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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 16, 1900, Image 1

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V oL tX'"^°- 19,571.
SCARE NEWS FROM CHINA
I VAST ARMY TO OPPOSE
SEYMOUR'S FORCE.
FOREIGN* MINISTERS VIRTUALLY PRIS
ONERS IN THE CAPITAL—RUS
SIAN MOVEMENTS.
{Copyright; 11*00: By The New-York Tribute]
[BY CABLE TO Till-: TEIBtTXE.I
London. June l i. 0 a. m. — The news from
China to-day is more alarming than ever. "The
Express" correspondent at Shanghai says that
the foreign Ministers are virtually prisoners in
Peking, and their position, should the Chinese
trocps attack the Legation guards in force, is
hopeless. A hundred thousand Chinese soldiers
are massed outside the capital prepared to re
sist the advance of the relief column, which,
however, according to the latest reports, is
still at Lang-Fang. All official contradictions
[withstanding. '"The Express" correspondent
maintains that Russia is siding with the Em
press. Confirmation is lent to this statement by
the fact that a Russian force, with six siege
puns, has arrived outside Peking, and is acting
independently of the other Powers, though it is
believed that France is co-operating with it.
The only telegraph wire now working from
Peking is the Russia line, and on this line
English messages are rigidly refused.
British reinforcements to the number of 3."V)
Bailed from Hong Kong yesterday for Taku.
and to-day, says "The Times." the cruiser Ter
rible will leave with 300 more.
An undated "News" telegram from Peking
states that the European Legations and Amer
ican missions there have been placed in a state
of defence. l - -"*• *"•" •
SITUA TION XO T IMPRO I '!. D.
DfSCBBBCTIOX SPREADING FROM PBOV
INCE TO PROVINCE.
[Copyright: 19»'<0: By Th» New-York Tribune.]
[ht CABLM to tub rRiBCXE.I
London, June 16, 1 a. m.— Chinese situa
ton has not Improved during the last twenty
.'our hours. Admiral Seymour, with twenty
three hundred marines, is not more than three
fifths of the distance between Tien-Tsin and
Peking, and the Boxers are destroying the rail
way in front of his force and burning bridges
behind it. The excitement at Shanghai and
Tien-Tfin is increasing:, and it is rumored that
the relief column is itself in nc-^d of rescue.
Admiral Seymour is a cool, intrepid officer of
excellent Judgment, and he can be depended
upon to conduct the force to Peking if supplies
hold out. The foreign Admirals may have mis
calculated the strength of the Boxers, and it
may be necessary to nd a. Russian military
force to support the marines. The Russian re
serve of seventeen hundred men is already on
shore, with guns and horses, and this can be
increased by four thousand men from Port Ar
thur. Englishmen, who have a confirmed habit
of seeing a deep intrigue in everything Rus
sian, are convinced that the bridges are burned
and the marines Isolated in order to provide the
garrison at Port Arthur with a pretext for
sending an army to Peking. In this Chinese
affair it Is difficult enough to find out what is
on the carpet without trying to look under it.
Dispatches received here before midnight were
mainly from the coast towns, and there was
little trustworthy Intelligence from the capital.
Christian refugees had swarmed into Peking
from the mission stations, and the embassies
and Protestant churches and buildings were
barricaded. The China Inland Mission at Yuri-
Nan-Fu had been attacked, and the insurrec
tionary movement was spreading from province
to province. There bad been a quarrel between
French and British marines over an engine, but
a reconciliation had been effected by the Ameri
can Consul at Tien-Tsin. There were rumors
of hard fighting, but these were not confirmed
with authority.
The British policy Is not understood, but there
!.= a general impression among Members of Par
liament that a European concert will I
Russian occupation and that Lord Sal
will not offer objections. Russia, by making a
..•h Japan in Corea or
elsewhere, will have a free hand and not be
red with. I N". F.
TO SEIZE THE TAKU FOETS.
REPORTED INTENTION' OF THE INTERNA
TIONAL FORCES.
T;*-n-T£in, June 15.— The mixed forces. It Is
■ ■■••!, will attempt to seize Che Taku forts
to-night.
■-••h la moving twenty-five hundred
from Lu-Tai to Chun-Lia-Ch-np Gen
eral Tur.L-s shanghai troops are moving to
Peldi ■
WILL NOT OPPOSE FOREIGN TROOPS.
INFORMATION FROM THE FRENCH MINIS
TER AT PEKING.
Paris. June IS. — a Cabinet Council to-day
the Minister of Foreign Affairs. M. Delcasse\
announced that the telegraph line to Peking had
again been cut. The latest dispatch from the
French Minister there, he added, was dated on
the evening of June 12 and said the Chinese
Government had Informed him that it would not
oppose the foreign detachments entering Peking.
The French Consul at Tien-Tsin, ML DelcassG
announced, had telegraphed that all was quiet
within the French concession there, which was
guarded- by French and Russian troops.
Finally, M. DelcafisA Raid, a swift first class
cruiser had been ordered to proceed to Taku to
reinforce the French naval division at that
p'.ace.
TROOPS EMBARKING AT SONG KONG.
Bong Kong, June LS. — The departure for Taku
of the hired transport Hing-Sang has been de
layed, swine; t0 th " t!n "' t;ik " n In fitting her up;
embarked this morning a portion of the
K',r.».' regiment, the remaining three bun
" which win embark on the i ruiser Ter
'-morrow.
GERMAN FORCES IN CHINA.
Berlin. June ir». — The German Foreign Office I
has not yet received expected dispatches from
China, and tht-fr non-appearance Is Interpreted
to mean the existence of a!armins conditions. |
Doubts in .expressed, however, as to the ac- j
curacy of the latest alleged news from Peking,
because of the fact that telegraphic communica- !
tion with the Chinese capital has not been re- i
established. The correspondent of Th« Asso- !
elated Press to-day obtained from a. leading I
A.* a summer day*a entertainment nothing can
♦xcel th* Hudson River Hum Una Trias.— < Adv.
/
Foreign Office official the following statement
as to the German forces in China:
Our for> es include three large cruisers — the
Hansa, the Hertha and the Kaiserin Augusta—
the small cruisers Gefipn f.i'd Irene, and the gun-
I'cats iitis and Jaguar, with their crews, ag
gregating 2,-72 men. Then there are our forces
at Klao-Chou, :>.'_'i*<». These ".,472 are all irain-'ii
men, of whom .".<KKt may be spared if required
for action ashore.
KEMPFF TO BE REIXFORCED
BUT UNITED STATES TROOPS WILL KE
BENT TO CHINA ONLY A.S
A LAST RESORT.
[BT TELEGRAPH TO Till: TKIJIfXE.]
Washington, June 15. — The Cabinet meeting
to-day was wholly devoted to considering r'ans
for rescuing Americans from the fury of Chinese
fanatics. The President's anxiety ha? been ma
terially intensified by Minister Conger's In
ability to communicate with Washington and
by a dispatch from Consul Rapsdale, showing
:hat Tien-Tsin, lyini: under the puns of the
foreign fleet, is In the hands of the mob. This
>■;. . p concern is increased by the failure of the
international relief expedition to make substan
tial progress toward Peking in the last forty
eight ttburs, as well as by the indications of a
general uprising against fon
throughout all the provinces of the empire than
had been believed probable.
The Cabinet agreed that Admiral KempnTa
: : . largely increased without delay,
. |y for the purpose of giving the United
i an adequate n presentation in the efforts
• ;" the Powers. ': . order that the fullest
tion should be afforded to all
Amerl Is. missionaries and merchants,
I rests in the emergency being
ration. The present Cnited
regarded as inadequate to up
hold the d of this country ln view of the
ests at stake. No dissent is manl
• |to tl • : position that the United States
is much assistance at 1<
. the concerted
t in behalf of the safety of legations at
: :t Is determined that American re
s in this respect must be promptly
and c
The • ry of having to call on the army
In th- ■ea to supplement the naval
- which la regard) 1 with n-pu-rwi'-
I as a last r> sort, ha ■
. - mi re t han an • ventua .
it not 1 ' time.
. MARINES TO GO FROM MANILA.
rts will concentrate In
:
I to ihe Anial
. will be ordered to send to Admiral
f the em ttalion from Cavil I •
from General Ma -Arthur's com
Id. who •■ to the
I \-,i in< • " ■ assure ih-'
that these mai be landed
..ins in five da I arture
: ■ fast Army transport be i
ng these n h
ments. the >few-<
lyn could be spared fl
around Tien ; >ved In
Owing to the natural reluctance to employ
troor,s except as a last resort, and the disinclina
tion of the War Department to supply such
troops except under pressure, the officials this
afternoon were considering an alternative propo
sition. This contemplated the putting out of
commission of several of the Ms chips attached
to Admiral Heme.y's fleet, notably thi Oregon,
and the addition of the sailors and marines so
released to Admiral KemjvfTs landing force. The
big ships carry on an average more thin thrfe
hundred men apiece.
Th< re is a ( lief that It w 111 be
tlon at Ti<
to mai
.
need
•..;. The Monoca ed
Lku, and If •
emerge i
by pushini the river. The
rt 1
.
so that the safety of the
: • ii ■■! Th-- gunboat v irktown ar-
POSSIBILITY OF SENDINX3 TROOPS.
Se retary ' I the military
p In t h.- n< .'. spa per '■■■■ n
this afternoon he admitted that the situation
• •■ ■ -•■tin*
to-day. ;ii.'i that Secretary Hay furnish* .
the information in bia possess! in Mr Root .'..is
asked whether it had been finally decid i I
troops to China from the Philippines, and
replied that it had not. To a furtbei question
wheth< r there prc»] ect of such
action, he said he would not undertake to talk
It. He was. willing, however, to make the
tion that troops would li» sent to China in
■ • .i eater
necessity for them Hi'-m- than in the Philippinea
.
far as he v •
present situation in China to call for the im
:.nt' h of tro •!■* from t he i
The Navy Depart! I anged with
Quartermaster-General Ludington to ta
battalion of marines, composed ol 220 men .md
• i^lit officers, to Manila i n the transport Grant,
- from San Francisc i on July I
Should It be de< -•;••! to Bend troops to China,
are now available at Manila the big
pacity
of about thn • nd men. The Shei
due ;>t M- nils on July 1 , and the Pei
and the Indiana and several other small
also are available.
APPROVED BT FOREIGN DIPLOMATS
Among the foreign repn I I res ln Wash
ington the information that the United
would increase its military for ■ vaa
received with satisfaction, particularly In Brit
ish and Japanese circles. Mr Nabeshima, 'in*
Japanese Charge d' Affaires, Baid that the for
warding of a large military force t>y any one of
the European Powers would ex< on and
■ ion, wh« nas i uch a i ourse I
. as absolutely above suspicion
\Vhil<* no joint request had been made on this
Government to act. yet, he said, the other
B would speedily acqulesci In tt,'- action
and applaud Ua disinterestedness. The Chinese
Minister showed the deepest Interest im the
course of the United States, but In the abs< nee
of adv his Government he did not
to discuss the matter. The Peking Government
is maintaining absolute silence throughout the
agitation.
The Japanese Legation to-day received a dis
patch from the Foreign Office, dati I al Tokio
on Wednesday, and giving Information from
Peking up to the day before. It stated posi
tively that Prince Tuan, one of the Emperor's
favorites and father of the Chinese Crown
Prince, haw not been appointed at the l.
the Tsung-11-Yamen or put in any office A re
port is i >;rrent in Japan, and is repeated .is
such by the authorities, that Prince Tuan is the
real head of the Boxers. The dispatch further
that all the diplomatic representative! at
Peking agree that the Chinese Government is
Incapable of restoring order and maintaining
peace, so th<> have sent orders to fheir admi
rals to bririK forces tor the protection of the
legations The dispatch left Peking before the
killing of the Japanese Chancellor The Tokio
(Onl in ik-iI on Iliinl ptkge
A BUMMER RESORT DIRECTORY
)•■[■•-•• with to-morrow* Brooklyn Eagle; very com
pl*tc; lully Illustrated. Price 3 cents— Advu.
NEW- YORK. SATURDAY. JUNE 16, 1900. -SIXTEEN PAGES.-* t» g 3S^£2»*«
RAX GAYLYTO KILL HIMSELF.
HAD PARRIED THE SUICIDE ROPE WITH
HIM FOR WEEKS.
A HARLEM DELICATESSEN DEALER'S
STRANGE PREPARATION FOR
EXDIVG HIS LIFE.
William J. Koehler, forty-four years old, of
No. 2.203 Seventh-aye.. kissed his wife of four
months goodby early last evening, ran laugh
ing upstairs into his apartments, then locked
himself in the kitchen and hanged himself from
a gas fixture suspended from the middle of the
ceiling.
According to the story told by Mrs. Christina
M. Peters, the Jani tress of th" apartment house
where. Koehler and bis wife lived, the suicide
is a strange one. Koehler for several years had
kept a delicatessen store on the first floor of the
building. There were many bachelor apartments
in the building, and Koehler hrid only the best
trade. Tils customers have always, it is said,
commented on his gloomy and morose disposi
tion.
About four months ag:o be surprised all his
acquaintances by Introducing to them a comely
woman of about thirty years as his wife. Im
mediately following his marriajro his moods un
derwent a change, and from being peculiar for
his melancholy nature, became remarked be
cause of his extreme yood nature and congeni
ality.
About three weeks ago, Mrs. Peters said.
Koehler w.-nt to his Hat one day carrying a
piece of stout rop<- about ten feet long. "I have
long l"'in looking for just such a piece of rope,"
he is Bald t" have remarked t'> his wife. ( ~'n be
ing asked • himself, Koehler told his
wife: "I believe that every man is bound to
c.ime to t»." end ■•!" ).:s rope in time, ami he
should hrtv.- the rope ready. I am simply pre
.: myself."
His wife remonstrated with him. but he car
ried the rope with him, always keeping it coiled
up. in ■ " - finally took the
: i.. When h<
Bisted that she retun at
last did in order ;■> previ nt a quarrel.
. 6 . ernoon Koehler
• ).:::\ ..;- they were standing In
"If you ant to kiss me you must rlo It now,
for 1 ... . going upstairs to attend to some mat
ters, and you will probably not have another op
portunity."
Mrs. Koehler again remonstrated with her hus
band, entreating him not to talk bo. Koehler only
laughed, and told h.-r he felt the on<i was com
ing and that h>* was determined to be ready.
Finally, to satisfy him. Mrs. Koehler placed h«-r
arms about Jit husband's n»-ck and kissed him,
saying, "Well, then, goodby!"
Koehler left the store and started upstairs to
his apartments, laughing as h-« bounded up two
find trrer- Bteps at a time. As lv> passed the
door of Mrs. Peters's flat, the door of which was
open. Mr.- Peters remarked to him that he
sivmni to be in «<>od humor.
"Well." hft answered, "1 have good cause to
be. Yon know I'll be at the end of my string In
a few inomf'rits."
A few minutes later Mrs. Koehler went up
stairs and found her husband hanging from tho.
gas fixture by thf rope which he had carried and
fr.ndl.-d for weeks.
JMPORI \ \ i r iPTURE tir REBELB
GENERAL. MACABUtrOS AND HIS COMMAND
SURRENDER AT TARLAC.
Washington, June 13.— An important capture
cf insurgents was reported to the War P«>p.irt
ment to-day by General Mac An In the fol
lowing cable message:
r,r. r .- t (ifflotn, 124

• ; ; ....... ...

PATERN'O RET AT LIBERTY.
• ...
Presldi
b'-^n relea - • i
f-'rrln^ wltl ; ncamino, t
■■ ■ ■

■ ■ ■■ |Btl [nfai try, who
■ • Han-
In charge • <
On lnfon ■ '■■
thai General Lacuna i I I attack Papaya,
!n the Province of Nueva E la, General Fun
nt'.n. v.ith staff officers, Captain Koehler and
It h Cavalry i I I i com
pany of th" 34th I ' ■ • • '
: n : th two hundred
rv-n ■ ■ • niln il rldße two miles
of the town
General Funston attacked him vigorously, six
ty Americans charging th» enemy under a hot
fire The insurgents fled. When they at
tempted to make a stand later Captain Koehler,
with a detachment of troop?, charged and scat
tered them. The pursuit over he rough coun
try lasted until nightfall Twenty-two insur
gents were killed. One American was killed and
one wounded.
r« is HEP "i /'.' ' ' ) i\f FALLS
ON9 LOST IN A DIS \HTKR
I A .V \
Kingston, Jamaica, .lun- I."> British Guiana
wt report anol her n\ er t>. »:i t ai
on June 1". when a boal with twenty-three i"-i-
F^ns v. i over the falls of Cuyunl
River pi ml dai he I to pieces. All hands were lost.
77//: PORTE STILL SILENT
MR GRIBCOM PRESSING FOR /- SOLUTION
OP THE tNDEMNITTC MATTER
Constantinople, June IS.— The United States
Legation has not ye\ received ••' reply to the
note regarding the Indemnity question he.nded
to the Porte on May 21, and Lloyd C, Grltfcum,
United States Charge d' Affaires, Is making
verbal representations to the Government, ajid
pressing for a solution of the matter.
VEWFOVNDLAND LABOR TROUBLES.
STEAMERS UNABLE TO SECURE ORE CARGOES.
St John's, N. X j'in.' 15.- Pour steamers have
now been compelled to leave Bell Island the scene
'■f the strike, without securing hematite cargoes.
The Bituati hen is unchanged The .-ir;k<jrs
control and all w.irk i- suspended
Jt is reported I , that the mine owners
■ ■ ■- ■■! Italians it Sydney to
the Newfoundlanders. If th^ Italians at
ti:npt to do this bloodshed li Inevitable
THE REBEL LEADER ILONE ESCAPED.
• on. Jam ■■ ! N i etved hero
to-day by way ol Venesuela and Trinidad confirms
the report of the signal defeat of the Colombian
revolutionist.- in the Department of Santander. The
rebel General Uribe Uribe escaped sJone, atid ta
now a fugitive.
The s;imr source announres an outbreak of r - on
■;..- revolution in Ecuadoi against President

PITTSEI'RG. CHICAGO, CLEVELAND CINCIN
XA'II AND ST. LOUia
All the Principal cities of the Middle Weat
reached via Pennsylvania Railroad.— Advt-
OUTWITTED METHUEN.
DE WETS SUPERIOR TACTICS
IX THE FREE STATE.
BRITISH GENERAL LURED FROM THE
RAILWAY— VOLUNTEERS AND
YEOMANRY CAPTURED.
[Copyright lfW>: By Th<» Vttm York Tribune. 1
[BT CAIU.n TO THE TKIBUNK]
London, June I*\ 6 a. m.— From Cape Town
comes an account of the series of operations
between General Methuen and General De Wet.
from which it is tolerably clear that the Boer
commandant steadily durinp the whole time out
manoeuvred the British general. He succeeded
in lurins him away from the railway, and by
clever, swift movements, he turned and de
stroyed rhp line for many miles north of Kroon
stad.
De Wet is stated to have captured, in addition
to the Derbyshire, two companies of City Im
perial Volunteers and Yeomanry. I. N. F.
BOER RAIDERS STILL ACTIVE
BREAK THROUGH THE HAP OF THE
CORDON IN THE FREE STATE.
[Copyright; MOO: By Th» N"--.v Y.rk Tribune.l
[ny cable to the THinrxE.]
London, June 16, 1 a. — War news from
South Africa is fragmentary and indecisive.
General Hunter has occupied Klerksdorp with
out resistance, and is not likely to he opposed
in marching to Johannesburg. Towns are sur
rendering and the burghers are giving up their
arms. This advance of Hunter's division secures
the western flank of the main railway against
raiding, but the harassing warfare is not ended
on the eastern flank. General Kitchener was
compelled to call upon hi- mounted troops to
drive off raiders who attacked a reconstruction
train on Thursday on the Rhenoster. Then
were a dozen casualties on the British side. The
force which General Methuen scattered In every
direction does not pear demoralized. The cor
don still runs from Hellbrun to Lindley and
Senekal, and thence to Flcksburg, but there are
wide gaps, through which the Doer raiders can
pass east and west. General Runrlle, Instead of
attacking the commandoes, seems to be acting
on the defensive to prevent their passage south
ward, and the forces at Senekal, Llndley and
lleilhron are holding their ground and finding it
difficult to obtain supplies. The best chance for
the clearance of the Free State seems to be in a
movement of two of Kulier's divisions from the
north against Vrede. Frankfort and Harrismlth.
General Roberts in a well written bulletin
does full Justice to lan Hamilton's work in Tuos
day's title east of Pretoria, when the Boer
centre was driven in by a gallant advance of
three battalions, supported by the Guard* Bri
gade. He also gives a clear account of Baden-
Powell's methods of pacification. General Rob
erts, unlike General Buller. knows how to write
otfk-ial bulletins.
Th* political deadlock at Cap« Town is due in
a large measure to th* bitter hostility between
Mr. Rhodes and Mr. Schrelner. This renders a
coalition ' between Schrpluw and the League
Ministers difficult if not Impracticable. Sir Al
fred Mllaer requires all his resources of tact for
the formation of a new Ministry which can count
upon ,i majority, and elections at present are
out of the question. INF
ROBERTS'B REPORTS TO WAR OFFICE.
HOW BOTHA'S ARMY WAS FORCKD BACK
KITCHENER'S AMi BADEN
POWELL'S WORK.
London] June I".— The War Office to-day
issued the following dispatch from Lord Rob
erts:
Pretoria Residency. June 14. 10:40 p. m —
Klerksdorp surrendered on June 8 to an armed
party sent on by Hunter.
Kitchener reports that the Boers attacked a
reconstruction train early this morning a few
miles north of Rhenoster River. He sent out
mounted troops and drove off the enemy before
they could do damage One man was killed
and eleven, including two officers, wounded.
A m< Mage from Klerksdorp reports that
Cronje, who commanded there, determined to
surrender as Boon as }:•■ knew for certain that
Pretoria was In our possession His example
has been copied by many in the neighborhood
The courthouse is now said to be full of arms.
The War Office also received th« following
dispatch from Lord Roberts:
Pretoria. June 15.— As i telegraphed yesterday
from one of our outposts, fifteen mile's east of
Pretoria, the Boers evacuated their position
during the night of June 12. They had paid so
much attention to strengthening their flanks
that their centre was weakly held, and as soon
as this became evident, on June 12. l directed
lan Hamilton to attack. He moved against
Diamond Hill with the Sussex. Derbyshire^ and
City Imperial Volunteers, supported on the left
by th.' Guards Brigade under Inlfro Jones. It
was grand seeing the way our men advanced
over the difficult ground and under a heavy fire.
Tho casualties, I am thankful to say, were less
than one hundred, a very small number, consid
ering the natural strength of the position which
had to be carried.
Our seizure of Diamond Hill caused the Boers
to feel they were practically surrounded, and
this resulted in their hasty retirement, They
were being followed yesterday by some of our
mounted corps.
Hamilton spoke In high terms of the troops
engaged. Hamilton received a contusion from
a shrapnel bullet in the shoulder, but is not. i
am happy to say, unable to perform his duty.
The rest of Lord Roberta's dispatch deals with
tho casualties and General Baden-Powell's
movements in Western Transvaal, where Baden-
Powell, with eight hundred men. Is systemat
ically re-establishing order and collecting arms
and supplies. About six hundred Boers have
surrendered, and Baden-Powell captured 230
prisoners.
A ordlng to Baden-Powell's report, the Boers
will readily discuss terms of sum-nder. and they
all appreciate the work of pacification performed
by his troops.
By the peaceful occupation of Klerksdorp, an
nounced by Lord Roberts, the British have
gained a strategic position of some importance,
as the town is not only the terminus of another
railroad to Johannesburg hut it is within easy
reach of the Kroonstad-Vierfonteln Railroad.
The Cronje who surrendered the place is a son
of the famous General Cronje, now a prisoner
at St. Helena. The former was prominent dur
ing the sifge of Mafeking.
A dispatch from Kimberley reports the capt
ure of the well known pugilist, "Jim" Hallo
way, who was an adjutant in the Boer army.
and who blew up the bridge at Fourteen
Streams. Holloway was among a body of Fed
etals captured in the western part of the Trans
vaal.
BOXD CONGRESS IX SESSION.
Ixindon, June 1& — The Afrikander Bond Con
gress opened at F'aarl to-day with seventy dele
gates. Including seven Assemblymen, present.
The doctor's best prescription for Colds la
JAYNE'S EXPECTORANT.
"BUSS HANNA'S CANDIDATE."
PLATT'S STATEMENT REGARDING TITE
EX-SECRETARI OF THE INTERIOR ■
NO ONE BOOMING HIM HERE, SAYS THE
SENATOR-ODEI.U WOODRUFF AND
WHITE niSd'SSED— MR. IU.ISS
DECLARES HE IS NOT A
CANDIDATE.
Senator Platt talked freely at tho Fifth Ave
nu.- Ifot~l last ni.u'ht about the candMacy of
Corn* lius N. Bliss, paying he did not think Mr.
P.liss would be the candidate for Vice-president.
"Mr. Bliss is Hanna's candidate." the Senator
said. 'Didn't you know h>- and Hanna were
bosom friends? It is Hanna who wants him to
be a candidate and wants to persuade him to
run. I don't think that Hanna will run the
New-Tork delegation. No one over here is put
ting pressure on Mr. Bli^s. N'> one is booming
Mr. Bliss in the N^-wYork delegation."
The Senator ha.', read with interest some re
ports from Philadelphia, indicating that Mr.
P.liss was saining su I a possitv.
didate for the V ncy. Some of the re
ports declared that Mr. Bliss could have th*:
nomination for Vice-Presid< :>t If he had the
support of the New-York delegati n.
"I do not believe that the votes ■ f the New-
York delegation could be concentrated on Mr.
Pliss," Mr. Platt said. "1 believe that Ueuten
ant-Governor Woodruff could command more
y.tes than Mr. Bliss could in th- delegation.
Mr. Woodruff is better fitted for the Vice-Presi
dency than many people think."
Senator Platt said he thought the d legation
would unite on Benjamin B. Odell, jr., chairmar*
of the Republican State Committee, if Mr Odell
wanted to be a candidate for Vice-President.
"The nomination ought to go to New-Tork." the
Senator added, "and Mr. Odell would receive the
united support of the New-Yors n if he
wanted it. Mr. od*l! is a reliable and conser
vative man. Ido not know that he wants to be
a candidate. Mr. Odell, however, is in no great
danger of being the nominee for 'Vice-Presi
dent."
In reply toaqi • D. White,
the Si nator said: "Mr White is not an available
candidate, on a anti
:•■ and anti-Irish in ti Be. AI the same
time, he Is a good man and an able man."
i 'orn< llua N I lay ai if he
did not want to be
He said be was n- t resi
I
recently. "It was report
■ •ther day." h^ snid. "that I had a confi
with Senator Platt and Senavt I A
the V . ncy. I have i
Piatt in a month, and have n
for a longer t 3enai
announced that I am not a candidate, and h
'.. My fri(
■ before th>?
entlon."
< 'hali '. of the r<

.. .
Senator Platt was asked last evening if he
Intended to carry to Philadelphia any plank
for th.- Republican platform, and he said: "I
am r.ot a platfonu maker. " Wh^n he was re
minded that hi had claimed cre.iit for the gold
[lank In th» St. Louis platform he said: "Then*
was an issu>» In ISJHI."
Governor Roosevelt, Senator Platt. Senator
Depew and Mr. Odell will go to Philadelphia to
day on a special car. which will be attached to
a train in Jersey City soon after .'* p. m. Sena
tor Platt said last evening that the meeting of
the New-Torfe delegation would not be held in
Philadelphia until Monday night. "We will not
hasten the meeting to help anybody settle the
Vice-Presidential question." he saiil.
KILLED WIFE, COMMITTED SUICIDE.
Oneonta, N. V., June 15.— Charles 11. Myrtck.
forty-two years old. of Gilbertsville, shot and in
stantly killed his wife, forty years old. at his
mother's horn», at GHbertsvllle, to-day. M-. ri
thf-n shot himself in the head, dying instantly.
MyrlCk went to the home of his mother, where his
wife, from whom he had separated two years an<\
was visiting. Sh« was out and while waiting for
her Myrtck talked with his eight-year-old daughter.
When his wife return.. 1 tie asked h. -r to live wnn
birr a^'ain. an<l when she refused threw hf-r to the
floor, drew a revolver and Bred. The second shot
penetrated her train. Myrlcfc's mother saw the
tragedy and tried to stop him. Four daughters
survive the couple.
TBK GOLD COAST TROUBLES
SLIGHT BRITISH CASUALTIES IN I FIGHT XT.
Cap* Coaa •'■list. Ju^. 15.—Cap
tain Ellis, with the ■\\.s i Afiican
while advancing fn m Pumsu to Kwisa, losi one.
man killed and a corporal i n wounded.
WEST INDIAN REGIMENT K"R ASHANTEE.
Kingston. Jam.ii - > June 15.— The British Wir
otfio- has tunt eal Government
nnnounolng that it 1.-- prepared to accept i com
posite militia contingent from Jamaica,
Trinidad and Demerara for senri \
j.im.-ii . • :"<■■" and :.
The wv.-t India regiment baa red to
Ashantee forthwith.
KRAALS FULL OF SKELETONS.
DISCOVERJXa OF AFRICAN EX]
t \Kr Rl :
I, on. ion. June UL— Reports Just received here from
tha Whitehouse-Harrison expedition to Abyssinia,
which safely returned to Mombasa, on the East
■ i Africa, on June 10, show th.it the ex
found the districts around Lake ;•
and Stephai d tiuit the inhabitants
! i.i »lther <he,i or 1. ft the country, lr i~
■ kraala were discovered I
etona
CASTLE AND BEI iSCO TO COLLABORATE.
London, Juno l.".. — David Belasco announces that
he and Eajertoa Castle signed papers to-day
Belasco the dramatic righti of "The Hath Comedy"
both in the United States and dreat Britain. It la
understood that Castle and i collaborata
In writing this anJ othi uit playa
MEDALS FOR AMERICAN PAINTERS.
Paris, June 15.— American painters have received
more awards in gold medals at the Paris Exposi
tion of 1900 than competitors of any other nation,
save France, receiving seven against tour obtained
at the Exposition of IBSB. At that time all those
who received coM medals lived In Paris. This year
five of the paintings are the work of artists living
in th« United States. The recipients are Messrs.
Alexander, Paris: E. A. Abbey, London: Wlnslow
Homer, Abbott Thayer. George De Forrest Brush
William Chase and Cecilia Beaux, United States.
A NEW MAHDI IX THE DESERT.
Alexandria, June 15.— A new Mahdl recently ap
peared at Wady Haifa, preaching and proclaiming
that Christ would soon be seen again in the flesh
upon earth.
He was arrested by tho Government together
with forty-five adherents.
NKW YORK TO PHILADELPHIA AND RE
TI'KN. t£Sti
Via Pi-nnsylvanta Railroad. June 15 to 21 inclusive
account National Repablican Convention and Ger
man Turnfe»t.— Advt.
PRICE THREE CENTS.
TO RUN WITH M'KINLEY
MANY CANDIDATES ARE DIS
CUSSED IX PHILADELPHIA.
MR. PLATTS PF.rrr.IAR POSITTOW-*
strength w si.nti.mknt for
bliss — no stampede
pi:oi;ap.lk.
[p.y nojeura to tsb tkum %m }
Philadelphia. June 15 : : 'homas <3L
Platt's cur: avo that aa a candi
date for th- avttasi Cor
nelius N. I. ■ I i r to cob
die support of a majorir. ' -York's
seventy-two delegates h - "■• 'lueation
\vh--ther N. w-Vork.
Pennsylv»ni:i. is to pi -^d i n "
effective role bo • xt :nat *t
played under V. .-hip in the Re
puMican National em S '-' ; i nJ I S IW.
h and
every part of the Union a ■ llnarinsi to
Mew-Tork noml
■< will pr - - -aith a
: ite whose record an .■nmend
him to general a
Th.-re can be no doubt, moreover, that in th«
last few days the conviction has rapidly gained
ground among the Western cjiil Southern dele
gations committed to no local aspirant's in
terests that in Mr. Bliss New-York possesses
a candidate certain to attract IBS cordial sup
port of all sections. Mr. Plan's intimation that
on a trial of strength in New-York's caucus
next Monday evening Mr. Bliss would probably
be beaten by either Mr. Oiiell or Mr. Woodruff
has therefore started Western and other lead
ers to thinking that the veteran New-York
manager does not care to participate In any
serious movement to name a Vice-Presidential
candidate from the Empire Star?
PLATT'S ABSENCE SIGNIFICANT.
Mr. Plan's delay in coming to Philadelphia t»
consult with th leaders of other delegations
seems also t■> confirm this view. In the opinion
of the most experienced politicians here neither
Mr. Woodruff nor Mr. Odell. if pushed forward
with Mr. Plait's indorsement as New- York's dis
tinctive candidate. could attract strength,
enough to make a respectable showing for mare
than a single ballot or prevent a speedy con
centration of votes on some available rival from
the Middle West. Mr. Platt has therefore to
decide between now and TuesJiy whether New-
York is or is not to carry oft the second honors
in the convention of 1900.
As Senator Hanna pal iUam in an
ta be up to
New-York ta a| a man. but if the
New-Torken i larrel the prize
may g ' i that
he kn>-w o a further
ibto choice of a
"You were to hear from Senator Allison to
day; have you received any message?"
"Nothing as yet."
r Platt ill ar
::
"N . and I don't expect any word."*
•nven-
in t«
Th. ght will not be
inonal

QL'AY NON-COMMITTAL.
Ex-Senator Matthew S. Quay, who reached
town this afternoon, declined for the present to
ir.ak^ any predictions about th^ Vice-Presi
dency. "I am without an opir-it-iTi as to the prob
able nominee for Vice-Presldent." said Mr. Quay.
"I have been rusticating out at the Mountvilla
farm, and have not been on ;he ground a suffl
cient time to get in touch with the situation. I
suppose, however, the convention will name a
man who will be entirely acceptable to President
McKlnley, and who will give strength to the
ticket before the Republicans of the country."
"What will be the policy cf the Pennsylvania
delegation in making a choice among the large
field of Vice-Presidential candidates?"
"The Pennsylvania delegates will caucus on
Monday afternoon, and until thac time it would
hardly be titling that I should say what they
may decide to do."
There are those who believe that Mr. Quay
will carry to Mr. Plan's aid ;n any demonstra
tion he may make with a candidate like Mr.
Woodruff probably four-fifths of the Pennsyl
vania delegation. P.ut Pennsylvania politicians
have taken only a faint interest so far in the.
choice of a running mate for President Mc-
Kinley.
Senator Ponrose. who is still acting as Mr.
Quay's proxy on the National Committee, to-day,
had this to say about the contest for the Vice-
Presidency:
CONTEST AN AMICABLE ONE
"The contest over the Vice-Presidency is en
tirely amicable. All of the men who have been
mentioned in conned with the office are well
qualified and would be acceptable. The general
sentiment seems to be to acquiesce in any selec
tion which will best promote Republican suc
cess. While locality is a consideration that
always prevails within certain limits, it would
seem at this time as if a man of eminent quali
fications from any State might secure the nomi
nation. Senator Allison is such a man; he would
add immense strength to the ticket, regardless
of locality. He, however, prefers his seat in
the Senate, and has emphatically declined.
"I have already declared my personal prefer
ence for Senator Wolcott, who has made great
sacrifices in Colorado of his political fortunes by
reason of his adherence to the Republican party.
AX AITHORITATIVE STATEMENT REGARD
ING THE IMPORTATION OF CHAMPAGNE.
Taktn from the report cf the Board of Food Prod
ucts Connected with the United States Health
Reports, which is the recognized authority upon
all matters of diet as it is upon all questions
pi sanitation and hygiene and wr.os* purpose it
is to take into consideration the interests nt
the public who desire :o know the faeis
Taktn In its order of importance, the Moet and
» han.lor. White :?eal Champasne naturally receives
first place in any consideration o' ;he subject form
ing me basis of this Report. Xot only does this
house take precedence in tht» point of a^e 1' hav
ing oven founded nearly one hundred and seventy
gears, hut it owns more vineyards than any half
■ ombin«U, tho best known producers of champagne
combined, and its tales throughout the world arS
greater man those oi any aihor brand Moot and
Chandon White Seal Champagne shows by rUM
chemical analysis that its sustaining and nutritive
Qualities largely exceed any other champagne and
tor this reason leading members o-f the medical
brand prescrlbe v ta Preference to all other
This brand of champagne is absolutely pure;
there is not th* slightest admixture of any fielel
terlous ingredient a. Is so generally found to bo
the case with other brands of ohampasnift For
this reason it has justly earned the confidence of
the hygienist who in general is chary in bestowing
commendation upon champagnes, knowinz as ha
does how frequently such wine,, are •doctored" at
the ex pens* of the health of the user It la
scarcely necessary to mention Moet and Chandon
White Seal Champagne from an epicurean stand™
point as It has long since received such recognition:
from connoisseurs that its place as the leadimc
champagne is never disputed by !hose familiar vrttiL
th* prestige and favor It enjoys amons people oi
the most cultivated and exacting tastes
It la owing to the facts which hive been cited
that w«> select Moet and Chaadon White S«£i
Champagne and bestow upon it the official and edi
torial endorsement of the United States Health /
Reports.— (Extract. United .States Health * »
N. Y. and .Washington. June t. UOfit K** ol '* i

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