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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 23, 1900, Image 1

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V OL LX...-X 0 - 19,578. NEW YORK, SATURDAY. JUNE 23. 1900. -SIXTEEN PAGES, WITH TRIBUNE EXTRA. EIGHT PAGES.- byTh r& h :i^. tlon PRICE THREE TEXTS.
HARD FIGHTING AT TIEN-TSIN.
FOI'R THOUSAND MEN OF THE ALLIED FORCES ENGAGED
JX REPELLING ATTACKS OF CHINESE.
AMERICANS IN ACTION— ANARCHY IN PEKING.
The rces, 6 mr thousand strong, had sharp fighting to repel on Tues
lay the attacks of Chinese at Tien-Tsin. Eight hundred Ameri
>n. They apparently formed a part of the supplementary force.
Rear Admiral Bruce, of the British squadron, and messages re
rmer at 1 akr were read in t lie House of Commons. The Admiral ex
m that Tien-Tsin would be relieved on Tune 22. The dispatches
fjhting and casualties among the allied Powers.
Alt! t is generally believed that the lives of the Ministers at Peking
lan g reports from native sources continue to he spread. These
ctically in a state of anarchy.
nn China was received in Washington. The Government has
I Genera] Mac Arthur to hurry the 9th Infantry, accompanied by a bat
artillery, from Manila to Tien-Tsin.
AMERICANS TAKE PART.
•EMENTS BELIEVED TO BE AT
TI KN-TSIN.
The silence of Peking con
. Four thous-ajid men of tho
-harp defensive fight
'' ■ Tuesday and "Wednesday.
■ reinforced on Thurs-
Fhls Is the situation f n China as set forth
r :!m'-nt dispatches.
ndent of 'The Daily
.;. s in a dispatch sent last evening:
ricans are taking part in
at Tien-Tsin. and they apparently
■ supplementary force arriving
British after the conflict
to estimate the num
there, bat they had a sur-
I
appears to have been
1 States gunboat Nash
■' ' ••-'■=^raph<»d thence to
wrtlng Shanghai
I and going into the interior.
• ..•■■►- sonrees continue to reach
- rchy in Peking. According to
- the streets are filled day and night
who are wholly beyond the con
and who are working
.i Frenzy and clamoring for
- ■ • pnera.
The English Consulate at Shanghai Is said to
have received from influential natives reports
of a tragedy in the palace at Peking, though
precisely what ■ = not defined.
The Consulate th'nks that Admiral Seymour.
commander of the international relief column.
was rnJeled by information from Peking, and
~~cbf.Bequpv.tly underestimated the difalcalttea. in
his way and tUe Chinese power of resistance
with Maxim g-unp and Jlauscrs.
The Consuls at Shanghai still believe the for
eign II ulsters at Peking cafe, although Jap
anese reports received at Shanghai allege that
up to June I~t. or.c hundred foreigners had
been killed in the city.
"Th>? Daily Express" says:
We understand that Reginald Thcmas Tower,
Bf-crfrtary of the r.rjtish Embassy in Wash
ington, is to succeed Sir Claude M. Macdonald
at Peking, and that the reason of Sir Claude's
recall is the reakdown of his health.
A special dispatch from Vienna says:
LI Iluntr Chans has telegraphed to the va
rl'.us Chinese ationa in Europe directing them
to inform the governments to which they are ac
credited that he is called to Peking by the
Empress to act as intermediary between China
and the Powers to negotiate a settlement of the
points at >-su<-. and he instructs them to beg
the Powers to facilitate his mission by ceasing
to send troops to China.
Din ■ r-Oeneral of Telegraphs, tele
fmin Shanghai to the Chinese legations
•Mat the Foreign legations in Peking
It is reported that the British Government will
Immediately send 1,200 marines to China, and
possibly, according to some of the morning pa-
I'rs. 10.000 of the soldiers now with Lord
RoV-rts.
.1 GREAT ARMY XEEDED.
FOREIGN ADMIRALS AT TAKU NOT ABLE
TO OOPE WITH THE EMERGENCY.
[OcorrtKbt: |M»: By The New-York Tribune. 1
[BY . Aiu.K TO THE raiacxa.]
London. June 23. 1 a. m.— Every day counts,
«ad the situation in China is worse for that
reason. It is ten days since there was authentic
Information from the legations at Peking, and
that fact alone justifies serious apprehension. It
!s hardly credible that the : rations with all
their resources should not have been able to
Ee.-.d a courier vlth dispatches to the sea board.
Twelve days have passed since the British Ad
miral, with th»? mixo'l force of 2,3fKt marines,
left Tk-n-Tsin for Peking, and there is no au
thentic news of his arrival. A Bvusseta com
mercial house is reported to have received a
mt-sEa^e announcing the passage of the c.ilumn
into the- capital, and there are other reports of
a similar nature from Chinese sources. What is
anxiously awaited h<*re is an official bulletin of
come kind in the place of the vague conjectures
which, have been substituted for news in one
capital afti?r another. .
Mr. liroderick made some official (-xplana
tions in the House of Commons yesterday, but
It *as with the air of a man who did not tell
*•! he knew nor half what he feared. The truth
is that there Is deep anxiety 1r official circles
Over the : aatlon in China, and this feeling is
tl:art-d by the diplomatic circles. Nothing is
known respecting the jtlons. and anything
niay have happened In Peking. Admiral Sey
n:our's force of marines was not supplied for a
march of twelve days, and It has been cut off
from communications with T!en-Tsin. There will
be an intense feeling of relief when authentic
Information comes from tli<- column.
Meanwhile, a thick fogr has settled over China.
The most experienced nan in public life do not
pretend to understand what is going on. The
best informed diplomatists frankly admit that
they do not know what Lord HsllalmrT if try
-rtg to accomplish, or what be has in mind. There
Is a general feeMnjj in Qovernnenl < ir.-!<-s that
a large military force is needed for service in
China, and the fju^tlon i« under flfvrasalon
Wftether twenty thousand intn cannot lie fhifted
without delay from South Africa. The situa
tion at Ti-n-Ti.!ri, which is a city with a popula
tion of 1.00i'.000, seems to require the presence
of a Kiacb larger for..* than Is now available.
• ■".li:.ii.-:l on tlilxi \>iij.*-
PEKING NEWS UNCERTAIN.
MORK REPORTS OF MASSACRES—ALARM
ING MESSAGE FROM BUSSIA.
•rlfrbt; 1000- By The New York Tribunal
|nr cath.k to thi; TiurrNFl
London. June 23. 0 a. m.— Little reliable- news
has been received from China this morning. The
reports of massacres in Peking still come to
hand, but they are not substantiated.
"The Dally Mail's" correspondent in St.
Petersburg states that Russia is mobilizing all
her line regrlments In Siberia and that the
Czar has ordered that the status quo in China
must be strictly maintained In the closest un
derstanding with England, Germany and
France.
Intelligence of the bombardment of Tien-
Tsin by the Chinese has been brought by the
American cruiser Nashville to Che-Foo. The
foreign force engaged was estimated at over
4.0(10, Including 800 Americans, heavy rein
forcements having arrived from Taku. The
Chinese had a surprising number of guns, and
as there were many hundreds of women and
ch'.ldren in Tien-Tsin who had sought refuge
from the various districts, the greatest anxiety
prevailed as to the result.
"The Express" understands that Reginald
Thomas Tower, the former ChargrS d'Affaires at
Washington, is to be Minister in charge of the
British Legation at Peking in succession to
Sir Claude M. Macdonald. recalled owing to ill
health.
The Chinese Envoy in Berlin has received a
telegram from Li Hung Chang pledging his
word for the early restoration of peace and
order in China, and requesting the Powers not
to send any reinforcements to the Far East,
since that would only render his task much
harder.
Count Damsdorff, the Assistant Foreign Min
ister for Russia, says a telegram to "The
Standard," has been temporarily appointed to
succeed Count Muravieff. I. ft. F.
STILL ATTACKING TIENTSIN.
THE AMERICAN CONSULATE RAZED— MANY
EUROPEANS REPORTED KILLED.
Che-Foo, June 22.— 1t is officially reported that
the bombardment of Tien-Tsin with large guns
continues Incessantly . The foreign concessions
have nearly all been burned, and the American
Consulate has been razed to the ground. The
Russians are occupying the railroad station, but
are hard pressed. Reinforcements are urgently
needed. The casualties are heavy. The railroad
is open from Tong-Ku to Ching-Liang-Chung,
half way to Tien-Tsin.
Berlin. June 22. — According to a dispatch from
Shanghai received here, Tien-Tsin Is being bom
barded by Chinese regulars, and not by the
Boxers.
A THREE DAYS' BOMBARDMENT.
Berlin, June 22. — The commander of the Ger
man squadron at Taku has telegraphed as fol
lows to the Government:
A French officer who has arrived here from
Tien-Tsin, which he left on June 20, reports that
for three days the city had been bombarded by
the Chinese and that the troops of the foreign
detachment were short of ammunition.
The German cruiser Irene has arrived here
with 240 marines, who. with 3n» British and
1,000 Russians, proceeded to the relief of Tien-
T?in. The railway id working from Taku to
within tifteen kilometres of Tien-Ts.n.
RUMOR OP A MASSACRE.
London, June 22.— A dispatch from Shanghai
Fays it Is reported from Japanese sources that
1, ."»<!«.» foreigners have been massacred at Tlen-
T.-in.
MORE COLUMNS FOR THE CITY.
Rome, June 22. — dispatch from Taku, dated
yesterday, says:
An international column conpißtii;g of British,
Russian and Japanese troops left Taki: this
morning for Tien-Tsin. An Italian detachment,
commanded by an ensign, will remain here to
Kuard the Itulian flag, which, with the Haps of
the oth'-r Powers, has been hoisted over the
forts.
The detachment of Italian sailors which par
tlclpated In the capture of the forts suffered no
loss.
German reinforcements from Kiao-Chau and
British reinforcements from Hong Kong have
arrived here.
FEARS OF RISING AT KIU-KIANG-FU.
Shanghai, June 22.— Owing: to the absence of
warships at Klu-Kiang-Fu, some apprehension
la felt there of an uprising. The merchant
Bteamer companies, therefore, have arranged to
always keep one steamer In readiness.
The British twin screw sloop Daphne has ar
rived here with ammunition.
There are no signs of a disturbance.
REFUGEES ON THE NASHVILLE.
THIBTY-THBEE AMERICANS RESCUED AND
BROUGHT FROM PEI-TAI-HO.
Shan-^-'il. J^-^ 22.— The American Consul at
Che-Voo writes that T>-» Nashville, from Taku,
is bringing thirty-thiee AnMflcans from Pet-
Tal-Ho.
OUR WHOL.B COtTMTRT REPRESENTED.
Oranges from Florida, fihad from North Carolina,
Brealcfaot Food from Minnesota. Potatoes from
Utah Water from the Adirondack Mountains,
Wine from Missouri and California.— ln addition to
the finest imported Wines— Cigars from Cuba,
f'uerto Rico and Manila, in the Dining Cars of the
ew YorV CentraL— AUvt.
BOER FORCES WEAK EX.
SLIGHT RESISTANCE TO ADVANCE OF
BRITISH ARMY.
[Copyright; 1900: By The New Tork Tribune. 1
IBT CABLE TO THE TRIBUNE 1
London, June 25, (5 a. m. — Martinus Preto
rlua, the first President of the Transvaal, In
an Interview with "The Express's correspond
ent In Potchefstroom, said that he had never
been In favor of the war. and had. in fact,
told President KrOffer so. He Is of the opinion
that the burghers will settle under the British
rule if leniency Is shown toward them.
Mr. Reitz Is reported to have Btated that the
Boers are In a position to carry on a guerilla
warfare for three months or longer.
I. N. F.
GETTING DOWN TO POLICE WORK.
PROGRESS OF THK CAMPAIGN* OF PACIFI
CATION IN SOUTH AFRICA.
[Copyright: 10(>0: By Tho New York Tribune]
[HY CAPI.TC TO THE THIiIINE]
London. June 28, 1 a. m.— News from Lord
Roberta's headquarters shows that the move
ment for the occupation of the railway between
Johannesburg: and Lains/s Nek Is in progress.
Lan Hamilton's column is heading for Heidel
berg", and Buller, with two divisions — Hlldyard's
and Clery's-is approaching Standerton, which
has been already occupied by the British cav
alry. Official news of the occupation of Heidel
berg Is expected every hour.
The budget of official and press news received
yesterday was small, and consisted malnlj of
belated accounts of tho previous week's battle
east of Pretoria and Baden-Powell's success in
pacifying the western district, where Command
ant Steyn and three thousand rifles have been
taken. The British campaign Is degenerating
into police work, with an occasional dash of
guerilla warfare on the part of the Boers, who
are unable to convince themselves that they are
beaten. That is, after all, a British trait.
T. N. F.
ROBERTS AND BULLER JOIN HANDS.
COMPLETING THE DIVISION OF THE FORCES
OF KRUEGBR AND BTETN.
London, June 22.— Lord Roberts reports that
General lan Hamilton's column reached the
Spring? yesterday en route for Heidel'ourg.
where they will join hands with General Bul
ler's troops. The dispatch of Lord Roberts in
full is as follows:
Pretoria. June 22— lan Hamilton's column
reached the Springs yesterday en route to Heid
elb-.irg, where thf-v will Join hands with Buller's
troop«. who reached Paardekop yesterday, and
will be at Standerton to-morrow, thus opening
up communication between Pretoria and Natal
and preventing any joint action between the
Transvaalers and the people of the Orange
River Colony.
Baden-Powell reports from Rustenburg that
he found the leading Boera very pacific and
cordial on his return journey hence. Command
ant Steyn and two actively hostile field cornets
had been captured during his absence.
Lord Edward Cecil, the Administrator of the
Rustenburg District, has to date collected three
thousand rifles.
The Commissioner at Kroonntad reports that
341 rifles have been handed in at Wolmaranstad.
RAILWAY EMPLOYES EXPELLED.
Amsterdam, June 22. — The Netherlands Rail
road Company of South Africa has received
official notification of the expulsion from the
Transvaal of 1,400 of its employes, with their
families.
The Dutch Consul at Lourengo Marques tele
graphs that a proclamation has been Issued to
the effect that the company's officials who re
fuse to do British military transport work will
be sent to Europe via East London, Cape
Colony.
DTNDONALD SEIZKS STANDERTON.
Kaatsboseh, June 22 — General Dundonald.
with the Third Cavalry Brigade, occupied Stand
erton to-day without opposition. The burghers
left yesterday, after having blown up the rail
road bridge and doing other damage. The in
funtry marched twenty-two miles to-day and
camped at Kaatsboseh Spruit to-night.
FEVER JX LEE'S STAFF.
MAJOR KEAN AND CAPTAIX HEPBURN
TAKEN DOWN AT QUEMADOS <'AMF.
Havana. June 22. — The unusually heavy rains
that have been falling throughout Cuba have
caused yellow fever in places whore ft hn ■'.
unknown for several years. Fortunately, except
at Santa Clara and Quemados, the United !
troops have escaped. At Quemados two now
cases are reported anionp the members of Gen
era] Le^'s staff— Major Kean, Chief Burgeon,
and Captain Hepburn, Signal < ifflcer. Captain
Hepburn's case is serious, but Major Ktan's is
light. Mrs. Edmunds, wife of the late Major
Frank 11. Bdmvnds, is convalescent, she has
not yet been told of her husband's death.
Havana has developed only three cases thus
far. in spite of the gloomy predictions of what
would occur as s(*>n as the rainy season, from
which ihe city did not puffer last year, was
really at hand. "El Cubano" says:
The Cubans have a rlxht to object to the ex
penditure of money for Banitary measures In
tended to protect the lives of a few Americans,
as they do not themselves take yellow fever. In
;mch circumstances large expenditure cannot bo
Justified.
Genera] Wilson, commander of the military de
partment of Matanzas-Santa Clara, telegraphs
that the situation at Santa Clara City has ma
terially Unproved since the troops were ordered
out of the city limits. General Lee's headquar
ters at Quemados! will probably !>e moved to the
camp in the neighborhood of Fort Columbia,
when- the troi.jis nr«-, or possibly to the sit?> of
his first headquarters at Bue.na Vista.
Governor-General Wood will a; point a com
mission to investigate nil claims for or against
church property, several municipalities having
claimed that much property, nominally in charge
of the Church, really belongs to the people. In
many instances the municipalities have con
fiscated disputed property on that ground.
WORKMEN ARRESTED FOR MAKIXG NOISE.
Property owners and persons living near Broad
way and Thirty-fourth-at., complained yesterday
to the Health Departmetn that workmen em
ployed in repairing the Metropolitan Street Rail
way tracks at that place made so much nolae at
night that the neighborhood was almost unin
habitable.
Chief Sanitary Superintendent Roberts sent Po
liceman Abraham Brunner, of his Department,
last night to make an tgation and arreMs, if
nect'sesnry. l-Tunn<-r llptenn'. to the clanking of
r:iiK hunim«-rtii« of spikea -md shouting of work
ers, and decided that iho grievance recited was
wi! founded. He t>ierrfor» nrresu-d four laborers
on a charge of violating the 9anltary Code. Ho
sold (•• iiiii not srreai in.- forrri.nii because he <ii<i
not nctunlly make any noise.
MEAT BILL PASSES BUXDEBRATB.
Berlin. June Z}.— The Meat Inspection bill
paused the Bunder-irath to-day.
A Summer Day's Dream. Every attribute of re
fin.li pleasure nullzed on Hi. isun Ulver Day Uat.
•Advt
CROKER HERE TO-DAY.
MANY WICtWAMITES TREMBLTXCt WTTIT
PEAR.
FEW PREPARATIONS TO MRF.T IIIM-RE
PORT REVIVED THAT CARROLL
VIAY RE REMOVED.
Richard Croker ia a passenger on the Cur.arJ
Lino stoamship Lucania, which will be at her
pier early this morning, as she was sighted off
Fire Island at 2 a. m. Mr. Croker ta re
turning to New-York after an absence of several
months In Europe. Since his departure things
have not gone smoothly with the organization or
with Mr. Croker. i-'ome time ago. while at
tempting to mount a spirited horse. Mr. Croker
was thrown and his ankle badly hurt. He ha?
recovered slowly from that mishap, and to-day
he walks with a limp and is compelled to use a
cane. He is coming back on the eve of a Na
tional convention to find the Tammany organi
zation thoroughly discredited on account of the
disclosures concerning the 100 Trust, and th..
d'strict leaders at war with one another. 11.
comes home to support Bryan, but Bryan has
recently In a scathing statement arraigned those
who were identified with the Ice Trust, and In
this he embraced John F. Carroll, leader of the
organization while Mr. Croker has bet-n in
Europe: Mayor Van Wyck. tho Tammany mu
nicipal executive, and other prominent Tam
many men.
Mr. Croker does not like demonstrations or
fusa. He has absolutely forbidden any celebra
tion over his arrival. As a result of this only a
few persona] friends. will go down the Bay to
meet him. John F. Carroll, Peter F. Meyer,
John W. KelW, president of the Democratic
Club; Thomas F. Smith, Mr. Croker*a private
secretary, and Andrew Freedman will be the
only ones to greet him at Quarantine. They will
go down the Bay this morning on a revenue
cutter. They will be the first to see Mr. Croker.
and they will be equipped with the latest news,
so that he will be quickly placed in touch with
the situation. When the boat reaches her pi^-r
Mr. Croker will be greeted by a hundred or
more personal friends. Including "Larry" Del
mour and nearly all the district leaders. After
this he will go to his office, at No. 11l Broad
way. In the evening Mr. Croker will be at the
Democratic Club, where all the faithful will be
on hand to gre^t him.
SIGNS AT THE CLUB.
The Democratic Club began to show signs of
revived prosperity last night. Ever since Mr.
Croker went away the club has boen dull and
listless, with few visitors. John W. Keller, John
F. Carroll, Mayor Van Wyck and John B. Sex
ton have tried hard to keep up the attendance,
but only a few were regular in their visits.
Seme of the old time leaders, suca as "Jimmy"
Martin, James W. Boyle, -Larry Delmour and
others have spoken openly about the close cor
poration maintained by the Carroll-Van Wyck
crowd, and th" way they have used the influence
of the organization in their own Interest. These
disaffected leaders ha\-e kept away from the
Democratic Club, and made Delmonlco'a a head
quarters. It was raid last night that they would
talk freely and frankly to Richard Croker to
day about the way the organization had been
run in his allure, and It was declared that
they would ask that certain prominent leaders
be divested of their power.
The burning question last night was. "What
will Croker do?" and a score of Tammany men
were quaking apprehensively. From recent
signs it has been manifest that Mr. Croker is
nettled over the Carroll-Van Wyck combina
tion, and it is said that he will depose Carroll
when he has heard the whole story. it Is
known that Carroll and Van Wyck tried to get
Croker to stay in England a little while longer,
until they could clear up some of the discord
here. On the other hand. "Larry" Deimourand
some of the other leaders asked his immediate
return. They won, and now it Is said It will be
a test of strength between the two factions,
and it was freely predicted last night that the
end would be the turning down of Carroll, and
the practical annihilation of any future political
hopes or aims of any member of the Van Wyck
family.
The Interesting story told is that Croker is not
so angry with the leaders he left in charge be
cause of their being in the Icm Trust as he Is
i'\'T the fact that they were "caught with the
goods," so to speak. He thinks, so it is said,
that they have blundered in managing things.
He is, furthermore, Incensed, reports say, over
a breach of faith. According to this story, while
the stock of tho Am^rioan Ice Company is sup
posed to have been paid for, it Is apparent, cer
tain Initiated on-W say, that the various finan
cial transactions were only blinds to conceal
the fact that th» stock was given outright for
ace. Mr. Croker, the story goes, was
told that he was getting an even share, and
now that the lists are m tde public, it is shown
that Carroll and Van Wyck had far and away
ta* re stock than t'roker. and it is declared that
the chief was deceived.
NOT PLEASED WITH OTHER THINGS
While the revelations concerning the Ice Trust
are the rn^st harmful, y*t Mr. Croker Is not
i with other things. He charges the
s with stupidity and lack of discretion.
When he goes to Kansas City it will be pointed
out to him, so it was declared last night, that
the Tammany men, by their copartnership in
t'.iis perhaps mi st harmful of ill trusts,
had placed the party in a bad position to argue
upon the trust question.
Tammany men lust i'tght Inclined to the be
lief that things were "going to happen" soon
after Mr. Croker gets thoroughly familiar with
the situation. They declari thai Carroll will
go. ond that some man, puch as ■•Larry' Del
mour, will be named in his place. They say,
also that Mr. Croker will make it plainly evi
dent that be in BO way sustains Mayor V;;n
Wyck and his brother; that, tn fact, he will
disown them politically. It was freely de
clared that unlifs Mr. Croker did this and
■,v3f drnptlc and sweeping In discipline, the
majority of the Tammany leaders would revolt
and tell him plainly that they could not go into
their districts and ask support for the ticket
with such men retained in positions of trust and
Influence.
Mr. Croker will start for Kansas City about
June 21», so it was said last night. Within the
few days that he is here he will carefully study
the situation and talk with State as well as
Tammany leaders.
The near approach of Mr. Croker to these
short- 8 started a flood of gossip yesterday. It
was declared that as soon as the chief got here
the friei ds of Controller Coler would make rep
resentations to Mr. Croker that would induce
him to consent to the nomination of Mr. Colt r
for Governor this fall. Others said that Con
troller Coler would be named for Vice-President
at Kansas City, desiilte his age. The Con'r tiler
says that he is not a candidate for anything, but
his friends are aggressive In his behalf, and It is
certain that the matter Will be brought up for
discussion when Mr. Croker has time to talk it
over. His feelings on the subject, however. Jtr«
not kno«n and It depends, It Is declared, en
tirely upon him whMher thin nomination for
Governor will (•»• made or not.
ON THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE.
It la generally believed that Mr. Croker will
be elected to the National Committee at the
It cures Colds and cannot harm anybody—
JAYNES EXPECTORANT- Advt.
coming National Convention, and that he will
be placed upon the Executive Committee and
have a prominent position in the campaign,
being probably In charge of Eastern headquar
ters. It is said that ex-Senator HIU will be
named as the New-York representative on the
•"•'■mmlttee OH Resolutions.
There is some talk about both ex-Senator Hill
and ex-Senator Murphy for the Vlce-Preslden
tlal nomination at Kansas City, hut it is vague
as yet. It is generally believed that If New-
York would scree upon a candidate, he could
1>« nominate). Whether such an agreement
will be reached cannot be foretold. O, H. P.
Belmont, Dr. John IT. Qtrdner and others are
avowed candidates for the nomination, and
many favor f-x-Senator Hill, while other? favor
ex-Senator Murphy. Much will depend upon
what Richard Croker says whether or not New-
York presents a candidate.
BRYAN INBIBTB O.V FUEK SILVER.
IN A LETTER TO DR. OIRDNER. HE IS SAID
TO DEMAND THE M TO \ PT.ANK
Dr. J. H. Glrdner yesterday announced that he
had received a private and confidential letter
from William J. Bryan, but he told some of the
things that were in it. He declared that Mr.
Brynn said he would not be a candidate before
the Kansas City convention or accept the
nomination if free silver were slighted; that
the Republicans had made it an Issue by nam
ing it in the platform adopted, and that he
would not only insist upon a reaffirmatlon of
the Chicago platform, but of the 10 to t plank
especially.
BOXES OF IMI/U077/ FOFSD.
T-NEARTIIED IN OHIO GRAVEL. PIT. WHKRX
OTHER RELICS OF GLACIAL PERIOD HAVE
BKBN DISCOVSRED.
Ashtabula, Ohio, June 22 (Special).— Workmen In
the Amboy (Ohio) gravel pit . have Just unearthed
several large bones and two tusks of a mammoth.
The find was well preperveil on first being taken
out, but began to crumble when exposed to the air.
The tusks, although broken, showed thnt they bad
been of good length, possibly ten feet. The dis
covery was made at a depth of thirty-five feet In
the gravel. At a similar >lei>th three yean ago
timbers were found in another part of the same
pit lying closely side by side and resembling a
corduroy road. This gave rise to the theory that
they were the Work of prehistoric man. but the
best minds discredited this explanation.
The Amboy region was visited at that time by
Professor George Frederick Wright, of Oberlfci Col
lege, an authority in both this country and England
on all pertaining to the Glacial or Mammalian age.
At present he is continuing his Investigations in
Siberia. On his visit to Amboy he expressed the
belief that the corduroy road and several large
bones then uncovered were relics of the Glacial
period. The gravel pit covers mnny acres, and i 9
situated within two miles of Lake Erie. On ht3
last visit to Amboy Professor Wright stated that
'he would again visit this vicinity to make further
investisations.
BORROWED A BT'RfiLAR.
DEMOCRATS TNAPI.E TO OPEN KENTT'^KT
TREASURER'S VAULTS WITHOUT PENI
TENTIARY AID.
Frankfort. Ky.. June 22 (Special).— The inside steel
doors to the cash and bond boxes in the State
Treasurer's vaults were finally opened this morn
ing. Experts had been at work on the doors for
»hr?e days, and made no progress. This morning
a message was sent to the penitentiary for the loan
of a professional cracksman. Frank Simmons, who
was sent up from Floyd County for safe blowing,
was ssisetad by the prison authorities as the best
man"*fo"36' the Job. and he Justified" th»lr confidence
by opening the safe in thirty minutes. The open-
Ing of the safe completed the transfer from the
Republican to the Democratic administration.
FIRE IX PITTSBVRG BUSIXESS BLOCK.
LOSS OF A QUARTER OF A MILLION DOLLARS.
Pittsburg, June 22. — Fire In one of the prin
cipal downtown business blocks to-day caused a
loss of $250,000, involving eight buildings, contain
ing many office tenants. The aggregate insur
ance will more than cover this amount. The fire
was first discovered in the rear of the Eichbaum
Company's printing establishment. supposedly
caused by spontaneous combustion. The Eichbaum
building fronts on Flfth-ave., a few doors below
Wood-st., was six stories high, and had many of
fice tenants, among them being Duff's College, oc
cupying the two 'lpper floors, and the Holmes Elec
tric Company, on the third floor.
In an Incredihlv short time the entire building
was a mass of flames, which, before the firemen
could do much effective work, had communicated
to tho Exchange National Bank Building, next
door, and from there to the Ilussey Building, ad-
Joining. Simultaneously the fire extended to James
Platt's saloon and restaurant and A. M. Murdock's
flower store, on the other side. The blaze was one
of the most threatening seen in this city for many
years, and for a time the .-ntire block, bounded by
Flfth-ave.. Wood. Diamond and Market sts., seemed
doomed to destruction, I.rnnieiisc firebrands were
carried by the wind to building? In all directions,
but the roofs of all the buildings In the district
were so<tn manned by private tire brigades, who
prevented the fire from spreading beyond the build-
Ings named. The ronf of the First National Hank,
2."0 feet away from the Eichbaum Building, and on
the oilier side of The <=tr>-. t, caught fire, but this
w;is scon extinguished without material damage.
The new Western Union Telegraph office building,
immediately opposite Eichbaum's, was sa\ by
the ••;. precautionary measures adopted by the
company nnVinls.
The greatest excitement prevailed In the rooms
of DufTa P-tisiness College, where fifty or more
students were at work. The extension of the
tlames was so rapid that they hn<i to run for their
lives, not bavins time even to gather th°lr belong
ings together. Reports were current that several
students had perished, but it Is known to-nlgbt
that all escaped unhurt. The Eichbaum building
was completely destroyed, and the Hus-sey build-
Ing harl t'".t thn upper stories burned and the
lower Boors flooded with water. When the Eich
baum building had been burned out the wall of
the portion which ran back of Platt's and Mur
docks buildings fell, crushing In the rear portions
of the Wood-st. buildings occupied by the Ameri
can Express Company, Paulson Brothers, Ambuhl
Br' th»rs and Kurtz, Longbetn & Sworta, Several
firemen were caught In the debris 61 this wall, but
none was hurt so badly be could not continue his
work.
The principal losses are the Eichbaum building,
owned by wliitney, Stephens™ & Co.. $7.->.OCO; the
Hussey building, owned by Mrs. Emma Alsopp.
$3ti,non. and Duffs College, 115,000. The Exchange
National Bank did not sufTer much damage except
by water, by reason of the fact that Its building
is only a two atory structure between the two big
office buildings, and the flames practically skipped
over It.
COURSE OF MISSOURI CHANGED.
CHANNEL CUT ACROSS NECK OF LAND THAT
GIVES A NE3RASKA TOWNSHIP TO
BOOTH I'AKOTA.
Sioux City, lowa. June 22 (Special).— l'nder guard
of an armed force a bs.nd of forty men lr.nded be
fore daylight this morning on a narrow n*ck of
land at one of the great bends on the Missouri
River, near Sioux City, and began to cut a ditch
teross tb< short stretch of one hundred ft-et
that separated the two channels of the main
Btream. for the purpose of changing; Its course and
switching more than 27.000 acres of Nebraska land
Into South Dakota.
Farmers living near by tried to stop the work
when they discovered It. but the armed men pre
vented it. An alarm was carried to the Sheriff of
Dakota County, Neb., but by the time he organized
a posse and arrived on the scene the ditch had been
completed and the muddy waters of the Missouri
were swirling and tearing through their new chan
nel It Ii widening every hour, and by morning the
old' river led of forty miles In length, will b« a
mere elouffh of mud and the stream will flow
through Its new course, and ■ Nebraska iownsrii;>
will become a bit of South Dakota's jrreat domain
Frequent efforts to cut t'iU neck have been mud**
in the past by farmers whose lands wer« being
gradually ealen away by the oM cbaa— ls of th«
river but each time they were discovered ami
driven off.
THE SARATOGA LIMITED
Commencing to-day leaves Grand Central Station
every Saturday at 1:50 p. m.: other week days at
3:20 p. m runriln* at -the- wmi" speed the Em
pire Slate Express, and »t9pptnf only at Troy.
-Advt.
ROOSEVELT SEES PLAIT.
MR. ODET.T. SAYS THE MEETING WAS A.
CORDIAL, ONE.
REPORT THAT THE GOVERNOR WOULD
RESIGN DKCT.ARF.D A n.-T'RD—
ERA -J GREENE AND THE
COUNTY COMMITTEE.
Cordial relations and friendly feeling between
Governor Roosevelt and Senator Platt were In
dicated yesterday by a call which the Governor
made upon the Besmta* at the Fifth Avenue
Hotel. Incidentally Th" Governor's visit indi
cated his interest in his friend General Francis
V. Greene and a deedn to see that there should
be no feeling atrain^t General Greene for the
stand he took at the meeting of the New-York
delegation in Fliila4eti
Governor Boof V*)Tt fir. General Greene had
breakfasted together at the Union League Club
yesterday morning. General Greene went to tho
Fifth Avenue Hotel Mediately after the
breakfast, and had a talk with Senator Platt.
who is still confined to hi 3 room in the hotel.
General Greene and Senator Platt had a pie«a
ant talk, and after he left the Senator's room
General Greene saM to newspaper men:
There Is bo truth in a report that iitor Platt
and t hive had a disagreement of a ktnd to pre
vent my election to the presidency of the .-publt
can County Committee. I opposed a plan to have
the New-York delegation Indorse Governor Roose
velt for the Viee-WesHlency. Of ruurse. when tb»
demand for Roosevelt's nomination be.-ame so gen
eral and overwhelming there was nothing for th»
Governor to dt> but to take the nomination which
caTie to him unanimo Of course. I am hat>py
now that the Governor h<- been nominated for
Vice-president. The ticket N a sure winner. Never
was a National ticket nominated with such una
nimity nnd enthusiasm.
I did not seek the presidency of the County
committee, i wai asked ami urged to accept the
place, and I believe the reasons which led tv my
selection for the place still hold good. . s <
STATEMENT BY Ml:. ODELL.
General Greene had a talk with Chairman
Odell of the Republican State Committee, and
Mr. Odell said there was no truth in the report
that General Greene's selection as president of
the County Committee had been reconsidered.
The report was traced to some friends of Lemuel
E. Quigg, who said that perhaps Mr. Qulgsr
might be Induced not to resign the presidency of
the County Committee. Mr. Quigg, when asked
about the report, said:
I shall rnslsjw anyhow. I shall r.ot be at the ad
journed meeting of tho County Committee on the
evening of July .', because I am going to the
Adlrondacks noxt week and will spend several
weeks in the woods. My resignation will be in the
hands of Mr. Globe, to be presented at The. meet-
Ing, and my successor will have to be elected.
Governor Roosevelt went to the Fifth Avenue
Hotel yesterday morning soon after General
Greene had talked with Senator Platt. He met
General Greene in the hotel lobby and talked
with him a minute before going to a publishing
house in the neighborhood. In less than half an
hour the Governor returned to the hotel and
met Mr. Odell. who went wirh him to Senator
Platt's room. The Governor carried a book
which he had purchased. "The Life of Charle
magne." When he had left Senator Platts room
and was about to leave the hotel he said to sev
eral newspaper men who surrounded him:
There isn't anything I can say. My visit to Sen
ator Platt was a purely personal one. I wanted to
ask after his health. He Is much better than I
supposed he . ould be. I am going •.-> Oyster Bay.
ami on the wav there I sr.al! stop at Richmond
HIH to see Jacob A. Rils. who is l!l.
The Governor went back to the Union League
Club before driving to the East Thirty-fourth-st.
ferry. He will remain in Oyster Hay until June
2\K when he starts for Oklahoma to attend the.
annual reunion of the Rough Riders. He will be
back in Oyster Bay to receive the committee of
the Republican National Convention on July 12
and receive official notification of his nomination
as Vlce-President.
TALK SAID TO HAVE BHEN FRIENDLY.
Chairman Odell of the Republican State Com
mittee said yesterday that th-> nieering between
the Governor an.! Senator Platt was cordial and
their talk was frienily. Mr. OJ-?!I said there
was no talk about the aeminattea of the Gov
ernor's successor. He added that a report that
the Governor might refien hi* present office be
cause of his nomination fa* Vlce-Presideni was
absurd.
Mr • >dell went to his home, in Newburg. yes
terday afternoon, and is :. 1 to return
to the headquarters of the Slate Committee until
Monday.
Senator Platt eacased himself from talking to
newspaper men at The Fifth Avenue Hotel last
evening, saying I ' His condition
was said to be satisfactory xr> his physician.
Senator Platt expects la go to the oriental
Hotel, at Munhnfta-n Beach, in a few days, and
rest there quietly until he has recovered his
health. _
"" WAT.L STRKF-rr WELL Pf rTMfaTPI
WELL KNOWN PIKANCma GIVE THEIR
VIEWS iF THI TICKET.
Wall Street is we", pleased with the ticket
named at Philadelphia.. Amonsj the well known
financiers who yesterday • Ikejf grati
fication at the work H the Convention was
Oliver S. Carter, president of the National Bank
of the Republic, who said:
I quite approve of the nominations and believe
the ticket will be successful. I think they have put
the rißht men in the r ?ht places.
William H. Truesdale. presl lent of the Dela
ware, Lackawanna am' Western Railroad Com
pany, said:
It Is a sso*t excellent ticket and a sure winner.
The Republican party could I ne better.
A. B. Hepburn, act. | the Chase
National Bank, in the atsence el Henry W.
Cannon, when askfd about tlie ticket yester
day, said:
The ticket is magnificent Praise for it Is heard
on all side*. President McKinley'a Administration
rr-arks an eDocc In the history of the Nation, ia
that th United States became a powerful competi
tor for the tlrst time in th- markets of the world.
The rtnanctal interests of the country during tha
last four years have been wor.clorfullV ilated.
Roosevelt adds strength to the ticket. He Is a
positive, aggressive man, with a habit of express
lr.ij his opinions forcibly. The record of both can
didates Inspires the greatest respect, confidence and
enthusiasm.
ENTHUSIASM IN BBOOKLXX,
CHAIRMAN" DADT TO SET TH:. CAMPAIGN
GOING AT ONCE.
Republicans in Brooklyn yesterday were enthust.
astlc for the candidates nominate,} at the Republ?
can Convention. Michael J. Datfy, chairman of the
Campaign Committee, says that he wt;i go to work
at once to put the c unpalgn in motion. Before the
end of next week lie will have an&junced all of h!s
sub-commltteea for the ninislgn. an! In another
week he hopes to ha . • an active headquarters ia
every as.-iem'oly dUt.-ic in the borough.
Several -rganixitton* are vl»-lns for the honor of
being the first to ratify the ticket. As far as
known, however, the Xth Assembly District Repub
lican Club hoisted the first ilcKinley and Roose
velt banner in Brooklyn. I: was flung to the BSSJSBI
at *:3T p. m. on Thursday, accordSßSJ to the official
timer of the club.
The first campaign club to be organized since the
nomination* is reported from the XVI l:h Assembly
District A number of Republicans tress the
Twenty-third and Twenty-first wards are tack of
the organization, which Is called the MoKlnley an<J
Roosevelt Independent Sovial Club. In spite of the
name Its promoters ss that the organization ke>
ISadß to pu' In some string strck»s for |Bje ticket.
Headquarters are to be opened at Stuyvesant and
Lufayette aye*. Georye T. Tumpklns !s president
John Hartley vice-president. William Dobbie secre
tary. \\ i.im Van Voorhees treasurer and Robert
Burkhard' nergennt at arm*.
H. M Masters, on behalf el the Union League
CHICAGO AND RETURN, m.
Via Lackawanna Railroad. Tickets rood solas:
June 23 ana 16. Rriurn limit July *.— AJ\ m

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