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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 20, 1900, Image 1

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For Convention
Proceedings
see Part 11.
VOXV OK LX N° 19,575.
In the front row at the further eide of the centre aisle will be recognized Senator ScweH at the head of the New-Jersey delegation. Behind him sits Franklin Murphy. At the head of the Tndiana delegation h Senator Fairbanks,
lender the -\ew-\ork standard sits Senator Plan, and at his right is his son, 1-rankH. Platt. Immediately behind Senator Platt will be distinguished plainly ex-Congressman Benjamin B Odell jr \t his right is Lemuel Ely Oratr" In the
same row may be seen ex-Congressman John Murray Mitchell, Senator Dcpew, John Sabine Smith and Charles H. Murray. Behind Chairman Odell stands out plainly an excellent portrait of Governor Roosevelt with George W
Aldndge, of Rochester, at his right. At the foot ot and behind the staff carrying the name of Ohio, in the centre aisle, sits Congressman C. H. Grosvenor. In front of him is Governor Nash of Ohio, and behind the GoV< later
Foraker. Heading the Pennsylvania delegation can be seen ex-Senator Quay. In the Massachusetts delegation, with his hand stroking his beard, is Henry Cabot Lodge.
This is the most successful photograph ever taken in a National Convention, and supplies for the readers of The Tribune a permanent record in which nearly every delegate may be easily recognized.
RUSSIANS ATTACKING PEKING.
BELIEVING FORCE SAID TO BE SHELLING THE CHINESE
CAPITAL ON TWO SIDES WITH MANY GUNS.
SEYMOUR'S COLUMN CUT OFF AND SURROUNDED.
Many exciting and doubtful reports were telegraphed from Chinese coast
cities last night.
A Russian relieving force is said to have reached Peking "in the nick of
time." and to have attacked the city with artillery on two sides.
Stones of massacres of Christians and foreigners continued to reach
Shanghai.
Admiral Seymour's international column, it was reported in Shanghai, was
cut off without food or water in the middle of an arid plain, and surrounded by
hostile forces.
In announcing the dispatch of four thousand troops to China Russia has
given assurances to the other Powers that she has no purpose of territorial ag
gression.
The commander of the British cruiser Endymion reports from Taku that
up to 2 p. m.. Sunday. Tune 17. the British Rear Admiral at Taku had heard
nothing of the alleged return of Admiral Seymour's column to Tien-Tsin. This
news was nine hours later than the intelligence announcing the column's return
brought to Che-Foo by a Japanese torpedo boat
Rumors that lapan would act as the mandatory of the Powers and send
twenty thousand troops to China were revived.
Li Hung Chang is said to have been summoned from Canton to Peking.
SEYMOUR NEEDS BELIEF.
BITTATION OF TITH INTERNATIONAL
(••LIMN BEPOBTEO I>I>PEHATE.
ttmm York Trttraacl
[liT CABXM tO THn TRIBfVK.]
Locdon, June 2Q, <i a. r-i The Chinese situa
tion is apparently unchaiiped. All Forts of
- . . :. .-:.;. .ai, taut not any
really fresh news is forthcoming. "The Ex
prest" Dom ••■ns a r-S'^rt that the
ror is d<-ai. and that the Empress is pre
paring for flight, while a Russian relieving force
is Eaid to have arrived outside of Peking yester
day morning sad Immediately begun an attack
on the citjr.
At Yunnan-Fu, where a rising has been gath
ering force for some days past, six hundred
Christians attached to the French missions are
. murdered and the French
jI made a prisoner.
Japan is said to be mobilizing twenty-five
thousand troops for immediate transport.
An Imperial decree has been published banish
•ng General Tun? Fuh Slang, and Li Hung
Chang has been ordered to proceed with all
speed to Peking.
"The News" correspondent at Shanghai says
the Chinese officials there have received intel
ligence from Peking down to June 17. The sit
uation was at that time very serious, but no
details were known.
Conflicting reports are published with regard
to Admiral Seymour's relief column. A "News"
message from Shanghai says the force has not
yet returned to Tien-Tain, but is still sur
rounded by hostile forces In the middle of an
Continued on fourtb iMU?e.
8.50 TO PHILADELPHIA AND RETURN.
During the North American Turnfeet the Central
v^ o **.^ New J *"ey will stll tickets In New
York at 12.50 for the round trip. Ticket* good to
£° on June 15 to a. Inclusive, and to return on or
before June 26 Stations la New York. Liberty
Et. and South Ferry:— Advt.
>^?*fc^ . r - «,V |r> a m
WILD REPORTS FROM CHINA
COAST CITIES CONTINUE TO FURNISH
STIRRING BUT DOUBTFUL NEWS.
. ■
London, June 20, .'5 a. m. — "The Russian re
lieving lord arrived outside of Peking this
morning," says the Shanghai correspondent of
"The Daily Express," 'and Immediately began
to attack the city on two sldf-s, employing
numerous artillery.
"The force apparently arrived i n the nick of
time, for th-- Chinese assert that the attack on
the legations had be:-n successfully renewed.
On the night of June 1»; the Chinese troops un
der <<enerals Tung Fuh Siang and Tung Ohing
attacked the legations and set on fire five Euro
pean buildings. Nothing definite is known as
to the result, except that the Crinese were dis
appointed, although other reports, utterly dis
credited by foreigners her.-, are that the Chinese,
infuriated by the destruction of Taku, have
since massacred all the foreigners In Peking."
A modified version of these rumors received at
Berlin is that the French as well as the Ger
man Minister has been killed.
It is n<-,w reported at Shanghai that it was on
board the Russian cruiser Koiietz. and not the
Mand^ohur, that the explosion occurred, killing
and wounding more than fifty. It is reported
that no fewer than seven hundred Chinese were
killed in the forts
The British cruiser T'ndaunted arrived at
Shanghai yesterday, cleared for action and took
up a position commanding th«- Chinese fins.
There are three Chinese cruisers in the harbor.
The new Chinese cruiser Hai-Yang, built by
the Armstrongs, has been taken into custody at
Taku by the British and Russians.
The disorderly elements have secured the
upper hand at Wuhu and Sze-Chuan. where the
native fhriptians have been massacred.
The Shanghai correspondent of "The Daily
News," telegraphing yesterday, says:
The Chinese officials here assert that they
have news from Peking up to June 17. The situ
ation was then very serious. Beyond that they
claim to have r»-oeiv.-<] nothing, but they deny
that dispatches have been withheld.
Admiral Seymour's column Is now In the mid
dle if an arid plain, with no food and no good
water, and surrounded by hostile force?.
JAYNE'B EXPECTORANT— cures all Colds—
JAYNE'S KXPECTOKANT.-Advu
NEW-YORK, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20, 190 D.-TWENTY PAATOi
LISTENING TO SENATOR WOLCOTTS SPEECH.
ASSURANCES FROM RUSSIA
NO PURPOSE OF TERRITORIAL AGGRES
SION IN CHINA.
j "Washington, Juno 19.— The Russian 0"f fcrpffi
£ v Aitaiies here. Mr. thir, morning in-
I formed Secretary Hay that' Ma Government was
I dispatching four thousand Russian troops from
Port Arthur to Taku. The Department accepted
this statement without comment.
It is known to the officials here that Japan
also is sending a corresponding: number of troops
to the seat of trouble, and that England, Ger
many and France are doing likewise. It is be
lieved that, with our own force, numbering
about two thousand, including the Oth Infantry,
the international army will t.e quite strong
enough to relieve the siege of the legations at
Peking.
One of the most important developments of
the day, however, was that the notice by the
Russian Government of its intention to dis
patch four thousand troops to China was ac
companied by an undertaking that these troops
were to be used for the assistance of Europeans
and Americans, and with no purpose of terri
torial aggression on the part of Russia. This
assurance was received with the greatest satis
faction. It is understood that Japan, in view
of Russia's frank declaration, will consent to
assume the same obligation toward the other
nations, in which case the greatest obstacle to
effective action, whether concurrent or joint, by
the Powers In China, may be considered as re
moved.
THE THOMAS AT TAKU.
TWELVE HUNDRED AMERICAN TKOOPS AT
THE SCENE OF ACTION.
London, Juno 20.— A dispatch from Shanghai
announces that the United States transport
Thomas, with troops for Manila, was divert* d
at Nagasaki and has arrived at Taku with
twelve hundred men.
EXCITEMENT IN JAPAN.
THE MIKADO'S GOVERNMENT MAY SEND
TWKNTY THOUSAND TROOPS TO CHINA.
Yokohama, Juno 10. — The lews of the shelling
of the forts at Taku has caused sreat ex<ite
ment throughout Japan. It is reported that the
Powers will ask Japan to send twenty thousand
troops t<> suppress the revolt. It is probable
that the Government will consent. Additional
transports are being: prepared.
London. June 19.— Rumors that Japan will, as
the mandatory ol the Powers, restore order In
China were revived In a dispatch to-day from
Yokohama, Berlin dispatches intimate that Ger
many will not object to Japan's sending I\<nio
troops, while Great Britain win indorse the plan
with avidity, though perhaps only secretly.
The Japanese Legation in London has official
lnf< rmation of the dispatch of three thousand
tro. ps. In the mean while the British are dis
patching six native regiments, besides artillery,
from India.
FRENCH FORCE IN THE EAST.
Paris, June 19.— The French Government will
have 4,200 troops at Taku when the reinforce
ments Just ordered out reach there. Two thou
sand will reach Taku before July .'-!.
The dispatch of a cruiser division, which was
l upon to-day, will give Prance a strong
naval force, consisting of seven modern cruisers
—three of the first class :md four of the second
four Kunboats and a dispatch boat.
LI HUNG CHANG SUMMONED TO PEKING.
Paris, June 19.— A dispatch from Shanghai
pays Li Hunt,' Chang has been summoned to
Peking from Canton.
Hong Kong. June 10.— It is understood that
LJ Hung Chang leaves Canton for thi- North
June 30.
Cant' n is quiet, and the Viceroys of the prov
inces bordering on the Yaag-tse-Kiang ar- be
to be Mn.ngiy opposed to the revolution
ary movement
RELY UPON PLATT'S CHLORIDES
for household disinfection. Odorless and cheap.—
Advt. "'
HORSE DASHES UPSTAIRS.
CAUSES TERROR AND RUIN IN GROCERY
STORE.
PLUNGES UP TWENTY-ONE STEPS TO SEC
OND FT.OOK. 18 LASSOED AND LOW
EKED ON AN ELEVATOR.
A horse ran away in Eijrhth-ave. last evening,
dragged its owner for some distance along the
asphalt on his back, got loose, and at Forty
fourth-st. grew tired of the roadway and took
to the sidewalk. Two men, one a cripple, and a
woman got in the animal's way and were
promptly knocked down and run over. At
Forty-fifth-st. the horse decided that there was
no reason why he should keep on the sidewalk
and, noticing the open door of Smith & Sill's
grocery, decided to go in there.
He did it so quickly and his appearance was
such a surprise that clerks and customers fled
in terror. Overturning crates of eggs, trays of
vegetables and doing much damage, the run
away dashed through an inner door and bound
ed up the long flight of twenty-one steps to the
second floor.
The horse reached the second floor, and, still
going at a mad gallop, ran toward the rear.
Several barrels of groceries were taken in a
l< ap. and the animal came down on the floor
with force enough almost to go through, and
the chandeliers in the store below fell with a
crash. The men at work on the second floor
hardly knew whether to believe their senses.
John Cleary, of No. L'lS West Forty-seventh-st.,
was nailing up a box.
"Run, mm!" he shouted, in his rich brogue,
"it's the divil himself!" Cleary stopped lung
enough to hurl his hammer at the horse, and
then fled to the roof. He was found there late",
and could hardly be induced to come down.
CAUGHT WITH A LASSO.
The horse was all this time dragging the
shafts of the runabout, from which he had
broken loose, and as he tried to get through be
tween two columns preparatory to leaping
through a window he stuck fast. The men tried
to approach the animal, but he kicked and
stmrted and intimated that there was lots of
deviltry left. John Kennedy, a driver, who mice
worked on a ranch, «i»t a new clothesline from
a shelf and managed to lasso the hi
liciw to R( I the i/.-ast downstairs was th.' next
problem. To indue- him to walk down was a
waste of time, and It waa not attempted.
li was decided to wait n little while for the
animal to get over its fright This was done,
and after much trouble the horse was backed
inf» the elevator. When it began I
the h'-ise broke out again, and. rearing and
plunging, made K< nnedy*s position a dan
one, The bottom was reached without injury
to him or the horse, however, and th>- anirna.l
was taken to a stable.
BROKEN SHAFT CAUSED THE TROUBLE.
The hurs>- is owned by lfoe Kisman, connected
with the Fireprponne Manufacturing Company,
of No. 610 W<st Forty-nlnth-st., and living at
the Hotel Lincoln, Broadway and Fifty-second
st. After finishing work Mr. Eisman and a
friend, Richard Phillips, of the same firm, or
dered their runabouts and trotters brought
arii\:nd. They Intended to take a turn ap
Eightb-ave. and <>n the Speedway. At Forty
third-st. Eisman'a shaft, pulled out, and hit his
horse on the heels. The animal Is cxi
high spirited, and began t.. plunge and v- u:
Mr. Eisman tried to quiet the horse by letting
out the reins, havini; about two yards slack
on the seat It proved futile, an '. )>• fore hi
realise his danger be was jerked from his run
about i" thi- asphalt and. rolling and sliding,
wan pulled a distance of sixty or seventy feet
before ho let go.
At Forty-fourth-st the horse struck a mail
box, tore it l"<>se, and its contents wer.- dis
tributed over the street. Mrs. Mary Palmer,
ihirty-ivo years old. of No. :-Jl7 West Forty
fourth-st, was knocked down. Although not
seriously hurt, she fainted from fright.
John Donahue, forty-one years old, a driver,
of Nn. 4L'<> Eleventh-aye., was knocked down and
much bruised. Charles Baker, fifty-five
Old, who walks with crutches, was knocked inn
itter, but hi* chief injury was a slight cut
Mr. Eisnian escaped with some humps and the
Irss of his suit of clothes and some s'ltifire Inches
Of cuticle.
FAST TRAINS TO THE WEST VIA PENNSYL
VANIA RAILROAD
leave West £M Street Station at convenient hour*.
Sec Time Table.—
REPUBLICANS IN CONVENTION.
TO RENOMINATE PRESIDENT W KIN LEY BY ACCLAMATION
TO-DAY.
NEW-YORK INDORSES WOODRUFF FOR VICE-PRESIDENT.
The twelfth Republican National Convention was called to order in Philadel
phia yesterday by Senator Ilanna, as chairman of the Xationa! Committee.
Senator Walcott, the temporary chairman, eloquently reviewed the party rec
ord, and predicted the re-election of President McKinley. tal com
mittees were appointed, and the Convention adjourned until 12 o'clock to-day,
when it is expected President McKinley will be renominated by acclamal
The Committee on Resolutions began work on the platform and the Committee
on Credentials took up the contests.
The result of the contest for the Vice-Presidency remained involved in
doubt. The nomination of Roosevelt appeared still to' be possible, although
the chances of Long and Dolliver increased.
The New- York delegation indorsed Lientenant-Governor Woodruff.
NEW -YORK FOR WOODRUFF
ROOSEVELT OUT OF THE RACE, SAYS
HANNA— RESULT STILL IN DOUBT.
!p.y nuG&tra t<> the nißtrsz.]
Philadelphia. June 10. — At the meeting of the
New-York delegation to-night Lieutenant-Gov
ernor Woodruff was madf> the unanimous choice
of New-York for the Vice-Presidential nomina
tion. Chauncey M. Depew w.is chairman of th»
meeting. Senator Platt did not att.-nd Mr.
Depew said that the meeting vas called for the
purpose of determining the attitude of the New-
York delegation in the Convention on th
Ject of a candidate for Vice- President R B,
Odell, jr., then was recognized, and said
Before determining upon any nction, T fe-M
that, inasmuch as Lieutenant
raff has been and i? a can
nation, that he should he heard. He is not a
member of the delegation, v-ut I feel O
should be asked to ei>nv- here and star- his
views.
The motion was pur and carried, and C. a.
if Brooklyn, waa ask. ■■? the
Lieutenant-Governor t.> the meeting. H- v re
turned In a few mi ments, and Mr. \\" ]r .
cheered as be entered. Senator said:
Governor Woodruff, you have been h>
era! days. V v are a candidate for the noi
tinn for Viee-Presldent. The delegation
your Stare would esi i 'as both a favor am!
teay If m>u would giv.- your rl
situation frankly to them.
WOODRUFF STATES HIS POSITION.
Lieutenant-Governor Woodruff replied:
My position in this matter is plain. I have
occupied only one position. If Governor Roose
velt Is a candidate then I withdraw. I believe
that a large majority of the delegates here, in
fact I believe that the sentiment from all over
the- country, Is practically unanimous that he
accept the nomination. I have not been able
to convince myself that he would ultimately op
pose or refuse this demand. Therefore I have
made no campaign. I have not solicited sup
port. I believe that ■ great many of the mem
bers of this delegation would vote for me, but
I have not asked any one to do so, New- York
is the pivotal State in the coming campaign.
The eyes of the country are turned toward New-
York. There Is a demand thai New-York ex
press its preference for the Vice-Presidency. I
believe the time has come when the host inten
tions of the Republican party in the State and
Nation demand that a choice be made. New-
York should have the Vice-Presidential nomina
tion. New-York is to be the battleground, anil
a. New-York man on the National ticket would
greatly help in New-York. ! believe the great
Empire State should have such a representation
and the hour has come for a choice, and with
only the best interests of the Republican party
$250 TO PHILADELPHIA AND RETURN VIA
PENNSYLVANIA UAH. I;- IAD
Account North American Turnfest. June loth to
Slat, Inclusive; good to return until June 26th, In
clusive.—Advt.
For Convention
Gossip, sidelights,
etc., see Part IL
PRICE THREE CENTS.
at heart I believe that tome decision should bo
ROOSEVELT APPEALS TO DELEGATES.
Governor Roosevelt, after the cheering for Mr.
Woodruff ceased, said:
After the equally dignified and generous state
ment'of th» Lieutenant-Governor. I feel that a
word is due this cieleiraiion from me. and yet I
simply wish you to take at their face value the
wor('« I have already said, and I wish to repeat
the last sentence of the statement I made yes
terday, in which I said: "I feel that the best
field of my usefulness to the public and- to the
party is in New-York State, and if the party
should see fit to renominate me for Governor
I can in that position h»lp the National ticket
as in no other way, and I earnestly ask that
every friend of mine in the Convention respect
my wish and Judgment."
As I meant it then, I mean it now. If you
doubt my sincerity, then you have no business
to name me as a candidate. If you believe in
my sincerity, I ask you to respect it.
After this strong refusal Robert c. Waldo,
of Brooklyn, made a strong speech urging- that
the Governor's v.i?h ought to be respected, and
the delegation should vote as a unit - Wood
ruff. The same plea was made by Mr. Howe,
a Kinsa County delesate.
WOODRUFF ASKS FOR DELAY. ■
At this Lieutenant-Governor Woodruff sprang
ui> and said:'
I would ask that action be deferred on this
until we give the subject mature thought, and
I do not wis!i a - vote jet. As the case stands
there Is uncertainty aa to whether 1 can : be
nominated or not. I do not admit I cannot be
nominated, but I say It Is not absolutely sure.
In the- case of Theodore Roosevelt there Is no
uncertainty. I knoTv how Governor Roosevelt
has talked for six months, and I know that no
more sincere man breathes the breath of life.
If he allows his name to go before the Conven
tion we are assured that h>? will. be named, and
the> Empire State will be the gainer. If ha still
refuses, the nomination may ko— God knows
whert — possibly to some State which is sure to
pive the: ticket UX>,4»X> majority. Therefore. I
subordinate ail to the thought as. to what, ls
Lest for the party.
Governor Roosevelt jumped up and stood
silent for a moment. Then he said, uttering his
words with vigor:
I have taken this position after lons consulta
tion with many friends and political leaders,
I -took the position that L did not want this
nomination if the party would be pJeased-jto
"nominate me for Governor of New- York, vhera
I believe I can be of most service to the" party.
Of course I never hai any ri<ht to say if ] was
nominated for Vice- President t would refuse.
Certain gentlemen seem to doubt my sincerity.^
Asata I ask you to recall what I have said."
and I appeal tr» you. my fellow delegates and
my friends, to r»speot that wish and credit me
with being as zealous for the best inter c£
the party as any one else here.
ROOSEVELT'S LAST STAND.
Speeches were made by C. A. Moore, Frederick
~"
THE SARATOGA LIMITED,
Comra. June 3d, leaves Grand Central Station
every Saturday at 1:30 p. m.: other week day* at
3:-t> p. nv. running at the same speed a* the Em
pire State Express, and atopplas oaly at Tray.—
Advt. , .

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