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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 20, 1900, Image 9

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BOERS AROUND RUNDLE-
BTATEBB GATHERING ABOUT
FICKSBURG.
X/)RD ROBETiTS CALLS POP. HUTS TOR
THIRTY THOUSAND SOLDIERS.
ICoryrlS-ht: l»00: Pr The New-Tork Tribune. 1
[BT CABLE TO TKK THnitJXE.]
Lor.dor.. June 20. <\ a. m.— Boers are
■aid to be gathering in considerable strength
near Ficksburg. in Orange River Colony.
General Rundle has, however, been reinforced,
and should be able to deal with any force that
may attack him.
•The Ma!"' correspondent In Blcemfonteln
learns that Lord Robert* has arranged to have
tuts f=ent out promptly for thirty thousand
■sen. I. X. F.
LULL IX AF RFC AX XEWS.
A BEt-ATKD DISPATCH PROM LORD ROBERTS
REACHES LONDON.
[asßßTfcjtt: 1900: By Th» New-York Trlbun*,]
Let CABLE TO the TKIBTTKK.]
London, June 20, 1 a. m. — War news from
South Africa continues stagnant. General Rob
erta's belated dispatch relating: to the deliver
ance of 3.lft" British prisoners at Watervaal and
Pretoria has been received via Zeerust, whither
It was sent when direct communications were
Interrupted. It Is not yet known whether the
bulk of the nine hundred prisoners removed
eastward were colonial soldiers, as has been
currently reported.
Incomplete lists of the casualties of the Derby
shire Militia have also been posted at the War
Office.
M: Chamberlain referred Justly and gener
ously at th» Liberal-Unionist meeting- to Ameri
can opinion on the Boer campaign, and assumed
that thf general elections -would not be held
• re was a settlement which would Justify
the war from the British point of view.
There was a most Impressive service In West
minster Abbey yesterday at the funeral ot Mrs.
Gladstone. The service was similar In form to
the.t -which she attended when her husband was
buried ars when the Prince of Wales kissed her
hand with courtly grace.
There was a brilliant programme to-dar tor a
B1&B84 performance for the benefit of the suf
ferer* nf the Ottawa fire, Irving, Tree and many
o'her actors taking part. I. N. F.
UIAMBERLAIN ON WAR SENTIMENT.
THE COI/ONJAI, BECRETART REFERS TO
THE SYMPATHIES OF AMERICA.
London. June 19. — Joseph Chamberlain, Secre
tary of State for the Colonies, addressing a
meeting of the Women's Liberal Unionist Asso-
CBfttkm this afternoon, said the colonies had
peen through the haze of the South African
ante-bellum negotiations, when Sir Henry
Campbell -Bannerman (the Liberal leader In the
House of Commons) axid others were mystified.
Now that the war wae concluding, he added, all
were unanimous that whatever the final settle
mlgfet be It must be final, and should not
;-a\e behind It ths seeds of further mischief
and rnaka a repetition of the trouble possible.
The Opposition wanted to know when a general
f-lection would occur. He wa? unable to gratify
their natural curin=it> , but whether the election
fx>k place to-morrow or was postponed Indefi
nitely it would be one of the most momentous
•ed to the people of the United Klng-dom
during a century, Involving the question of the
uf South Africa and the future of the
:e.
•Tins to Continental criticism, Mr. CH&m
ber!ain. after remcrldng that England always
expected this, went on to say:
But there are quarters whence even a note of
disapproval would be a matter of serious con
cern. I refer to ntir colonies and to the United
I think we are happy In that we have
pood opinion and approval. It is true
ad opinion of the United States Is not
ur.rr.lxed with other sentiments. I will not now
enter upon the causes, partly political and
partly sentimental, which have led certain
Americans to sympathize with what they call
a republic, although Its whole existence and
practice have been one perpetual denial
of the principles upon which their great Repub
lic is founded. I beileve the great majority of
true Americans recognize that our aims In this
war are &t> high and unselfish as those which
animated themselves In the Spanish-American
stmssTie. They fought then for justice and
liberty, not for their own subjects, indeed, but
■ bom they believed to be the victims
n. and we did not enter into quizzi
cal disquisitions or technical discussions, but
recognized that They were carrying out as
Anglo-Paxons a great -work of civilization and
X«~,w we are asking their sympa
i-rfd we believe that In the long run we
ps'.n thf final seal of their approval.
LATNGS NEK TUNNKL OPEN.
THF FIRST TRAIN PASSED THROUGH ON
MONDAY-BURGHERS SURRENDERING.
I»ndon, June 19.— N0 Important developments
ir.ark the progress of the British In the Trans-
Ix>rd Roberts reports that over two thou-
Fa:. : stands r >f arms have been given up at
Pretoria since the occupation of the capital.
TbCM will be utilized by the released British
trs, of v.h.m there are 14S officers and
• Truer 12 and of th« latter
■I itals.
. of tht- British losses on June 4, says
,y amounted to two men killed
er and forty-eight men wounded.
: reports that the first train
ised Lain?'« Nek Tunnel on Monday,
." and proceeded to Charlestown.
[afekinf/a sick and wound
ed arriv^.j at the hospital at Beelfonteln on
BUBEBSIDBBIKa AT WAKKERSTROOM.
-■jst. June 1!* -The town guard of Wak
kerftroom has surrendered to the British, and a
• r of Mausers, with st-veral r'l^s of Ameri
can manufacture, have been handed in. General
Hildyard has returned h<
PASSES REQUIRED AT ST. HELENA.
Washington, June 19.— The Consul at St. Helena
has transmitted to tbe State Department a copy
of a proclamation issued by the Governor of the
island forbidding, during 'he continuance of the
war between Great Britain and the South African
republics, and the consequent detention of pris
oners on the island. persoiiß to land from any ves
eels without a pass signed by the Governor.
EEALYITES WERE ABSENT.
• OPENING OF THE NATIONALIST CONVENTION AT
DUBLIN.
IhibUn. June I*.— The Nationalist Convention
cr*ned to-<!ay under the presidency of John Red
mond, chairman of the United Irish Parliamentary
I party, and wan largely attended, many Roman
Catholic clergymen being ; resent. The Healyites
were absent. Mr. Redmond Bald it was the most
representative assembly of Irishmen since the
union. No attacks, he added, would be permitted
°« their absent brother •■' ms lists, but the hand
of fellowship Wai held out to every one willing to
work on their lines.
Resolutions were adopted declaring there was
no longer anything to prevent the Nationalists
from reuniting, pledging Mr. Redmond, their un
flinching support and asserting that the first ob
ject was to secure Independence for Ireland as a
nation.
TEE MARTINIQUE TROUBLES.
Paris. June » Pspljiliis. In the Senate to-day to
fin interpellation regarding th- result of the In
quiry into the troubles In the Island of Martinique,
the Minister of the Colonies. 'M. Decrala. ,t,) the
liivcstlration Bhowed that the lieutenant who or
dered th- »ol<3l#»re to fire on the gtiikera acted
haatily. and he would bo withdrawn from active
sVSMaa. I» aAdJtion, the loyal police would be bet
ter recruited, the gendarmerie would be reinforced
and public functionaries would be forbidden to In
tervene in electoral campaigns.
THE FIGHTING IN ABHAXTEE.
A CAPTAIN OT THE ROYAL, rRISH rUSILIERS AKTD
SEVEN NATIVES KILLED.
London, June 19. — Colonel "VFillcocks reports
to the Colonial Office that Captain Wilson, of
the Royal Irish Fusiliers, and seven natives
were killed and ten wounded in Captain Hall's
attempt to relieve Colonel Carter.
There 1b no newß from Coomassle.
A dispatch from Prahsu to "The Daily Ex
press," dated yesterday, saye:
Captain Wilson and Sergeant Humphries, with
one hundred and forty West African frontiers
men, while reconnoitring between Bekwai and
Kupha, were attacked by the rebels.
Captain Wilson and ten men were killed, and
seventeen were wounded. Sergeant Humphries
brought the detachment to Fumso.
WEST THTXA REGIMENT FOR AFRICA.
Kingston, Jamaica, June 19— The West India
Regiment received orders to-day from the War Of
fice to hold Itself in readiness to proceed to Gam
bia, Western Africa, to fight the Sofas.
Demerara has offered four hundred volunteers
and a Maxim gun for service against the Ashan
tees. About two hundred and seventy-five men of
the Kingston Infantry Militia volunteered for the
same service, yesterday.
The community has been excited by the receipt
of news that the Secretary of State for the Colo
nies, Mr. Chamberlain, has ordered a military con
scription at St. Kitts and Nevis, by which every
male between seventeen and forty is liable to eom
pulsrry military service. The local press denounces
the step.
FIFTY REBEL PEASANTS KILLED.
THE INSURRECTION SPREADING IN* BUIXJAJUA.
Bucharest, June 19.— The insurrection In Bul
garia Is spreading. Fifty peasants have been
killed by the military at Duran-Lekah.
AMERICAN WINES MAT BE SHUT OUT.
THE EXPOSITION JTJRT OBJECTS TO THETR
FRENCH NAMES.
Paris. June 19— Unless such pressure can be
brought to bear as to rescind th« resolutions, nearly
every brand of Amerlca.n wine will be thrown out
of competition at rhe Exposition. The Jury on
wines has decided not to judge any wine which
bears the name of any French wine. Most of the
American wines have the general name of a French
wine after which it is flavored, such as Sauterne.
Chablis, Bordeaux, Chateau Yquem, etc. These
will be excluded under the action of the Jury, half
of the entire membership of which are Frenchmen.
The California Commission, who hoped to secure
recognition for their wines, is incensed, and threat
en to withdraw all its exhibits. But the matter Is
In abeyance until presented to Commissioner-Gen
era! Peck in the form of a protest. Still, it is felt
here that Jealousy of the American wine industry
Is at the bottom of the trouble, as the wines now
excluded were Judg-Pd at the Exposition of 1889
under the names ttiey now bear. Besides, the
American wines were catalogued under their pres
ent rmmes, but there hns been no protest until now.
I/ate this afternoon the question was brought to
the attention of th« American Commission by Dr.
Wiley, the American representative nn the wine
Jury, a-nd pressure will Le brought to b^ir with tho
object of annulling the decision. Which Is consid
ered most unjust to th* American exhibitors. It to
b'-Meved the wine Jury, which is a cla§s jury, acted
without authority, rind that it will be overridden
by the group Jury, whose duty It is to decide such
matters.
LAXG'S DEATH DUE TO DISAPPOINTMENT.
Berlin, June 19.— 1t is said that the death of Herr
Johann Lang. Burgomaster of Oberammergau, who
died yesterday as the result of an operation, was
hastened by his disappointment over the exclusion
of himself and his daughter from the cast of the
Passion Piay. whi^h wan due to a village intrigue.
FACTIOXS OF KNIGHTS OF LABOR.
TTrn ASSEMBLIES IN SESSICV IN WASHINGTON
Washington, June 19— Two gatherings of the
Knights of Labor of North America, each claiming
to be the regular and legally constituted legislative
body of th<= Knights, were in full swing here to-day,
,ss^nit>!y having for its avowed object the
deposing and removal from office, of the leader of
the rival faction. Neither faction expects to fully
accomplish what it has set out to do without in
voking the aid of the civil courts, and even then it
seems doubtful If a split in the organization can
be averted. The faction headed by Genera) Master
Workman Parsons heard the report of the general
Executive Board, submitted by John A. Connor. It
recommended that the charter of the District of
Columbia Assembly bo revoked; that the secretary,
John \V Hayes, be removed from office, and that
ii tit!*- '<■* secured to ihe property of th« oM<t in
trict Without action further thun refer
ring the recomnw • proper commit
tees the assembly adjourned.
.!. l> Chamberlain, of Colorado, gensrul worthy
foreman, presided over the deliberations of the
Huyee faction and heard the rej>ort of the Com
mittee on Appeals n.n<\ Grievance*. Thia report
rwo.-nrnended that Messrs. Parsons, Q'Keefe, Con
nor Armbtrong and Inks be expelled from tlm
order upon U'*" chars;*" >->t misconduct made against
t!,<Tu by Local Assembly No. M.
TRUNK. LINE PASSENGER AGENTS.
The ITunJi Line passenger scents met yesterday
and made a number of special summer rates to
various seashore and mountain reßorts; also* upe
clal rates to Bever&l ttoclal and labor organization
conventions. The report that the scents had dis
cussed certain phases of the Joint pasbunger acre*
ment with a view to modliyi>>if It waa donli-d.
NEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. JUNE 20, 1900.
AN INTERESTING STAGE OF THE COURTSHIP.
MURDERER EIGHT TEARS OLD.
NEGRO BOY IN VIRGINIA KILLED NEGRO
GIRL AGED THREE BECAUSE HE WAS
"MAD AT HER MOTHER."
Richmond, Va., June 19 (Special).— News oomei
from Grayson County that Arthur Waddell, a
negro boy eicht years old, enticed Bettie Hampton,
a little negro girl three years old, to the woods,
killed her with a rock and hid her body under the
top of a tree. Waddell hns been put In Jail at In
dependence and ordered before the Grand Jury. Ha
will probably ho sent to the reformatory, being
too young to go to the penitentiary. Arthur, who
is probably the youngest prisoner ever arrested in
Virginia for murder, had been bound out to Cap
tain S. M. Fulton for four years, having previously
been in the county poorhouse.
He and the negro girl went toward the woods
together. When he returned he taid the girl had
wandered away from him and been lost. Search
was made for her, but in vain. Finally the boy
confessed the murder to Captain Fulton, and told
where he had concealed the body. He took the
searching party to the top of a troe, in a link hole
in the woods, and told them that he had hid her
under the limbs and brush. They removed the
limbs and debris, and there was the body of the
girl. Her forehead had been beaten and mutilated
with a blunt Instrument, which the negro boy sayg
was a rock. When asked wl^at ehe was doing to
him, he said "Nothing," but that he was "mad at
her mother." The boy Is Incorrigible, and has
given many evidences of criminal disposition. He
does not appear to realise the enormity of his
crime.
HOMCEOPATHISTS MEET IX WASHINGTON.
TO DEDICATE STATUE OF HAHNEMANN— NEED OF
UNIFORM STATE MEDICAL LAWS.
Washington, June 19.— The American Institute of
Homoeopathy began its annual session here to-day,
Dr. Charles E. Walton, of Cincinnati, presiding.
The chief feature of the convention will be the
dedication presentation to the Government of the
Btatue of Dr. Hahnemann on the east side of Scott
Circle on Thursday afternoon. The President will
attend the dedicatory exercises, and addresses will
he delivered by Attorney-General Griggs and other
well known men. The same evening tho President
will give a reception to the members of the conven
tion in the White House.
President Walton in his annual address to-day
earnestly advocated uniformity of medical laws In
every State in the Union. He said the right to
practise medicine In one State should carry with It
the right to practise In every State, and he favored
any means, whether by concerted State legislation
or Congressional action, that would bring about
this end. Ho opposed the establishment of homoeo
pathic chairs In allopathic colleges.
Dr. Custis, of Washington, presented the report
of the International Bureau of Homoeopathy, and
Dr. George B. Peck, of Providence, supplemented
it with a paper on th<> present condition of homoeop-
Rthy in the United States. He said there are 9,3fi9
regular homrpopathic physicians in this country, of
whom 1,158 are women. There are now twenty-one
homoeopathic medical colleges, with 13,120 alumni.
Papers were read In the course of the day on med
ical topics by Drs. Newton N. Collins and .Julia F.
Hay wood, of Rochester. N. V.; W. T,. Hartman, of
Syracuse. N. V. ; Flora A. Brewster and Cora B.
Brewster, .>f Baltimore; Edward A. Krusen. of
Collegeviile, Perm.; Florence N. Ward, of San
Francisco: De Witt G. Wllrox. of Buffalo; Sidney
F. Wilcox, B. '■ Carlton and Orlando S. Kiel!, of
New-York City; Julia Holmes Smith and B. S.
Bailey, of Chicago; David M. Gibson, of St. Louis;
Leon T. Ash. -raft, of Philadelphia; G. C. Jeft>ry,
of Brooklyn, and Henry F. Thamplin, of Rlooms
berg Perm.
In connection with the meeting of the Institute
the American Homoeopathic Ophthalmological,
Otological and Laryngolngical Society held a meet
ing, at which technical papers were read by a
number of physicians.
BEQUESTS: FOR HARVARD AND WILLIAMS
PROVISIONS IN THE WILL OF DAVID D. WELLS'S
FATHER — SPRINGFIELD LIBRARY
REMEMBERED.
Norwich, Conn., June 19 (Special).— the death
of David Dwlght 'Wells, son of the late David A.
Wells, the well known political economist, Harvard
University is richer by about $37,000. The same sum
goes to the Springfield City Library. Springfield,
Mass., and to Williams College, Wllllamstown,
Mass. The bequests come from the elder Wells,
whose estate was so left at his death that if his
son should die without issue one-third of the
estate should go to the son's widow and two
thirds, after the payment of certain bequests
amounting to $20,000, should be equally divided be
tween Harvard. Williams and the Springfield li
brary. The, estate la inventoried at $330,752 SO.
David Dwlg'ht Wells, the son, died on Friday,
June 18. His will was probated to-day. The sum
of $10,000 is left to Rutger Bleecker Jewett. of New-
York City. The remainder of the estate Is left
to the widow without reserve.
Mr. Wells was born In Norwich. He whs an ex
tensive traveller and had ■ will* reputation as a
playwright and author. For several years he lived
in London, England, being assistant secretary of
tho American Legation during the second Admin
istration of I resident Cleveland. It was while
living in England riittt he secured the material (or
Ills most euccuesful book. "Her Ladyship'! Ele
phant," which whs published some time ago, and
also for his moat recent work, "Ilia Lordship's
Leopard," which has appeared within the last few
months.
CAPTAIN 0. P. LEE DROWNED.
Washington, June 10.— Adjutant-General Corbln
received a cable message from General Mao Arthur,
at Manila, to-day, saying that Captain Orison P.
I*-*, of the 18th Volunteer Infantry, was drowned
off the coast of Alli,i\ on Jun« 10. Captain Lee
was born at BhetbyvUle, [nd , on July 30, 1860, and
entered the service April 2fl. 1898, an captain of the
ICOth Indiana Volunteers. He served with that
tuiiiment. at Matanzoa, Cuba, from January to
March. 1899. He wag appointed captain of the 45th
Volunteer Infantry August 17, 1599, and accom
panied the regiment to the Philippines in De
cember.
m
GEX. WOOD REFUTES CHARGES.
EXAMINATION OF HAVANA'S TREASURY AC
COUNTS SHOWS AN EXCELLENT
CONDITION.
Havana, June 19.— General "Wood has Issued the
following statement:
The examination by expert accountants of the
Treasurer's Office from the rlate of its Inception
last year has been completed. The office was
found In excellent condition. It haß alao been con
clusively proven that the charge of extravagance
in the matter of salaries to Americans paid from
the Island funds is absolutely without foundation.
The fact Is that the highest salaries paid In the
Island are pni'l to Cubans. The reports of ex
travagance in transportation and the like are abso
lutely false.
When seen to-day regarding 1 this statement or
notice General Wood said:
I am much pleased at the result of the examina
tion. I engaged the best experts to be obtained
In the United States, and gave them instructions
to he thorough in whatever they did. It is impor
tant to have the conclusions they have reached
published, for we find it difficult to keep military
men doinar ihe work of civilians without extra pay.
It is a thankless task for them at the best, and
they are called thieves every day in the local
papers.
As to the charge that the officers ride about in
carriages, I would say that there is not one of
them who has any more facilities of that character
than he would be entitled to in the United States
under similar conditions. Several officials in the
Knclnoerlng and Sanitary departments have con
veyances, but I do not believe that any are al
lowed save where hack hire would be mors ex
pensive.
Since his arrival here General Wood has devoted
his energies largely to the reduction of public ex
penditure, and he has already cut down the ex
penses of the city of Havana more than $100,000 a
month.
DEATH OF MAJOR FRANK H. EDMUNDS.
OCCURRED YESTERDAY AT HAVANA FROM
YELLOW FEVER.
Washington. June 19.— Major Frank H. Edmunds.
Acting Inspector-General on the staff of Brigadier-
General Lee, commanding the Department of Ha
vana and Plnar Del Rio, who died from yellow
fever at Havana yesterday, and whose death was
reported to the War Department to-day by General
Wood, was born In Michigan on December 30, 1849,
and appointed to the Military Academy from Dakota
on July 1, ISM. In January, 1899, he was assigned
to duty at headquarters of th"c Seventh Army Corps,
at Havana, serving successively as Chief Ordnance
Officer and Acting Inspector-General of the depart
ment. In November 1899, he was made major of
the 15th Infantry, and the following May was trans
ferred to the Ist Infantry.
EXTRADITED FORGER SENTENCED.
Havana, June 19. — Clarence Mayer, who was re
cently extradited from the United States, charged
with forgery, has been convicted and' sentenced to
eight years' Imprisonment.
WILLIAM P. HARRISON REPORTED SICK
BROTHER OF CHICAGO'S MAYOR SAID TO BE IN
THIS CITY SUFFERING WITH APPENDICITIS.
According to dispatches received in this city
yesterday, William Preston Harrison, brother of
Carter Hnrrison, Mayor of Chicago, is lying seri
ously 111 In this city and Is to be operated upon
fcr appendicitis to-morrow. His case 1b pro
nounced critical, and his brother, it is reported,
left Chicago yesterday for this city, in order to be
present .it the operation.
It eouM not bo learned Just where the sick man
Is, but 't is surmised that he is being cared for
in a private hospital. Inquiry at the Holland
House, where Carter Harrison Is accustomed to
staj while in this city, failed to elicit any infor
mation as to where his brother might be found.
No information could be obtained either from the
Hotel Imperial or the Hotel Manhattan.
WEST SIDE REPUBLICAN CLUB.
Th« West Side Republican Club held its regular
meeting last night at its club rooms, No. 3,307
Broadway. The special purpose of the meeting was
the election of twenty-nine applicants for member
ship. John Proctor Clarke, president of the asso
ciation, was in the chair. Among the committees
to report progress was the Committee on Public
Speakers, of which J. Castree Williams, of No. 179
West Elghty-sever.th-st., is chairman. Many of
the members of tho association were reported to
have volunteered to go on the stump during th<;
Campaign, and the prospects of doing some hard
work wa.« In every way promising. This committee
is ,i suh-comm!ttpf» of the Campaign Committf*. of
which Frank Urainard is chairman, and of which
there aro Bfty numbers'.
Energetic work la now being done by the
Library Committee In its endeavor to furnish the
ehf.. with tho foundation of an historical and
political library. Members nrc nsslstlng in thr>
work by either giving the book named in the list
specified by the committee or by contributing an
equivalent sum of moi
Among those present, of whom there were about
fifty In all, were T. T. Baylor, Walter R. Quick,
J. C. Pumpelly. W. W Morrill, W. H. Coburn. W.
M. Benr.ott. B '". Dusenbury and I* D Pall.
UNDERTAKERS' ASSOCIATION MEETS.
Rochester. N. V., Jyne 19.— The twenty-first annual
convention of the New-York State Undertakers' As
sociation was called to order by President William
J. Phillips, of Albany, at 10:15 o'clock this morning
in the Common Council chamber. The meeting
will continue until to-morrow afternoon. Mayor
George A. Carnahan of Rochester delivered an ad
dress of welcome, and A. Elckelberg. of New-York.
made the response, thanking the Mayor on behalf
or the delegates. President Phillips then delivered
bin H'ldrePH on the history of the association, In
■which he told how the organization had grown to
be 11 powerful body during the twenty-one years
of it* «xlhtP!i.-e. lie praised the State laws relating
to undertakers, which compel them to apply tests
to bodies to see if life la extinct before injecting
any embalming 1 fluid, and said the majority of
sto'rli'M nuitiinhed -bout persons being burled alive
were false.
BLOOMINGTON'S BIG FIRE.
FIVE BLOCKS BURNED— LOBS BETWEEN
$1,500,000 AND $2,000,000.
Bloomington, 111., June 19.— Five blocks of the
best business buildings In the heart of this
city were destroyed by flre. which started at
12:30 o'clock this morning. The McLean County
Courthouse, valued at $400,000, was burned out,
but the records were saved.
Nearly fifty firm"! were burn»d out. It Is esti
mated that the losses will foot up between
H "., -000 and $2,000,000. Two leading hotels,
the Windsor and Phoenix, were burned, but all
the guosts escaped. At 8:30 o'clock the com
bined Fire Departments of this city, Peoria and
Springfield had brought the flarres to a stand
still in the block west of the Courthouse.
Only one life was lost, and that indirectly.
The fire started In the Model Laundry, in Mon
roe-st.. in th* block northeast of the Court
house. It spread rapMly along th» north and
east sides of Courthouse Square. Help was re
quested from Peoria ar.il Springfield. Before this
arrived the fire was eating Its way to the east,
and dynamite was used to check Its progress.
Robert L. Schmitt. r.lnet^n years <>M. h"ard the
terrific explosions and fell rtond from h'-art
failure.
The block where the fire started waa soon en
tirely destroyed, with the exception of the
Government Building: and postofflce, which
escaped undamaged. Besides the old Doric*
Theatre, the following firms were In the block:
Brand & Co., furniture; Vimont & Koehn. dry
goods; Cooper & Jackman, glassware: Pixl-y &
Co., clothing; Thompson & Sons, furniture; the
Model Laundry, the B. S. Green Company and
Miller & Sons, hardware.
The flames then jumped across Maln-st. to the
Minerva Block, which was destroyed. It was
tenanted by the following firms: Thp No Name
Store, Xi^haus's restaurant, H^lMg's music
store, the McLean County Cral Company. B
ney's coal office, Guthrie's cigar store, the Phce
nix Hotel, Carver's drug store. Coblenfs drug
store. R. C. Rogers, wall paper; C. W. Klemm,
drygoods. loss $l<n>.tMx> : Stephen Smith Sons.
drygoods, $75,000; J. H. Higgs. drygoods, $3ft.ooi>;
Bolle's tailor shop and the Sohn ••idpr-Zshon
Store Company.
The Windsor Hotel Block next went before
the flames. The loss nn the hotel amounts to
$50,000, and on Wilcox's drygoods establish
ment to $75,000. Griesheim's seven story build
ing at Main and Jefferson sts. then caught nr.\
and, with the entire block I>lns east of the
courthouse, was destroyed. The ground floor
was owned by Griesheim's clothing house, and
the loss was $100,00* ». The upper floors wer?
occupied by many professional men, who lost ail
their books and office fixtures. Parritts Broth
erß' Jewelry establishment. Cole Brothers' new
building and drygoods stock, the Corn Beit
Rank. Reed Brothers, hardware; Klopp. hatter.
State National Bank and "The Kasjie" office
btilMlnp were wiped out in turn. Burning
ernbere from the Grl^sheim building set fire to
tho courthouse. The big building burned slowly,
and whils hundreds of citizens were assisting in
removing- the records the clock in the dome
tolled four times. Nothing was left save the
walla of the building, which was erected at a
cost of $400,000 twenty years ago.
Assistnnce had arrived from outside) points,
and when the fire was communicated to the
block west of the courthouse the combined tire
departments made a last stand to check its
spread. The block was burned out, however,
ard oeveral business houses lost their stocks.
But the firemen were successful, and checked
the flames after eight hours' hard work.
No figures are obtainable as to the amount of
Insurance.
WESTrnESTER MAN GETS A GOOD PLACE.
Justice Keog-h, in White Plains yesterday, on the
application of Corporation Counsel Whalen. ap
pointed Edmund G. Sutherland, of White Plains.
Commissioner of Appraisal on the eighth Cornell
dam proceedings. The Commlssionersnip Is the
most Important in the water proceedings, and has
hefore it the consideration of claims for land taken
by the city to the extent of J7.0W.000 to $8,000,000.
The appointment of Mr. Sutherland was vigorously
contested by leading Westchester County Demo
crats who wanted the place. Mr. Sutherland ia one
of the editors of "The Westchester County Re
porter." The place Is worth JIO.vWO.
FRANCHISE FOR FLTNN SYNDICATE.
The authorities of the village of Bronxvlllo have
finally agreed to give the New- York. Westchester
and Connecticut Traction Company, owned by tho
P. H. Flynn syndicate, a franchise which will en
able It to extend its Mount Vernon line to Tuekahoe
nnd ScarsdaJe. In its new franchiao the company
agrees to pay 1 per cent of the gross receipts after
twenty-five years and to sprinkle the highways In
The summer months. It is said that the Traction
company will now push on toward White Plains and
attempt to connect that city with Its line In Mount
Vernon.
THE WEATHER REPORT.
YESTERDAY'S RECORD AND TO-DAY'S FORECAST.
Washington. June 19. — F»lr weather pievatled Tuesday,
exeapt In the Middle and "West Gulf and North Pacific
State*, where showers occurred. The temperature con
tinues helow the seasonal average in the Atlantic Coast
and Southern States, and Is 10 degrees to 18 degrees above
the normal In the Northwestern States. The highest
temperature reported Tuesday was 108 degrees at Phoenix.
Ariz , and the lowest was M degrees at Nantucket. Mass.
No well defined storm appears within th-» rang- of observa
tion. The barometer In high over the lake regions, and Is
low In Texas and the British Northwest Territory. During
■Wednesday showers are likely to occur In the Southwestern
States and on the extreme North Paclfli Coast, while
e'.Eawhere the weather will be generally fair. The tem
perature will rise slowly in the Atlantic Coast States, and
will continue high In the Northwest. Alcng the At'antlc
Coast fresh east to northeast winds will prevail.
FORECAST FOR TO-DAT AND THTTISDAT.
For New-England and Eastern New- York, fair to-day;
fresh northeasterly winds; fair and warmer Thursday.
For the District of Columbia, Eastern Pennsylvania.
New-Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia, fair and
warmer to-day and Thursday; light to fresh northeasterly
winds.
For West Virginia. Western Pennsylvania and Western
New-York, fair to-day; increasing: cloudiness Thursday:
fresh easterly winds.
TRIBUNE LOCAL OBSERVATIONS.
In this diagram the continuous whits line shows the
changes In pressure as indicated by The Tribune"* self
recording barometer. The dotted line shows the tempera
ture as recorded at Perry'a Pharmacy.
Trth".-e Office, June 20. 1 a. m.— The weather yesterday
was fair. The temperatuie ranged between 02 anj 72
degrees, the average (6<?H) being (i o' a degree higher
thin that of Monday and B*4 degrees lower thaa that of
the corresponding date of last year.
The weather to-day will be fair.
MARRIED.
OGILBT— HICKOK— On Tuesday. June 16. I£XV>. at St.
Teter's Church, Morrlstown. N. J . by the Rev Dr.
Hihbar.l, Anne Hopkins, dauahter of Mrs Germrdtne
Hcpktna Btckok, to William Ptewart Ross ORliby. Jr..
of Staten Island.
\VILIJAM.-»- JOHNSTON — On Tuesday. June 12. at Christ
Church, Roanoke. Va., by the Rev. R. \V. Patton.
Alice Boyd. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter N
ston. to Pavld Louts Wlllams. of New -York City.
Notices nf marriages and deaths must be In
dorsed with full name and ad iress.
DIED.
Berry, Louis P. Matthews. Aiel r>.
Cleveland. Natalie. -ditch. Margaret T>.
Hawkins, Howard C. Vug*. «. N
Hughes. William H. T. Margaret.
Sfahlod < ■ Bsory w.
Loomls. M. Marie. \v .rmaer. Carolyn C.
BERRY — On Monday. June 19. I-outs P.. son of Samuel
J. and Charlotte L. Berry. In the 28th rear of his age.
Funeral from the residence of his parents. Elizabeth.
N. J.. on Thursday, 21st lnst ., at 1 o'clock
CI.KVKI.ANI> — At Summit. N. J.. June IS. 1900. Natalie.
Infant daughter of J. Wrajr ani FJdlth R. Cleveland.
,! private.
HAWKINS— At the residence of his parents. No. 158 East
37th-st.. on Tuesday. June 19, Howard Clarkson. second
son of Julia Floy and Eugene Dexter Hawkins, age 6
m^ths.
Funeral private.
HVOHKO— AI Bemls, Me.. June 18, William H. T.
Hughea.
Notice of the funeral hereafter
JONES — At Dinard. France. June 19. 1900. Mahlon,
Ogden Jones. .
IjOOMIS — On Tuesday. June lft, 1000. at her late resi
dence. No. 47s lst-st., Brooklyn. M. Marie, widow of
Harvey Loomls.
Funeral ■>! 11 li IS at No. 47S lst-st.. on Thursday, June
21. at 11 a. m.
MATTHEWS — Suddenly, at Plttaneld. Mass. Monday.
June IS. IWO. Azel Dennis Matthews, In his 02d ye.»r.
Funeral cervices will he he. i In the Lafayette Avenue
Preibyterlan Church, corner South O*fjrd-et. and La
fayette-aye., Brooklyn, on Thursday evening, June 21.
a.l 8 o'clock. Relatives and friends are Invited.
DIED.
MIDDLEDITCB— At h«r rMtdsiMM. Xo. 94 9t«x>sr P!*e».
Brooklyn.- on Jun» 18. Margins Urtncston. wies SJ
H-r. R. T. Uld4ls<Utch. D. D.. In h«r 7«th r«ar. i'WTJWi
Notice of, funeral hereafter.
PAOE— June 19, at Asbury Park. N. J.. K. It. Pa«S, <*
Waterford. N. Y.
Funeral notice hereafter.
«HAW— Suddenly, on June IT. at !».■>. 140 Wast getb-tt.,
Margaret. wlf« of George Shaw.
Vuneral services at 10 a. m. W»dne»la.y. Jons 20. at St.
Matthew's Church. No. 28 West 84th-st.
Interment private.
WEBB On Monday. Mm 18. 1900. at his rislfl—im.
B*«*rhw&rwl. Scarborough, N. T . Henry Walter W*bbw
son of the late James Watson Webb and Laura Vir
ginia Webb, In the 4»'h year of his age.
Funeral services will •■>« held at St. Mary's Church.
Scarborough, at 10 o'clock Thursday miming.
A special train will leive Grand Central Station at 9:30
o'clock Thursday morning-: returning. It will laav*
Scarborough at 11:15. reaching New- York at 12 noon.
WORMSER— At West Eni, N. J.. suddenly. June 19.
Carolyn Claire, beloved child* of Mv:rlc« S. and florin*
R. Wormser. In her 6th year.
Funeral private.
A.— The Krnilro Omelrry — Private stattM
Harlem Rallroa!. 4.'! minutes 1 ride from th« Grand Central
Depot. Office. 16 East 42<1-st.
Cemetery Lot Ilnrran.
E. EDMUND MARKS. Established ISTS.
(220 Broadway. New Tork.)
Lots for sale In all Cemeteries. Low prices.
Special Notices.
For Pare Wln»« and Liquors
for your city or country bum*. £<■> to
L. J. CALLAXAN. 41 AND 43 VESET 3T.
Send for copy of Monthly Price List.
For Rnrhnrk's cu«tom made an<l other wire window
•cr«vn<i. screen doors, wir»« nnd all fixture*, «• ta Roe
tuck's. 172 Fulton Ft.. New York: 14ta St. mat Hamilton
At*., Brooklyn. Telephone. '
Trlbnnr Subscription RstPS.
tirma COPIES.
PAir.T. R cents. ■ WIXKLT. •' CsatS.
SUXDAT. 5 cents.- | TRI WEEKLT, 2 cents.
PT EARLY MAIL TRAIN*.
(For all points in the Tmte^ States <outstf« of Greater
Xew-r,-vrk>. Canada and Mexico.)
DAILY AVD SUNDAY: i TRI-WF.FKLY:
On* Month. Si 00 ! fk Merrh9. .75
Thr-» Months. .<■.• SO I Twelve M ••.!«. II BO
Mx Months. J.". <■<> WEEKLY:
Twe'v» Months. JIOOO I Sit Month*. -.SO
SUNDAY ONLY: v w) .|v» Jlonths. $100
Twelve Months, |2(W I TRIBI'NF. ALMANAC:
DAILY ONI,Y: Per copy. 2»
On- Month. .90 I TRIHUNE I.VDEX:
Three nth. «2 «O Per copy. II CO
Six Monrhs. *4 <V> I TRIRfNF: EXTRAS:
Twelve Months. J* •*> \ 3*r..1 for catalogue.
BY OCEAN STEASIER.
(For Europe, the British Isle* and all countries in th«
Universal Postal. Union.)
DAILY AND SUNDAY: ! DAILT ONLT:
One Month. *1 73 One Month. $1 44
Two Months. $.1 M ! Tn-r. Months. $2 M
Three Months. *4 05 T*it+* v~«-hl. *"» ""
Six Months. «•< 'V.! Sis Months. IT 11
Twelve Months $1» 3-1 Twe..o l...r.tha. *>■» -<*
SUNDAY O.VLY: WEEKLY:
Six Months. »2 BJ t fit Months. •'- 02
Twelve Months $3 12 , Twelve Months. $204
TRI-WEEKLY. six month-. #1 "I. Twelve months. $3 CO.
IN NEW-YORK CITY.
Mall subscribers to the DAILY an.l TRI-WEEKLT
will be charged one cent a copy extra postage In addition
to the rates named above.
REMITTANCES.
Address all communications relative to subscription* or
advettlsements to THE TRIBUNE. New- York City. Re
mit by PostnflW money order, express money order, draft
or registered letter.
OFFICES.
MAIN OFFICE— No. 134 Na.«sau-st.
UPTOWN OFFICE— No. J. 242 Broadway, of any Am«rt
can District Telegraph Office.
NEWARK BRANCH OFFICE Fred** N. Sommer. So.
7D4 Broad M
AMERICANS ABROAD will "r1 Th» Tri'r, • at:
LONDON— Office of The Tribune. No. 1«> Fleet-st.
Chaplin. Milne. CrenfelT & Co.. Limited, No. •
Prince^ St., B. C, I^mirn.
Brown, Gould & Co., No. 54 New Oxfori-st.
American Express Company. Xn. 3 Waterloo Place.
Thomas Ct>ok * Son, Lu.lsrate Circus.
The London office of The Tribune l» a convenient plac*
to leave advertisements and subscription".
PARIS — L.-iuU Vuitton. No. 1 Rue Scribe, oppostt*
Grand Hotel; end at all Klcsks and hotels on th*
Exposition grounds.
J. Monroe .v Co., No. 7 Rue Scribe.
John Wanamaker, No. 41 Rue ,isa I'otites Ecurles.
Hottinguer & Co., No. 3S Rue de Provence.
Morgan. Harjes & Co.. No. 31 Boulevard Haussmajin.
Credit I^yonnals. Bureau dcs Etransers.
Amemcan Express Company. No. 11 Rue Scribe.
Thomas Cook & Son. No. l PUoe de I'OpSra.
Societe rtes Imprimertes Lemercler. No. I rises d«»
■ -a.
GENEVA— .*Lfmhßrd. Odler * Co.. and Union Bank.
FLORENCE — Whitby & Co.
HAMBURG — American Express Company, No. IX
Sonmiede Strasse.
BREMEN — American Express Company. No. »> Bannhof
Strasse.
Postotttce Notice?.
(Should be read DAILY by all Interested as changes)
may occur at any time.)
Foreign malls for the week ending June 23, ISOO. will
close (promptly In all eases) at the General Postoffice a*
follows: Parcels Post Malls close one hour earlier than
closing time shown below. Parcels Post Mails for Ger
many close at 5 p. m. Monday and Wednesday.
TRANSATLANTIC MAILS.
WEDNESDAY — At 9 a. m. (supplementary 10:30 a. m.) for
Europe, per s. a. Teutonic, via Queenstown; at 9 a. m.
Supplementary 10:30 a. m. for Europe, per a. a. South
ward, via Southampton an 1 Antwerp (mall must be
directed "per i. a. Southward"'.
THURSDAY — At 6:30 a. m. for Europe, per •- 9. August*
Victoria, via Plymouth and Hamburg (mail for France.
Switzerland. Italy, Spain. Portugal. Turkey, Egypt and
British India, via Cherbourg, must be directed * T p«r a. a.
Augus'a. Victoria"); at i":";> a. m. for France. Switzer
land. Italy. Spain Portugal. Turkey. Egypt and British,
India, per 3. a. La Charrpaffne. via Havre (mall for
other parts of Europe must be directed "per a. a. L
Champagne."); a- 13 m. for Azores Islands, per a, a.
Borderer.
SATURDAY— At 8 a. m. for Netherlands, per a- a. Rotter
dam, via Rotterdam (mall must be directed "per •- ■.
Rotterdam"): a! 9 a. m. for Italy, per s. 9. "Werra, Tl»
Naples (mall must be directed "per s. s. Werra"); at
0:30 a. m. (supplementary 11 a. m.» for Europe, per
9. a. Servla. via Queens town; at 10 a. tn. for Scotland
direct, per ■ s. Furnsssia (;r.all must b« directed "per
b. a. Furnessla"); at 11 a. m. for Norway direct, per ■. a
Thlngvalla (mail must bo directed "per a. «. Thin*
valla"); at 2 p. rr.. for Arares Islands, per a. a. Trojan.
Prince. >
•PRINTED MATTER. ETC.— C.erman itearners sailing on
Tuesdays take Printed Matt" etc.. for Germany, and
specially Addressed Printed Matter, etc.. for other parts
of Europe. American and White Star steamers on
Wednesdays. German and French steamers on Thurs
days, and Cunard an.l Herman steamers on Saturdays
take Printed Matter, etc. for all countries for which
they are advertised to carry mall.
After Ike closing of the Supplementary Tranaatlantlo
Vails named above, additional supp.ementary malls ar*
opened on the p:ers of the American. English. French
and German at»amers. and remain r>pen until wltnla
Ten Minutes of the hour of sailing of steamer.
MAILS FOR SOUTH AND CENTRAL AMERICA. WEB 111 1
INDIES. ETC.
WEDNESDAY— At 11 a. m for Cuba, per U. 8. Trans
port Crook, via Havana and Tfslasias at 11 a. m. for
Rio dh Janeiro and Santos, per s. « Asti (mall for
ether parts of Brazil must be directed "per I -■!">; a.
12 m. for La Plata Countries direct, per a. ». Newton;
at 12 m. ftor Bah.a and R!o -in Janeiro, per a. a.
Handel (mail for orher parts of Crazil must be d'.aected
"per s. « . Handel" i ; at 1 p. m. supplementary 1 :3O
p. m.l for Nassau. N. I* . per «•. « Antllla (mall must
be directed "per s. a. Antllia"); at 1 p. m. for Mexico,
per s. s. <*ity of Washington, via Tamlpco (mall must
be directed "per a. s. City of Washington").
THURSDAY— At 8 a. m. for Bernradsj. per s. i. Trinidad;
at 10 a. m. for Caibarien and Nuevltas. perU. S. Trans
port McClellai (ordinary specialty addressed mat] only);
at 11 a. m. for Cuba, rta Havana. Matanzas, Cardtnas
and Sagua, per I*. S. Transport Sed«-»-»iok (mail most
be directed "per U. S. Transport Sedgewlck"); at 11
a. m. (supplementary ll:3i> a. m.> for Porto Rico. Cura
cao and Venezuela, per 9. 9. Philadelphia (mall for
S»vanllla and Carthasena. via Curacao, mv.st be directed
"per s. s. Philadelphia"); at 1 p. m.- for Yucatan. Caro-
C • lie, Tabasco and Chiapas, per s. a. Orizaba. via Ha
vana and Fregreso (mail for other parts of Mexico and
for Cuba must be directed "per ». a. Orizaba"): at 1
p. m. (supplementary l:3O p. M.i for tsssaa. N. P..
Guantananio an 1 Santiago, per s. ». Saratoga; at 9 p. m.
for Jamaica, per s. s. Admiral Schley. from Boston.
FRIDAY— At 11 a. m for Porto Rico, per s. 9. Arkadia.
via Mauaquez.
SATURDAY — At 9:30 a. m (supplementary 10:30 a. m.)
for St. Thomas. St. Crolx. Leeward and Windward
Islands and Demerara. per s. ». Roratma. (mall for
Barbados must be directed "per s. 9. Koralma"); at Id
a. m. 'supplementary M) 10 a. m. for Fortune Island.
Jamaica. Savar.illa. Carth^senn and Oreytown. per a. ».
Athoa (mail for <>-.«ta Rica must be directed '"per 9. ».
Athos"): at 11 a. m. for La Plata Ccuntrle* direct, per
S. ■■>. Cyp rlan Prince: at 11 a. m. for Cuba, per a s.
Havana, via Havana; at 11 a. m. for Yucatan, per a a.
Ravensdale via Pro^reso: at 11 a. ra for Brazil, per
■» 9. Ragusa. v!a P-rnambuca and Fantos (mall for
Northern Frazil must be directed "per s. a. Raguaa.");
at 11 a. m. for I'err.ambueo and Santos, per s. a,
Scottish Prince (mail must be directed "per s. • Scot
tish Prince" »: at 2 p. m. fir '.--« , and Northern
Brazil, via Para and Mar.acs. per s. ■>. Cearense.
SUNDAY— At 9:.Trt p. m. for St. Plerre-Miquelon. per
iteamer fr>m North Sydney.
Malls for Newfoundland, by mil to North Sydney, and,
thence by steamer, close at this i->ffw <Ullv at 8:30 p. m.
(connecting clone here every Monday. Wednesday and
Saturday). Malls for Ml<iueion. by rail to Boston. anj
thence by steamer. cli-»e at tm.i «>t?i-e .<»ilv at S:SO p. m.
Mali!* for Cuba, by rail to Port T^-npa, Fla.. and theao*
by s'eamer. close at thU ofrlre .la'.ly (except Monday>
at t7 a. m.. (the ccnnectlnit closes ar" on Sunday.
Wednesday and Ftiday>. Mails for Cuba, by rail to Mi
ami. Fla.. and thence by steamer, close at this office er«ry
Monday. Tuesday and Saturday a: :2:."K> a. m. (the con
necting closes are on Tuei*!;\y and Saturday*. Malls fr*r
Jfexlo City, overland, unlers rr-eoiaTiy addressed for
dispatch by steamer, clos* at this "Roe daily at 2:30
a. m. and 2:."<> p. m. Matla for Crsta Rica. Belize.
Puerto Cortez and Guatemala, by rail to New-Orleans,
an.l thence by .«te»mer. clom at this efflce daily at t3:0O
p. m. (ccnnectlnir rl.ises here Tue»:!ay» for Costa, Rica,
and Mondays for Belli. Puerto Cortez and Guatemala,).
tßes*tst*red tnall cl — » at 6 p. m. previous day. {Reg
istered mall d ;« »t »i p. m. second day before.
TRANSPACIFIC MAILS.
Malls for Hawaii. vU San Fran. !sco. cl.»e her» dally % «A>
p. m. up to Juns t2^. toelualv*. f^r lii.f^utc.i per s. 9
Australia. Mail» for Auntralta «exci-pt U>st *Austr*l!4i
whl.-h «oes via Kurope. and New-Zea!and whl.-h. roej
via San Francisco). Hawaii, and FIJI liUn.U via Van
couver, close here daily at UdO p. =. = to Jvne t23.
lnclusivo. for dispatch per s. s. Warrlmoo. Malls far
Hawaii. Japan. Chin* ar.d Philippine Islands, xla, Saa
l'fanclsco. clo«e. here dally at «:io p. m. up to j'—\
t23. Inclusive, for dispatch per ». a. Dorte. MMU f,»r
China, Japan and Phlllcpine I«larls. vt» Tacoma. clote
h«r» dally at 6:St> p. m. up to Jur;e V2l, Inclusive for
dltpatch per •. » Victoria. Malls for Chtr.a and Jasan.
via Vancouvv. cIOM here daily at «:J(> p. m . uota
July t3. laoluslve. for dispatch per *. s. ' Empres* of
China (registered maU must b«> directed "via Van
couver"). Mails for AuatraUa (except West »tral!ar
New-Zealand. Hawaii. Fiji »nd Islands? v< a.
Sap Francisco. cK.se hen. d»l!y at 6:3*) p. ra. after Jua«
•M an ! up to July tT. Inclusive.' or on day of arrlv.ii
of a. ». Catnpanlt. due at New- York July tT for Ala.
patch per ». <■. Muana.
Ttanfnaclflo malls are forwarded to port of m«il!ni daily
an.l the schedule of closing is arranged on th« v-.
• umptlon of their uninterrupted overland transit.
t ßegistered mall closes at 4 p. m previous day
eoRNRa.i VAN COTT "-" mill— •
Foatofflca. Xaw-Yoik, N. I, Jim Sai 4-us\ ™-
9

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