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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 24, 1900, Image 5

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CHICAGO ENCAMPMENT.
GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC PRO
GRAMME.
ILkSX DISTINGUISHED MEN* EXPECTED TO AT-
T j£M>— DETAILS OF TUT: WEEK'S EXERCISES.
Chicago. June 23.— This city is preparing for the
greatest Grand Army encampment ever held in the
history of the organization. It will be the thirty
fourth, and in all probability the last really great
tnd notable one. One of the great features of the
encampment will be a Court of Honor, to be erect
ed assßC !,.can-ave. from Van Buren-st. to
Twelfth-Et.. a distance of nearly a mile. This is
to have great arches at either end, and the whole
■will cost in the neighborhood of $25,000. Each of
the various parades will pass through this Court of
Honor, at a certain point of which President Mc-
Kinley and other distinguished guests will review
the inarch of the heroes. Theie will be free band
concerts in the various park? of the city ana lire
tr.-rks displays at night. There will be camp
fires, dog watches, regimental reunions and other
patriotic meeting^, for which hails have already
fceeu secured ar.d to which organizations are being
ssflgr.ei.
The Committee on Invitations, of which General
John C. Black is chairman, is now sending out
*.<t»o requests for prc-mineht men and organizations
from all parts of the United Motes to attend. Pres
ident McKinley has already accepted. For the care
«if visitors in the matter ot nee quarters for vet
erans all of the schooinout.es tnroughout the city
have been placed at the disposal of the Free Quar
ters Committee.
In encampment week occui u»e annual meetings
of the fallowing orfranlzatioiis: Grand Army of the
Republic, Woman's Relief corps. Ex-Prisoners of
War. Lndles of the Grand Army of the Republic,
rjaaignten of Veterans, Army .-Nurses' Association,
Loyal Home Workers and tne Naval Veterans.
The comr'lete list of Bonurea guests will be as
io'.lo-**: President McaUnley, ex-President Harri
son. ex-Pres!dent Cleveland, Oovernor Roosevelt,
"Wllliatn Jennlnps Bryan. Generals Palmer, corbin,
Otis. Meiritt, Schofleld, Cnanee. - Howard, Miles,
Wheeler. Sickles, Lee, Gordon, Wallace, and Ad
mirals Sampson and Sehley and Captain Clark.
The complete official programme ns adopted by
the Executive Committee ■ -•-. iy will be as follows:
SUNDAY. AViil'ST 20.
1030 A. M — Pr** rlal patriotic services will be held In all
telty ehuren**.
,p. 3j. Sacred euncerta win b<? given in the parks by
military bends,
p. jt Grand patriotic and sacred sons sen-tees In
the Coliseum.
MONDAY. AC'il'ST 27.
Sunrise, dilute to the fir.*;, thirteen pur.?. All
citizens nre requested to Join in the cere
mosy end raise : ip» nt thta hour.
S:(K> A. M. — Dedication of the Naval Arch.
JO3O A M rand | .<•■•• Naval Veterans of the
Civil War. esc-jrled by veterans of the
fcpanish-Ameriean War nnd Naval He
Eervcß, together with the National Asso
ciation of i'n!.*n Ex-l'r!soners of War,
t-scorted by a battalion "f the National
Guard and the Hoys" Hr:pn.:<*. representing
ire soldiers of the past, present an.i future.
all r?vl»w*>d by Commodore <}*• rge I.
Beaver, eommandei in chief of the Naval
Veterans" Association: Notional Comman
der ] line* Atwell, of the National Asso
ciation rt Ex-Prisoners of War; Comman
<iei lr Chief Albert D. Shaw, of the Grand
Army of the Republic; Governor John R.
Tanner. Mayor Carter 11. Harrison and
<Jt«".inßU^hed ruefts.
I.imP. M. — Parade of all Government vesselß on the
lakes, tups, yachts, etc.. all prc Justly deco
rated. Th» court* will be from Lake Front
Park to Lincoln Park.
4:00 P. il. — The committee receives the President of the
United Stares end his Cabinet and other
dl*'lniruts=?-f>J (rueyts.
;/iOP. M— Naval battle oaT Lincoln Park. ,
8:00 P. 1 M.— : • ? watch of the Naval Veterans" Aaaocte
tlon at Me<iir.ah Temple. Camptlre and
reunion of the ex-prlsor.ers of war at the
C.-.!!seum. First Illumination <->f the arches
and OViurt 'if Honor on Michigan nve. The
electric fountain to play in Lincoln Park.
6:30 P. M.— Fireworks off Lake -Fr r.t' Park.
TUESDAY. AUGUST 2«.
Funiise salute, thirteen guns.
(MA 31.— The dedication of tbe Army Arch.
J0:«O A. — Pcra^e of the Grand Army of the Republic,
reviewed by Commander-in-Chief Albert D.
Fhaw the President of the T'nlted Ftates.
the Governor cf Illinois, the Mayor of Chi
cago nnd other distinguished guests.
6— t» P. M.— lnformal reception to the Pr»f ident of the
United Plates. Commander -in- Chief Shaw
and other li«'lnKUlshcl KUestF, at Grand
Army of the Republic Memorial Hall.
6:00 P.M. — Twenty-five State reunions.
6*o P. M — Reception of "Woman's Belief Corps at Palmer
House.
8:00 P. M. — Reception of Dnuithters of Veterans, drill hall.
Masonic Temple.
»— P.M. — Reception of Ladies of the Grand Army of the
Republic at Palmer House.
:30 P. Fireworks off Lake Front Park. Illumination
(jf £tre< •- aroh«« and court of honor.
WEDNESDAY, ATJOUST 9.
Sunrise salute, thirteen gun*.
6.-00 A M. — Veteran* 1 bicycle road rare, rive mllea. »t*rt
ine st "Washington Boulevard »nd finishing
at Garni Id Park bicycle track.
10-00 A aT — lleetlnp of the Th!rty-founh Rational En
camprr.cn of the Grsnd Army of the B< -
p-j'.ilic. at Stud<»hck«>r Hall, welcomed by
Mayor Patter H. Harrison: response. by
Coromatider-ln-Cliief Shaw; welcome on b»
half of tiie Department of Illinois by Com
n.cnder Joel If. I^njren^cker; reaponae by
Adlutant--<ieneral Thomas 3. Stewart
Convention of Woman? K»llef Corps, in
MwMnah Temple. Meeting of Indies of the
Grand Army of the Il«i>ul>!i-. in auditorium
of First HetbOdirt Episcopal Church. Mcci
!nr of Pnup'itTß of Veterans, at Hall N ■
r>\2 Masonic Temple. Meeting of LadlPH
of ex-I'ris.Ters of War Association, at
Ha!l No IK' Maaonic Temple. Meeting of
the L-idies or the Naval Reserve*, at Hall
Hall No. 013. Masonic Temple. Meeting of
Naval Veterans, .t Hanael Hall. Meeting
of ex-IYisoners of War AFwciatlon, County
Uuildlng.
*:<f, V SI. — Campflre of the Army of the Potomac Camp
fire of the Army of the T-nnersee. Camp
fire of the Army of the fumberland. Camp
lire of fie Army of the Mirsisipp! and Gulf.
Campfire rt the Army of the Frontier.
t:'M 1: M.— Fireworks off Lake Front Park. Illumination
of stills, arches and court of honor.
THURSDAY. AUGUST SO.
Sunrise salute, thirteen ervris.
10:00 A. M.— A 'i< urned busings mp.tlng of the Encamp
ment. Adjourned business meeting of aux
iliary societies. Reunions and Interchange
of visits among posts.
£.00 P. M.— lr.f&ntry. <-avalr>- and art'llery manoeuvres
, and sham battle at Washington Park by
the Ist and -'•: raiments I. N. G.: Illinois
Cavalry and United States Artillery.
BJO P. M.— Fireworks off I^ke Front Park, Illumina
tion cf streets, arches and court of honor.
FRIDAY. AUGUST 31.
8:00 A. M-: l^gatps" iake excursion. Excursions on
the I>ake and Drainage Canal.
SJX' P. If.— Fireworks off Lake Front Park. Illjmlna
tlon of streets, arches and court of honor.
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 1. ,
I'.ecrpatlon.
Afternoon— Baaeball. uolf and ■•■■!) the various
perks throughout the city.
<<X)P. M. — Concerts In Lincoln, South and Garfield
partiT.
t.3OP M.— Fir^workß off Lake Front Park. Illumina
tion of etreete, arches and court of honor.
II 00 P. M.— Taps.
SECRETARY WILfSOV COMING HERE.
TO PRESIDE AT THE MEKTING OF THE AMERI
CA?.* ■" iBESTRT ASSOCIATION.
Washington, June . -Jaanes Wilson, the Secre
tary of Agriculture, will go to New-Tot* City next
week to attend the meeting of the American For
estry Association, of which he Is president. He will
presida at one cr more of the nesslons. Secretary
Wilson has taken a lively interest in the forestry
work of the Department of Agriculture, as pushed
to practical results by Glfford Pinchot, the Gov
er&flMnt forester. Much has been done to aid own
ers cf wood lots on ordinary farms, as Well .'.9
ov.-t:f-rs of extensive forests, to plan a wise and
eyttornatlc management of their properties, and
both th* E^f-retary and the for<-Ht<r have worked
in entire sympathy with th* Forestry Association
In Its efforts :n favor of State and National legis
lation for the protection and Improvement of forest
litnds.
ARRESTED FOR A MURDER IN 1807.
Sforth Adams, Mass.. June 23.— Alexander Grant
fcJid David King, of Clarksburg, were both placed
un"2*r arrest late this afternoon charged with the
murder of Henry F. and Blanche M. Reed on the
morning cf August 7 IST. The arrests were made
:.f;er the closinK wsFion of the Coroner's Jury
whi-h has fce«rn in session here for several days.
WA.RBASTS FOR COAL MIKE STRIKERS.
WHtr— half. Perm., June 23 (Special).— Sheriff
Harvey and beveraJ deputies guarded the Fernwood
<c!llery ell last night and part of to-day, and their
jrefence deterred th* strikers from making the
threatem-d attack upon the works. This afternoon
the company had enough arcsed men to protect the
place against an assault, and the Sheriff withdrew
i.li" men - Jle la in ■„,,,,. touch with the officials
fcnfl In the • -en' of trouble can send deputies to the
boom In an hour's time. Twenty-four warrants
nave been tworn out for the strikers, but of th*so
only three have been served The strikers are in
a dangerous mood at present, and the Sheriff will
not servo the warrants until they are quieter.
WHEAT GOES IP, CROP NEWS BAD.
ADVANCE OF $1 TO $123 IN THE PRICE OF
FLOUR A CON3£QJUI£i^».
Bull- operators In wheat gave their opponents
yesterday a lively scare, the market exceeding In
sensational features anything hitherto produced in
the course of the present campaign. Taken com
pletely unawares, because of Friday's drop from
the top point, the bears were panlcstrlcken yester
day morning on finding English cables 2V4<Q3V»d
higher and an advance at Budapest of 45 points
overnight. In large numbers they plunged Into
the market as the gong struck, and began a fran
tic, and excited effort to replace their sales. The
result was an Immediate jump to 90% c«*r:ts for
July, compared with £3 cents at the close on Fri
day. After a little hesitation, during which a lot
of long wheat came out, the screws were moved
again, and July shot up to 93* i cents, with hardly
a stop, representing an advance of 5% cents for the
day and about 22 cents In the last three weeks.
This means to the public a rise of $1 to $1 23 a bar
rel In the price of flour. Toward 12 o'clock wheat
suddenly dropped off again, reaching 91%. cents on
the midday curb, under renewed heavy realizing.
The crop news from the Northwest was exceeding
ly bad; estimates nrp bflng cut down dally, and tho
crops seem almost a complete failure.
BREAD NOT TO ADVANCE AT PRESENT.
It Is not believed among the bakers of the city
that the increase In the price of wheat will affect
the price of bread, at present, at least. At the
Vienna Model Bakery, Tenth-st. and Broadway,
yesterday afternoon the following statement was
made:
There will be no Increase In the prtee of bread
at present. What may happen within a month
from now we can tell nothing about. If there
were to be an Increase in price we would know
of It. We have heard nothing of It.
This statement was borne out by other bakers
■who were seen.
LAFAYETTE KISSED HER.
MISS ROSS WAS ONE OF THE FIXJWER GIRLS
WHO MET Hlla IN NEWARK.
Two venerable women died in Newark yesterday.
Miss Sarah Moon; Ross, aged ninety-six years,
passed away at the house of her niece, Mrs. Jarcd
Halnes, No. 34 Franklin-st. She was born in 1804
in a house on the site now occupied by the State
Bank building, in Broad-st.. and was the daughter
of James and Margaret Ross. Mir=s Ross was one
of thirteen girls, representing the original thirteen
colonies and States, who strewed flowers before
Lafayette when he visited Newark. She was a
beautiful girl, and Lafayette honored her with a
kiss. For fifty years Hiss Rosa was a communt-
CHiu at the First Presbyterian Church, and helped
to organize the Pnrk Presbyterian Church.
Mrs Mary W. Dusenberry, mother of James P.
Pu^enberry' president of the Essex and Hu>!s..'.i
Gas Company, and of Augustus Dusenberry. presi
dent of the Board of Police Commissioners, died
at her home, No. 772 High-st., aged ninety-two
years She was born in New-York, and her father
was a captain In the Continental army In the Revo
lutionary War.
'TWAS TWEXTY YEARS AGO.
ANNIVERSARY REVNION OF THE NEW
YORK UNIVERSITY CLASS.
The twentieth anniversary reunion of the class
of "80, New-York University, was held yesterday
at Grantor., N. J.. at the summer home of Harry
Snrgent Blake, and was attended by fourteen
members, only two being absent.
A luncheon in the afternoon and dinner at
riight with approprlite toasts by each one present
made the day memorable. One of the features of
the day was an exhibition of photographs of mem
bers' families, cln«s books, university memora
bilia, and at the. dinner table each place was Indi
cated by a phoingrnph of the man as he appeared
twenty years ago. A group picture of the entire
claw was taken in the afternoon, and this will
be a pleasing exhibit at the fortieth reunion.
The "Class Boy," 1 Master Edwin 1L Daniel. Jr.,
of PlatnfW-ld, N. J.. was present, and was pre
sented with a silver loving cup. ho being the
oldest son of the class.
■>t the twenty-three members of the class asso
ciation at graduation, pev;a Kwe died— Noble,
Dunnine-. Gilbert. Roberts, Arrowsmith Dix and
Pfenning. Those present were S. A. Eddy. L. Al.
Daniel. H. C. Kudllch, E. C Philip. E. A. Mason,
N C Htndrickson, K. S. Blake, W. K. Glllett,
G. L. Richmond. E. I>. Van Dyck and C. S. Bene-
Tlio president of the association Is Henry P.
Morrison, of Richmond Borough, and the secretary
and treasurer Is Dr. Charles 8. Benedict, of Man
hattan.
RIVER A\D n ARDOR INSPECTION.
BOARDS OF TRADE OF FIVE CITIES MAKE A TOUU
OF NEW-JERSEY WATERWAYS. ,
Elizabeth. N. J., June 23.— The Boards of Trade
of Staten Island, Newark. Elizabeth. Perth Am
boy and South Amboy escorted Chairman Theo
dore F. Burton, of the Congress River and Har
bor Committee, on a tour of Staten Island Sound,
Woodbridge Creek and the Ruritan River to-day.
The steamboat Victor w;is used, and Chairman
Burton was in charge of the party. The object of
the committee was to show him the need of im
provements In the channels of the bodies of water
named.
The commerce of the district from Elizabeth
port, on the Sound, to New-BTunswlck, on the
Raritan River, amounts to more than $140,000,000
annually. Navigation !s carried on under great
difficulties, owing to the shallow water and the
narrow channels. Congressmen R. Wayne Parker,
B F Howell and Charles N. Fowler, of Kew-
Jersey accompanied the ptfrty, and called to Chair
man Burton's attention the importance of the
various parts of the districts visited. Mr. Burton
■ to commit himself as to what his recom
mendations might be. but said that he was satis
fied of the need of Improvements all the way Irum
EMsabethport to New-Brunswick.
MR. COLEJCB REPLY TO J. W. MACK.
CONTROLLER THINKS THE LATTER IS HONEST.
BUT MISTAKEN.
Controller Col. r was asked yesterday if he would
make any reply to a statement by Jacob W. Mack
about the bond sales in 1898, upon which his
charges against the Controller were based.
■I have only this to say," replied Mr. Coler.
"that 1 believe Mr. Mack Is honest In his iruen
tlon« and when be knows* as mwh about tho
finances of the city as 1 do be wfll conn.' to me and
make a public apology."
MISSING MAN RETURN B HOME.
Frank W. Peer, of No. 925 Park-aye.. who was re
ported on Friday night as having been missing
since Tuesday last, returned to his home yester
day Mrs. Peer said that her husband had suffered
no injuries in his absence, and that he had been
with some of his friends. He bad not informed her
for fear of causing needless anxiety. She said
th-it he had r.ot been well for pome time, und thut
when he had been missing for so long, she natural
ly felt unxious.
INCORPORATED AT ALBANY.
Albany. June 23— The Kensington Automobile
Manufacturing Company, of Buffalo, with a capi
tal stock of $600,000. filed articles of Incorporation
to-day with the Secretary of State. The directors
an William J. Knowlc^ Charles G. Shepard, John
j Gibson. Hiram C. Martin, Janus A. Roberts,
Herbert l\ Ufcsseli. and George C. iUI.-y. of liuf
fjlo.
A SAFE ROBBERY IN 80VTB BROOKLYN.
A bold and successful safe robbery was com
mitted early Friday morning in the ofnee of the
Hancock Life Insurance agency, on the sf-cond floor
of No. 472 Flfth-ave.. Brooklyn. The floor above
the offices Is BOOecapted. It Ib supposed that the
i,uri;iars concealed themselves In the rooms after
hours Thursday night. They forced open the rear
ii.or of the o'ffWp. and drilled a hole Into the
«r.fe door The oumUnailon lock was ptcke.l. The
safe was not a big one nor was the lock strong. Tho
Lurglars contented them--elvejs with taking |170.
and did not take any of the papers which were In
the safe.
CINCINNATI POLICE AT HEADQUARTERS.
Police Lieutenants Carroll an 1 Corwfß. with six
patrolmen of the Cincinnati police force, who are
spending their vacations in New-York, called at
Police Headquarters late yesterday afternoon. The
visiting policemen carried a letter of introduction
to Chief Devery from Chief of Police Dletsch of
Cincinnati. After calling on the Chief, who re
ceived them cordially. Sergeant Flood showed the
visitors over the building, through the Rogues'
oillerv the Detective Bureau and the Museum,
and explained the workings of the Bertlllon «>•*
t*m of meaßurc-ments. Police Commissioner George
E iCshaw of Cincinnati, who came to New-York
in the party, called on Commissioner York in tho
iruriiiiigand sailed for Paris In the afternoon.
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE, SUNDAY. JUNE 24. 1000.
HOME FOR DI HAULED FIREMEN.
GOVERJSCIi - VOOnIIEES ACCEPTS THE
BUILDING ON BEHALF OF THE STATE.
Eoonton, N. J., Juno 23.— Firemen took possession
of Boonton to-day. They came from all parts of
New-Jersey and New-York to take part In the
dedication of the State Home for Disabled Fire
men. Governor Voorhees and his staff were also
present, and reviewed the parade. In which three
thousand firemen inarched. The Governor was
welcomed with cheers as lie and his party passed
throuph the line of firemen, escorted by the Boon
ton Fire Department.
The ceremonies were ns follows: Salute to the
Governor; music Voss's Ist Regiment Band; invo
cation, the Rev. John Keller. Arlington. N. J.;
raising of the flag; address on behalf of the Com
mission, delivering the Home to the Governor of
New-Jersey, by General Bird W. Spencer, presi
dent of the New-Jersey State Firemen's Home
Commission; acceptance of the building and
grounds on behalf of th;.- State, Foster M. Vouc
hees, Governor of New-Jersey; address of welcome,
William I. Powers. Mayor of Boon! on; "The Fire
men In Action," W. D. Edwards. Jersey City; "The
Morris County Firemen." Mahlon Pitney, Senator
from Morris County; "The Veteran Volunteer,"
George W. Anderson, former president of the Vet
eran Firemen's Association of New-York; '"The
Legislative Deeds /of the Fireman," Benjamin F.
Jones, Speaker of the New-Jersey House of Assem
bly; "The State Association," W. A. Cotter, coun
st 1 of the New-Jersey State Firemen's Association;
"The Financial End of It," John S. Gibson. New
ark; benediction, the Rev. A. R. McKelvey, Boon
ton.
The Home is located about one mile from the
railroad station. It la In an Ideal spot for such
an Institution. In the plot purchased with the
home there are about sixty-five acres, most of
which are under cultivation, and the rest Is laid
out In lawns. The building is of brick. Is three
stories high, and stands, far back from the road
on the highest elevation of the whole tract. Built
originally at a cost of $80,000 for a private resi
dence, the building, when purchased, contained
many modern Improvements, and since then
changes and additions have been made. Besides
the main residence there are on the land a green
house, farmer's and gardener's houses and several
large barns.
For some time the State Firemen's Association
had been endeavoring to get funds to buy and
maintain a home, and from the Legislature last
year it secured the necessary aid. The act passed
decreed that the Commission to be appointed
should consist of one member from each Congress
district, and funds were provided for by placing at
the disposal of the Commission the 2 per cent tax
levied on fi reign fire Insurance companies doing
business in this State. The purchase price was
$36,000.
SPEAKS AFTER A MONTH'S SILEXCE.
HAROLD POOLE TRIES TO DESCRIBE HIS ASSAIL
ANT IN BROOKI.INE.
Boston, June 23.— After almost a month of silence,
nearly three weeks of which was due to uncon
sciousness. Harold Poole. the sailor boy from the
schooner Ella F., who was found unconscious In
Bpookllne one Saturday night a month ago. tried
to tell the story of the assault to the police yester
day. Those who received the disconnected state
ment of the boy. who by no means has recovered
the full use of his faculties, expressed the belief
that the man who committed the assault was
George Champion, whom the police suspected of
the crime, and who since It was committed has
been arrested and held for the Grand Jury in an
other State for the alleged murder of George <J'>od
win, of West Newfleld, Me., and three other mem
bers of his household.
I'ihj].- was unable to speak connected sentences,
and his condition was such that he was not pressed
to tell everything about the case. He was per
mitted to give su<-h facts as he could recall without
too much mental effort. lie could not name the
man who assaulted him and who it appears also
robbed him. but he gave a description sufficiently
accurate for (he authorities to determine that it
was Champion. The police will have another talk
with the patient n< x; week.
RIGHT TO BECOME A CITIZEN,
INTERESTING QUESTION REGARDING ONE OF THE
RUSSIANS BROUGHT HEBE TO SERVE
ON THE VARIAG.
Philadelphia, June 23.— An unusual and Interest
ing case. Involving the right of a person serving
under the Mag of Russia to declare his Intention
of becoming a citizen of the United States, was
argued before Judge McPherson In the United
States District Court to-day. The defendant was
I.co Alexandroff, a sailor in the Russian navy.
Along with flfty-two oth^r snilors he was brought
to this country last April, under command of Can
tain Vladimir Behr. The latter had been assigned
by his Government to the command of the Russian
cruiser Variag, now In course of construction at
Cramps' shipyard, and the men were part of the
crew to take the vessel to Russia upon completion.
Alexandroff was not a seaman by choice, having
been graduated in bis own country as a physician.
The requirements of the Russian law forced him to
serve.
Shortly after his arrival Alexandroff went to
New-York and declared bis intention of becoming a
citizen. At the Instigation of Captain Behr he was
arrested on the charge of desertion and brought
back to this city. United States Commissioner Ed
munds rc-mant!ed him to prison to await the action
of the Russian Government. To-day his counsel
brought him Into court on a writ of habeas corpus,
and contended that under the treaty laws with
Russia any seaman who left a Russian ship while
in an American port could be considered a de
serter. In Alexandroffs case he argued that the
Variag was still In course of construction and had
not gone Into commission, and could not therefore
be looked upon as a Russian vessel.
The Court reserved decision.
PlfoMl'T LYXCHIXG OF lih'l T.\L MURDERER,
LOUISIANIANS TAKE THE LAW INTO THEIH OWN
HANDS.
New-Orleans, June 23.— Mrs. Josephine Coates.
mother of Mrs. Bailie otts. of this city, was as
saulted and brutally murdered yesterday In h< r
home, in an isolated neighborhood On th>? Tlckfaw
Kivcr, in 'Livingston Parish. She was sixty years
of age nnJ reputed to have considerable money
Frank Gilmore, a white man, who lived about two
miles from her bouse, who was seen to leave the
house, was arrested and charged with the murder.
I^ater In the evening a crowd gathered at the
Coates house, where Giimore was held, and took
him out Into the nearby timber. There he con
fessed to the crime, lie was promptly Btrung up
to a beech tree limb. The branch broke, and the
miih riddled his body with bullets before he could
arise from the ground. A hole was .lug under the
tree where the lynching took place. Gllmore'a body
was tumbled into it and iheu the mob dispersed.
SWINDLERS SELL BOGUS FOREIGN BONDS.
Philadelphia. June 23.— The police of tbil city have
in custody two men cf apparent foreign birth, who
are believed to have swindled a large number of
persons out of thousands of dollars by selling
bogus Servian, Italian nnd Australian bonds. They
gave- their names as Howard Green and Edward
Weiss. Both are about middle age. It Is known
that in one Instance $1,000 was secured. When
searched thirty pawn tickets for gold watches,
chains and other Jewelry were found en Green.
Tills feature of the case Is being Investigated, ua
we!l :is tin- sale (if tlie bonds. At a hearing to
day Beveral witnesses testified to paying various
sums of money ti> the men. The men art alleged
to have largely confined their efforts to widows of
foreign birth.
Green ar..i Weiss ar»> said to have carried on
their scheme In an artistic manner. The contra, is
ami elaborately engraved papers they carried al ■ it
with them in ian'e leather eases, ami one big docu
ment bore th "ne of Edward Sanders, banker,
Br <a New- York City.
TILL TAPPEh <T WORK A ROUND BOSTON.
Boston. June 23.— The police of this city are of
the opinion that a gang of skilful till tappers ar.
at work in the cities adjacent to Boston. Their
plan of operation Is to travel by twos and to call
on business firms at a time when, from watching,
they know that only one person is on duty, One
of the men generally represents himself to be an
agent of the Board of Health looking after the
sanitary condition of the property, and If possible
gets the clerk to leave the store or office for a
minute to show the false Inspector the location of
a water pipe or other appliance. This gives the
second man a chance to slip tmand empty the tin
unobserved. Two men are under arrest for com
plicity In affaire of this kind, and Chief Inspector
watts to-day Identified one of them, who was ar
rested in Bast Boston last night, as "Mat tie"
O'Nefl. alias Leonard, alias Kennedy. ■ notorious
till tapper. • The other man under arrest was
caught at Lynn while attempting a similar offer* ■•
lie Is Identified as Harry King alias "English
Harry," one of. the .most notorious till tappers
pickpockets nnd sneak thieves In the country.
YALE HONOR AWARDS.
PRIZES IN THE SHKFFIKLD SCIENTIFIC
SCHOOL AND ORATIONS IN
THE COLLEGE.
New-Haven. Conn., Juno £3.-The Yale faculty
to-day announced the following prize awards in
the Sheffield Sr-lentlc School, class Of '02:
Knr excellence In all studlen of the freshman yeai^-
CHAMPION B. MATHEWB, ..f afllford. Conn.
Kor excellence In phrato— WILLIAM J. i'AN'ADA of
Weatvllie, '".■nn.
For excellence In German- ROHEKT T. noiiKRTS. of
Wlrustr.l, Conn., mil HOI.KKT P. WADAMB. of Torring
ton. Conn,
ror <x<-«-ll<>nre In French— JOHN J. WIUUHT-CLARK.
ol Newark, N. J.
For -xrellenre In chemistry- WILLIAM II CRAMER
of New Haven.
For exocllenre In mathematics -HKDFORD F. HIKES
of l>echer'l. Ti nn.
For excellence in English— THOMAS D. ADAMS, of
Westpi rt. Mass.
Tlv Ropers scholarship for excellence of studies
In the chemistry course Was given to George 8.
Jamleson. '01, Sheffield, of Bridgeport.
The Yale College faculty this morning announced
the following senior appointments, based on the
work of the graduating class during Its four year
course:
Philosophical orations— Albert B. Van Buren,
Lynn, Mass.; Frank E. Hale, Hartford, Conn.:
Sidney A. Weston. Bharon, Mass.; Thomas \V.
Swan, Northampton, Mass.; George L. Hlnckley.
Northampton. Mass.; Herman M. Opitz. Norwich,
Conn.; George N. Whittley, New-Haven, Conn.;
E. N. S. Thompson, New-Haven. Conn.; John U.
Hartweil, Providence, R. I.; E T. Bauer, Easton,
Conn.; William 8. foffln, New-York; Howard L.
Bronpon, New- Haven; Robert Ferguson. Sprlng
fleld, Mass.; R. C. Peck, North rienntrißton. Vt. ;
11. A. Dow. Pittsfleld, 111.; J. S. McLaln, New-
Haven; W. L. Porter, Wlnterset, lowa, and Leaon
F;irr. Kingfisher, <>k!a.
Hiph orations— Walter If. Adrlance, Cincinnati;
J. H. Bailey, New- York; O. H. Bartholemew, New-
Haren; N. W, Bartlett, Evanston, III.; Cogswell
Kent ley, Rochester, N. V.; Francis < 'ross, Jr.. New-
Haven; Stanley W. Edwards, Granby, Conn.; E. C.
Ellsbree, Meriden. Conn.; O. D. EsteV. Gloversviile.
N. V.; K. F. Farley. Derby, Conn.; F. E. Field.
Dover, ill.; J. Graves, Hartford. Conn.; William K.
Hamltn, Bast Hampton. Mass.; Edward B. Hill,
Yonkers, N. V.; William S. Johnson, Meriden.
Conn.; Charles Kinds, Seymour. Conn.; C. A. Kel
logg, jr.. Carthage. Mo.; A. S. Kittle. Ross. Cn!.;
Samuel S. Levy. Blooming-ton. 111.; F. L Look, New-
York; S. B. .Morton, Chicago; Henry L. Moses.
Bcranton, Perm.; W. H. Nelson. West Buffleld.
Conn.; Leonard A. Peck, GloversvlUe: F. D. Pen
dleton, Somerville, Conn.; H. M. Poynter, Shelby
ville, Ky.; J. P. Rice, Santa Barbara, Cal. ; Horace
G. Sanders, Concord, N. H.; Laurence Van Dyke,
Milwaukee. Wis. ; Klisha Walker, New-York; L. 3.
Weaver, Newry, Perm.: William H. Weiss, Bchuyl
klll Haven. Perm.. and S. Bf. Wood, Mount Ver
non. \"t.
Announcement also Is made that 197 other mem
bers of the clnss have received minor appointments.
making a total of 248 honor men in the class about
to graduate, out of a grand total of 327. This Is a
high percentage.
COMMENCEMENT AT HILLSIDE.
Mrs. Melville Emory Mead's well known school
at Norwalk. Conn., graduated Its senior cla?s on
Wednesday last, with an interesting programme.
The salutatory -was by Miss Dorothy Lowing
Kautz, of Illinois; Miss Helen Marie Burr, of New-
York, gave selections on the harp, and Mis* M.
Edith Hlake. of New-York, snng. Address— were
made by the Rev. Dr. R. G. S. McNeille. of Union
ville. and the Rev. Johnson McClure Bellows, of
Norwalk. Miss Marjorle Steams Bishop, of Con
nectlcut, delivered the valedictory, the diplomas
were presented by Mrs. Mead and the Rev. George
D. Egbert, of Norwalk, pronounced the benediction.
THE SHEFFIELD CLASS DAY EXERCISES.
New-Haven, Conn., June 23.- The class day exer
cises of the graduating class of the Sheffield Scien
tific School of Yale were held, beginning at 11
o'clock, this morning. The members of the class
were seated In the centre of an amphitheatre, each
man being held aloft as his history was rend.
The historians were Ransom H. Glllett, Wash
ington; C. D. Lockwood, Stamford. Conn.; Herman
A. Webster. Chicago; Irving L. Lyons, New-Or
le.uis, and Trumbuli Keller, New-York.
The attendance of friends of the graduates was
rather, smaller than usual, probably owing to the
threatening weather.
After the reading of the histories the class pa
raded the streets of the campus alid vicinity,
cheering the halls and President Hadley and
Director < hittenden.
PRETENDED TO BE EXCISE INSPECTORS.
TWO MEM WITH EXCURSION TICKETS TO BELL.
RUN* DOWN HY POLICE.
Two men. who describe themselves as .lames Wil
son, twenty-seven years old, of No. 323 East FOTty
nlnth-st., and Charles Young, forty-five years old,
of No. 17 Becond-ave., are lot ke j up at the East
One-hundrcd-and-fourth-st. police station charged
with obtaining money under false pretences and
for reji re.ser.ting themselves as State excise In
spectors. Testerday the two men went to the
saloon uf Joseph Fredriohs, at No. 414 East One
hundred-and-third-st. They represented themselves
as State excise Inspectors, and pretended to have
authority to sell tickets for the annual excursion
of the Olympla Association to Lake Hopatcong.
N. J., to tak» place on next Sunday. Fredrlchs had
heard of similar schemes and told the men to re
turn later. Fredrlcris then informed Policeman
Van Twissner, who followed the men to the saloon
of William Meyers, at No. 418 East One-hundred
and-second-st The men again tried to sell tickets,
r« nr« ■-eiiting themselves as nger.ts of the Liquor
Dealers' Association. Meyers also put the men
otT. and they drove away. The policeman followed
Them in a butcher's wagon to One-hundred-and
tweifth-st. ar 1 First-aye., when the two men see-
Ing that they were closely pursued. Jumped from
their btiKK>'. Policeman Van Twissner grappleil
with Wilson. Policeman Baumelster followed
Young, and arrested him In the building at No. 15
East One-hundred-and-tbirteenth-si . where the
man ran into the basement. Young was found
in the alrshaft. On the floor were several
of the Olympia Association tickets. In Wilson's
pockets were also found a large number of the
tickets and a small sum of money- Wilson sail
he was a bricklayer, and Xoung that he was a
salesman at No. 17 Becond-ave. Both will be ar
raigned in the Harlem Police Court this morning.
The police ask f> r complainants to appear against
the men.
THIS EXCURSION HEATS ALL THE REsT.
BANKERS AND COTTON MILL SUPERINTENDENTS
SURPRISE ASBURT PARK.
Asbury Park. N J.. June 23.— One hundred and
fifteen bankers and cotton mill superintendents, ajl
In the employ of \V. S. Wltham. of Atlanta, Ga.,
arrived here last night In a special train, and held
their annual convention to-day In the Laurel
House. The bankers are presidents, vice-pres-
Identa and cashiers of Mr. Wltham's thirty
two banks, located at Atlanta and scattered over
the State of Georgia. Besides controlling all these
money institutions. Mr Wltham owns and is finan
cial agent of a dozen or more cotton mills.
The excursionists include four bridal couples,
who are the victims of many good natured pranks.
Eight unmarried cashiers are offset by eight beuu
liful Georgia young women, who were brought
uiong by Mr. Wltham as sponsors for the party.
The expenses of the trip are borne by Mr. Wltbam.
He employs all his men on the co-operative plan.
He has even provided for their spiritual need by
defraying the expenses of a chaplain, who every
morning and evening conducts religious services.
whetner the bankers be In railroad cars en
route or ill the many hotels at which they lodge.
The Rev. Dr. J. W. Heidt, of Athens. Ga. is their
spiritual leader. He will conduct a service on t),e
beach to-morrow. Mayor Frank L. Ten Broeck.
ex-Senator James A. Bawdier and the president of
the Common Council, Prank Appleby, welcomed the
visitors this morning.
TO BE MARRIED O\ THURSDAY.
On Thursday, June ZB, at No. 10 West On.-Juin
dre.l-and-thirty-flrst-st., the home of Mr. and Mrs
Berliner, the parents of the bride, at noon, Mls-^
Lillian Viola Berliner will be married to Moaes H.
Grossman. The young couple will sail for Europe
on the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse on July 3, re
turning on the Augusts Victoria early in Septem
ber.
Mr Grossman is a member of the Progress.
Preundßchaft, w. End, Columbian, New-York
Press German Press, Demo-iatlc and Semlnole.
clubs.' and of the Mystic Shrine. Ha la also a di
rector of the Young Men's Hebrew Association,
and Is connected with many of the charitable ln-
Btltutiona In this city.
CHARGED WITH ROBBING EMPLOYERS.
George W. Croasley, forty years old. of No. 144
Ellzabeth-ave.. Newark, was arrested yesterday on
a charge of stealing gold from his employers. Day
is. Clark, Jewelry manufacturers. In Marshall-st..
Newark. Crossley has been In the firm's employ
for eighteen years. For six months nuggets of gold
have been missed. Crossley was arrested as he
left the factory, and sixty-five pennyweights of gold
was found on him.
NO SUNDAY TRAINS FOR ASBURY PARK.
Asbury Park, N. J., June 23 (Special).— The Penn
sylvania Railroad Company has notified the special
committee of the Common Council, recently ap
pointed to ask that company to stop Its trains on
Sundays at the North Asbury Park station, that It
cannot giant the request this summer, owing to the
fact that the summer train schedule has been ar
ranged.
VAXDERBILTS REACH FOR MOXON.
QUIET STOCK BUYING REPORTED WITH A
VIEW TO MERGING WITH THE
"810 FOUR."
The report that the VanderWlt interests had ac
quired control of the Monon road was denied yester
day by prominent officials of the New- York Cen
tral. It was declared that the report psiliaiMj
grew out of the fact that Horace J. Hayden. vice
president of the New-Yorll Centra', was taking a
trip over the road with some other railway officials.
Despite this denial It la known that the New-York
Central Interests have recently secured additional
stock intereHts in th« Monon, and are quietly buy
ing the 3tock. The plan, so It N said, is to BWII*
the property with the "Big Four" some time in tho
future. No merger at his time Is looked for. so it
Is declared, but it Is sal.! that the trend of affairs
is toward that end.
BOSTON AND ALBANY LEASE AI'VANTKD.
aIASBACMUaa.na senatk PASBn the mi.L to a
THIRD RKADINCI— THI WICHBUHQ IK APE.
Boston. June 23— The hill for the approval of tho
lease of th* Boston and Alb my Railway to the
New-York Ontral Ral!ror\d passed to a third
reading In the State Senate by a vote of 24 to S.
with four paint. Numerous attempts were made
to amend the bill, but with the exception of one of
slight Importance they all f.illed when it came to
a vote, althouK.i the amendment offered by Sena
tor Atwlll, of Lynn, which provided for the revo
cation of the lease by tbe Legislature if the con
ditions were violated, was lost by only one vote.
It Is probable that this amendment will find favor
In the House, and may eventually be appended to
the bli:. The hill has still another reading in the
S-.rikte before It goes to the House for approval
The House will t ike up the discussion of the
Fltchburg lease on Monday. The principal action
in the House was the refusal to reconsider the
adverse vote of Thursday on the bill compelling
the Incorporation of the New-England (lus and
Coke Company.
SIMMER WORK OF THE XAYAL MILITIA.
FIRST BATTALION BEGINS ITS DRILL AT WHJTK
STONE. LONG ISLAND
Although the annual tour of duty of the Naval
Militia does not begin before July 26. the Ist Bat
talion h undergoing preliminary drills and exercises
in the waters off Whltestone. Long Island, whore
the United States ship New-Hampshire is moored.
Instead of sending the men on the United States
steamer Prairie this year, it was deeme i advisable
to give them alongshore work and training in the
steam launches and cutters.
The preliminary work being performed consists oi
chart work, compass and boat drills, and boat work
on Long Island Sound and the East River to Fort
Wadsworth.
The fleet of the Naval Militia consists of the
United States steamer Aiben. sev* n steam launched,
ten cutters and four whaleboats.
COUNTRY ADVANTAGES KS THE CITY.
AN OPORTUNITY TO OBTAIN CHOKE HOME SITES
IN" THE TOWNB TRACT.
People who want to live and breathe In comfort,
and even In the city have some of the pleasures
of a house with countryllke surroundings, will do
veil to take a ride to-day, or any other day, to
Slocum Park. Comfort, Sheepshead Bay Park or
Brighton Terrace by the Sea, where !ots are of
fered by Mlraheau L. Towns, the lawyer and poet
of Brooklyn, for anywhere from $-T5 to 1375 apiece.
Mr. Towns's friends say that he has done a
great many good things In his happy an.l success
ful life, but they unite in declaring that he never
did anything better calculated to make his old
age green with the friendship of men and women
than when he bought large choice tracts of unde
vtloped real estate In the old city of Brooklyn and
put them upon the market In the shape of low
priced building lots. The properties advertise.! by
Mr. Towns are carefully restricted and fully Im
proved. There are macadamized streets and im
proved sidewalks, shade trees, water, gas and
electric light, public schools and police and tire pro
tection. But beyond anything else Is the consider
ation that they offer a man earning fair wage? a
chance to make a home for himself.
The extension of the rapid transit tunnel sys
tem through the Borough of Brooklyn is likely to
result in a large Increase in real estate values in
Brooklyn Borough, and people who buy lots now
Will get them a great deal cheaper than they will
be aale to secure them two years from now.
There Is no 'hnnge of cars between the New-
York end of the Bridge and the plots which Mr.
Towns l> offering to the public. The Kings County
elevated road and the Smith-st. surface line will
take the Intending purchaser directly to these
properties.
BIRMINGHAM IRON ASD STEEL AFFAIRS.
EXPORT AGENT AT LONDON- WAtfE SCALE MAT
INVOLVE CONTEST.
Birmingham, Ala.. June 23 (Special).— The Re
pubUc Iron and Steel Company, the Birmingham
Machine and Foundry Company, and other Indus
trial concerns In North Alabama have begun a
new trade custom by appointing a resident export
agent, with headquarters at London, England, to
directly represent them on the Continent and se
cure orders for pig iron, rolling mill and steel mill
products, coke and coal and machinery. Recent
developments have indicated that there !s n.
a market in Europe for the finished products of steel
and Iron and machinery made In the Birmingham
district as for Its raw pig Iron, and an effort !s to be
made to establish a permanent trade In these lines.
J. L. Knoepfler, of this city, has been appointed
export agent, and starts for his headquarters to
morrow.
It is understood that the State miners at the
*vage convention, now in session in this city, will
next week present a wage scale tor trie year be
ginning July '1. which will ' demand higTier wages
It is certain that the operators will not grant the
demand, and this makes the situation dubious tn
the extreme. President John Mitchell, of the
Miners' National organisation, is attending the
convention. Both miners and operators are well
organised, and a stubborn tight on th* wage ques
tion after July t Is not Improbable. The pig Iron
market is sMU dropping, and the operators state
that in view of this, the wage s.-ale being bttßtd on
the price of pig iron. It would be folly to gram
any increase of wag2S to the miners. Th^ miners
are now getting 40 per cent higher wages than be
fore the Industrial revival set in.
CUBAN TEACHERS START FOR BOSTON.
Washington, June 23.— Quartermaster-General
Ludington received word to-day of the departure ol
the transport McPherson from Mar.zanillo
with 2>") Cuban teachers, bound for Boston by w iy
of the eastern ports of Cuba. This movement
rr.arks the beginning of the general movement ol
about two thousand three hundred teachers from
Cuban ports to Boston, wtrnro they are to receive
a general course of Instruction during the summer
under the auspices of Harvard University.
RECEIVER FOR COLORED POLITICIAN.
Judge Brown, of the United States District Court.
luis appointed Theodora M Taft receiver of the
assets of Frank J. Ferrell. of No. Its West Twenty
si-venth-st.. on the application of the City Trust
Deposit and Surety Company, of Philadelphia, a
creditor for IH7S. Mr. Ferrell fa a colored politician,
and whs formerly engineer at the Postofßce Build
ing.
ADVANCE IN COTTON FUTURES.
The market for cotton futures opened steady m
tone yesterday, with prices one point higher to
four points lower, the latter being la sympathy
with unfavorable closing Liverpool cables, a leal
bullish "Chronicle" review than had been looked
for. and war news from China. Far from encourag
ing bear speculation, however, the decline was used
by local shorts as an opportunity to cover. Soon
crop disaster reports were pouring in* from nearly
every section of the cotton belt, while the West
and South fairly Hooded the market with buying
orders. Prices advanced twenty-five po'.nts In less
than as many minutes before this demand showed
the least elgn of abating;. Wall Street and other
outside Interests were heavy purchasers of the
new crop options. Shorts were panlcatrieken and
made frantic efforts to cover. Holders steadily
gained confidence, and could be induced to sell
freely only around the top prices. "Nine cents for
August"' brought out several large blocks, which
the. market absorbed greedily. The July sold up to
921 and .-loseJ at 9.12. as compared with Friday's
dosing price of 8.96. August rose to 9.01. closing at
B.9<>. a net advance for the day of thirteen points.
The September advanced sixteen points, closing
at 8.51.
FRIENDLY SUIT OVER HOTEL CH AM BERLIN
Norfolk. Va.. June 23.— 1n a friendly suit, brought
in the Circuit Court of the United States, by the
Knickerbocker Trust Company of New- York, trus
tee, against the Hampton Roads Hotel Company,
an order was entered to-day appointing William
Butler Duncan. Jr.. receiver of the Hotel Chamber
l!n. The object of the proceeding Is to effect a re
organisation of the company. The hotel will re
main open.
"( )ur Mtrtaa] Frieml." the newspaper,
keeps you infwmetj oi yow opportuni
ties liere.
P>lue and Mack - riped flannels
and a large variety oi cheriots; suit to
order. f16.60; trotßcrs, >i «>«). We guar
antee all colors and recommend black
trimmings. If you like the up-to-date
style, have the narrow concave collar
and broad concave shoulders. Xo extra
charjrc for cutaways or double-breasted
sacks.
Our fashion booklet and samples given
or mailed free.
ABNHEIM
BROADWAY & 9TH STREET.
WISSNER
PIANOS
Used by Eminent Artists.
BROOKLYN: -X>R. P"Jt.TON FT. & FI^ATBUSII AVaV
NEW YORK: Ci BAa* MTU ST.
ircond-Iland L'prlaxbta of Good Nuktn.
$85— 5125. Grands, $175— 5300
OFFICE OF
New Amsterdam Gas Co.
840 THIRD AYE., N. Y.
June 21, 1900.
On and after Jure -- I .--• the price of gaa supplied
by thi3 Company will be restored to the legal rate at
$1.03 per I,«H cubic feet.
KURD lIt'NTINGTOX. Secretary.
OFFICE OF THE
Standard Gas Light Company of
the City of New York.
801 AND Hi 3D AVli,
Nttw York. June 22, 1000.
On ami after June 25 inst. the price for gas supplied
by this company will be at the lesal rule of. $l.l& par
1.000 cubic feet.
\V. (.HKKM'.Y IIOYT. Secretary.
BETRAYS HIMSELF THROUGH FEAR.
MAN GIVES ma BMOTHER-Ef-Unri NAME 13*
THE ILLICIT STII.L I
Louis Frlemar., of No. 31 Essex-st., and Joseph
Goldstein, of No. 64 Rutgers who were arrest
ed on Friday In an :l". it still In Mount Vernon,
were arraigned before United States Commissioner
Shields yesterday morning-. They were held in iiCCO
ball each for examination to-morrow at - p. m.
The man who was supposed to be Louis Hyman
was arraigned later. Through an interpreter it
was learned that hla name la Morris Slepp, and
that he has a brother-in-law whose name is Louis
Hyman. Slepn explained that he v.as so excited
when he was arrestrd that he save the name of
his brother-in-law. Siepp was also haM in $2,500
ball for examination next Monday afternoon.
Deputy Collector John F. Donahoe and Inspector
Frank G. Thompson yesterday morning destroyed
the distilling- outfit which was discovered in an old
house at No. 412 South Seventh-aye.. Mount Ver
non. They also seized all of the machinery which
the gang of moonshiners used In the manufacture
of the spirits. The liquors and ma'.t. which till
about fifty barrels, will be stored. The officers ex
pect to hold a public auction and sell the hcrse and
wagon used by the gang for the distribution of its
product. Mr. Donahoe says that the distillery was
one of the best equipped he has ever discovered
around New-York
It was found yesterday that the water and sewer
Pipes had been tapped by an experienced plumber.
The water pipes were used to convey the malt from
the storerooms on the third floor to the retorts De
low. The waste water ran through rubber tube 3
Into the sewer pipe. A large supply of boxes used
for shipping the spirits were plied up In the sleep
ing rooms of the woman, who lives downstairs.
The officers have not yet arrested her, but she 13
under close surveillance tnd Is not permitted to
leave the premises.
The detectives say that there is in immense)
protit in the manufacture of "'moonshine." It can
be made for about -O cents a gallon and sold for $2.
The best customers arc the small lifjuor dealers.
With a five gallon cask <>!" "moonshine" diluted
with water and a little coloring matter can be
made a decoction which will retai! for 10 cents a
drink on the East Sid.*. By adding more water the
dealer can produce live cent whiskey. It is esti
mated that the Mount Vernon estnMishment. which
has been in operation three months, has turned
out about ten thousand gallons, which means a
profit of about SI6.(HA> to Its proprietor.
SING SING CONVICT TAMES A ROBIN.
THC lilliD COMES AT IK.S WBISTLB-IS FuLLOWt
iil.U To m< .
A convict in Sing Sing prison, who was in the
bird business in this city and has made the taming
of birds a study, has, while temporarily engaged
at work outside the north prison vwal!, caught and
tamed a young robin. The bird comes to him
when he whistles: to It and perches itself upon his
finger.
Sometimes it goos wirh him to his cell at night,
and perches en his book shelf. It is entirely at
home In the prison. In the morning it soea out
with htm and stays around while he la at his work.
FAREWELL RECEPTION TO MISSIONARIES.
A reception will be given to Dr. and Mrs. R. M.
Johnston at I o'clock to-morrow nl^ht at th»
Thirteenth Sireet Presbyterian Church. Brief ad
dresses will be fielireied by the !:• ■. Dr. Arthur J.
Brown, A. V.'ooilrijrr Ha!sey and J. Wilbur Chap
man. Dr. and Mr?. Juh.ns.ton will sail on Tues
day for t.ie West Coast c? Africa. They go under
the auspices of the Presbyterian Hoard cf Foreign
Mtaaioas, cr.d they will Ik; supported by the Thir
teenth Street Presbyterian Church.
BEES HIVE IN BROOKLYN BTMESTW,
The residents In the Immediate neighborhood of
Ralph-aye. and Halsey-st., Brooklyn, are trying to
form a ways and means committee to forcibly dis
possess a swarm of bee* which has made Its happy
home In a box containlns the connecting wires of
the telephone company. Another swarm of bees
h'si- at Ralph-aye. and Putnam-ave. The air 1*
noisy with : !i.- ban of the Industrious Insects.
►_ — -,_
SPANISH WAR VETERANS' REUNION.
Buffalo. June 21— There wil! be a reunion of the
2<Ed New- York Volunteer Veterans' Association in
this city on July li». The Executive Committee has
Invited the T' ir.! Division Naval Resenrni the 3d
New-York Volunteers and the 7th Battery with
the purpose of arranxtea a State reunion of New-
York Spanish \\'ar Voiuntdera at which a Stata
organization will be formed. It is desired that tho
veterans of the State mute md affiliate with orn
of the five National organizations.
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