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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 17, 1900, Image 1

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~ ~ ~ ' T — a ; ' rn_pn|__| _ 1900: hr Tti* "TVTtin* Afsoctatlo-.t
X ov LX No'N 0 ' 19.572.
ANARCHY IN CHINA'S CAPITAL.
fOB&GN LEGATIONS REPORTED BUttNED AND THE GERMAN
IMISTER, BARON YON KETTELER, KILLED.
AN ATTACK OF BOXERS REPULSED WITH MAXIMS.
An unconfirmed dispatch from Hon g Kong said that the foreign Legations
id been burned and the German Minister. Baron yon Ketteler
cd.
itches from Tien-Tsin received in Berlin say the Boxers entered Pc-
Juifc 13, destroyed several missions and attacked the Legations, but
were' «th Maxims; no Kurop cans were killed.
■ ;h from Shanghai said that five of the foreign Ministers demanded
1 from the Tsung-li- Yam en for themselves and their people, in-
Tsung-H-Yamen that they could no longer maintain relations
Iz; ivcmment. The re quest of the Ministers was curtly refused
reigners :;re reported huddled in the various Legations at Peking
oir servants and short o f food.
ction is reported to be s preading throughout China. There have
cendiarism in Tien-Tsin. and the inhabitants are in a state' of

■: in loaded with supplies and ammunition for the international col
ble to reach the force, owing to destruction of the railway between
Tsin and Lang-Fang, where the international force is encamped
BOXERS ENTER PEKING.
:ISM IX THE FOREIGX QFAR-
Et AND AN ATTACK ON THE
LEGATIONS.
■me liv— Dispatches from Tien-Tsin
: I in Berlin etate that the Boxers entered
• lie evening of June 13 and destroyed
several Ddaatona and attacked the legations, but
pulsed v.-ith the aid of Maxims. Xo
•ere reported killed. The attitude of
.. troops toward the Boxers was un-
dispatch from Shanghai, dated to
- v? that It Is reported that after the au-
B - Claude Macdonald. British Minister
a. with the Tsunr-ii-Yamen. five foreign
■ manded a safe conduct for their
ta and their people, notifying the Tsung
■ -at they could no lunger maintain
• s with the Government. The answer
Certainly not. What other answer could
acted in a civilized country?" This was
1 by an increase cf the forces round the
• next night widespread lncen
c rism.
:ncer.diarism. according to the dlspa'ch
Shanghai, prevailed among the foreign
-?es. The massacre of native Christians
ar.d other fr'ends of the foreigners was also
common. The buildings of the American Mis
■ nstoina. the mess quarters and a
number of other structures are deFtroyed. The
s alone f-aved the foreigners who. It is
In legations are very fhort of
;.- native servant?
The latent Chinese reports stste that the Brlt
iah marines ar.d pallors fcught the troops of
', Jung- Fuh Fiang several boon. Many
r o killed.
Dispatches from Shanghai dated last even
ng state that Admiral Seymour's force is in
i tight place between Lang-Fang and Tung-
Sun, with enormous masses of soldiery in front,
ahile th<=- Boxers with more soldiery are cutting
:he railway in the rear. The column la reported
shcrt of provisions ard water. Kiang-Nan
irsenal, outside of Shanghai, is ponding vast

juar.tities of munitions north.
VISA FFECTIOX SPREA DING.
BEVOLUTTOXART SYMPTOMS IN THE
BRITISH SPHERE OF CHINA.
[Copyrie-t: 1300: By The N>w~Tork Tribune.]
[bt cable to the tribute. 1
London. June 17, 1 a. m. — The news from
Peking comes indirectly through Shanghai and
rk-n-Tsin, and is strongly colored by public
incitement in both cities. The European lega
tions are reported to have been attacked by
nobs and the buildings destroyed. Tho Roman
"atholic Cathedral is said to have been burned
u:<J the Boxers are charged with murdering; the
-erman Minister and a considerable number of
-hristian converts and European servants.
These dispatches are without doubt grossly in
«curate. The only trustworthy news from
?efc'ng is contained In dispatches to the Foreign
-*Csce ar.f] embassies here, and these re not
Published.
It is evident that the Empress has r>»»<* n
farmed by the report that her deposition ha i
if^n proposed and that she has decided that the
•oreign marines must not be lowed to reach
"be capital. The train conveying food and am
j&aaltion for rh» :n has returned to Tien-Tsln
without <Jr-livt-r!ng tho supplies. The marines
•re repairing the railway, but the Boxers in
tfv&nee are destroying the line even more rap
■ than It can be mended]
Incendiaries are at v.< rk In Tien-Tsin where
2»re€ American and English churches have been
tiyn«-<i_ There are alarming rejxwts of the
•pread of disaffection and revolt in other dis
ricis of China, especially those within the Eng
ish sphere of influx nee.
The British Cabinet he!d a prolonged meeting
lere yesterday, ar.J the China question was
Slscusstd in detalL I. N. F.
IHXISTEK KILLED. LEGATIONS BURNED?
SEIIMANYs REPRESENTATIVE AT PEKING
IKEPOP.TED A VICTIM OF -THE MOB.
London, June 16.— dispatch from Hong
Kong fays all the Peking legations have been
Jestroyed and that the German Minister. Baron
*on Ketteler. has beei killed.
Detroit. June 1».-Earon yon Kf-tteler. the Ger
man Minister t 0 China, whe is reported ■•) have
*en kiMed in th e Boxer riots In Peking was a
"on-n-law of Henry U. Ledyard, president of the
cichipan Central Itellroad. Tfce Baron was mar
•orv iIIS I>Jyard to J&7. Whfn the news was
inUifan .l«. l « £_* home It wan the flrflt in-
K-eum-d \t . famlly of what i 3 mW lo have
-arorv -..< ! =» ut th * faml! >' stated that tha
•-ble «]',. - , , W2H * lf h him in Peking-, nnJ that a
teo Vvw !, Lad been r.-cclv.-(l from tbera ■ wf-k
IftSwS" J^yari cf No. 27! Lc.ington-ave..
icr "f'tl lj:iro;; " i Bi B yon Ketttler-his brother being
„-_." 1 r ~ tiili la s»- night that he had received no
mtfilsSS?. th *. death of the Earon, th« Ger
tier 10 cu.r.a,
NEW YORK. SUNDAY. JUNE IT, 1900.-2 PARTS. 28 PAGES. WITH ILLUSTRATED SUPPLEMENT. 16 PAGES
READY TO SEND TROOPS.
THE ADMINISTRATION WILL ACT
PROMPTLY IF REPORTS FROM
CHINA ARE CONFIRMED.
[HT nr_EGB_PH TO TIIK THIBVXE.I
Washington, June 16.— Confirmation of the
alarming reports from Hong Kong will result
in the prompt dispatch of Regular I'nited States
troops from Manila to Tien-Tsin. In the ab
sence of all official advices to-day, Peking and
Tien-Tsin being effectually cut off from tele
graphic communication, this Government has
confined Its activity to effective preparations for
events In China which now promise to exceed In
gravity anything hitherto looked for by the au
thorities. Officials are hopeful that Hong Kong
has been misled as to the destruction of the le
gations and the injury and massacre of mem
bers of the Diplomatic Corps at the Chinese
capital, hut the failure for more than five days
of any direct word from that city to reach the
outside world, with ihe last discouraging re
ports from Tien-Tsin before that city was iso
lated, in defiance of an assembled fleet of forty
modern warships, has prepared Washington to
expect little or no improvement In the situation.
It is pointed but that Hong Kong cannot by
any possibility secure news from the North of
China except by way of Shanghai or London,
and neither of these places has had any infor
mation at all from Pe-Chi-Li Province for
twenty-four hours. All news of Peking must
come by way of Tien-Tain, and thence either to
Shanghai or overland through Siberia to Europe
le is believed that the excitement in Hone: Kong
incidental to the hurried departure to
warships and troops for Taku gave rise to wild
speculation, not attributable to a trustworthy
or authentic source, but sent out broadcast at
its face value. In any event, whether the news
of the disasters is corroborated or not, a few
more days without reassuring advices from
Peking or from the international force which is
endeavoring to open the railroad will cause th<;
United States to adopt extreme measures, and
th" War Department, through the precautions it
has already taken, will be able To start th»' fast
transports Warren and Logan promptly from
Manila, carrying the Fourteenth Infantry, Light
Battery F of the Fourth Artillery, a detachment
of Fignal Corps men and an adequate trans
portation and supply equipment. General Mac-
Arthur is holding this selected force of set
regulars in readiness, and on telegraphic orders
from Washington, which may be a -r.t at any
moment, be can deliver it at Tien-Tsin within
a week.
CONFERENCE AT THE WHITE HOUSE.
Secretaries Hay and Root had a conf
with the President this afternoon regarding the
sending of troops to China. ' r he decision
reached was that if communication with Ad
miral Kr-mpff is not re-established within a rea
sonable time troops will be sent from Manila
to reinforce the American contingent. An in
quiry ah to what constituted a reasonable rime
failed to secure a definite answer, but the im
pression was conveyed that unless Admiral
Kempff Is heard from by Monday troops will be
Bent from Manila. When Secretaries Hay and
Root left the White House they said they had
• d no official confirmation of the alarming
reports from Peking. They were getting to
- all the data possible, they said, and
would do whatever the situation .seemed to re
quire. The President was greatly com ■ rned
over the news, but entertains hope that th" re
ports are exaggerated.
FRIENDS OF DIPLOMATS ANXIOUS.
The rumor that Baron Yon Ketteler, the Ger
man Minister at Peking, bad been kill* -
spread to diplomatic circles and caused great
uneasiness, as the erroneous Btatement got
abroad that the State Department had received
' ■ report. As a matter of fact,
neither the State Dei I nor the German
ling of tt. The rumor was
r,.in-- the less disquieting, for aside from the
International aspect of such an .. t, Baron
\-,,n Ketteler is well known here, having been
{•.■pt secretary > ; f the German Embassy up to a
few y.ars ago. Many diplomats and friends
called a: the German Embassy to Inquire as to
the report, but the answer was given that no
surh news had been received, and the report
was regarded with a great deal of doubt.
report of the destruction of the • mbassiea
and legations at )'• king was followed by many
ama asking the State Department for in
formation. Borne of th«se came from lowa, the
!. >rae of Minister Conger, and some from friends
and relatives of the other persons connected
with the United States Legation at )•
Mrs. Baldwin, sister of Minist.r Conger, called
at the Department to Inquire Into th.- truth of
the story- T" n " Department waa obliged
swer that it had no news and oould not confirm
the report. It was apparent that the officials
did nol believe thai the United states Legation
had been burned, and they only regretted that
they could not make a denial on authority. It
is amid at the Stay- Department that according
to the last reports there were at th.- United
Btatea Legation, besides Mr. Coager, his wife,
, lighter and at least one woman visitor,
the Secretary of Legation, Herbert <;. Squires,
of New-York; William E. Bainbridge, of lowa,
the Second Secretary; Lieutenant Albert 1,. Key,
i.i '. i "ii. ahlre, in*- r
j>reter.
PEACE PLANS OF THE POWERS.
It is learned Jn authoritative quarters that the
negotiations relative to the C— lßASfl crisis have
Continued on third p-ac
BOER ARMIES SEPARATED.
STEADY PROGRESS OF THE BRITISH CAM
PAIGN IX SOT'TH AFRICA.
[Copyright: 190O: By Trip N>w York Trft.une.l
[BY CABI.F TO TIIK TRIRUXB.J
London. June 17, 1 a. m.— There was little war
news from South Africa yesterday, but what
there was peemed favorable to the British aide.
Genera! Baden-Powell had reached Rustenburg
and a column was starting out from Pretoria
to meet him. He will be in Pretoria before
General Hunter reaches Johannesburg from
Potchefstroom. These two columns have proved
that the Western Transvaal is a hollow shell
without resources for resisting invasion. One
of President Krurpr's sons has surrendered.
Lord Roberts goes out of his way to explain
his Immediate plan of campaign. General Buller
has been ordered to Standerton. and Heidelberg
will soon be occupied. The Boer forces in the
Transvaal will then bo separated from the Free
State commandoes anil each division will be
dealt with in turn. The first movement which
General Bull^r will make from Btan4erton will
be toward Vrede, where I,<mk> prisoners are con
fined. I. N. F.
REPORTS FROM ROBERTS AM) BULLER.
London. June 16.— The War Office has received
the following message from I,f>rd Roberts:
Pretoria, June I<>. — Rustenburgr was occupied
yesterday by Baden-PowelL A column starts
from this place to-morrow to meet Baden-
PoweH and repair the telegraph between Pre
toria and Rustenburg.
Hunter is moving from Potchefstroom. His
advance brigade expects to roach Johannesburg
June 1!).
Buller, I hope, is at Standerton. Heldelburg
will be occupied from this place shortly, and
then the Orange River Colony will be completely
cut off from the Transvaal.
Baden-Powell reports that the district through
which lie passed is settling down satisfactorily.
over one thousand stands of arms were sur
rendered and Hans Eloff and Plet Kruger. son
of the President, were to make submission to
him yesterday, having been, previously dis
armed on their farms.
Botha's army has retired and is believed to
be at MHdleJiurs. His rear guard was surprised
and entirely routed by lan Hamilton's mounted
Infantry.
The War Office has received the following
dispatch from General Buller:
Laing"s Nek. June 15 (Friday).— Now that Na
tal Is clear of the enemy I wish to call atten
tion to the disgraceful way in which private
property was treated in the part of the Colony
they occupied. Their wilful and needless damage
is visible everywhere, and houses, when not
completely wrecked, have been desecrated with
filthy Ingenuity. That this has been done with
the consent of the leader? is proved by the fact
that while in Charlestown every house was
wrecked, in Volksrust, two miles off but in the
Transvaal, every house was intact.
SPRIGG HOPEFUL OF A MINISTRY.
MINISTERIAL DEADLOCK AT THE CAPE RE
LIEVED.
London, June 10— £. telegram from Cape
Town announces that the Ministerial deadlock
is relieved. Sir John Gordon Sprigg hopes to
have a Ministry formed by Monday, and it is
believed Mr. Rose-Innes will accept a portfolio.
Paarl, Cape Colony, June 16.— to-day's
meeting of the Afrikander Bond Congress a let
ter was read from the late Premier, W. P.
Bchrelner, announcing his resignation, and de
scribing the causes of the differences between
himself and his colleagues In the Cabinet, "which
itf;- no other course oycn to him.
The Congress adopted a resolution expressing
thanks to the Premier for his services to the
country, but indorsing the opposition of the
Bond members of Parliament to the measures
supported by Mr. Schreiner. azures
FRAGMENTS OF WAR NEWS.
London, June 16.— rumor is rife in the city
that Lord Roberts is negotiating with President
Kriiper and General Botha, through their wives,
regarding terms of surrender.
A dispatch from Laing's Nek. dated to-day,
says Genera! Christian Botha's next stand will
be at Paardekop, but with a reduced force.
The German ambulance captured by General
Buller has been sent to Durban, whence it will
be allowed to return to the Transvaal via Dela
goa Bay.
RAILWAY WRECK IX EKGLAXD.
THREE PEOPLE KILLED AND BIXTT-ONE
INJURED MRS BERNARD BEERE HURT.
London, June If..— A collision between an ex
press train and a .rain filled with Winslow race
goers occurred at Slough this afternoon. Three
persona were killed and sixty-one injured.
Mrs. Bernard Beere, the actress, was badly
bruised and cut about the arms.
The race train was standing at Slough station
when the express dashed Into it from the rear
Borne of the coaches were telescoped Th» s.-'
vere Injuries sustained consisted largely of
broken limbs.
BULGARIAN TAX RIOT.
TWO OFFICERS KILLED AND ABOUT THIRTY
PEASANTS WOUNDED.
Sofia. June 16.— Owing to the antl-t!thes troubles
in the Varna District, a squadron of cavalry sen'
to the village of Durankuluk was fired on during
the march, and two officers were killed The
eoldlera returned the fire, wounding thirty peas
ants. A state of siege has been proclaimed In the
\ arna and Shumla districts.
RISIKQ ix THE Gambia COUNTRY.
TWO BRITISH COMMISSIONERS \NI> SIX POLICE
MEN KILLED.
Bathurst, Gambia Colony, West Africa, June
16.- A native rising has occurred in tin Gambia
Colony, and two British Commissioners and six
ere of the police have been killed at Bann
kanndi, on the south bank of the Gambia River,
by Mandingoi s.
The party had gone to Sannkanndi to a
question of local administration, when the Man
dingoes suddenly attacked and murdered them
Cecil Sitwell, one of the murdered Commis
sioners, was formerly an official In the Wind
ward islands.
RUNAWAY TRAMCAR IX PARIS.
ONE PASSENGER KILLED AND THIRTEEN IN
JURED.
Paris, June 16. — A tramcar, while descending an
Incline on the Grande Avenue dv Trocadero, got
beyond control, and. gaining ternrtc speed. Jumped
the track and was finally stoj-ped by coming into
contact with a tree on Pont ■■■ i Alma One pas
senger was killed and thirteen were injured among
the latter being: Alexander Caesar, an American
who was slightly hurt.
Two carriages were overturned by the car in
1 1 descent.
//././ \ois STEEL M11.1.s TO RESUME.
1 i. ■ • ■ ree departnv nta of the mi-
Doia ati >v hich wen June ■''„ will
be opened ->ii Monday. Thla will klv.- employment
to 1,800 of ti,.- s.ooo men thrown out of -a : w bj
•it down. It i. *a:.l that all th« depart
menta '.'.il! i"- miiiiiiiK »' f' :!: capacity wS't.ii :i
KKOM 7 A. M. To MIDNIQHT
Tliere is a tin ouch train evsrjr hour leaving Grand
C»ntra: Station by the New 7ork Central, 'f^wo
cen; mileage tickets are good,— iJvi,
TO COMPLETE THE TICKET
XO NAME YET AGREED ON BY
DELEGATES.
ATTITUDE OF PLATT MAY PREVENT
TIIK NOMINATION OF A NEW-YORK
ER—MAYBE AN UNHOLY AL
LIANCE WITH QUAY.
[TIT NO JSGK—PB TO TIIK TRIBINK. ]
Philadelphia, Jurfe J 6.— Senator Thomas C.
Platt seems bent on manoeuvring the New- York
delegation into a position which will in sure a
repetition of the snubblnT it suffered under his
l^ar'ershlp In the Republican National conven
tions of lXf>_ and IS«,Hi. His declaration in New-
York last night that Republican leaders in othf-r
States will not be asked or ] ennitted to aid him
in selecting a New-York candidate for the Vice-
Presidency to whose support delegates from
every other section of the T'nion could easily
be drawn is taken here as notice that the
Tioga Boss proposes to encape next week in an
other of his celebrated losing National Conven
tion Bgbta
New-York dispatches indicate that Mr. Platt
will persist In putting forward pome such Vice-
Presidential candidate as Woodruff or Odell, ami
thus force the National managers in other States
either to choose a New-Yorker like Cornelius N.
Lllss over the delegation's prottst, or go to the
West at th> very outs.-t for a Vice-Presidential
nominee.
It is apparent that a New-York movement to
nominate Lieutenant-* Jovornor Woodruff or ex-
Representative Odrll would even with Mr. Quay's
time]-.- aid fall far short of commanding a re
spectable fraction of the nine hundred odd dele
gates to the Convention. With sixty-five or sev
enty votes In New- York, perhaps fifty in Penn
sylvania, four or five in Maryland, and a hand
ful of scattering Southern delegates, the total
strength of the column mustered under Mr.
Platt's leadership could scarcely exceed one hun
dred and fifty or two hundred.
Though conditions point more clearly to a
compromise than to a serious and decisive clash
over the Vice-Presidency, there are some ex
perienced politicians in Philadelphia who look
to sne the Convention forcibly set aside Mr.
Platt's preferences and Judgments, and choose
a nominee from New-York on whom he maj de
cline to set the seal <;f hir. approval.
AN OBJECT LESSON IN CLEVELAND.
At Chicago in ]>•.':; New-York, under ihr si::l
ance of Hill. Murphy and Croker, fought des
perately to prevent the nomination for the F'res:
dency of a New-Yorki r who had the supj
every important State in the Union save bis
own. The struggle was a hopeless one f"r the
Hill-Tammany combination, whose selfish dis
regard of National party interests bad alii
the Democratic leaders in other States who tin
der ordinary circumstances would have hesi
tated seriously about naming a Presidential can
didate so bitterly and vehemently antagonized
at home.
Mr Cleveland eight years ago Is an object
less. >n which many politicians here think Mr.
Platt might do well to study before he decides to
to a finish uls apparent plan of campaign.
It Is certainly within the power of the West
ern and Southern delegations to put on the Na
tional ticket any New York candidate in whose
qualifications they have established confidence,
however those qualification a may appeal to Mr.
Platt.
Ex-Senator Matthew P. Quay, of Pennsyl
vania, who appeared to-day for the first time at
the Hotel Walton to exercise his functions as a
member of the National Committee, admitted
frankly that he expected to confer with Mr.
Platt on the Vice-Presidential outli
QUAY WANTS TO MEET PLATT.
Replying to a suggestion that ho had already
arranged a course of action with the New-York
boss with a view to forcing on the National
ticket New-York*a candidate chosen by Mr.
Platt, Mr. Quay said this afternoon:
"I have seen many published reports affect-
Ing Senator P!att and myself, and commenting
upon what Is said to be -mr Intended course in
the Convention. Those «t tries are all news
paper talk, of coorae. I ha'e ni I seen Senator
Platt since March 4 of last year, nor had a
word With him Since that time. I want to see
him, however, and expect to confer with him
when he arrives in Philadelphia.
"I have no knowledge whatever as to who
may be nominated," continued Mr. Quay. "I
believe, however, that once the ■ of the
President is made known the entire strength of
the Convention will be thrown to that particular
candidate. < >i' course, the President will not
openly declare for any one of the many candi
dates, but the knowledge will be disseminated
through the medium of those who are In his
confidence.
"My personal opinion ta thai New-York will
num.- the candidate, and that it hns only to
• a good man with the Indorsement of
the delegation to sweep the field "
"Tlie fri -tids of Mr. VV Iruff are claiming
tin- si:!'i.':'rt of sixty of th" seventy-two !•'•■
:i New-York," w.i^ BUggei
"There are two ways "f Indorsing a candi
date," was tli" reply. "It is j.. Bsible to pass n
resolution Indorsing a candidate, and th>n let
lUtslde know that it was only an empty
compliment, and he Is not wanted for the
place. The other way is to follow th» Indorse
ment by hard w-^rk and honest support."
MAY SUPPORT WOODRUFF.
"Do you think Mr. Woodruff could win the
nomination?"
"I see do reason why h" should not bo nomi
nated, if he is really the candidate of the New-
York people and they make a fight for him."
"Will Pennsylvania support Mr. Woodruff?"
"i am in • ntire Ign irance of what our delega
tion will do, as f have nol conferred with the
members Bince th y were elec)
"They will probably vote as you may wish
them to?"
"Well, if New-York is t" name the man. anil
Lieutenant-Governor W Iruff is that man, I
suppose Pennsylvania would vote with New-
York.
"There are several good n.en In the field."
concluded Senator Quay, "any one of who:n
would not weaken the ticket. All the talk is
about some candidate for second place who
would give strength to McKinie-. in my opin
ion, the fight is on the head of the ticket— the
Presidency — and it will be won or lost on that
issue."
To thoße who are familiar with the many
coalitions formed by Mr. Quay and Mr. Platt at
previous National conventions the frank ad
missions of the Pennsylvania leader win carry
the conviction that another alliance between
them to obstruct 'be free choice of an Eastern
Vice-Presidential nominee is among the proba
bilities of the approaching Convention.
Not all the Pennsylvania delegates, however,
will follow Mr. Quay in a hard and fast alliance
with Mr. Platt. State Senator Christopher
Magee, of Plttsburg, the leader of the antl-
cinlnued un sixth y««e.
ELECTIOXS QHET IN CFBA
ISLANDERS ANXIOUS TO SHOW THEIR FIT
NESS FOR INDEPENDENCE.
Havana. June 10. — result of the elections
probably will not be known till midnight, the
count of the ballots not beginning until tJ p. m.
The day was very quiet, the city having the
general appearance of Sunday, except for the
large number of coaches In the streets hired by
the contending parties to carry voters to the
polls free of charge. Most of the voting was
done early. Some of the voting booths* had
voters waiting before C> o'clock in the morning,
when the elections began. At 10 a. m. probably
half the total number of inscribed voters had
cast their ballots. The election boards, nearly
all of which were camp of members of the
National party, were extremely contented,
claiming to be absolutely sure of winning. The
Associated Press correspondent visited a great
many booths, which were clean and orderly.
There was no confusion, and rows of voters
were waiting their turn. The Cubans, members
Of the boards said, were conducting the elec
tions in an exemplary manner, being anxious to
Show their fitness for Independence. One booth
at Cerro was the scene of a disturbance. An
inspector of elections representing Estrada Mora,
candidate for Mayor, becoming Involved in a
controversy with a watcher of the National
party as to the right of a voter to obtain assist
ance In marking his ticket, the Mora man was
taken to the police station.
WHITE TICKET ELECTED IN SANTIAGO.
Santiago, Cuba, June IC— The first Cuban
election passed without the slightest disturb
ance In this supposed turbulent province. In
this city there was only a small vote and only
one ticket on account of the withdrawal of the
National party a week ago. The white Demo
cratic ticket was unanimously elected, and the
same party was successful throughout the de
partment. The officers had every command in
the department under arms all day but there
was no real contest anywhere and absolutely no
trouble. Probably not 20 per cent of the legal
electors voted. Senor Orinan was elected to
succeed himself as Mayor of Santiago. He Is a
friend of Governor Castillo, who organized a
successful campaign, and will probably eventu
ally favor annexation.
ISLAND DELEGATES IN SESSION.
LEGISLATION RECOMMENDED to THE GOVERN
MENT.
San Juan, Porto Rico. June 16.- Twenty-five dele
gates representing fifteen municipal governments
met in convention here yesterday evening in pre
liminary session, their object being to discuss in
sular affairs and suggest future legislation. Among
a dozen items which they will recommend are the
disposition of the $2,033,000 appropriated by Con
gress; that the telegraph system at present con
trolled by the Army be turned over to the munici
palities; that a high tariff be imposed on salt im
ported from all countries, thus protecting the home
product, and that the surplus resulting from the
reeolnage of Porto Rlcan silver he credited to the
Island. The argument was put forward that the
silver peso and the dollar are equal, but that the
I nite.l States pays CO cents for a peso and coins It
into a dollar, leaving B profit to the United States
of 40 cents.
The business of the meeting was not concluded
who- the delegates adjourned, and the convention
reconvened to-day.
Mr. Elliott, the newly appointed Commissioner of
the Interior, took the oath of office yesterday.
REPORTS FROM GENERAL WOOD.
Washington. June H.— The War Department re
ceived the f >'!nw!ng eabla C.ispnteh from General
Wood at Havana:
Ejections m Havana prog-rasing quietly, without
Slightest disorder; no reports of disorder or trouble
anywhere m the island thus far.
A later dispatch received at the War P«»pnrtment
fnun General Wood read as follows:
rr« from every province indicate absolute
tranquillity and good order. Elections are pro
g quietly.
LARGE INCREASE IN CUBA CUSTOMS.
Washington, June 1G (Special).— The War Depart
ment tO-day furnished the first useful insular cus
toms statement that has yet been compiled by its
Insular Division. In this Interesting tabulation the
total customs receipts for all districts In the island
of Cuba for the first four months of 1900, compared
with a similar period for last year, shows the
gratifying Increase for the period of $369.81101. The
totals for the four months this year and last were
respectively &. 414,908 -4 and $4.44."..r.2 30. The re
ceipts by pom were as follows:
ISO* IS9O.
Raracoa $14.407 71 $11.424 54
Ilitub.inu 1.434 77 I.IST _:»
Ctenfuegoa . 3P2._i»i *7 mm ::_■» M
Oardenaa 11 1.03 a M 119 "4
nubarien Cit.snosi 40.ii.i4 81
Gnantanamo 41,814 S3 33.12. «»
Gibara 64.470 72 4S.»u?s <«
Havana 4,C_ts.77_ 11 3.2U6.31430
Manzanillu 47.981 «1 47.MR *>
Uatanzaa 180.245 M . iC3.4t;i>.%7
Nut-vilas 60.563 55 l>2 747 13
Saxua I.i Grande 7.1.314 11 47*4iM In
Santa • 'rui 1.5700 a :>■■:• 4.*.
Santiago 812. MS 04 30T» 1144 M
Trinidad 11,743 M 7.731 3D
Tunas ■■•'■■' 4.".: 12 1.620° 114
COURTROOM FLOOR GIVES WAY.
A MAN TRAMPLED OH BY TEW CROWD AND
BEVEREL.T iITRT.
At the trlil of Charles and Aaron Starr at Spring
Valley, X V.. on Friday night the floor el th*>
crowded courtroom, under which there waa an ex
cavatlon, caved in. The crowd was thrown to ihe
bottom of the excavation, and In their efforts to
reach the iioor Oscar Mershon waa trampled upon
iitul received serious Injuries The then were nol
much hurt. Court adjourned to 'he < >i"-r.i House.
where the trial ol thi then accused of
tenrinK iii wn and burning a British flat raised by
Robert Sneden In honor of the Queen's Birthday,
went on. and resulted in ■ disagreement
m —
T<> DEFEND HER FLAG WITH HF.lt CAXXOX.
EMPEROR PLEASED AT THK PROSPECT O]
MANY HAVIKG _ t;!:i:.\T PIJEBT.
k. June Hi— At the opening of the E3be-
Trave canal here to-day, Emperor William suid:
1 .:rn pleased to say that Germany ha* now rh>:
t--. .~i -t of having a Beet. Germany must be able
ommercial Bag In the f
rof the k1 | >' i> " !> . v aaeana of her cannon, stay
it lie granted us h> the completion of the Bi
, crate In maintaining 1 >ad!
The Emperor h.-.* gone to HeUgofeu

YALE GRADUATE'S SECRET UARRIAGE.
ALFRED S. CH_PP___ AND M-88 PALMER. OF
NEW-LONDON. WKl'l'Hl' TWO TEARS AGO.
New-London. Conn., June 16 (Special).— The fact
was made public here to-day that Alfred S. Chap
pell, son of William 8. Chappell, a local real estate
dealer, and Miss Addle Palmer, daughter of a New-
London manufacturer, were secretly mauled near
ly two years ago at Providence. The marriage oc
curred while the bridegroom was a member of the
Yale Platoon, which was recruited among the at—
dents of Talc nearly two years ago. The battery
never saw active service. After the auurlaga the
bride returned to her father's home and the hus
band went back to soldier life, only to be mustered
out. He Is at the 1 ■ resent time a clerk In the office
of the F. H. & A. H. Chappell Coal Company.
FIRE IX TILLAGE OF SMYRNA.
ALL BUSINESS Ht'ILPINGS DESTROYED AX!'
SEVERAL HOUSES BI'RNED.
Utlca. N. V.. June I*.— A dispatch to "The Ob
server" from EarlvlUe pays that fire broke out In
the village of Smyrna, a few miles north of Earl
vllle. on the Ontario and Western Railroad, and
that every business place In the village has been
destroyed and five or six houpes.
■ Smyrna is a place of about four hundred In
•Mbltanta.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
NEWS OF TWO IWPITAI.S.
LONDON.
AMERICA REGARDED AS THE SPECIAL
GUARDIAN OF THE OPEN DOOR.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR TRAr." DEVELOPMENT
IN CHINA-POSTPONEMENT OF A KHAKI
CAMPAIGN-LADY RANDOLPH
CHURCHILL.
['■••ryr 1»X>: By The Ka« T rk TrtMir.e.l
[bt cable to the TRtBr.NE.)
London. June ML— .-»■■')• of the American
Government in China escapes public observation
here because the forces* of marines oent to
Peking are small; but it la keenly watched in
diplomatic circles.
That action is Independent, if not isolated:
American marines* may b» marching with Euro
pean and Japanese marines. but they are goin?
to Peking for a specific purpose, the protection
of American missionaries and property, and are
not instrument.-, of any European concert. This
fact is clearly understood among diplomatists
here, and certain inferences are drawn from It.
One is that the United States Government does
not intend to be entrapped into any European
coalition for the protection or dismemberment
of China. A concert may be formed, but Amer
ica will not be in it. The Washington Govern
ment will look after the interests of its own
citizens In China, as it Ii doing In Constanti
nople.
Another inference is that this independent
course will strengthen the resources if the
Washington Government for holding the Euro
pean Powers to their guarantees on the open
door question. I? will not act jointly with Ens
land or Germany and will remain outside the
concert and be in a better position for dealing
with all the Powers and insisting that, whatever
changes there may be in spheres of influence
and territorial holdings, the principle of equality
in commercial advantage shall be maintained.
Lord Salisbury began several years ago with
ringing the change* upon the open door policy
and ended by leasing Wei-Hal-Wei on the same
terms on which Germany and Russia had ac
quired ports and naval stations. This was.
practical evidence that England, whenever an
emergency arose, would join th European con
cert for controlling action in China and regulat
ing a scheme of partition if there should be a
breakup of the Empire. It Is already clear that
the Powers are acting together in sending ma
rines to Peking, and that at the risk of Instigat
ing civil war they may be called upon to depose
the Empress and grant Russia a mandate for
the occupation of Northern China.
The Boxers" movement is widespread and has
been in progress for a lor.? time, and the Em
press has been forced to support it In order to>
protect the dynasty and the throne. The Euro
pean concert will be compelled to adopt strenu
ous measures for crushing this anti-foreign
movement, and It may be impracticable to defer
the dissolution of the Chinese Empire. In this
•v nt the American Government w_l be In a
unique position, if the worst comes to the worst,
for holding the European Powers to- their
pledges to respect the open door principle. It
may be enabled to play an important part as a
peacemaker and the champion of the com
mercial Interests of the world, and this it can do
with greater efficacy and grace if it remains
outside European concert.
Mining and railway engineers who are fa
miliar with China assert that an enormous
expansion of the world's trade will be the re
sult of opening the Empire under scientific con
ditions of modern enterprise. Millions are now
living ther^> in primitive surroundings, but with
the extension of railways, the development of
coal measures and ether mineral resources, the
introduction of electric machinery and the bulM
ing of factories, the market for foreign goods
could be quadrupled. One of the most im
portant interests of modern commerce is the
opening of China on conditions of commercial
equality to industrial competition by all nations,
and the United States has become the special
guardian of that principle. The Washington
Government should hold its resources in re
serve, especially as the British Government has
been caught unprepared and is stumbling from
one feeble expedient to another, with a vague
possibility that everything will come out right,
but a strong probability that there will be some
horrible catastrophe, such aa a general mas
sacre of white men or the dissolution of the
Empire into a cluster of anarchical provinces.
Momentarily the European Powers are held
together by the common menace of the slaughter
of foreigners, but th- concert Is not likely to
prove more efficient in China than at Constan
tinople in the past. Russia and France are
deeply distrusted, not' only by Japan but by
England and Germany, and it la by no means
clear that the concert can be induced to sanc
tion the deposition ot the Empress when the
rightful Emperor la at her mercy and the am
bassadors are virtually Imprisoned in their
embassies with the relief force cut off and
hung up half way between the coast and the
capital.
The China, crisis and the unexpected prolonga
tion of the South African war. through the
difficulty of transport ami the desperate re
sistance of the Boers, have choked off all talk
about a genera! election in July. The Liberals
will put out a strong feeler on Monday in ques
ticnlng the Ministers upon the state .( the reg
istry, but there is not likely to be a definite
answer. Lord Salisbury has not made up his
mind respecting the date of the elections, hia
continuance in the Foreign Office or the Cabinet
changes which are required. The Ministers
themselves are divided respecting the expe
diency of forcing an appeal to the country. There
Is endless chatter in the smoking rooms of the
Commons and in political clubs?, but the shrewd
est surmises defer the elections until October
and displace Lord Salisbury at the Foreign
< >r?!ce as soon as the area session is wound
up and Mr. Balfour is at liberty to devote all
his energies to the Chinese question.
Mr. Chamberlain is not likely to remain in
the Colonial Office, ana his future is the most
difficult problem which Lord Salisbury la called
upon to solve. He is a favorite with the Queen.
and the relations of Lor: Salisbury and Mr.
Balfour with him are most cordial. The leader
ship of the Commons, the First Lordship of the
Treasury and the, Chancellorship of the Ex
chequer are posts for which he is pre-eminently
fitted, but Sir Mk-hael Hieks-lit-aeh. like Sir
William Harcourt. has no idea of retiring from
Parliament, and there are scores of old Tories
who cannot tolerate the thought of serving un
der Mr. Chamberlain.
Alt these political change or.- dependent upon
Lord Roberts'.- SUCraaa In bringing the war to a
speedy float. The main obstacle to peace is the
C3O TO PHILADELPHIA AND RETURN.
During the Republican Convention and the North
American Tarnfent the Central Railroad of New
Jei.ey will -ell tickets in New York at CM for the
round trip. Ticket* B ood to go on June 15 to _T In
clusive, and to return on or before June M Station*
in New-York. Übertjr-ai. and South ,erry.°"-<A(_vt.

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