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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 24, 1900, Image 20

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CONNECTICUT INTERESTS.
£ HOOKER TO SUCCEED FESSENDEN ON
THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE—SATIS
FACTION WITH THE CONVEN
TION'S WORK.
Hartford, Conn., June 23 (Special).— The most
Interesting thing: connected with the Philadel
phia convention to Connecticut Republicans was
the selection of Charles F. Brooker to succeed
Samuel Fessenden on the National Committee.
Mr. rmmistn has for many years been upon
the- committee, with no question whatever as to
the ]■■>--:. of any one else being; chosen, and
during the Blame campaign, when he was secre
tary cf th» committee, no Republican stood
higher in the affections of the party In the State
than he-. His good work and his hearty enthusi
ng m have been commended freely, and he has
been if great value. The time came, however,
w hen he r.o longer represented the voting masses
of ihe party nor the leaders of it In State mat
ters, an] the delegation this year, chosen at a
convention where Fessenden was really the issue
an \ where he was defeated, has seen nt to sub
stitute Mr. Brooker. No better choice could
have been made in the State. He is of an en»
t'rfly different temperament from Mr. Fessen
t'en. a shrewd, open hearted man, who works by
\ ell thought out plans, and of the highest type
of mind. He is a Yale man, most successful In
business^ practically leading the great brass in
dustries of the State in Waterbury and Torringr
trn. and having an extensive acquaintance in
r-en-York and the big business centres of the
country. In Connecticut politics he has been in
the State Senate and proved to be a wise legisla
tor. He is above all things a most industrious
end capabie man, with great executive ability,
and will make Connecticut's place on the com
mittee one of influence. There is no »..'ush about
tins, but be has geniality and frankness, accom
panied with the moat practical sort of practical
ity in large things.
WILL PLEASED WITH THE NATIONAL CON
VENTION.
Th" Republicans of this section of the State
ere -well rjuri with the work of the National
Convention, and the general impression is that
HocFovelt's nomination for Vice-President was
the bept under the circumstances. The delega
tion fit the nm t!m» In the history of a delega
tion from this State to a Republican National
Convention agreed to vote solidly for one man
for Vice-President — for Dolliver; but when the
feet was announced Dolliver had taken himself
<at of the race. There is not the slightest
cnxlety about Connecticut remaining in the Re
publican column, and by a good majority. The
party management 1? in experienced hands, un
der Chairman Fyler, and the campaign will be
en active one from start to finish.
The platform is acceptable to the Industrial
interests as well as to the financial interests of
tHe State. Its comprehensiveness is freely com
mented upon, and its money plank Is particu
larly satisfactory. Ttiere had been a fear among
pome of the leading financial men of this city,
Republicans, that there might be a pressure too
Ftrong to be withstood for international bi
metallism, and the fact that it has no place in
the platform is an agreeable one to Connecticut
Republicans, the financial interests of the State
being large throughout the West, the home of
the silver agitation.
RECEPTION TO CONGRESSMAN RUSSELL.
A minor political event, but on«- of some sig
nificance, of the present week was the reception
to Congressman Charles A. Russell at his home,
In I>ayville. in the Hid District. More than two
thousand of his constituents from all sections of
the district were present, and the affair was on«>
of much enjoyment. "Our Charlie," as he is
called by the Republicans of his district, was
first mentioned In connection with the candidacy
for Congress In this correspondence, and he has
more than fulfilled expectations during his suc
ceF*:ve terms. He will be renominated unan
imously anfl re-elected, of course, and from
present appearances will continue to represent
the Hid District until the people of the St«»e
call uj>on him to enter the Senate, which is now
considered to be one of the sure happenings of
th» future.
A LINCOLN ADDRESS.
The Army and Navy Club of Connecticut held
4ts twenty-second reunion at the Fort Griswold
Mouse Friday evening. The principal speaker
of the occasion was Dr. George Loring Porter,
of Bridgeport, who gave the story of the execu
tion an<^ burial of the Lincoln conspirators from
Ms own personal knowledge, bringing out many
•Tacts which have not heretofore been published.
Other speakers were Congressman Russell, Sen
ator Hawley. Commander Bucklyn of the Grand
•Aimy of the Republic, and Colonel William B.
*Wooster. the retiring president of the club.
•THE NORMAL "SCHOOL SEMI-CENTENNIAL.
The seml-centtnnial of the State Normal School
at New-Britain was celebrated Thursday in the
echool building. The institution is one of the
earliest of its kind in the country, and has had
tmany Interesting vicissitudes. Colonel Homer B.
t^r-rag-je. who was its principal in IMS, delivered
the reminiscent address, in which he recounted
•the fact that in 1667 the Legislature formally
closed the school, largely through the influence
of Colonel William R. Russell, of New-Britain,
■who^was opposed to normal schools on principle.
Colonel Snrague was elected to the Legislature
the succeeding term, by hard work succeeding in
•Ravine the school reopened, and since that time
Jt has been prosperous. The normal school idea
&as flourished 10 such an extent that the State
Siaa three euch schools in operation, and all are
veil equipped and well patronized.
THE TOWN TAX LIST.
The tax list of the towns of the State has been
returned to the Controller, and amounts to $570,
0C3L749 after the Board of Equalization had
added to it 102400400. The list is the basis of
taxation by the State, the counties and the pro
late districts, but its chief value now is for
county taxes. No State tax has been laid for
«ix years, and the probate districts are usually
cared for by the Selectmen of the towns In
vhich they exist, out of proceeds from town
taxes. The effort of the Board of Equalization
has apparently been to keep the valuations as
nearly alike as possible throughout the towns.
Seme assessors put property Into the list at half
value, some at three-quarters and others at full
value, the interpretation of the law In the case
being: a matter of individual opinion. Bridge
port, which assesses at full valuation of prop
erty, had nothing added to its list by the Board,
tut New-Haven had $12,000,000 added and Hart
ford $10,000,000. chiefly because of the low rate
cf valuation.
END OF THE BRADLEY COURT MARTIAL.
The Bradley court martial is over, its final
lesion having been held Thursday afternoon.
It ha« covered a period of ten weeks, with twen
ty-four days' actual session; seventy witnesses
3 aye been mined, and the stenographic record
of the proceedings will make 1,050 pages. The
expense to the State will be something over
£3.000. The presiding Judge. Colonel Charles E.
Thompson, of this city, will make his finding
later. Captain Bradley'a friends look for his
nc/juittil of the charge of drunkenness, and the
best friends of the National Guard expect that
the trial will bring about a reorganization and
abolish the present system of gala drill week at
Niantic, substituting therefore an actual school
of the soldier for individual regiments.
CAI'K SOME RAILROAD nfCORPOBATED.
Lv,vt !• . . June 23.-The Port Clarence and
Cape Ncme and Norton Bay Railroad Company, of
Kew-York. to construct and operate railroads' In
was incorporated here to-day. Capita;.
AX ORIQIXAL RF.PVBUCAX DELEGATE.
DANIEL F. APPLETON SAT IN THE FIRST con-
VENTION IN ism.
Daniel F. Appleton. of the American Waltham
Watch Company, and wnlor member of the Jewelry
firm of Bobbins & Aj>pl«ton, No. 21 Maiden Lane,
was one of the delegates to the first Republican
National Convention. In Philadelphia. in 1856. He Is
one of the veteran manufacturing jewellers of this
city, and in Maiden Lane there Is hardly any one
better known.
Mr. Appleton was born in Marblehead. Mass., tn
1826, the son of General James and Sarah Fuller
Appleton. General James Appleton removed from
Marblehead to Portland. Me., in 1833. There he en
gaged actively in polltlcE. and was several times
candidate for Governor of the old Liberty party,
one of the forerunners of the Republican party.
Daniel F. App>ton was educated in the public
schools of Portland, and at the age of twenty-one
came to New-York, where he secured a clerkship
r>. r. Ap-pt.KTov,
Of Xew-York. .me of the delegates to the Phila
delphia convention of 1556.
with Royal E. Robbins, then an importer of
watches. Later he was admitted to a partnership
in the business, and the firm of Robbins & Apple
ton has continuously done business in the Jewelry
district since I*"" It' wa? in that year that the firm
became practical owners of a small watch work?
in Waltham, from which grew the present Ameri
can Waltham Watch Cnmnany. which has been
conducted by thf-m ever since.
Mr. Appleton has at :tl! times been a sincere sup
porter of the Republican party, although he never
• vailed upon to run for office. He Joined the
Union League Club In ISSS. and has served a? its
vice-president. He ie at present, or has been until
recently, a member of the Metropolitan, Century.
Groller and other club?, and served as presi
dent of the New-Englfind Society of New-York In
IR7S and 1879. His sons, Franci* R. and James W.
Appleton are connected with him in the business
of the firm of Robhins & Appleton. Mr. Appleton's
summer home is at Ip=wich. Mass. He \a still in
pnsseppion of a fair degree nf good health, and to
hi? frieYids has f-xpressr-d his admiration for the
ticket iuFt nominated by the Republicans. His city
home i? at N ■ 28 lCast Thirty-?ixth-st.
XORWA.LK'B QUARTER MILLENNIUM
THE ANNIVERSARY OF THE PURCHASE OF
THE LAND OBSERVED LAST WEEK.
Norwaik. Conn., entered upon the second quarter
millennium of its history last week. Tuesday! .Tun"
19, was the 250 th anniversary cf the pignlng of the
purchase agreement by the representatives of
the settlers. As it is the intention to cele
brate the anniversary of the settlement of the
town and city of Norwalk next year, the signifi
cance of the day was recognized only informally.
Wreaths of flowers were placed in the old burying
ground and upon the Ludlow Monument. The town
was not settled until some months after the pur
chase of the land, and the actual date of arrival
of the settlers Is not known, so the celebration next
year will not be altogether out of place.
A person entering the main street of the old town
and driving beneath Its arches of the graceful elms
would quickly recognize m Norwalk one of th
older NeW-England towns, although many of the
pronounced characteristics of a New- England town
have been toned down by a half century of close
contact with the metropolis. A few old houses, the
architecture of the older churches, the green and
the atmosphere of some of the old homes still pro
claim its early character.
The history of the town, civic, ecclesiastic and
social, is typical. ' The land occupied by the town
of Norwalk was acquired by purchase from the
Indians at three different times. Such articles as
"coates," hatchets, hoes, "knifes," scissors, "jewso
barpes." "tobackoey 1 kettles and wampum were
the purchase price. The first purchase was made
by Roger Ludlow on February 26, 1040. On April 20
of the same year Captain Daniel Patrick, one of the
settlers of the town of Greenwich, purchased an
other section. In 1651 the settlers acquired still a
third tract.
On June 19, I*so, Roger Ludlow transferred his
purchase to a number of Hartford colonists for £15,
they agreeing to settle before the following spring.
This transfer was the first step toward the settle
ment of the town, and its date is the one observed
last week.
There are two happenings and one personage
connected with the history of Norwaik which give
it inure than a local interest. The town was one
of jhose Connecticut places destroyed by Governor
Tryon. It is generally supposed that the soil of
Norwalk is the last Connecticut soil upon which
Nathan Hale Bet foot before he was killed as a
spy. He is said to have taken a boat there in order
to cross to Long Island en his way to the British
camp. The date of Governor Tryon's exploit is set
down as Sunday. July 11, 1779. Tryon, crossing from
Long Island with twenty-six vessel*, arrived off
Norwalk on the evening of July 10 and landed his
forces the tame day. Before destroying the town
the next day he was obliged to overcome a body of
four hundred patriot troops. He lost several men.
The salt pans along the shore, the magazines, the
stores gathered for the patriot army, the craft
moored at the dock*, eighty horses, two churches,
eighty-seven bnrns, seventeen shops and four mills
were burned. At this time the taxable property of
the town was about $300,000. The damage was esti
mated by a committee appointed by the General
Assembly of the State at about $116,000. Tradition
says that Tryon sat In a chair on a nearby hill
looking upon the burning town with satisfaction.
Roger Ludlow. who was the first owner of the
land on which Norwalk was settled, was a promi
nent man in his day. He is generally credited with
bring chief among those who framed the first writ
ten Constitution of Connecticut and its transcriber.
He held office- from the time he arrived in Massa
chusetts in 1630 until he went to Virginia, about
1654. He was .i Deputy Governor of Massachusetts
and afterward held the same office in Connecticut.
He was also a magistrate for many years in Con
necticut.
Memorials have been erected to commemorate and
mark various spots connected with the burning of
the town, and a monument has been erected to the
memory of Ludlow. Funds are now being raised
for the erection of a memorial to Nathan Hale. At
the present time Norwalk occupies an important
position in the oyster industry, being one of the
principal ports for this business on Long Island
Bound.
THE PR XT CLOTH MARKET.
Fall River, Mass.. June 23 (Special).— Brokers' re
ports of conditions In the local print cloth market
are a repetition of what they have been giving out
for the last ten weeks. Thero is absolutely no
change and little prospect of Immediate relief from
the depression that has existed much longer than
was expected. There was practically no trading
during the week. The sales did not exceed 15,0u0
pieces, and may not have reached that figure.
Prices are demoralized, and it ls believed that If
forced sales were brought about to-day they would
not obtain a higher figure than 2% cents.
The members of the Selling Committee are
anxiously waiting for something to turn up, and
they are now pretty nearly convinced that if trad-
Ing ls done to any extent it must be on a basis
lower than the present. Still, they are not yet
ready to make any reduction to bring about a de
mand. Some are of th«> opinion that there will bo
business after July 4. There have been many
rumors of action on the part of manufacturers
but It may be said with authority that there has
been no agreement as to future transactions, ex
cept that they will continue waiting for a few
weeks longer. It is hard to tail Just what buyers
think the price should be, and the syndicate quota
tion of SV* cents for regulars still holds good.
QUIRK BACK OX THE POLICE FORCE.
Martin J. Quirk was reinstated on the police force
yesterday in compliance with an order of the Ap
pellate Division of the Supreme Court. The Police
Board was ordered also to give him a retrial on
h= C . a 6« c i? 1 !. w J! llch -, he was dismissed In 1897. but
ih» ™?? ked A h 7" "^oration Counsels opinion in
«m»S-i i Qulrk refl^ ed tIJ "how hU paw to a
fnce Oulrk'i £** accUMll . 0 ' creating a disturb
s?n»rii thl k . J aw>er t *" "Kht'ng a retrial on the
%%£ yt th * A W*"<"« had no right to
raw- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. SUNDAY. JUNE 24, 1900.
ATLANTIC CITY PLEASURE.
THE DATS CROWDED WITH AMUSEMENTS
OF ALL SORTS— PEOPLE AT
THE HOTELS.
Atlantic City. W. J.. June 23 (Special).— The al
manacs say that these are the longest days of the
whole year, but many of the days this week have
seemed all too short for the thousands of health
and pleasure seekers who are domiciled within the
walls of Atlantic City's hospitable- hotels. So many
and so Varied are the pleasures which present
themselves that, were the days lengthened almost
Indefinitely, they would still come to a close bo
fore the list of amusements could be exhausted.
The resort is now at its best. The hotels are not
bo crowded as they will be a couple of weeks hence,
so that everybody has a chance to enjoy himself
or herself in his or her individual fashion, without
interference from the Jostling throngs which take
poeuesslon of the town in midsummer.
Preparations are making to celebrate the Fourth
Of July in the noisiest possible manner— an old
fashioned Fourth, the projectors call it— and then
will begin a series of entertainments that will keep
the resort going at a lively pace for tho rest of the
summer.
The idea of the Fourth of July celebration origi
nated In the fertile brains of the members of the
Press Club, that unique organization, all officers
and no privates, which first suggested the formal
oponlngr and public dedication of the Lonsrport
Speedway. They have asked thp business men and
various organizations to participate in the arrange
ments, and tho response to the invitation hus been
general. On the afternoon of the Fourth there will
be a street parade, in which a!I military, political
and secret organizations will be invited to par
ticipate, without regard to sect or creed. Both
Democrats and Repuolicans will march in the same
line with the military companies and the secret
societies, all differences being sunk in a common
celebration of the day. There will also be ad
dresses delivered by speakers of National repute
during the day. the whole affair winding up with a
great display of fireworks on the beach in the even
ing. While the primary object of the demonstra
tion Is to show the patriotism of the citizens of
Atlantic City, a general Invitation to participate
has been extended to all visitors who may be here
at the time.
ELKS' REUNION AND HORSE SHOW.
The Fourth of July excitement will have hardly
subsided when the rush Of Horse Show week will
begin. The reunion of the Benevolent and Pro
tective Order of Elks, the largest convention of
the summer, occurring while the Horse Show is in
progress, will make the week following the great
National holiday a notable one In the annals of
Atlantic City. The Horse. Show Is assured of ab
solute success. The number of entries is now
larger than was expected, and the lists will be
open until next Saturday, bo that the number will
probably be materially Increased. It is expected
that a most fashionable throng will be attracted
here by the exhibition.
As for the Elks, their reunion this year will mark
an epoch in the history of the order. The local
preparations for the affair have been In progress
for several month?, and all arrangements are com
pleted for the greatest reception that has ever
been tendered any visiting: .organization. There will
be a continual round of entertainment from the
time the first Elk arrives here until tha last one
takes his departure. Lodges all over the country
are taking on unusual Interest In the affair, and
will send the largest delegations that have ever
attended any convention of the order.
The rolling chair fad shows no sign of diminution.
In fact, these perambulating vehicles seem to be
come more and more popular "very day, notwith
standing the numerous witticisms and criticisms
that have been levelled at them and their occu
pants. As a matter of fact, the rolling chair, if
properly used, is an admirable institution that has
evidently come to stay, but there is considerable
objections to its abuse. There was at one time
great danger that pedestrians would be crowded
off the boardwalk altogether by the übiquitous
vehicles, ami it looked as though drastic measures
would have to 'be used, but proper regulations have
been enforced, and there will probably be little If
any caupe^far^ complaint this summer.
The question' of liquor licenses Rlong the beach
front has long been a troublesome matter here,
and It Is still far from settled, but a more liberal
spirit has been shown recently, and there will
probarly be little difficulty hereafter In having well
conducted cafes on or near the beach front licensed.
Ordinary loons, however, will continue to be
frowned upon in the upper section of the city,
although they have always been freely permitted
In the excursion district. There is a decided opin
ion in favor of keeping the beach front, at leant in
the more fashionable districts, entirely free from
anything that could in any way offend the moot
fastidious taste; but the demand for well op
pointed cafes has become bo Imperative that a
number of concessions in the matter of selling
wines and liquors have become necessary.
CONVENTION GUESTS AT THE SEASIDE.
There have been many notable people here this
week from all parts of the country, the Republi
can National Convention in Philadelphia having
drawn together hundreds who knew the City-by
the-Pea by reputation alone, but who hftT© Im
proved the opportunity to make a more intimate
acquaintance. And 01 all these people who have
visited the resort this week for the first time not
one has been disappointed, for none of the mrir.y
description! of Atlantic City, glowing though some
of them have been, exaggerated in the least the
charms of the place.
The many fishing parties this week have all had
good luck, almost. Invariably returning with good
sized strings of fish to show for their day's spor\
\\ eakfish are taking the hook rather more freely
and some other varieties are also being captured'
An occasional drumfish rewards the seeker after
big game, but this sport can scarcely be called
popular, owing to the scarcity of these fish, and the
skill required to land them after they are hooked
Sailing parties are also popular with those who
do not care to take the time required for a regular
fishing expedition, and the many handsome yachts
of the inlet fleet are in demand at all times. A
row fine moonlight nights permitted the enjoyment
or an evening sail, and hundreds of visitors made
the most of the opportunity.
The golf links have become so thoroughly a part
of the dally routine here that no day seems com
plete without a trip to Northfleld, the pretty lit
tle country place where the course is located
ltainy days last week failed to Interfere with the
sport to any material degree, an the sandy, porous
sol dries off quickly after a shower. A number of
well known amateurs from various places are now
enjoying visits to the shore, and are improving
the opportunity for practice on a course that has
been pronounced by Harry Vardon and other ex
pert golfers to bo one of the very best in the
I l"i lt€"<j Stft t£S.
♦ i™t th iPfv ls nardl >' ?8? 8 Popular as it was at this
time last year, owing to the continued cool
weather, but tnero are enough people in the surf
every day to make the beach scene an animated
one. A few warm days, such as may be expected
rush ny time, will start the bathing season with a
PROMINENT PEOPLE AT THE HOTELS.
Well known New-Yorkers who have registered
at the various hotels during the week Include the
following:
Brighton— W. W. Castleman. Joseph Lyman
Harry Hark ness Flagler. Miss Lamed George^ W
Clarke, T. M. Royal W L Sargent D S Ska*eV
X M - Church Frederick Taylor Ganee, Mr and
M/s.Maurice Bouvier W I langer. Mr and Mrs
\\. S. Rice and Miss L. Babcock
Windsor-Miss H. Miller, A. W. Fnrrr.an Mrs
Henry A. Hendricks, Mis. Alma 11-Hricks. James
R. Hoagland. V\ illlam A Logue. A. A Leverich.
F W. Smith Edward M. Edle.' Albert C. Wall
Charles H. Hartshorne Mr and Mrs. H. Bloom,
P. J. vVhite. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Felder Mr
and Mrs. Jacob Bookman. Miss Bookman. J. M.
Mayer. P. FeldhHiiser. Mr. and Mrs. IL W West
and Edward 11. Garcin
GRAND ATLANTIC-Charles F. Holden Miss
Maud Fra nc i S Mlss Adele Franclß> ff hh o ma g
Holmes Mr. and Mrs. Charles Jalme.s, Miss Helen
Adalr Hohenfels, H. Davidson, William E. Murphy
D. Osterwels. H. W. Cook, Mr and Mrs E E
Barney. G. W. I'urdy. Charles B. Smith. Mr. and
M £ s -/V. C & as< l' E - B : Dean » nd Mlsß A - C. Bates
Rudolf— H. Hellenberg. C. V. Ilagar. L Hurd
P. Freldland. Miss A. Wolf. Alexander Wolf L B
£* r u* r i. M , Lorine and family. Mr. and Mrs.
G H. Fowler. Mr. and Mrs. B. Panning. Mr and
Mrs. John E. Burke Mrs. Henry Mann. Idrs. W S
Pitt Mr and Mrs H. B. Levy. Mr. and Mrs. H.
Hutchinßon, Mrs. V. E. James, Mr. and Mrs H C
Foster. Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Strouse. Mrs" j' j'
Jacobs 8. J. Keech. A. D. Weldon. S. E. Moffett
B. L Hughes. L. H. Leonard, E. W. Watson H
Hauptman. A. S. Hagar and Mr. and Mrs' B
Jtffienzlng.
Truvmore— John J oloma , ' Miss Soloman. Mrs.
M. t£l «i Clym & m> EU L. Lambert, Mr. and Mr.-.
\i- c ck I "'., M » - £ R i. Mr9 ' C E - Johnson. Mrs.
HarPy Bel! Westervelt and Mr. and Mrs.
Waldorf-Astoria-Mr, and Mrs. Charles Paine,
Mr and Mrs. J. H. Burns. J. P. Hood. J. H. Levls
and Louis Fry.
Dennis— Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dix Mlsa Ethel
Hannett, S. J. Gallagher. J. A Palmer and on
John S. Starr E. W. Simpson. Mr. and Mrs F l'
Sohmer, George Bruce. T. E. Morse. W. S. Reck!
Joseph Thomas and Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Tomp-
Haddon Hall-Mr, and Mrs. Henry Bolford.
Frank Dans. Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Lewis H D
Lewis, Mrs. William Doubleday, Mr and Mrs A
Porter. Miss Hod.on, Charles Miller. W R. Miller '
Us. and. Us a. T. Bail«v. £•. H. Con*. W. ii. JohaJ.
son Mrs. H. H. Newklrk. Miss Alma Newklrk.
Miss M. L Warren. Charles Dean. Mrs. Robert
Stafford. Mr. and Mrs. R. Myer. O. B. Cook, Mrs.
G. M. Dana, E. D. Jones. Mrs. D. McMahon, Mrs.
W. Scott, William L. Colbert Alexander Grelgr.
Mrs. C E. Ceeble, Mrs. Marnell Sayer and A.
Marnell Bayer. _ ,
Archdale— Mrs. A. Goodenough, Miss Good
enough. Mrs W. B. Orcutt and Miss Daisy Orcutt.
Bingham— John Ewtng. G. B. Good. A. Wilson.
G. H. Kane, D. Richey, Charles Rourk and F. E.
Stevens.
Cordova— Theodore Thatcher.
Clifton— A. M. L-ik«.
Edison— G. Baker.
Royal— Joseph Kulp and M. G. Moore.
Holmhurst— J. S. Ham, G. T. Kirby and M. H.
Julian, jr.
Iroquois — T. J. Donohue. Miss Donohue and Louis
Fleckinger
Mount Vernon— E. C. Crlckerford and H. J.
Bralnerd.
Marsden— Thomas McClenwlck.
Majestic— F. M. Hardenbrook. Mrs. E. Foster,
Mrs. A. Huber. F. R. Kaldenberg and Mr. and Mrs.
R. E. "Barrett.
New-York Hotel— Mr. and Mrs. B. T. Williams,
Mr. and Mrs J. C. Jones and Frank Haskley.
Pitney— A. Lee, W. G. Gascone and J. S. Col
man.
Richmond— Mrs. E. M. Weston. J. R. Anneus,
Mrs. E. E. Pressman and Mrs. H. Pressman.
Roanoke— H. Roepeke.
Roesmore— Mrs. L. H. Lynde, Joseph Crosly and
J. R. Pettlt.
Seaside House— C. Banks, George Otis, Mr. and
Mrs. F. L. Elsoffer. S. M. Patton, Mr. and Mrs.
Charles B. Wilcay. F. B. Watson, Mr. and Mrs.
P. J. Koonz and Miss C. A. Koonz.
Stratford— Count Staples, George D. Freestone
and George Philips.
Wiltshire— James Hough, W. Epaham. E. S. Ed
wards and M. Stevens.
Brookhurßt- Miss Edna B. Williams and Miss
Ida F. Glnnings.
Bleak House— C. McDevltt. Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Camel. Samuel Isaacs, Miss M. Isaacs, George
Speering, R. Rothschild. Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Burns,
J. C. Settle. Mrs. C. O. Tnmpklns. C. F. Crosby, E.
P. Cramm. A. Cunningham, Miss A. Isaacs and C.
W. Treadwell.
Chalfonte— M. J. Dowley, Mr. and Mrs. M. Wall,
Mr«. A- Schafi', N. Brewer and George Marshall.
Heckler's— F. G. Kraft, C. Bresslan, A. C.
■Weaver, K. T. Harding, D. Rehent and Victor
Spitz.
Islesworth— Mr. and Mrs. H. Meikel. Miss H.
Melkel. Bernard Henry, Harry Llssauer. W. W.
Btasser, N. Stern. Milton Weber, G. Paskus. Harry
M. Kan, O. Moses. Francis Cranford, Miss Cran
ford, Mrs. G. Lasker, Morton Lasker. M. Barten
dale, Alfred Klwanj. S. Goodfriend, F. A. Adams
and J. Sperber.
Kenllworth Inn— J. Wallace. E. S. Child. W. J.
Foster, J. F. Paul] and Mrs. S. R. Howard.
Little Brighton— Barfield.
La Fontaine— William Townsend, Miss Cora Salis
bury, Miss Belle Dr.iffln, T. P. Coakley and Miss
Coakle,v.
Norwood-— and Mrs. F. J. Shellenburg.
Pierrepont— Mr. and Mrs. H. Mowly, Miss
Roeber, J. C. Thorman, R. H. Koch and F. Gil
more.
Revere— Miss Read.
R'Uflte— Mrs. James Burkard and Mies Mary
Dickerson.
Scarborough— Miss Irma Frinke and E. G. Gar
rison.
Ph. ■lhtirne— Mr. nnd Mrs. B. W. Gomez, William
Novi, thp Misses Steward. Mrs. A. A. Knight and
J. C. Faulkner.
Wetberill- Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Roberts. E. B.
Farley and Edwin Thomas.
Kondertorr— Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Jackson and Mr.
and Mrs. B. I ' Adams.
Morton— Wiliiam Doran.
Arlington— Mr. and Mrs. Howard M. Davis, E. S.
Lyon and O. H. Jackson.
Anchorage— Harry C. Willets.
Berkeley— J. L. Deck, Mr. and Mrs. William J.
Ernott, T. Hlggins, C. L. Smith, G. M. Lord and
J. c. Melly.
De Ville— Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Burns. Miss J. De
Ryther and A. R. Roper?.
Westminster— Thomas H. Bell. Miss Sadie
Bel> and Dr. William J. Hickson.
Belmont— Mrs. W. N. Foster and A. W. Foster.
Irvin»rton— Thomas. J. H. McHenry and
C. E. Tobey.
Malatesta C. J. Griffin, H. B. Graves and
Harry Briggs.
New-England— A. E. Aarons and Mr. and Mrs.
B. D. Hacjenburc
Tarlton — John Davis.
Brexton— C. Dolp.
Loraine— Mrs. A. P. Whiting:.
Lehman— Craig Hall. T. H. Daly and H. H. Lloyd.
Lelande— Mrs. E. M. Townsend and Miss Cora
Salisbury.
Peiham— B. F. Williams, A. Lonsdale and B. H.
ralfchlld.
Ponnhwrst— Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Ludlow.
Ralelfrh— Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Canavat.
Among the arrivals at the Palace Hotel to-day
were Genera! Powell Clayton. Minister to Mexico,
and his party, consisting of Lieutenant and Mrs.
S. G. Jones, of \\>st Point; Mr. and Mrs. 11. L.
Remuel, and S. B. Redding, of Little Rock, Ark.

B. R. T. DECLINES FURTHER.
LARGE TRANSACTIONS IN THE . STOCK—IMAGINA
TIVE JURORS.
On transactions of over 60,000 shares, Brooklyn
Rapid Transit stock marie i further decline yes
terday to ol^, closing. .1; IS-, a net loss for the
day of 4 s g points. r Insiders were active la the
stock, and considerable liquidation took place. Re
ports were put out that the city ■would contest the
ton cent fare to Coney Island by withdrawing the
Brooklyn Bridge privilege now held by the com
pany, and rumors were heard of labor troubles on
the company's lines— rumors which came from
bear imaginations.
Tho- Interests that are fighting agair.st the ter.
cent Corey Island fare have gone to Albany to
make an application to the Attorney-General to
havf- the charter of the Brooklyn Ht-Uhts Railroad
Company annulled on the ground that th.' ■•> m
pauy is oh.'ireiiitr an illegal rate of fare in violation
of the General Surface Railroad art. It is expected
tfc&l th* aoplic&tion will be made some day this
we-k. jwtiliably to»morrow. It' the Attorney-Gen
eral I!" r-ase he will, it is said, bring the
action before the Supreme Court >f Kings County
tti Pf^cfftl Tmid. a decision against the company
wpukl not force it Into bankruptcy, and the rhief
otrnffs of the property are net erttlng oat of their
stock because of all the current speculative at
tacks upon tho company's securities.
The Brookivn Rapid Transit Company 5 per cent
bonds closed strong yesterday at I^4.
ATTRACTIVE F<>! RTB OF JULY OUTINGS.
The Krie Railroad Company will sell tickets to
Niagara Falls at $S for the round trip, good going
Tueaday, July t, returning on all through trains
leaving thi 1 Falls on or before Thursday. July 5.
The excursion to Shohola Glen must be experienced
: a to fully appreciate it. The "Gien" is at its
best at this season of the year, and offers a most
romantic field for exploration. Round trip, $1.
Greenwood Lake, In the northern part of New-
Jersey, is <■ delightful objective point for a day's
outing. Round trip. $1; Including table d'hote din-
Mf-r at the Casino, SI 50.
(Enropcan
EUROPEANS AND TRAVEL
LERS will find the London office of The
Tribune, 149 Fleet Street, a convenient
place to leave their advertisements and
subscriptions for The Tribune.
FOREIGN LETTERS OF CREDIT.
Tourists in Europe
AND AT THE
Paris Exposition.
The EUROPEAN OFFICES of the
American Express Co.
are conveniently located for cashing its
TRAVELERS CHEQUES § LETTERS OF CREDIT
mill 111 furiilnli nil required Information,
ulao (orTTardliiK and atomice fnc-illtle>.
OFFICES IN EUROPE.
J.ONDON- I'AKIS, 11 Hue Scribe.
8 Waterloo Place. HAVMK.
8 Lore Innr. -17 Qua I d'Orleana.
I.I\KHt,M»L, HAMHLKG.
-n Water St. 11 Schnilede Str.
SOI'TIIA.MI'TOX. HItEMK.V.
.'t i .1 nil. Itond. <> Itulmhof fltr.
Correspondent* at all principal points of the
commercial world.
LONDON SHOPS.
H. P. Truefitt Ld.,
13-14 OLD BOND-ST., LONDON, W.
(Through to Burlington Arcade.)
Hotel Cecil, London,
Elysee Palace Hotel, Paris.
High-class Hairdressing by female experts. Manicure
and Chiropody by New York operators. First and
only "American having Saloons" m Europe.
HATCHARD'S
BOOH ISU IKS,
187, PICCADIUJLV. LOU DON, IV
Their »hop feaa bees th« resort of tha f»»hl .nuble worM
»--v^ I . >ear> - A «" ci » l c»talo«u« •'American, in
IZns land" ••fit .re*,
European sU)ucrtißcmcnis.
LONDON SHOPS.
New and Exclusive De- / /
signs in Silks for /Cv/
1900. / /€?
French Millinery /&yj f
And /&/&A'
Costumes. /x^/*
A£/?f
A* /
/^/ Laces, Ribbons,
/<& / Hosiery, Flowers
/ / And Dress Materials,
JAS. SHOOLBRED & CO.
(Established 1822.)
GENERAL DRAPERS
Silks, Dresses, Mantles, Costumes,
Gloves, Laces, Ladies' and Gentle
men's Underwear and Hosiery,
Men's and Boys' Clothing, Hats,
Boots, Etc.
JAS. SHOOLBRED & CO.,
151 to 162 Tottenham Court Rd.,
London, W.
.foreign Resorts
LONDON HOTELS.
London.
Hotel
Metropole.
QAVOY HOTEL, LONDON
4^HOTEL DE LUXE OF THE WORLD
The rooms are bright, fresh and airy,
and delightfully quiet. Bathroom to every Suite
SAVOY RESTAURANT.
The most famous Restraurant In Europe. Th»
Orchestra plays during Dinner and
the Opera Supper.
Visitors to the Old Country.
SOUTH KENSINGTON
HOTEL
Considerably BtttarMd. QUEEN'S GATE.
Noted for fa Comfort * TKRR a CF T w
ami Convenience. lnKß.uc, o.w.
One of thf: most Fashiouable Hotels in London.
CLARIDGES HOTEL,
The Centre of Fashionable London
" The Last Word" of Modern
Hotel Luxury. Charming suites tvith private
entrance, bathroom, etc! Over 300 rooms.
Nearly 100 bathrooms.
A magnificent Royal Suite.
ALEXANDRA HOTEL
yU (Hyde Paris Corner),
1 ■ LONDON.
Finest position In London,
overlooking Hyde Park ami "Rotten Row."
BvcluHlvr Pntronasre.
Rc-decotated and re-furnished throughout.
Modern sanitation.
Cnisine now one of the beat in London.
THE
LANGHAM HOTEL,
LONDON.
I'nrlvnlled Situation In Portland Place.
At Top of Hi-Kent St. W.
Convenient for the Bent Shops, Theatres, Etc.
Every Modern Comfort and Convenience.
Moderate Tariff.
HOTELS IN ENGLAND.
Kenllworth, England. The Abbey Hotel
Romantically situated, overlooking historic ruins of
Kenllworth Castle and Abbey. Leading hotel and most
central for Shakespeare-Land. Proprietor had 10 years"
New— experience. Moderate terms. 'Write for book
let. CHA3. E. CLEVELY. Proprietor.
JLFRACOMBE (England).
ILFRACOMBE HOTKU.
All rood Americans atav there before they dla.
The International Palace Hotels,
The ltivif Palace Monte Carlo.
The Kivleni Pulnce,
Mil-: France.
Shephenrd's Hotel and
The Ghealreh Palace, Egrypt.
HUM
The I. a Plase. & The Royal Palace,
OSTEND l)rl 'lum.
ChAteuu Itoynl,
AKUEXN BelKlum.
Pavilion tie Oellevne,
IJi:i.LK\ I E. near Paris. .. France.
Motel Stephanie,
All VZI.V Austria.
Tin- «■<!• Hotel International.
niiIMHSI Italy.
The -lima Palace,
ÜBBO.I Portnsal.
The Summer Palace,
TH KM APIA Turku.
The Pern Palace,
CONSTANTIXOI'LE Turkey.
Teriniunn Hotel Bordeaux.
For information, tickets to all points and to reserve
accommodations apply International S. C. Co.'s Offices 14
Cockspur-st.. London, or 3 Place de r Opera. Paris.
PARIS HOTELS.
Hotel Continental,
aBBBBaT^^ *^a«^^BBBBi JL t^B^3P ■
Hotel Chatham,
=PAKIS.
GRAND HOTEL de I'ATHENEE,
15 KUK SCKIBE.
OPPOSITE THE GRAND OPERA.
The Modern Hotel of Paris.
A ARMBRUSTER. Manager.
Hotel de Lille et Albion. Paris.
cUm. Moderate terms. All home comfort. Fr«« llaht
«nd «rvl... ■ Large U a!l. ladles 1 drawing room. Res
t»urant. Dmlng J°°. m - Lunch * Table dh..t« (Sinner at
n?,^*" 1 !'?.. 11 ";!**. Pe X. f ', ct »«nlt»tlOB. Electric !l«ht ihrufh
d«ir V "iill'ttV J* 11"'"1 1 "'"- B*Jr<«,m with .team *"' If
daslred. HE.NRI BADIE. Proprietor
AIX-LES-BAINS
Louvre & Savoy Hotel
l-'n'-inj; Casino pavic
GRAND HOTEL D AiX
Aix=Les- Bains
lort\%u fUeortft.
HOTELS IN GERMANY.
OSTEND--HOTELS
The "Splendid," 300 Beds.
»• "Continental," MM Beds.
" Kursaal & Beau Site, 125 Beds
A. Declcrck, Proprietor.
Al.',A I .', these Hotels are modern in every detail,
and on Sea Front.
HOTELS IN GERMANY.
Jiornberg
On the World Rfnnnnrcl
nLACKFOHEST RAILWAY.
Much frequented ideal location for purs air
and climatic cure-resort; 1,262 feet above «a
I level. Magnificent Pine Forests with well kept
■ foot paths free from dust. Splendi 1 view* from
many points with nearby resting places. Every
amusement and pastime, includins unexcelled
trout fishing and hunting, swimming and other
baths. Pure spring waftr. Ist and L'nd class
modern Hntols. v.-ith electric light, telephones,
etc. Prospectuses from the President of the
Kur-Comlte, BUROERMEISTER VOGEL.
Hornberg, Baden, Blackforest
Triberg=Blackforest
Sch^arzwald Hotel Ist Class.
Proprietor — L Bieringar.
Favorite Resort for Americans.
Modern Improvements. Luggage Registered.
Railway Tickets.
hornberg; &
Frankfurter Hof,
Frankfurt A Main.
MAYENCEON-RHINE
Hotel de Hoi
Panoramic view Hhine «t Moan tain*, tvery
comfort, Kaclns Steamer Lauilio^.
FOUR SEASONS,
Wiesbaden
NEULLENS HOTEL,
Aix-La-Chapelle.
HOTEL MARQUARDT,
Stuttgart.
BAYERISCHER-HOF,
Nurenberg.
HOTEL STRAUSS
isff* Narenberg
GRAND HOTEL
Nurenberg
First Class family hotel situated on
right hand of Railway Station. Pat
ronized by Americans. Every modern
comfort and sanitary arrangements.
Nice garden in front. Carl Schnorr,
1 Proprietor, also of Victoria Hotel.
HOTEL CONTINENTAL
lillftSlPU ALL MODERN COMFORTS
nIURIUIIa FINEST SITUATION
Gd Hotel de Rome,
BERLIN.
SWITZERLAND AND AUSTRIA.
Hotel Bristol
VIENNA
The Favorite Resort of Americans
Hotel Krantz
VIENNA
Newest and Most Hodern.
Patronized by the American Ambassador.
Gd'Hotel Hungaria
BUDAPEST
first-Class Hotel with Panoramic vie a over Urn
Danube. Every modern comfort. Exclusive Americaa
end English patronage. CtUKIES J. UIKGLR, Mj>
ager, formerly of Imperial Hotel, Vienna.
HOTEL PANNONIA,
Buda Pesth.
HOTEL BEAU SITE
The Modem Hotel of Lausanne,
Splendid -view of T.,k«-« .V nirMin.tai.ns>
American «Sc >:i»iiliwl\ l*»tron*«i;e<.
HOTEL KLBNOER "
■■•■•I Finest Situation.
Marienbad } ggg*
Gd, HOTEL NATIONAL,
LUCERNE.
HOTEL BEAU RIVAGE,
GENEVA.
Magnificent position on the lake opposite
Mont Blanc. Beautiful terrace. Concerts
in summer. Baths on each floor. Lift.
Electric light in every room. Managed by
the proprietors themselves.
< _________ Mayer & Kunx._
The Baur au Lac,
Ouvert . *7 ■•«•«' "»fl
toute Cannes. /LliriLlli
ITALY AND SOUTH OF FRANCE
PALACE,"
STANDING iN r^«/*o
£EA VTIFVL PRIVA TE PARK. 0C ft odt0 dt
HOTEL DE LA VILLE,
iYI lion Railway Tickets.
T 11 lit 11, Luggage Registered.
T.tft .£_iciEi4. T I^,

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