulted in great damage to the com
pany in that, its contracts being for life, it is re
quired to keep agents in Prussia, and to keep large
amounts of money there deposited with that Gov
ernment, and because the time luring which it
wa? permitted to do business there was not long
enough for it to recoup itself for Its original ex
penditures.
The committee believes that the decree cancelling
The concession of the Mutual Life Insurance Com- ,
pany in Prussia was made through a mistake or
by reason ■' misinformation as to the facts by the
Prussian Minister, and not because of any change
In methods of transacting business, financial mis- ,
management, or by acts contrary to the lawn of j
PniFPia done by the company and that an injup- ;
tice has. no doubt unintentionally, thereby been j
done. :
It also appears that life insurance companies of
England. France and other foreign countries are
still permitted to do business in Prussia.
The resolution, whose passage is recommended, :
! has the approval of the Secretary of State.
THE CfEUR D'ALEXE IXQUTRY.
MINORITY OF THE COMMITTEE DENOUNCES
GENERAL MERRIAM AND THE
PRESIDENT.
Washington, June 4.— The minority report of the j
Ccßur d'Alene Investigation Committee was given j
out to-day by Representatives Lentz and Hay, who !
! drafted It. The following is a summary of its main !
j features:
The minority point out that the evidence taken j
during the investigation shows that there was abso
lutely no rioting in Bboshone County. Idaho, after
April 2Tt. 1K99: that when the United States troops
arrived upon the scene quiet had been restored and
no resistance was being made to the State authori
ties, who were arresting as rapidly as possible |
I those who were suspected of being implicated in
• the crime of April 29, 1899 j
It is maintained by the minority that the troops :
sent to Idaho by the President of the United States I
continued to be under the control of the President.
and that the military commander in <*.-■ mmand could |
-only use the troops in aid of the civil authorities j
of the State to preserve peace and order and pre
y..- resist ■- • Ing made by lawless persons to !
the process of the courts and the proper civil :
authorities of the State. The President of the i
United States has kept and is still keeping soldiers
In that community, and by so doing Is upholding a
tyrannical course of conduct pursued by the Gov- ;
ernor if Idaho.
The minority point out five flagrant Instances of i
abuse of power and violation of law by General I
Merriam. the commander of the troops:
First — General Merriam sent on May 3 about one |
hundred and fifty troops to the town of Burke
and arrested without warrant the entire male popu- j
lation of that town, consigner of about three
hundred persons. It was an outrage upon the lib- i
j erty of the citizens which has no parallel in the j
annals of this country.
: Second— General Merriam sent a detachment of
' troops into the State of Mont ma for the purpose
I of arresting fugitives from Idaho, an inexcusable
! exercise of arbitrary power by General Merriam.
Third — Lieutenant Lyon. acting under the orders ,
of his superior officer, by threats of violence forced
certain citizens to work in the Tigar-Poorman :
n ;ne against their will. No such flagrant Invasion
of the right of the citizen can be cited in the his
: tory of thi* country.
Fourth— Major Smith suppressed "The Mullan ;
Mirror." a newspaper published at Mullan. thus i
denying: free speech and -••„. press. This was a
gross violation of law wholly unjustified.
Fifth The permit system — in fact, a blacklist
evstem approved by General Merriam and kept in
operation to this day by the presence of the mili
tary forces of the United States, Is a violation of ;
law which cannot be defended.
In summing up the minority «ay
We are satisfied from the evidence adduced be- !
1 fore trie committee that General Merrism was j
! wholly mistaken as to his powers and duties: that
' his conduct has resulted in the gravest injuries
! to the liberty of the citizen and the rights of Indl
■ viduais. Innocent men have been kept in prison ,
■ for months without trial, and have been finally
discharged without any charges being preferred
■ against them.
At one time or another there were ov»r eleven
1 hundred men in the prison at Wardner, known as
i the •'bullpen." They were kept there many months,
i Thfy ■.v,-!.- not tried. They were not charged with
any crime; they were held and guarded by United ;
States troops. It was the duty of General "Merriam :
; and of the Pre« ■• ■ of the United States to in- '
quire into the cases and reasons Tor the detention ;
of so many citizens. No such inquiry was ever :
made. Such indifference is hard to understand j
and harder to excuse.
The plea that General Merriam was acting at 1
the request of the Governor of Idaho and his State i
rf .p r( r. S entatlve. Bartlett Sinclair, Is not good.
Neither the Governor nor Sinclair had the right !
to violate the law, and General Merrlam knew it, j
or should have known it.
Although the Governor of Idaho has for ■ year j
and more been governing Shoshone County by j
martial law he has never railed the Legislature to
gether. The laws of Idaho provide that a session
of the Legislature be called on twenty days" i
notice. The minority hold that the President is I
not jus'lfled in keeping United States soldiers in- I
definiwly in Jhoshone County at 'he mere will of i
one man, when the Legislature, representative of •
the people, could be and ought to be convened
and their wishes ascertain!
The majority report was also completed to-day
and submitted to the minority members, but it will j
not be made public until approved by the House
Military Affairs Committee, which conducted the i
investigation.
TREATY WITH ARGENTINA RATIFIED.
Washington June 4.— United States Minister j
Lord, at Buenos Ayres, to-day informed the State !
Department that the ratifications of the new treaty
of extradition between the United States and the
Argentine Republic were exchanged are to-day. !
This treaty was negotiated in th«» last Adminlstra- |
tion, but failed of ratification because It Included a •
clause permitting each of the nations to surrender
its own citizens on extradition proceedings. This
clause was !inal!y omitted to meet, the wish of the
United Stales Senate, and as amended the treaty
has been ratified.
.
REFORMED PRESBYTERIANS AXD H) \t\ .<
Cedarville. Ohio, June 4.— When the Reform Pres
byterian Synod met to-duv it was decided to meet
next year at Plttsburg on Hay 29. in the Eighth
Street Reformed Presbyterian Church.
A resolution was adopted declaring thai the sub- ■
stitution of hymns for psalms in public worship 1»
the same aa "the substitution of a work of prose
tor some other book of the Bible.
The Committee on Systematic Beneficence re
ported, urging the members of the Church to give |
one-twelfth of lh«ir Income* to the work of the :
Chiirn/i I
KEW-TOBK DAILY TKIBrXE. TUESDAY. JUKI 5. 1000.
MANY APPOINTMENTS.
THE PRESIDENT NOMINATES PORTO
RTCAN JUDICIARY AND EX
ECUTIVE COUNCIL.
Washington. June — The President sent the fol
lowing nominations to the Senate to-day:
JOKE SBVETIO QUTXONBS. of Porto Rico, to ba Chief
Justice of the Supreme I'ourt of Porto Rico.
LOUIS srLZBACHFTR of Missouri; JOSE C. HERNAN
DEZ. .IOSB M. PIQUERAB and RAFAEL XOETE T
AIIBILLB, of Porto Rico, to ba Associate Ju2tii-es of
the .Supreme Court of Porto Rico.
WILLIAM H. HOLT, of Kentucky, to be United .States
District radaja for the Distiict of Porto Rico.
EDWARD S. WILSON, of Ohio, to bo United States
Martha] for the Distri.-t of Porto Rico.
NOAH R. K. PETTIXGILL! of Porto Rlcn. tn he United
State* District Attorney for Porto Rico.
JOP JPH F. DALY, of New V .rh LEG >. ROWE, of
Pennsylvania, and JUA.V HTHIXAXDEZ LOI'EZ. of
Pan i-:Ti : rto Rio, to be member* of the i'omml«
■lon to compile and revise Ota lawa at Port Rico.
JOBB C. BARBOSA. of San Juan . ROSENDO MATIENZO
• •I.YTROX. .if Ponce rOSEJ liE DIEI.iO. ■< Mnyacuez;
MANTEL, CA.MUNAS. of Fajarcto. and AXDREAS
i ROSAS, of San Juan, to be members of the Executive
Council of Tor:o Rico.
MARTIN GROVH BRUMBAUGH, of Pennsylvania, to he
Commissioner of Education of Porto Rico.
JOHN E. KEXDRI'-K. of Rhode Island, to b« Marshal of
the United States for the District of Rhode Island.
ARMY.
Second Lieutenant ROBERT C. CORLISS 34C.1 U. S. V..
to be Oral lieutenant ■ pora JOHN H. RUFF. '-..in
pany EL, MUi Infantry. U. S. V., u> be second lieu
tsnant.
NAVY.
Cadets to he assistant constructor* — HI3XRY WILLIAMS
and ITDXRY T. WRIGHT.
WALTER Q. p. -Tin (naval cadet] to be lieutenant in the
Marine Corps.
Naval cadets to be ensfpns — .1. HALLJGAX. Jr., CHARLES
BOOXH Y. S. WILLIAMS. WILLIAM C WATTS.
L. SHANE. E. T. COXSTIEX. O. I. .SMITH. E. W.
IITXTTRE T. L. JOHNSON. H. J. ELSON. F. L
PIXNBY, 'i T. PETTRN'ULL. W. G. BRKiCS. W. P.
i'RONAX. J. A. *"<)FIBL^. F\ L. SHEFFIELD. U
f. MAi-Y. <1. C. SWEET. P.. X. MARBLE. Jr.. Z. E.
BRIGGS, F. T. EVANS, H. C. DIXLVQR. W. B.
TARDY. M. H. BROWN, ,T. A. HA.ND, Jr.. W. T.
TARRAXT D C. HAXRAHAN, L. A. rTEN, G.
W. FALLER, J. F. BARi-OfK. • EDWARD WOODS.
''. A. ABELE. J. S. GRAHAM. A. X. MITCHELL.
W. B. WELL? and C. P. NELSON.
When ex-Judge Joseph F. Daly waa seen at his
home. No IP East - eond-st., last night, he
«aid that he had as- yet received no official noti
fication of his nomination to the Porto Rican
Commission. Accordingly, he preferred not to
make, public a.= yet what the work of the Commis
sion would be.
AGREEMEXT ON ALASKAN BILL.
NO DELEGATE IN COXGRESS— REGULATIONS FOR
MINING.
Washington. June 4.— The conferrees on the
Alaskan Civil Code hill have reached a complete
agreement. The House provision for a Delegate
in Congress from Alaska if stricken out, as it was
fcund that It would be Impossible to hold an elec
tion next fall. The mining provisions are adjusted
so that miners may continue to work between
high and low tide and to dredge under the bed of
the ocean, according to rules made by the Secre
tary of War, and on condition that they are citi
zens or have declared their intention of becoming
citizens. These were the chief points in con
troversy.
ARMY AND XAVY ORDERS.
Washington, June 4 (Special^. —The following
Army and Navy orders have been issued:
ARMY.
The following? ihangei In th«> stations and dutte* of offi
cers if the Ordnance Department are ordered:
Captain WILLIAM W. GIBSON will report to the Chief
of Ordnance, Washington, for duty in hia office.
*Ttrst Lieutenant JAY E. HEFFER ib directed to mport
to the commanding officer, Frankfort! Arser.al, for a»—
«l(rnm»nt to duty at that post.
First Lieutenant KENNETH MORTON, upon the arrival
at the Frankfort Arsenal of Lieutenant HEKFER.
will ■»» relieved from duty there and will report for
duty to the commanding officer of the sandy Hook
Proving Ground, taking station at New-York City.
First Lieutenant WILLIAM H. TSCHAPPAT Is relieved
from duty at the Watertown Arsenal, and will report
to the Chief of Ordnance, Washington, for duty in
his office.
First Lieutenant EDWARD P. OHERN Is relieved from
duty in the office of the ' Ctrief "of Ordnance, and
will report to the commanding officer of the Water
town AraanaJ for duty at that post.
Captain WILLIAM L. SIBERT. C"r«-ps of Engineers, will
proceed to Fort Totten and report for temporary
duty.
Leave of absence srranted ■: an Assistant Surgeon
ELMER A. BCHERRER is »xi#nderl . ten. days.
Major SAMUEL O. L. POTTER; surgeon, will report to
th» commanding (teneral. r'-DH—n-,>-nt of California,
for temp<irary duty In that department.
A-.-t!n* Assistant Bureeon ROT A. WILSON will proceed
to Fort Slocum and report to the commanding >rfl -r
of that v-*iv -*i for the purpose of accompanying re
cruits 10 San Francisco, and upon the completion of
this duty will return to his station at Fort Totter..
First Lieutenant FRANK M. CALDWELL. 7th Cavalry,
new on leav<» of absence, will proceed to Madison.
Wl«.. and report to the Governor of Wisconsin for
duty with the National Guard of that Suite for two
months.
X A VT
Lieutenant-Commander J. C. CRESAP, to Naval War Col
lege, Newport, June 23, for course of instruction.
Lieutenant-Commander J. E. ROLLER, additional, to
Navy Yard. Boston, as relief of Lieutenant Smith.
June 12,
Lieutenant R. C. SMITH, detached works of Ger>rge Law
ley A Son June 12. to the Kearaarse June 16.
Captain X. M. DTER. detached Navy Yard, Boston. June
11, to «p<-<-ial temporary duty in charge Puisret Sound
Naval Station. Bremerton, Wash., June ltt. during
a'Mcnce of Captain Coghlun.
Captain C. F. GOODRICH, upon arrival home, to pro
pare course of lectures for delivery at Naval Wax
College.
Lieutenant P. 'WILLIAMS, detached offlce captain of
yard. Xavy Yard. League Island, to the Richmond
Immediately.
Lieutenant C X. ATWATER. or»l»r of May 31 modified;
detached 1 Naval Academy June 16, Instead of June 8.
to the Mononßahela June 17
Lleutenant-'-ommander E. B. I'XDERWOOD, detached
the Alliance when out .{ commission, to NavaJ War
College for course of instruction.
Lieutenant H. G. MACFARLAND, to home, ria the
Dixie, from Manila.
Lieutenants I J. riEXX and J. H. SYPHER, commis
sioned.
Assistant Surgeon J. R. WHITIXQ, detached the Chi
cago and to the Montgomery.
Passed Assistant Smvaon A. M. D. M'CORMICK. de
tached the Montgomery and to the Chlcajfo.
Naval Cadet W. G. ROPER, detached the Porter, tn
connection with Instruction at torpedo station, grant
ad sick leave for one monta and then report to the
academy for re-examination physically.
Naval Cadets S. W. BRYANT W. K. RIDDLE. W. K.
WOR'IMAX. J. .1 HTLAN*D and W. 8. CASE, de
tached Naval Academy June 8 and to the New- York
June 13
Naval Cadets H. T. WINSTON, R. MORRIS. E. B.
BCRANTON and C. P. HUFF, letached Naval Acad
emy June 8, to home and wall orders; be ready for
sea fTvlce about July 1 on board the lowa.
Naval Cadets J. F. HBLLWEG. H. ELLIS, J. H. COM
FORT, H. <'. COCKE. C L. ARNOLD. R. A. ABER
XATHY. W. V. TOMB and L E. WRIGHT. Jr.. de
tucnetf Naval Academy June 8, to home ,md w.-ilt
orders; be ready for sea service about July l on
Am* Station.
Naval Cadets E. H. DODGE, E. P. BVAR2 and F. D.
BBRRIEN, detached Naval Academy June 8. to home
and wait orderß: be ready for sea service about July 1
on board the Philadelphia.
Naval Cadets J. W. SCHOENFELD. G. B. LAXDBX
BERGKR R. L. BERRY. C. E. LAXDRAM. F. R.
NAILE and" 8. H. R. DOYLE, detached Naval Acad
emy June 8. to the Kentucky June li.
Naval Cadets D. P. MAM i L XOA. J. W. TTMMON.-
J. D. WAIXWRIGHT P. »>OLBT and H. W. OP
TERHA'".-'. detached Naval Academy June m, and to
the Kearsaige June 11.
COUNT LAUTREC TO BE SURRENDERED.
Washing-ton, June — Having withheld action out
of deference to the request of counsel as lonpr as
possible in the case of Count Lautrec, Secretary
Hay to-day issued to the British Embassy a war
rant for the surrender to th*> Canadian officials of
the Count for return to Montreal, where he is
wanted to answer a ••hn Ke of embezzlement.
SALOONKEEPER DIES AFTER AX ASSAULT.
Frank McCluakey, thlrty-eipht years old. of No.
3W East Thlrty-«evanth-st.. died it his hon. yes
terday under such •!■ unsta ea that the Coroner
was Informed. Dr. Hyland, of No. 160 East Thir
ty - Etn-St . was called in yesterday to attend M. -
Cluskey. and learning of an assault on Thursday
refused to iHHUe a certificate, and reported the ease.
McCluskey kept a Biiloon at Wlnety-etghth-st, and
Third-uve. On Thursday night Defectives Dtzon
and Hallihan, of the East De-hundred-and-fourth
st. •.'■n. were near the saloon when they heard
the nolße of a tight and saw two men rush out.
They arrested the two men. and took them back
to the saloon. There McCluakey was found witn
a severe cut on his chin. A third man was pointed
out to the detectives as being connected with the
assault, and he was arrested.. The three prisoners
gave their names at Bart Condon, eighteen rear*
old, of No. 1,512 Lexlnerton-ave.: Jamen Galvin,
twenty-seven years old, of No 1.191 First-aye., and
Joseph Stewart, twenty-one years old, of No. 23*
Kant Nlnety-fourth-at
The next morning the throe men were arraigned
before Magistrate Mende. in the Harlem police
court, but McCluskey did not appear. The de
tectives however, made a charge of disorderly con
duct against them, and they were fined $T. apiece.
Condon has been rearre.ste-d. and the detective?
are atill looking for the two other men. The po
lice are inclined to thlnU that M<-<. MiKkey did riot
die from the assault, and believe that alcoholism
waa the primary causa of death.
BUSINESS IN THE SENATE.
MR. TELLER CRITICISES THE ADMINIS
TRATION'S PHILIPPINE POLICY.
Washington. June Congress Is In the last grasps
of the long session, and its expiration apparently
Is to be perfunctory. Unless something extraor
dinary accurs no further general legislation of
National Importance will be enacted before final
adjournment. The Senate was In session more
than ten hours to-day, nearly four hours of which
were Blent in executive session.
The chief features of the day session were a
ppe«»ch on the Philippine question by Mr. Teller, of
Colorado, and an ineffectua 1 effort of Mr. Petti
grew, of South Dakota, to ob;a!n consideration for
the Anti-Trust bMI passed -, the House last Sat
urday.
Mr. Teller referred to the speeches of Mr.
Beveridge. Mr lx>dge and Mr Spooner. declaring
that they contained a strong political bias and an
evident desire to advance the policy of the Ad
ministration, rather than to arrive at a just and
righteous solution of the problem presented. He
declared that the speeches of These Senators had
contained references to thr President of 'he United
Sta'.es which w?re sycophantic. Some of the
speeches of the Republicans had been marred, in
his opinion, by attacks on Mr. Bryan. It would be
his effort nor to make a political speech, although,
he added, "my remarks may b*- tinged With my op
position to the Republican party '
He was one of those who believed that American
sovereignty attached in the Philippines to the
Island of Luzon, at least. "By the laws of war."
said he, "we occupied those islands. When we be
came masters of the island of Luzon we became
practically masters of all of the islands. I believe
a republic may have ,id may hold colonies, hut
those colonies must be founded nn a participation
in rhe Government by the people of the colonies.
I see no way to surrender the Philippine Islands.
I don't know whether 'imperialism' la to b« an
Issue in the coming campaign or not. It will not
he unless the Republican party shall make it an
issue."
He referred to the speech of Mr. Hoar as show
ing finitely more concern is to the fate of the
Republican party in the elections next November
than that justice and righi should be. meted out
to the Filipinos. So it was. he declared, with Re.
publicans everywhere, It was the most striking
part of the Senator's speech, he said, that he
should have presented so strong an appeal to hi*
parry not to face defeat in the campaign by re
fusing to chance its policy.
In a sharp and exrenried criticism of the govern
mem provided by <.\>r:gr»ss for the people of Porto
Ri o Mr Teller said it was a part of the imperial
istic policy of the Republican parry. In conclusion
he said he would not support the Republican party
in tlie reaching campaign. "1 dc not support
its financial policy and I do not support the Phil
ippine policy as foreshadowed In the pending meas
ure 1 rhe Spooner bill). And I do not want to give
up the Islands, either They should be a source
of Kreal advantage to 'is. They stand in the great
pathway of the commerce of the world, and they
.•an b:- made of immense value to this country."
To-night a session was held at which many of
the S«>narorp appeared in ■■: dress, and the gal
leries were filled by a gay dressed crowd of spec
tators. Mr. Pettlgrew replied at length to the
speech of Mr. Spooner on the Philippines, but did
not finish his remark* The remainder of the ses
sion was consumed in consideration of conference
reports and in passing minor measure" on the
calendar.
THREE HOURS IN EXECUTIVE SESSION.
EXTRADITION TREATY WITH SWITZER
LAND RATIFIED— BTNUM'S NOMI
NATION DISCUSSED.
Washington. June — The Senate was in execu
tive session three hours to-day, dividing the time
between the extradition treaty, which has been ne
gotiated recently with Switzerland, and the nom
ination of W. D. Bynura to be general appraiser of
merchandise at New-York. The treaty was rati
fied without division after some slight verbal
amendments. It in the regulation agreement for
extradition of criminals and is a modification of the
old treaty with Switzerland. According to the
former agreement Switzerland was pledged to sur
render her own citizens on the demand of the
United States, but a law having been enacted re
cently by the Legislative Assembly of that coun
try making such surrender unlawful a new treaty
became necessary, and the convention ratified to
day was negotiated.
The Bynum nomination was then taken up and
consideration pressed by Senators who opposed
confirmation on the theory that if a v«tevt:ould
be secured confirmation would be defeat^. Sen
ator Fairbanks, as Mr. Bynum'a friend and ■!:>•;
supporter, opposed consideration, and. failing in
his purpose, moved to recommit the nomiwmorrto
the Committee on Finance. This motion was lost
by a vote of 32 to 34. Mr. Fairbanks then took
the floor and spoke for he remaining wo hours
of the executive session. The session was brought
to an end a few minutes before 6 clock by an
order for a recess at that hour, and action on the
nomination to-day was prevented.
STATUS Or POSTAL CLERKS.
CLASSIFICATION BILL BENT BACK TO COM
MITTEE—CHARGES THAT A BIG LOBBY
ING FUND HAS BEEN RAISED.
Washington, June *. — tho Senate to-day Mr.
Wolcott, chairman of the Committee on Post
offices and Poetroads, moved to send back to the
committee a bill tor the classification of clerks in
first and second class poetofftces. He said It had
been stated that the first and second class poet
office clerks of the country had contributed an
immense fund to be devoted, to lobbying this bill
through Congress. They had been assessed $10
or more each to be devoted to a cause absolutely
senseless and of no use whatever. As lobbyists,
Mr. Wolcott said, some good men perhaps were
employed, and certainlj some notoriously bad men
had been employed. He thought the clerks ought
to be advised that such contributions gained
nothing.
Mr. Butler remarked that the amount assessed
on the clerks had reached the sum of SH'iu.uOO.
Mr. Wolcott said he had little doubt of that, aa
every lobbyist with a political pull waa on the
payroll.
The bill was recommitted.
XIX TH IHSTRICT REPFBLICWS.
COMMITTEES REPORT PROGRESS IN THEIR
EFFORTS TO GET MEN OUT TO
THE PRIMARIES.
The Associated Republicans of the XlXth Assem
bly District held their monthly meeting last nljrht
at Xo. 2144 Broadway. William H. Douglas, chair
man of the organization, presided. The purpose of
the meeting was to hear reports from subcommit
tees appointed for the purpose of stirring Into
activity Republicans who are not members, and to
get them to the primaries. Am many as twenty of
these committees' reported progress. Many of the
members expressed the belief that the revelations
now being made of certain Tammany officials as
connected witli the Ice Trust would work inf.-itabie
retribution at the polls. The association numbers
in ail i ■■• ■■:; MO members. Among them may be
mentioned William H. Douglas. F. F. Waters. W.
C Crane L. M titanton, W. H. B. Totten, J. L.
Elderking. Nathan Bijur, D H. Bates, jr.. Dr.
VVooster Dr. A. Fisher. Joseph H. Mead, Ernest
Rosenberg. W. B. •'ramp.. Leroy D. Ball, Henry A.
Wise. W. H. Cromwell Dr. Frank F. Clark and
Theodore Wentz.
In answer to the report that the association la
antagonistic to the regular Republican organiza
tion Mr. Douglas said to a Tribune reporter:
"If the regular Republican organisation nomi
nates men in whom we believe the people can
rightly put their confidence this association lends
us aid. If not. it don't."
COLOMBIAXS WANT HOOD UOXEY.
Washington. June United States Consul Shaw,
at Barar.qullla. Informs the Slate Department that
according to a decree issued by the Minister of
Finances Colombian port dues, which have here
tofore been pays lie in Colombian currency, are
now to bo collected in the gold coin of the country
to which tlie ■ — tel may belong. This materially
Increases the expenses of vessels entering and
clearing at Colombian ports.
XEW-MEXICO'B XEW CAPITOL DEDICATED.
Santa. Fe. N. M.. June 4.— Tha new Capitol of
New-Mexico was dedicated this afternoon with
mposing ceremonies This quaint old city was
thronged with visitors. Houbes and streets were
>-sp«-vial!y decorated. A jicrand military .and civic
pageant was reviewed from the Capitol steps by
Governor Otero. a: I o'clock the- Governors
salute was fired and the monster flag raised on the
lantern cupola.
The dedicatory exercises were held in the hall
<,t the House of Representatives. Chief Justice
W I Mills presided and miuie an address. Arch
bishop Peter Bourga.de offered the dedicatory
nraver F A. M;inzanar*s. o' Las Vcpiß. deliv
'■rf-d the building over to Governor Otero, wno. in
turn placed the building in barge of the Custodian
Committee for which the Territorial Secretary,
.." .... H Wallace, made the address. Ex-<.over
nor L. Bradford Prince delivered the oration of
1 This' evening the Territorial officials ga\e a
recentlon at the aCpitol and the Woman* ■ Board
ortfrade a ball at the Palice Hotel. The Capitol
ivas tlluminaied with 2.000 electric liKhts. The n<-w
Capitol takes the place of the > one destroya by
lnc«Tndiarie« in IJBt The butldimr is classic in
.trchitecture and huilt of sandstone, granite and
pressed yellow to «•■
AIRS. JOHX SHERHA.X DEAD.
i
; THE WIFE OF THE EX-SECRETARY PA39EB
AWAY IN MANSFIELD. OHIO.
Mansfield. Ohio, June 4. — Mrs. John Sherman
I died at midnight. She was Miss Margaret
j Cecilia Stewart, only child of the late Judge
Stewart, of this city, and was seventy-two years
old. She was married to Mr. Sherman on De
cember 31, IS4S. She was born here, and will
J be buried here.
TO ARREST THE IXI>EX CLERK.
JUDGE GREGORY ORDERS A WARRANT 13-
SUED FOR E. H. DENNISTON. IN
THE SCHOOL BILL FRAUD.
Albany, June 4 (Special). — Judge Clifford D
Gregory. County Judge of Albany County, upon
opening court to-day, said: •
I have examined the evidence submitted since
Saturday laat and have determined that Ed
ward H. Denniston must be held to await the
action of the Grand Jury, and that a warrant
issue for his arrest. .
This was a reference by Judge Gregory to the
evidence taken in regard to the forgery of the
Rochester School bill. Edward H. Denniston is
the Index Clerk of the Assembly. James W.
Eaton, counsel for Mr. Dennis; on. had a confer
ence with District Attorney Dyer, and it was
agreed to defer the issuance of the warrant
until to-morrow. This course was taken to al
low Mr. r>enni?ton to procure bondsmen for his»
bail. He is in town, and probably will appear
before Judge Gregory In hi? chambers to-mor
row, as the warrant for his arrest designates
that he shall be produced there. Mr. Denniston,
it is said, will offer bail, which may be for
$n,OOO. for his release while awaiting the action
of the Grand Jury. District Attorney Dyer of
Albany County will submit a printed copy of
the evidence taken before Judge Gregory re
garding the school hill to the Grand Jury.
The Grand Jury of the present term Ik com
posed of the following: John W. Adam?, of Al
bany; John Baheock. of Bethlehem: Frederick
J. Barends. of Albany; Isaac S. Becker, of
Guilderland; Frederick Campbell, of Watervliet:
John W. Coughtry. of New-Scotland: Arthur
Fitch, of Albany; Gilbert H. Gay, of Albany;
Oscar Haswell. of Bethlehem; Henry Heck, of
Albany; James H. Hill, of Albany; A. E. Hoch-
Btrasser, of Berne: Jacob Horle, of Albany;
Lewis Hotueweitor. of Albany: David Martin,
of Albany; Hash Mullen, of Albany; John D.
New, of Cohoes; James J. Phelan. of Albany;
Edward Robinson, of Albany: Frank Smith, of
Albany; George Trapp. of Albany: George Van
Deusen. of Berne; Peter J. Veeder. of Guilder
land, and Thomas Warding, jr.. of Albany.
ILLINOIS STFF.L MILL AFFAIRS.
ONE MILL AT JOLIET STARTS W— WHAT
PRESIDENT GARY SAYS OF SHUTDOWN.
Chlcajro, June 4.— A dispatch from Joliet. in.,
Bays that the Merchant mill of the Illinois Steel
Company started up to-day, giving employment to
five hundred men. The company's officials say the
mill will run throughout the summer. It is ru
mored that the rod mills and converter will also
resume operations soon.
At the American Tin Plate Works the "hot
mills" also started up to-day, and the entire plant
la once more in operation, rurnlshlni work for
three hundred and fifty men.
Elbert H. Gary, president of the Federal Steel
Company, which controls the Illinois Steel Com
pany's mills at South Chicago, which have, been
shut down, made this statement yesterday:
The Illinois Steel Company has closed its plate
and slabbing mills, partly because it was found
necessary to make repairs and partly because or
ders were rather slow in coming along just now.
"We are not likely to shut down for more than a
brief period. We propose to keep our inventory of
Btoek substantially normal. Our other mills have
work on hand for several months to come. Th»
Milwaukee mills are busy with orders, and condi
tions generally are quite up to expectations. We
expect to reopen our Joliet mills by the middle of
this month.
President Bufflngton of the Illinois Steel Com
pany was at the office of the Federal Steel Com
pany yesterday, but could not be seen by re
porters.
President Gary started West last night, on a
tour of Inspection of the constituent companies of
the Federal Steel Company. In Chicago he will
be met by H. H. Porter chairman of the Board of
Directors, and Anson R. Flower, who is also a
member of the Board.
Accompanying Judge Gary are Nathaniel Thay»r.
one if the directors Richard Trimble, secretary of
the Federal 3teel Company: Edward Shearson. as
sistant to the president, and Thomas Murray,
clerk. Their tour will extend as far as Duluth,
with stops at Johnstown, Perm.; Loraln. Joliet,
Chicago and other points.
nstavnA plant
Mlddiesboro. Ky.. June. 4. —The sroe 1 plant of the
V'.rirtnla [roa, '""oal and Coke Osnqsaas -iere was
to-day Two hundre< ssev were *hro-v -
ioyment- No reasons are known for Dm
shutdown.
ITALIAXs TRY TO DROWS A MAX.
DRIVEN OFF A SCOW, THEY BEAT HTM AND I
DRAW KNIVES WHEN HE ATTEMPTS
TO LAND.
Gaetano Farina, an Italian laborer. forty-fly«
years old. of No. 314 East Forty-nfth-st.. waa a ■
prisoner before Magistrate Olmsted. In the York- {
vtlie Police Court yesterday, charged with assault
upon John McCarthy twenty-two years old, of No.
324 East Fifty-sixth-st., Sunday afternoon. Mc-
Carthy and a number of other young men were
sitting on the garbage scows at East Forty-Eighth- 1
st.. fishing. Some Italian scow tnmmera got dan- ;
gerously near the edges of the scows w*iil» at '
play, and McCarthy warned the younger ones that
they would fall overboard. The boys took excep- I
tion to the warning, and Farina picked up a bar- 1
rel stave and beat McCarthy so lustily that tie fell
Into the river McCarthy tried to get back, but ,
Farina beat him about the head, and McCarthy ;
swum to the -oier. Here another Italian appeared
with a knife, "and as McCarthy caught hold of a '
spile the Italian made a savage lunge at him. Other j
Italians appeared under the pier, and the intention
seemed to be to drown McCarthy.
The boys on the scows set up a yell, and Bicycle 1
Policeman Edwin J. Dobson. who happened to |
come along, dismounted and rescued McCarthy. As 1
Dobson went after Farina a number of his friends •
drew knives and threatened to kill Dobson if he j
arrested the man. Dobson drew his revolver and !
then Farina came from his hiding place and ac- ■
i-ompanied the policeman to the East Fifty-first- !
st. station. Dobson made a search for the Italian
■who attempted to stab McCarthy as he tried to
land but he had escaped. This man is known to
the police, and will be arrested.
■ j
PRODUCE EXCHAXGE ELECTS OFFICERS. :
BAD FAITH CHARGED AGAINST MINORITr. WHICH
CALLED ITS BALLOTS "REGULAR TICKET." |
Charges of fraud and bad faith were openly made |
at the annual election of the New-York Produce i
Exchange yesterday. A small minority had a (
ticket In the Bald printed in the same form and
type as thai of the ticket regularly nominated. ;
The minority did not stop there, but headed Its j
ballots "Regular Ticket." There was no difference '
in the list of nominees on the two ticket* »ay« that |
Frank I. Magutre was the candidate of tao re^-- .
lars for member of the Board of Managers, while •
the alleged regulars had put up Theodore B. Cha.-e.
To add to the general ill-feeling and iHsaatlsfarUon
there was criticism of certain members of the
Nominating Committee. becaua« the ballots ;or ;
trustee of the Gratuity Fund— Charlea H. Wessela
(regular) and Perry P- Williams (independent)— ,
were not ready when the polls opened in the morn- ;
■"•'• election resulted in an eaay victory for the j
regular nominees, altnoush Mr. Weasels vsut de- |
feated. These are the new officers:
President— KLUOT T. BARROWS.
v'iei-ITMKitrni— FKEI>EKI«" H. ANDUETVV3.
Treasurer — EL'WAiLD C KICK.
Uaaum* 'to s*rv« two y*ar»>— FRANK I. MAGriRE. ;
H MYERS BoGERT DAVID L>. ALJ^KRTON. OSWALD
BAXDCRSON. JOHN VALIANT «nd JCWIIPU d.
THAYtR
TniatP* "of 'he Gratuity Fund, to »*rv» full term itnra* ,
y*&r»>— PEKRY P. WILLIAMS.
TWO UES KILLED IS TRAIX WRECKS.
Weldon. N. C. June i.— A collision occurred on
th« Atlantic Coast Line Railroad near Weldon to
day. la which two men were instantly killed and !
three seriously injured. Number K. known as the
Atlantic Coast Line Fast Mail train, ran Into an !
open switch at Garyahurg. resulting in a collision ;
with some freight cars. Those killed were an en- (
glneer named <'heatham. one of the oldest entrl-
D f.» rs on ••;,. (."oast Line, and an unknown white
tramp who was stealing a ride. The baggage and
mail cars were wrecked, and three other persons
besides thoss badly hurt were injured, but not :
seriously.
PREPARING TO ADJOUBR.
ACTION IN THE HOUSE ON CONFERENCE
REPORTS.
"Washington. June 4. — The H isjsa to-day aarssj
to the Senat-» amendment to th<« Sundry Clvtl
hill appropriating $.".OO<\OOO for the Louisiana
Purchase Exposition at St. Louis. There wu
not a word of •iebat» nn roncurrencs In the
amendment. It was after 6 o'clock when the
: matter came up, and. owin«r to the lateness of
1 the hour and the overwhelming majority of til*
; House in Us favor, -he opponents of the appro
priation for the Exposition did not even males' a
j show of opposition. They contented themselves
[ with demanding a rollcali. which resulted 127
! to 7T» in favor of the appropriation. The lieu?"
; also Wnmt to the Senate it»m for the Mississippi
j River, reducing the appropriation to 52,250.000
and adding: a provision for the preparation of a
j comprehensive report on the levee system by the
■ Mississippi River Commission. "VVith these «■
[ epptions the items of the Sundry Civil bill still In
' dispute after the adoption of the partial confer
ence report wore sent back to conference.
The disputed items of the District of Columbia
! Appropriation bill were agreed to. and the MB
; ■went to the President. leaving inly four apprt>
. priation bills still in dispute b»tw<»en the two
j houses. Mr. Tawnev. of Minnesota, is maklnsr
an effort to d?lay final adjournment unless ac
tion is had on the Grout oleomargarine hill, but
he met with no success to-day. Everything , so
I far as the House is concerned, indicates final
1 adjournment on Wednesday.
STEAMER WRECKED OX FLORIDA COAST.
Key West. FTa.. June 4.-Th«» Copenhag-n. a Brlt
! Ml steamer, ran ashore on a reef near Fort
I Latiderdale. seventy miles north of ape Florid*.
! on May 26. at 8 a. m. The Copenhagen was bound
I from Philadelphia far Havana. The tvs Chflds
! went to her assistance and almost succeeded la
( floatine the steamer, when heavy weather a7a!a
j drove the Cop«»nhaeeu ashor*. dM water covering
1 her decks and boilers. The steamer Is a total
I wreck. Captain Smith went ashore at Fort Laader
| dale with the '>rh -r officers. Before away h*
1 made an account of waM with the cr*w to data.
I but afterward (is alleged, he telesr^phad to
Consul Taj • that th>- crew had d«>serte<l tn» ship
; The crew were tak-r off the wreck by the tv?
! Consul Tav - is providing for them, and will »— m
. them to their hnrr»(« in tn*» North on Thursday.
XORWICH nidi CITY OFFICIALS.
Norwich. Conn.. June 4.— At the city election held
her» to-day the Democrats elected Charles F.
Thayer Mayor, and also the City Clerk. City Cat
lector and City Sheriff, while the Republican*
elected the remainder of the ticket, including Al
dermen and fotEnimcTi. by a majority of about adL
The Republicans win have control of the city gov
ernment. A larg* vot^ was polled.
TITAR.NER'S WARNER'S
"CAFE" CI'RE
FOR LAME BACKS.
"CAFE" CURE
FOR w;.\K KIDNEYS.
"CAFE- Cl X
FOR KIPXST DISEASES.
"CAFE" CURE ~
FOR "rwnm
"CAFE" CURE
FOR BRIGHTS DSJBXJMaI
"C A FE" CURE —
FOR TORPID LITSRS.
"CAFE" CURE ~~
j fok
|"CAFE" CURE
FOR BILTOCS HEADACHES.
"CAFE- CURE.
' FOR BIUOTTS FLATTTLEMCT.
"C AFE" CURE — —
FOR LIVER EXERVATTO:*.
"CAFE" CURE *
has errßHr* THnrsANt*
"Cafe** CURE
WILL CTRE TOT".
"C AFE" CURE
SOLD XV KR -"- HERB.
"CAFE" CURE
ACCEPT XO STTBfTTTTTS.
ESTABLISHED 1846.
v — YORK STORE. I BKOOKLTM , «— .os»
BROADWAY. Brcaiway * B««lfr.r<i An.
COR. SI3T ST. I Fulton St. 4 Flat bush A-«%
Oxtords continue
Gentlemen's prime favorites —
their very neatness
Sults - and gentility appeal
to men of quiet taste.
They're here in — from the
merest mixture to light grey— sls,
$IS, $20, $22, $25, $30, $32
and $35.
Suits in many other colorings of
quiet tone, $15 to $35.
Rivals of these are the Serges —
blue, black, single and double
breasted — $15 to $35.
Fine clothes, too, for the Little
Gentlemen.
I For Summer, */*
pp/twg /m mum
mmW^ w w Send for
/ M New York: U2^fc** ld •*«-
I 1 lot* BrniMtfrar.
I M Brooklyn: SO4 Fulton M
CARPET CLEANSING.
a'^rt rth Ay., Near -J>ch >t.
Y^V E.t.ih. lHrt.l. -r>i ii 32 3>;h tt>
W*ll SK.\D KOII CtlUtLUl.
'Sg T. M. STEWART.
(Enropjran Qlfctiernacnujua.
London.
Hotel
Victoria.
JLFRACOMBE (England). ~
ILFRACOMBB HOTEL.
An rood Americana »t*» lhar* befor* thmg I.a.
3

xml | txt