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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 06, 1900, Image 1

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V- LX X° 19.561.
THE TRANSVAAL CAPITAL FALLS
PRETORIA SURREXDERS UNCONDITIONALLY TO THE BRIT
ISH FORCES VXDER LORD ROBERTS.
BATTLE PRECEDES CAPTURE—WAR VIRTUALLY AT EXD.
Lord Roberts sent a dispatch from Pretoria announcing the unconditional
nder of the city, and it was stated at the War Office that the British Com
mander in Chief entered the town at 2 o'clock in the afternoon.
A short eng - at preceded the town's capitulation, the Boers opening
five ' ' concealed artillery and attempting to flank the British, the move
mer' the work of General Hamilton's troops. The British
I ■
Battalion of the Imperial Yeomanry was cut off by the
Boers near Lindley and captured. Lord Methuen's force arrived on the scene
ton late to re- - prisoners, though the Boer troops were put to flight.
The war is now considered to be virtually at an end. The Boer commandoes
opp< r at Laing's Xek are expected to withdraw to Lyden
■g, where a fin : may be made.
ROBERTS MAKES NO TERMS.
CITY'S CNCONDTTIONAL SI'RRENDER
ASKED AND OBTAINED
London. June 5. — The War Office has received
the folio-wing- dispatch from Lord Roberts:
Pretoria, June 5, 12:55 p. m. — Just before dark
yesterday the enemy were beaten back from
nearly ail the positions they had been holding,
and lan Hamilton's mounted infantry followed
them to within two thousand yards of Pretoria,
through which they retreated hastily.
De Lisle then sent an officer with a flag- of
truce Into the town, demanding" its surrender
In ay name. Shortly before midnight I was
awakened by two officials of the South African
Republic. Sandberg. military secretary to Com
mandant-General Botha, a ■! a general officer
of the Boer army, who brought me a letter from
Botha proposing an armistice for the purpose
of settling 1 the terms of surrender.
I replied that I would gladly meet the Com
mandant-General the rext morning, but that I
was not prepared to discuss any terms, as the
surrender of the town must be unconditional.
I asked for a reply by daybreak, as I had or
dered the troops to march on the town as soon
as it was light.
In his reply Botha told he had d»
; t he trusted
■ • would
ted. A: 1 a. m. to-day, while on ':
-
-

It was arranged that Pretoria should be taken
possession of by Her Majesty's troops at '2
o'clock this afternoon.
Mrs. Botha and .Mrs. Kriiger are both in
Pretoria. Some few of the British prisoners
have been taken away, but the majority are
Etill at WatervaL Over a hundred of the offi
cers are in Pretoria. The few I have seen are
looking well.
It was announced verbally at the War. Office
-■ ts entered Pre
toria at 2 - . African time.
BOERS' FA INT RESTS TA XCE.
siABCH TO THE CAPITAL A STUDY IX
MANCEUVRIV
(Copyright; 1U00: By The New- York Tribune.]
[BT CABLB TO THE TRIBUNE.]
London. June 6. 1 a. m. The promenade from
Cape Town to Pretoria was tnded yesterday
after a battle of manoeuvres, rather than serious
fighting. Lord Roberts gives a detailed descrip
tion of this engagement, and helps thereby to
dignify the entry of the British troops into the
capital. The details have a hollow ring, and it
is not clear that the resistance offered by the
Boers was serious. The Boers, when attacked
by the mounted infantry and the yeomanry, fell
back upon a position in the rear, where they
ha.d concealed several guns. The naval guns
and the batteries of artillery moved up with the
infantry brigade behind them, and the Dutch
retired. The Boers then made a feeble attempt
to turn the left flank of the Eritish army, but
•were thwarted when General Hamilton's col
umn of mounted infantry filled the gap. The
Boers retreated, and Lord Ro'oerts's army, after
bivouacking overnight, entered Pretoria yester
day afternoon, the Guards leading- the way. The
casualties were not neavy and the engagement
was a series cf manoeuvres on each side, without
desperate or persistent fighting in defence of the
Dutch strong-hold.
Lord Roberts was embarrassed by the Earl
cf Rosslyn's enterprise last week in revealing
the helplessness of panicstricken Pretoria and
the facility with which it could be entered by
the Britibh troops, and he was deprived of the
cred:t of forcing bis way into the Boer capital.
sirce the eagerness of the officials to surrender
the town was proclaimed when he was not pre
pared to advance. By waiting- six days he gave
to the Boers On to recover from their panit
and to make some show of defending the capi
tal. The account of Monday's engagement and
Tuesday's entry is better reading for each side
in consequence cf the delay. The Bo^rs have
the credit for making a final stand at Six Mile
Spruit, and of seeking to ambuscade the British
and then to outflank them, and Lord Roberts,
instead cf marching In several days after the
enemy had scuttled out, has the satisfaction of
entering the capital in gallant style after a suc
cessful engagement.
MASTERLY TACTICS OP BRITISH.
Lord Roberts does not appear to have used
more than two brigades of infantry, with a
etrong body of cavalry, and, while the heavy
Suns were kept well In front, there was little
*ork for them. He had stationed two brigades
"f cavalry north of Pretoria, and General Hamil
ton's column to the west, and had not attempted
to concentrate his forces, since th« Boer com
mandoes were not strong.
After a few hours of manoeuvring the capital
■•^as left defenceless. The forts, constructed at
the expense of the mine owners and strength
ened during the rar were abandoned, the
Creusots and Krupps and the famous Long
Toms, which were to render Pretoria impreg
nable, were taken east to the mountains, and
tn*r capital, which President Krtlger's burghers
had boasted would be defended for month after
month, wai! surrendered after a single feeble
engagement.
The facility with, which Johannesburg and
« on tinned on ai-coiil pagr.
ONLY KwCftS TO ST LOVXB. NO EXTRA
FARE.
Pennsylvania Limited. L*nve B Hew York tvery
morning.— Advt.
YEOMAXRVMEET REVERSE.
IRISH BATTALION CUT OFF BY BOERS
NEAR LINDLEY.

[Coryrißht; 1900: By Th* New- York Tribunal
[BY CABLE TO THE TRIBUNE. I
London. June 'i, 6 a. m.— Late last night the
news was received from Lord Roberts of the
capture of the 13th Battalion of Imperial Yeo
manry under Colonel Bpragge by a superior
Boer force near Lindley. On Thursday, three
days ago. It was stated that General Rundle's
attack on the Boers near Penekal had relieved
the pressure on Colonel Spragge's detachment
a*kd enabled it to reach Lindley, but this must
have been an overoptimistic view of the situa
tion, for the little force was compelled to sur
render.
Th^ battalion included the I>uke of Cam
a Own, two Belfast companies and a
□ company of Imperial Yeomanry, and
numbered probably between four and five hun
dred men. Lord Methuen, of whom little has
•ard of late, was at the time on a march
■ Heilbron side of Kroonstad. and Lord
■ ordered him to go to Colonel Spragge's
mcc. Lord Methuen Accomplished a
I rr.arh. but although he succeeded in
-.? the intervening forty-four miles In
was too late to effect a
res .
H" states, however, that he had a running
fight with the Beers and routed them.
The incident is really of not much importance,
but It may serve as a warning- that there i« still
a good deal of fighting to be done.
A dispatch to 'The Express " says that Gen
e.als Hunter and BaAefi-Foveli met at Lich
tenburg, while the Central News states that the
former general is marching en Potchefstroom.
The news of the occupation of Pretoria is com-
I upon I y all this morning's newspapers.
Naturally great delight at British success Is ex
:. and 4 r. two or thr^e Journals Lord
Roberts is compared with Maryborough and
-rton. _ T. N. F.
OFF» LAX GERMAN VIEWS.
Berlin, lone ".—The 'Norddeutsche Allge-
Zeitung" prints a statement from an offi
cial source regarding the results of the m
rman Foreign Office into
the cases of reported insult to the German flagr
at East London. Port Elizabeth and Bendigo.
It says:
The a have been
gr*-ai:y exaggerated in the German press, and
th*- apology of th^ British Foreign Office has
made a favorable impression h<
To-day a high official of the Foreign Office
said:
. ie would Germany became a party to
any attempt to prevent Great Britain reaping
the fruits of her vie:
•hat the British hnve occupied Pre
■ . appears In the r-- »ning papers, but in al-
THE SENATE CONFIRMS HAZEL
j NOMINATION APPROVED AT A MIDNIGHT
EXECUTIVE SESSION".
Washington, June s.— The Senate confirmed
j the nomination of John R. Hazel to be United
J States Judge for the Western District of New
| York at an executive session, held at midnight.
The nomination of Genera] Joseph Wheeler to
i be brigadier-genera] was also confirmed, as were
i most of the nominations sent In yesterday and
to-day, except that of William Hay wood, of
; Honolulu, to be Collector of Customs for the
| District of Hawaii.
Among other nominations confirmed were the
i following:
! CHARLES H. BROWN, to be Attorney of the United
Slates for th* Western District of New- York.
| "WILLIAM R. COMPTON', to be Marshal for the Western
District of New-York.
j GEORGE B. CT"RTIP.=. to be Attorney for the Northern
Dthtnct of New-York.
i THEODORE L. POOLE. to be Marshal for the Northern
District of New-York.
] Erieadier-Ger^nil ELWELL S. OTIS, U. S. A., to be
major-general.
\ JOHN E. KEN'DRICK. to be Marshal for the District of
Khode Island.
TO OVERHAUL TURKISH FLEET.
Cons:.. June s.— The Government has
i contract with the AT »««Vlfi Company, of
for the renovation of eight Turkish iron
dads, and is negotiating with the Krupp com
rni . ..••in.
A WARXIXG TO AGRARIAXS.
Berlin. June — "The Post." in a semi-official
article, warns the German pr-.-ss against describ
ing Anglo-American Inquiries concerning the Meat
Inspection bill as an unwarrantable Intervention In
home politics, because, it points out. such an at
tack is calculated to provoke reprisals. The
"Neuste Nachrichten" also remarks that Germany
is not in a position to ignore th* foreign repre
sentations.
DEWEY STARTS FOR THE WEST.
Washington, June 5— Admiral Dewey started to
night at 9 o"clock over the Baltimore and Ohio
Railroad for his trip to Columbus, Detroit
and Grand Rapids. Mich. With him were Mrs
Dewey, Lieutenant H. H. Caldwell and J. H.
Maddy, representing the railroad company. On the
centre window of each of the cars of the train
was a miniature Admiral's flag, with its four
etars on the aid of blu«. the only decorative
feature apparent on the 'rein. Several hundred
people, saw The party off The trip West Is slmplj
a asocial one. and has. the Admiral says, no
political significance.
NEW 26 HOUR TRAIN TO CHICAGO VIA. PENN
SYLVANIA RAILROAD.
Leaves New York (West 23rd St. Station) 1:56 p. m.
dally.—
XEYV-YORK. WEDNESDAY. JUNE 6. 1000. -SIXTEEN PAQm.-w*Zg2S?J2Lmm
FILIPINO REBELS ROUTED.
GUNS AND AMMUNITION TAKEN-RES
CUE PARTY FOR CAPTAIN ROBERTS.
Manila. June 5. — Major Johnson, with two
companies of the 29th Infantry and twenty
five men of the 18th Infantry, sailed from Rom
blom to the neighboring island of Tablas. where
i:sembarke:l simultaneously in four con
verging clumns. The Americana encountered
about sixty rebels, who retreated, and they
captured forty, including all the officers, to
gether with 10.000 rounds of ammunition and
twenty-four rifles. Forty men of the 29th Regi
ment, with a lieutenant, were left as a garri
son, the others returning- to Rombl<rn.
Company E of the .V.th Regiment and Com
pany C r of the 4th Retrirrii-in encountered fifty
Insurgents behind stone trenches in the high
mountains near Norzagaray. Province of Bula
can. There was persistent righting, and seven
Americans were wounded. Finally Company G,
by a flanking movement, carried the trenches.
Trumpeter Speaker, of Company G, has been
commended for "determined bravery'" by Gen
eral Fttnsi
Troop Q of the 4th Cavalry, Company C of
the 34th Regiment, and Company A of the
'-2<i Regiment, are pursuing the captors of Cap
tain Charles D. Roberts, who was taken by
Filipinos while scouting n>-ar San Miguel de
Mayumo on Kay 29. It is reported that the
Filipinos have scattered in the trackless forests.
Forty rifles, with artillery, and a considerable
quantity of ammunition have been captured by
the Americans in the mountains back of Dun
alutihan. Thr°e Filipinos were aisn taken.
The Am< ■■ stroyed the camp
of Genera! Mascardo. The naiives report that
irith two hundred men and five hun
dred rifles, will surrender if he receives assur-
B th.it h~ will not be imprison--'!.
Yesterday, whil" scouting in the vicinity of
Santo Tomas. Province of Nu< a. two
ans w^re v. oui
An Investigation Ini .- [ the burn
'"andaha ha? red; it is alleged
to have • loi Irunken sailors.
3< :;il local conmi isea recently re
: anonymous ■ I lat -he Filipino
crews of th( - •■! fciii
■ never a fa - •• i ■■
v ntly the steamers are
now running with armM European guards.
The mem ■ ■ Civil Commission are now
(flees and places of residence.
HODGSON I. EAVES COOMASBIE.
GOVERNOR OF GOLD COAST BELIEVED TO
BE IN GREAT PERIL.
London. June 6 — ' The Daily Mail" has a dis
patch fr m ■ ra la ■: Tuesday, saying
■ed there Thar Sir Frederic Mil rheE "
son. Governor of the Gold Coast Colony, has
- he had been besieged, and
c is believed to be in great straits.
MOORS READY TO ATTACK FRENCH.
SERIOUS SITUATION* IX ALGIERS— COLUMNS
JOINED AT ZOUBIA.
London June 5 — Dispatches received this
evening from Algiers portray a serious situa
tion. Thousands of .Moors are massing at Figuig
and in the nHiehhorhoo*.* preparing- fjar i n>ter
mined attack upon the advanced posts
French.
The French columns have joined hands at
Zoubia, but the men suffer terribly from heat
and thirst, and hundreds of camels have .
The French are preparing ir-tr^nchments. and
repel an attack
and even to iakr the - - ■
!.•-. --ssary.
DE FIX ING CONSPIRACY.
A BILL, OF GREAT INTEREST IX THE LABOR
AND BUSINESS WORLD FAVOR
ABLY REPORTED.
"Washington, June s.— The House Committee on
Judiciary to-day voted to report favorably the bill
which has aroused widespread attention in the
labor and business world limiting the meaning of
tile word "conspiracy," and also the use of "re
straining orders and injunctions." A provision was
added that the act shall not apply in cases of
threats, intimidation or coercion. The bill provides:
That r.o agreement, combination or contract by
or between two or more persons to do or procure to
be done, or not. to do or procure not to be done,
any act in contemplation or furtherance of any
trade dispute between employers and employes in
the District of Columbia or any Territory of the
United States, or who may be engaj in inter
state or foreign trade or commerce, shall be deemed
criminal, nor shall those engaged therein be in
die table or otherwise punish for the crime of
conspiracy if such act committed by one person
would not be punishable as a crime, nor shall any
restraining order or injunction be issued with rela
tion thereto. Provided, that the provisions of this
act shall not apply to threats to injure the person
or the property, business or occupation of any per
son, firm, association or corporation, to intimida
tion or coercion, or to any acts causing or in
tended to cause an Illegal Interference by overt
act* with the rights of others.
Moth in this act shall exempt from punish
ment, otherwise than as herein excepted, any per
sons guilty of conspiracy for which punishment is
now provided by any act of Congress, but such act
of Congress shall, as to the agreements, combina
tions and contracts hereinbeiore referred to, be
construed as if this act were therein contained.
TO BUILD FBEIGHTCAJtS IX THE SOUTH,
AMERICAN CAR COMPANY WILL TRANSFER ITS
PLANT FROM DETROIT TO FENSACOLA.
New-Orleans, June 5 (Special).— dispatch, ema
nating from Martin H. Sullivan, the wealthy tim
ber owner of Pensacola, Fla., announces the de
termination of the American Car Company, of De
troit, to transfer its immense freightcar manu
facturing plant to Pensacola. Mr. Sullivan spoke
from knowledge acquired at Detroit, where he had
been in consultation with R. A Alger and other
men of the American Car Company management.
Some weeks ago Sullivan closed the sale of a large
slice of bis yellow pine timber n«»ar Pensacola to
the car company for the sum of $1. 600,000 cash, re
taining a large amount of timber land as his per
sonal property. It is claimed as reason for the
transfer of the plant to the South that material
can be laid down at the factories at one-half the
cost at Detroit, with a consequent reduction in
selling price and increased profits. An immense
force of men will be employed. Senator S. A. htm -
lory, of Florida, has been attorney to complete the
deal.
WALDORF POLICEMAN LOSES AX ARM.
Poticeman Barroa. of the West Thirtieth-st. sta
tion, fell from a Thlrty-fourth-st. horsecar near
the west end of the Waldorf-Astoria last night
and broke his arm. He was taken to the New-
York Hospital, where It was said the fracture was
such that amputation of the arm was necessary,
that such an extreme measure alone could prevent
blood poisoning and save Barros's life. Policeman
Barros la fifty-four years old, and has been on th»
force since 1577. He has been detailed to the Wal
dorf-Astoria ever since it was built, and is popular
there. At midnight the West Thirtieth-st. police
heard that the surgeons had amputated the police
man's arm. and that his condition was precarious.
AM ERIC AX KILLED AT THE EXPOSITION.
Paris, June 5.— A man named "Tony" Stringer,
of Chicago, employed .• the Worthlngton Com
pany's exhibit at the Exposition, was killed to
day as th« result of -in elevator accident.
BE SURE TO SEE NIAGARA.
So of course, you should take the New York Cen
tral from Grand Central Station, the centre of the
metropolis of America.— Advt.
ALWAYS USE FLATT3 CHLORIDES
for household diasnfectlon. You will like It.— Advt.
HOT TIMES IN CONGRESS.
STORMY POLITICAL DEBATE
IX THE SENATE.
SENSATIONAL CHAS6SI AGAINST RE
PI'BLICAN CAMPAIGN MANAGERS
OF ISO 2 DENIED BY SENATORS
CARTER AND HANNA.
[BT TELEGRATH TO THE TRIBUNE. ]
"VVa.-=hington. June .". — Nettled at the passape
by the H^use of Representatives of a drastic
and comprehensive Anti-Trust bill, and realiz
ing that only one full legislative day was left
them to break the force of the action of the
House, the Democratic and Populist leaders in
th» Senate set themselves to-day to making
campaign capital out of an Insincere and be
lated effort to rush the House measure through
the upper branch without even the safeguard of
consideration in committee. Mr. Allen had in
itiated yesterday the sham fifrht for action in
hot haste on the Anti-Trust bill, and his tactics
were renewed to-day by Senators Bacon. Petti
grew and Teller. Of course, with final adjourn
ment already fixed by general agreement for
to-morrow, a motion to dispense with a commit
tee examination of the House bill and force its
parsap^ offhand amid the ru3h of business
whi'-h marks the ."lose of every session could
hav<* no o»her purpose than to serve as a pre
text for an outburst of purely partisan recrim
ination.
Mr. Pettigrew. who seems to have been chosen
by common consent to fill the role of jackal for
the opposition, ec.ipsed his many previous per
formances in this Congress by dragging into
to-day's discussion some extraordinary fharges
against the management of the Republican Na
tional campaign of 1862, and following them up
with some equally sensational comments on the
methods by which the chairman of the Republi
can National Committee of 1896 secured an elec
tion fr^m Ohio to the T'nited States Senate.
Both Mr. Carter, the head of the Republican
Commiti 1862, and Mr. Hanna, its chair
man in 1896, r- pu Uated Mr. PettigreWs state
ments in the most pointed and emphatic manner.
But the South Dakota Senator's peculiar assaults
on fellow members have go ions been dismissed
In the S.-naT- as the empty railings of a political
outcast that even his reflections on the two Re
in . .impaig-n manazers made only a mild
sensation among- his auditors. Both Mr <~*arter
ani Mr. Hanna felt called upon to apologize for
uth Dakota Senator's insinua
tions — insinuations whose source left them al-
BufQclently discreditei. Mr PettigreWs
term a; Senator will expire on March 3, IWL
L'ntil then, no doubt, outbreaks like that of to
day are to be expected from him in accord with
that strar.g-e formula 'iT which seems
to control his eccentric political acting.
TROUBLE OVER ANTI-TRUST BILL.
The Chair laid the House Anti-Trust bill be
lore the Senate, and it was read i second time.
Mr. pettigrew moved to proceed with its con
sideration.
Mr. GaUfoger moved to refer the bill to the
Committee on Judiciary.
The latter motion, 'r »~hair Held., to** pjra**
; r ■ In the course of a brief speech Mr Petti
grew inquired; ••Was this bill passed by the
House to become a law? If so. then we must
remain In session until it is passed. Wu.s it
: to be used as a club to be held ov<
porations this summer to get campaign contri
butions? Then everybody knows who will use the
club. I shall resist the passage of any reso
lution to adjourn until this bill has been con
sidered'
In a speech favoring the reference of the bill
to the Judiciary Committee. Mr. Stewart de
clared that Coner-rss would make itself the
laughing stock of the world if it should pass
such a bill as that pending without first giving
it rrcst careful consideration.
THE CRAMPS' ALLEGED CONTRIBUTION.
"We cannot deceive the country into the be
lief," declared Mr. Bacon, "that we are proceed
ing in good faith if we give such direction to this
bill as practically will destroy any chance of
action upon it at this session. I think, and the
country will think, that the motion to refer is an
indirect method of defeating the bill." He was
profoundly surprised, he said, that a statement
made a few days ago by Mr. Pettigrew. that the
Cramps had contributed $400,000 to the Repub
lican National campaign fund of 1882, with the
promise that they would be repaid by contracts
for the building of warships, had not been de
nied. He regarded it as a most remarkable
statement, and directed attention to the fact
that Mr. Hanna and Mr. Carter, intimately con
nected with that campaign, were In the cham
ber and heard the statement.
MR. HANNA REPLIES HOTLY
Instantly Mr. Han.-.a wad on his feet. "If."
said he, sharply. "I should undertake to reply to
all aut-h statements mad.- on this floor I would
occupj Senate than even the
- from Georgia does. (Laughter | I
heard the statement and considered it unworthy
of notice, and I declined to dignify it by a
denial. I had nothing to do with the campaign
of 1892. but I have h~ard this story, and I say
most emphatically and decidedly that I believe
it is not true. So far as such allusions are
made to the campaign -^ 1896, I desire to say
that no promises were made, no considerations
were offered to any person or corporation for
contributions AS -
Mr. Carter, who was chairman of the Repub
lican National Committee in I S !>'J. and who had
sat calmly listening to the statements of Mr.
Bacon and Mr. Hanna. rose and sa i I de
sire briefly to reply to the charge made by the
Senator from Georgia, that In I*'.» 2"
•A LIE. SAYS SENATOR CARTER.
Mr Bacon, Interrupting: "I simply stared
that th^ charge had been made on this floor
and had not be*---
"The statement of the Senator." resumed Mr.
"is the first intimation I have had that
such a --harei- was ma ie by any person. As
to the statement, somebody ought to be respon
• . •ment was." pr^ led Mr.
Carter, "that In IiBB the campaign was con
ducted with funds derived from corporations
which were to be reimbursed through the me
dium of Government contracts. This is the
first time I ever heard 'hat statement made. I
say now. and then are flsnstrws on this rlo.ir
who will bear me out. that any charge that
■ utiona were thus lecsrvsd or that any
promises were made to corporations or to in
dividuals is absolutely false, and can be brand
ed properly only as a lie. Money was received
by the committee, but only through voluntary
contributions. In that campaign the party was
(ontluuni on fourth pm«;p.
NEW M HOUR TRAIN TO CHICAGO VIA PENN
SYLVANIA RAILROAD
Thrives New York (West 23rd St. Station) 1:55 p. m.
daily.— Advt.
THE DAY LINE in: are a rest for tired people
and a luxury for the Uzy. Music. See Sia,. ada.
—Advt.
FIGHTING BEGINS AT TAKU.
ADMIRAL KEMPFF LANDS SArLuRS
FRHM TH?: NEWARK.
THE NEWS FROM CHINA REGARDED IN
WASHINGTON A3 OF THE T,"T
MOST GRAVITY
Washington. June .">.— The Secretary of the
Navy has received the followir.? cable 'iispatoh
from Admiral Kempff. commandingr the ITntted
States ship Newark, lying- at th»» Taku forts at
the mouth of the Pei-ho Riv^r. dated Taku.
June .":
Engagement has commenced. Have landed
force of fifty seamen — battalion of ma
rines. KEMPFF.
The break in the Admiral's dispatch is» caused
by an illegible group of figures. Read in one
light it would seem that the Newark has landed
fifty sailors to reinforce the marines already
ashore, and In another aspect it might mean
that fifty sailors had been landed with another
battalion of marines.. However that may be, the
Admiral's news is regarded of the utmost grav
ity. Secretary Long has instructed him to send
his messages hereafter in plain English, in order
to avoid further misunderstandings and delay 3
in translating the cipher. The Admiral has said
nothing about needing more force, but the De
partment stands ready to supply this at once,
supposing that he has not communicated di
rectly with Rear-Admiral Remey at Manila In
quest of reinforcements.
The State Department has received a cable
dispatch from Minister Conger, at Peking, stat
in? that matters have taken a much more
serious turn there. No details are given, but it
is indicated that the activity of the Boxers Is
extending close to the Chinese capital.
The State Department still finds itself unable
to do more than it has already ordered for the
protection of American Interests In China.
Troops are not available, and even if they were
the Government is disinclined to take part in
any joint demonstration that would menace the
integrity of the Chinese Empire. This statement
is a sufficient answer to the intimation in the
British newspapers that the co-operation of the
United States with British forces in China would
be welcomed.
According to a dispatch from Shanghai dated
June 1 there are twenty-three warships at Taku —
nine Russian, three British. thr«e German, three
French, two American, two Japanese and one
Italian. In addition to their crews, the Russians
havt* on board their warships ll.fK'O troops from
Port Arthur, armed with field guns. There are
also 14.000 Russian troops held in reserve at Port
Arthur.
A dispatch from Admiral Kempff dated at Taku
on May 30 reported the landing of 100 marines.
The next day a special train started for Peking
with th»» following forces: Americans. 7 officers and
5<5 men; British, 3 officers and 13 men: Italian. 1
officers and 39 men: French. 3 officers and 72 men;
Russian. 4 officers and 71 men; Japanese, 2 officers
and 24 men. The foreign contingent was reported
to have taken with them five nuick firing guns.
On •: - last day of May It wris also, reported that
heavy fighting took place between the Boxers and
the Chinese Imperial troops at Lai-Shin-Sen. On
Monday the Cossacks who returr.ed to Tlen-Tsln
reported a sharp fight with the Boxers at Tu'.l. In
which they had killed"3ixteen and wounded many.
REBELS NEARING TIENTSIN.
CITY BEING INVESTED ON ALL SIDES
PREPARATIONS FOR DEFENCE.
London, June 6. — The Shanghai correspondent
of "The Daily Mail." telegraphing- yesterday,
says :
The Boxers ar? within three miles sH Ttan-
Tsin. In addition to the marines the defensive
force includes volunteers under the command or
Major Higgs, formerly of the l»Uh Lancers. The
tcnvn is practically under arms.
A dispatch to "The Daily Mai: ' ?7-orn Tien-
Tsin, dated June 4. says-
The situation Is very serioua The Boxers are
approaching Tien-T3in on all sides.

FOREIGN FLEETS MAY COMBINE.
London, June 6. — The Berlin correspondent of
"The Daily Chronicle" says:
In official circles here it is believed that the
situation in China has grown worse. The Powers
are now exchanging dispatches regarding- the
appointment of a single commander for the
united European and American squadron.
RUSSIAN TROOPS ORDERED OUT
London. June 0. — "The Daily Express" has a
dispatch from Shanghai, dated Tuesday, which
says:
Russian, troops have been ordered from Port
Arthur to the neighborhood ot P-king, to pun
■ - Boxers" tor killing tw ■ i ks and
wounding two.
GERMAN MISSIONS PILLAGED.
Berlin. June ."—News has reached her- - ti
several German and Catholic missions in the
Province of Sha.i-Tung have been pillaged by
rr.obs supposed to have been incited by the
"Boxer" aafitav
A MISSIONARY MURDERED.
VICEROY THOUGHT TO BE IMPLICATED—
CHINESE TROOPS MAKE A STAND
Tien-Tsin. June .". — News has just b»
eeived from the Viceroy, through the men he
sent to Yung-Chins, that Mr Norman, of the
North China Mission, wa.s murdered on Fnday
or Saturday. It is thought that the Viceroy
knew ot Mr. Norman s murder at the Us
Mr. Robinson's.
A visit to Huansr-Tsun. on the Peking-Tien-
Tsin railway, to-day, showed that the station
had been burr.-. and two bridges damaged.
The officer commanding the Chinese troops on
duty there said thru two hundred of his men
had bolted and only fifty remained..
These fought well, killing a number of the
"Boxers." The bolting troops were badly cut
up in the adjacent broken country. It Is stated
that sixty were killed or wounded. Some of
their bodies were recovered, frightfully mu
tilated.
All the Chinese railway employes are desert
ing their posts, and the troops sent to guard
the stations appear to be worse than useless.
A guard of 2.V) sent to Feng-Tai bolted at Lv-
Kou-Chlao yesterday morning when they heard
of the trouble a: Huang-Tsun.
EMPRESS'S DEFIANT ATTITUDE.
Shanghai, June 4.— "The China Gazette" says
it has the highest authority for stating that the
Dowager Empress has ordered the Tsung-H-
Yamen to face all Europe rather than interfere
with the "Boxer" movement.
Elsewhere It HI asserted that the Viceroy has
ordered the troops to oppose the further landing
of parties from foreign warships and that the
troops now engaged in operations are designed
to prevent further foreign reinforcements from
reaching Peking.
MAY BLOCKADE THE PEI-HO RIVER.
Vienna. June s.— The "Neve Freie Pre?-> to
day says the representatives of the foreign
Powers at Peking have requested their Govern
ments •■"> assent to the squadron of foreign war
ships blockading the Pel-Ho River, leading to
Peking, as well as blockading Tlen-Tsin.
HAVE YOU SEEN ONEILL'3 "AD" TO-DAY?
Read It You'll find :: on the back page. They're
selline women's Trimmed and rntrtmmfil Hats at
unusually Low Price*. t>th Aye.. »th to 21st St.—
Advt. _
PRICE THREE CENTS.
HILL COWS THE TWER.
ICE THREAT HOLDS >TATE
COMMITTEE EOR Hl'
CAMPBELL AGAIN CHAIRMAN — STATE
CONVENTION ADOPTS PLATFORM
WITHOUT CHICAGO FEATURES.
Drlrsatr* at Lar«r. Alternates,
nnvltl B. Hill. Prank Cnmp&ptl.
Edward Jlnrphr, Jr. •*. Van SnntToordV
Hi.h.inl Crnkw. Jacoh Rnpprrt, Jr.
An«rn«m« Van WyeU. .li«me« *herltn. "
STATE COMMITTEE OFFICERS.
Chairman Frank Cnmprtrtl. of Ratk
TmnnrT EaK»r IlnErhe*. of Onondnjgra
Secretary Charle* R. De Freest
The Democratic State Convention, which met
in this city yesterday in the Academy of Music,
was a colorless affair. The indications on Mon
day night hat the Chicago Platform Democrats
would carry their fight into the convention were
not fully realized, and, save the guerilla tactics
of one unbridied delegate cf the Chicago plat
form stamp, there was virtually no interruption
of the cut and dried plans of the convention.
There was more or less shouting-, hooting and
recrimination from the gallery, but the dele
gates were docile and meek. Augustus Van
Wyck. Mayor Van Wyck. John F. Carrolb and
Richard Croker we referred to by the gal
leries as "Icemen." Ex-Senator Hill was chided
for his ambiguous position at this time, and
there was from time to time some alight dis
order; but the work of the convention was don*
and adjournment accomplished without a fight
of consequence on the floor.
Ex-Senator Hill has his way from start to
finish except in the point of instruction of the del
egates, and he had conceded that some time ago.
He retained his control of the State Committee
at the meeting last night, and from surface
indications appears to have regained his lost
leadership in the State. This clutch upon th«
leadership, however, to the initiated is known
to be weak, indeed, and he will have to
strengthen himself materially If he hopes to
retain control this fall.
THE WORK ACCOMPLISHED.
The convention yesterday elected four dele
gates at large to the National Convention,
named Presidential electors, selected the dele
gation to represent New- York In the Kansas
City Convention and adopted a platform. This
platform was of Senator Hill's drafting. It was
along the lines expected. The only contest over
any plank was as to whether the money plank
of the Chicago platform should be reaffirmed
or not. The ultra Bryan men wanted the Chi
cago platform reaffirmed. Mr. Hill opposed this
and favored the adoption of a platform of his
own drafting. He had hs3 way. The platform
is printed elsewhere, and it will be noted that
it skims over the meney issue by declaring
vaguely for bimetallism. There is no reference
to the income tax. but trusts, imperialism, "en
tangling foreign alliances" and other alleged
iniquities 1 of the Republican party are de
nounced.
Everything was seemingly serene and placid
upon the face of the Convention, except the
hoots and yells from the galleries and the spec
tacular protest of ..one delegate, but Us was
only apparent. Th* real fight was in the Com
mittee on Resolutions, of which Frederick C
Schraub. of Lowville. wast the chairman. It was
allotted to this committee to draft a platform.
The matter was finally referred to a committee
of five. Norman E. Mack was the representa
tive of the ultra Chicago platform Democrats
■upon the committee. While the Convention
was dragging along and entertaining itself by
listening to the band play, commenting upon the
remarks from the gallery and either cheering
or hissing the lone delegate who tried to get a
• -nation of the ChicagD platform, the Com
mittee on Resolutions was lighting hard up in
the Hoffman House. The committee listened
to the remarks of five representatives cf the
Chicago Platform Democracy. Theae repre
sentatives didn't mince words in declaring what
they would do if they failed to secure a re
affirmation o* the Chicago platform. Norman
E. Mack led the struggle for this end. It was
nearly 5 o'clock when the platform which was
adopted was finally agreed upon.
HOWL FROM BRYAN MEN.
When the Committee on Resolutions adjourned
and it became known that a platform was to be
reported which did not reaffirm the Chicago
platform there was a howl from the Bryan men.
They denounced Mack without stint. Mr Mack
was seen and asked why he had surrendered.
He had unril the last moment stoutly ;-
clared that as the member of the Erie County
delegation upon the Committee on Resolutions
he would, if a platform was offered which did
not rearS the Chicago platform, submit a
minority report wh;ch would provide for such a
reaSrmation. This would have carried the ngfct
into the Convention. Mr. Mack said: "I got all
I was fighting for. I aimed high, and the com
promise was satisfactory- What I wanted was
instruction for Bryan, with a pledge to abide by
and support the platform to be adopted at Kan
sas City. I got that, and the organization in
the State is committed beyond al! hope of break-
Ing away.*" *
After the convention convened in the after
noon the delegates amused themselves by
watching a huge drop scene in the back of the
stage which depicted a number of glaciers. Ice
is in the background to-day," said one delegate
derisively. Elliot Danforth's speech was listened
to attentively, but met little ... After
the speech Mr Pan: as presiding Ulcer.
announced that the next thing In order was th*
report of the Committee on Resolutions. The
answer was that the committee was still in ses
sion and would not be able to report for some
time. Hardly had this announcement been mads
when a tall. one armed delegate, with a mop
of iron gray hair, a fiery eye and a clarion voice,
arose in the Essex County delegation. He was
Edward S. Stokes, an uncompromising- Chicago
Platform Democrat. He began in a slow, but
eam?st voice:
"Since the Committee on Resolutions has been
unable to report a platform, I beg to submit
one that can be adopted nd upon which every
Democrat in the country can stand. It ta the
Chicago plat.- of 1S9&"
AN UPROAR FOLLOWS.
He waved si his hand a piece of paper. Im
mediately there was an uproar There were
cheers and hisses I — i the gallery, and crte»
of "Sit down:*' "Put him out!" "Put him on
ice!" "Shu: up!" and like suggestions cam«
from various delegates. Stokes stood his ground
manfully, and sent up his paper, with a request
that it be read from the platform. Mr. Dan
forth replied Icily:
Th° i-ha!r rules that the gentleman is out of
ON HERE: OFF AT ST. LOUI3.
Lackawanna-Wabash luxurious new through car
leaves hero after June 2 at It) a. m. daily, arrtvtn ■•
St. Louts 2 p. m. next day. Unexcelled, meal* at
reasonable rate* Unrivalled scenery.— Advt.
Kerp v. aJws -.->use— the Cold esssaw
JAYNETS EXPECTORAXT.-Advt.

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