OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 25, 1900, Image 1

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1900-06-25/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

,v oL - lx . N°if),r>so.
AMERICANS FALL IS CHINA.
CHINESE ENTRAP WALLER'S FORCE, KILLING FOUR AXD
WOUNDING SEVEN NEAR TIEN-TSIN.
STILL SHELLING THE CITY— PEKING IN GREAT DANGER
Admiral Kempff sent a dispatch to Washington stating that the American
force under Major Waller had been amb ushed by the Chinese near Tien-Tsin,
of the United States troops being- killed and seven wounded.
The cruiser Brooklyn, with Admiral Remey in command, has been ordered
fr >ni Manila to Taku.
The bombardment of Tien-Tsin continued on Friday and heavy casualties
arc reported. Food supplies are said to be insufficient.
Among the deaths reported in the attempt to relieve the city on June 22 was
that of the commander of H. M. S. Barfieur. Casualties of the relieving force
were ted at three hundred.
Dispatches from Shanghai -.aid that the Taku forts had been blown up by
' force- and that more than two thousand Chinese had been killed.
nd were ?*aid to have lost their lives around Tien-Tsin.
No definite news has been received from Admiral Seymour's force, and Pek
r. g is believed to be in grc.it danger.
LEGATIONS KEPORTED SAFE
ASSURANCE OF SECURITY OF THE
FOREIGNERS AT PEEING.
fCorJTijrtit; 1&X>: By The New- York Tribur.o.J
IBV . aj : ■ TO THE TBIBCVK.]
London, June L.'.". »i a. m. — News, though not
Of a very reliable kin 1. has been received at last
from Peking-. A dispatch to "The Times"
from Shanghai states that Shcng, the Chinese
Director of Railways, announced on Saturday,
on the authority of news brought by a special
courier, that the residents of the legations were
safe, and that the foreign Ministers were de
manding their passports, which the Tsung-li-
Yamen was disposed to grant.
At Che-Foo it is feared that Admiral Sey
inuur's force has been cut to pieces, and the po
sition at Tien-Tsin is regarded as almost hope
less.
t Muravk ff on the day before his death
ted his repn sentative to make a com
: to the St. Petersburg correspondent
of "The Telegraph" with reference to the Chi
; n. On the whole, he thought the
| >ctent themselves with the task
Lfication, and he did not antici
pate that the outburst v.ould extend to any un-
L N. F.
THE I'LHiHT OF TIEN-TSIN.
FOBEIGX SETTLEMENT ALMOST EN
TIRELY 'DESTROYED.
[Copyright; 1000: B* The New-York Tribune.]
IBY CABLE TO THE TnißfXE.]
London. June 'Jo, 1 a. m.— The British Ad
miralty, being enmeshed -with red tape, docs not
give out dispatches as promptly as the Navy
Department at Washington, but it has con
firmed the previous accounts of the repulse of
the lief: column which attempted to enter Tien-
Tsin on Friday. The bulletin is short and de
pressing. The foreign settlement at Tien-Tsin
was almost entirely destroyed and the Euro
peans were fighting hard.
There is nothing about a relief column of
ins and Americans being cut to pieces, but
the r.puLse is described as attended with some
. -- < Inly one runner had entered Taku from
T .- 'i-Tsin in five days, ani not a word had been
: 1 from the relief columns which started
f.r Peking two weeks ago, nor from the lega
hemselves.
DEFENCE OF TIEN-TSIN.
foreign relief force may be described as
a chain consisting mainly of missing link.s.
- a r:.;.\e.l force of between two thousand
and three thousand men at Taku, including: a
.. of a Chinese regiment from Wei-Hal-
Wei. This column, with the Kussian and Amer-
Ingent of o\cr five hundred men, must
< ut Its way through a superior Chines.? force
i. I to have sixty guns, although this
-. The foreigners at Tien-Tsin
iriy In a desperate state, with th.- «ar-
SBrrounded by a Chinese horde and with
ammunition and supplies running short.
.■•here beyond Tien-Tsin, either on the
way to Peking or at that city. Is a mixed fore.;
„ with Inadequate .supplies, ammunl-
At the legations are probably
one hundred and fifty to two hundred
Europeans, Japanese and Americans, refugees
i t'i the working official force, and
litary and naval guards number about
red and fifty men.
Every link in this chain of relief is weak and
detached, and th.re is no accurate information
from any station except Taku.
DESCRIPTION OF THE CITY.
Men who have lived In China assert that the
number of foreigners at Tien-Tain is large,
Bince the city has a Chinese population Of over
a million and a commerce of over (45,000,000.
Tien-Tsin is the chief distributing centre for
trad» in Northern China and Manchuria, and
Is the natural outlet for a half dozen of the
most populous provinces. There are four for
t Urn banks, a large body of English, German,
Russian, Japanese and American merchants and
several groups of missionary stations.
The situation of the foreigners at Tien-Tsin
is regarded by former British officials in China
as deplorable, and doubts are expressed respect
jng the adequacy of the relief force which is
available at Taku, unless Russia takes decisive
Pleasures, as Indicated last night in ollicial com
munications from the Foreign Office at St.
Petersburg for the invasion of Chinese* territory
l > a really formidable army. The European
and American fleets may be working har
moniously under the leadership of the senior
rear admiral at Taku, but tho suppression of
anarchy in China now requires too presence of
a larger army than any great Power except
Russia can put into the. field witbcftit delay.
I. N. F.
NEW 8 HOUR TRAIN TO CHICAGO VIA
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD,
jfc/ti''** ,, N '* W York (West 23d St Station), 135 p. m.
inT h * ft?* Xsssw Richard Peck will attend th«
itt^ r< 'l^'' K h'" Boat ***«•« "J- l J ou£hlteei>Bic-. Juno
•fin. Bet Adv.— Advt.
AMBUSH NEAR TIEX-TSIN.
KEMPFF SENDS REPORT OF AMERICAN
LOSSES IN ENGAGEMENT.
Washington, June 24.— The Navy Department
this afternoon issued the following bulletin:
A telegram fr.»m Admiral Kempff, dated t'h<--
Foo, June 24, says:
111 niiil>ns<-]i)l<» near TUmi-Thlh oil tin- - lnt;
lour of Waller* command killed and neven
wounded. Nam.* will Ik- furnUbed as BOOH
sij. received. Force of two thousand Koiim to
relieve Ti«-n- l'r»in to-day. KKMI'FK.
The Secretary of the Navy has ordered Ad
miral Remey to go with the Brooklyn to Taku
and to tender to General Mac Arthur conveyance
of any army troops which th.; Brooklyn can
carry-
PERIL Gil OWING GREATER.
INTERNATIONAL TROOPS ARE HARD
PRESSED AT TWO POINTS.
[By Th,- Associated I'ivs*]
London, June "J."..— Th" position of th>- inter
national forces in tin- section of Northern
China where ten thousand m< n are striving to
keep a footing and to succor the legations in
Peking appears t<- Increase in peril with every
fresh dispatch. Peking has not been beard
from direct for fourti en days. Tho last dis
patch was one imploring aid. Admiral Sey
mour's column of two thousand was lxht heard
from twelve days ago. At that time ii was
burround.d midway between Peking and Tien-
Tsin.
Th<; G.CtOO International iroopn at Tten-Tsla
■were hard pressed and lighting for th» ir livi a on
Thursday, und a relieving force of less than a
thousand had been beaten back to Taku on Fri
day. Observers on the spot think that 100,000
men would not be 100 many t>> seize China,
lirrnly.
The Admiralty has received the following dis
patch from tho iiriiish Kear Admiral at Taku:
Che-Foo, Juri.- £3.- < >nly one runner has K"t
through from Tien-Tsln for five days. No in
formation could be obtained, except thai the
foreign settlement had been almost entirely
destroyed, and that our people were fighting
bard.
N.-ws is r.e, ived as this telegram is dispatched
that an attempt to relieve Tlen-Tsin on June -'-
was repulsed, with :><!'.:■■ loss.
The allied admiral! are working in perfect ac
cord, with the Russian Vice-Admiral ua senior
offi< er.
DISPATCH OP SECOND FORCE.
A press message from Shanghai, dated yester
day, at 4 p. in., embodies some later informa
tion. It says:
Official Japanese telegrams confirm the re
ports of a defeat of the allied forces .v Tien-
Tsin. The foreigners there are now placed in a
desperate situation. The Russian Admiral
HUlebrandt yesterday sent a mixed force oi
4'hh) from TaKu t., attempt the relief of Tlen-
Tsin. Nearly half of the force consisted of
Japanese. The remainder was made ujj of con
lingents representing the other nations.
The .^uiis of the Chinese around Tien-Tsin are
'' superior to anything the defending European
force has or is likely v> have for seme time.
The bombardment of Tien-Tain continued on
Friday. Bomb shelters were hastily erected by
th- ior-imi troops, largely coostiucted of wetted
piece goods. Th>- food supplies are Insufficient,
and the continued shelling is reported to be tell
ing terribly.
AmoriK those killed of the relief fore- on Kri
■ day was the commander of ii M s. Barfieur.
The foreign casualties were three hundred.
Japan is makinK every effort. Her troops are
' now arriving at Taku in large numbers. The
, Chines.- troops in the Province of Chl-LJ In
clude sixty thousand auxiliaries, who have been
drilled by Russian and German officers.
Captain Beatty and I^.-ut.-nant Wright. Hrit
lsh, have been severely wounded at Tien-Tsin,
according to a Shanghai dispatch to "The Daily
Kxpresd," dated Saturday. The information was
brought there by the Hritish crul.ser Orlando
from Che-Foo. The losses at the Russians have
been heavy.
HEAVY LOSSES OF CHINESE.
It was reported from Shanghai last evening
that the allied forces had blown up the Taku
forts, and that .very available man had been
sent to the relief of Tlen-Tsln. Two thousand
three hundred Chinese bodies are alleged to have
been cremated at Taku. and upward of four
thousand Chinese are said to have been killed
at Tien-Tsin.
Chinese runners who have arrived at Taku re
port that a foreign force was engaged several
days ago with an overwhelming body of Chinese
forty miles west of Tien-Tsin. At Shanghai it
is assumed that this force was Admiral Sey
mour's.
The Shanghai correspondent of "The Daily
Express" says:
I learn from a mandarin who stealthily left
Peking on June I'!, and who succeeded at great
hazard in getting clear, that the Boxers are
massed around Peking, and that more than half
of the northern anil western portions of the city,
including the foreign settlement, were aflame
when the mandarin left. He could tell me noth
ing as to the fat.- of the foreigners, nor much
as to the general situation, but he had heard
that the Empress Dowager was preparing to go
to the Province of Shan-Si.
ALL THE NORTH IN REVOLT.
A Che-FOO dispatch to "The Daily Mail," dated
yesterday, says:
The attack on the Tien-Tsin relief force was
made by twenty thousand Chinese, using ma
chine guns and modern field pieces. The allies
ALWAYS USE PLAIT'S CHLORIDES
for household disinfection. You will lilt.* it.—Advt
NEWYOKK. MONDAY. JUNE 25. 1900— TWELVE PAGES— „ t&S&ZZ**-
w.re v i.-c in retreating. Forwarding detach
ments in this manner ia Buicidal, and th«> de
1' the foreigners, even though In small
force, greatly . < i ■ 1 the movement of the Boxers,
winch is Kaining enormously through th« ina
bility of the foreigners to make head against it.
Practically the whole of Northern China is
ablaze. Hostilities are now conducted on an
i xtended :-. .i!>-. du< to direct orders from Pe
king. Gen ral i'aiin sin Kai, Governor of Shan
commands ll.iHiu foreign drilled troops,
organized to .. h.:rli pitch of en . and
equipped with Mausers. It was in the plans
that the-- troops should go ;■> Taku, but the
seizure of the fGrtS Was effect, d b.ToIV IIVV
i . uld gel there.
Somi •: the spocial dispatches from Shanghai
describe the groat southern provinces of China
as still quiet, but others assert that tii-- news
from the n -nli ;■ . x< iting the southernei
dangerous height of Ci ling, and that millions
n ay rise any day.
PROCLAMATION <>r THE BOXERS.
London, June 2T». — At Canton the Boxera are
posting inflammatory placards, of whi< h the
following la a ■ ampli :
Kill all Germans, French, Ann ricana and Eng
lish. To havi peuce prevail in :i.- hearts of
the people all : •
This .!,i can ■ attained in a few !aya If we
unite our stren
The British Admiralty has ordered live more
cruisers to pro to China. Thl ■• represents ah ruMi
tioim: 50,000 tons, the crews aggregating 3,0u0,
DIVISION <.«iI.N«; FROM INDIA.
London, June _■".. — According to a dispatch to
"The Times" from Simla, dated yesterday, the
Indian force going to China will be imrcaMd to
a dlvi. .
Tin-; j;n;.MMi OF Tin. IJSGATIUNS.
London, Jan.- 2
of "The Tin • '
Sheng, Director of Telegraphs, declares that
information wa received to-day (Friday, Juno
'S-> to the effect i ii.it the foreigners in i'eking
were wife on Wednesday, Juiv a), but that all
the legations had been burned except the Brit
ish, Austrian and Belgian.
Till: VARIAG MAY GO TO FAH EAST.
London. June -'■•. A St. Petersburg ■ patch
says that the new Russian cruiser Vsirlaj? will
go direct from Philadelphia to Port Arthur.
REMEY ORDERED TO TAKU.
WASHINGTON OFFICIALS PKEPAKE FOR
ALL EMEUGEXCIES.
Washington, June 24. Admiral KempfTs ilis
jiai.ii. giving the first definite news of the
shedding of American bl lon Chine.,.- soil In
the present war. came early this morning, and
was turned over to Secretary Long as Boon aa
be arriv.-d at the Department With Admiral
Crowninshield, the Secretary carried the dis
patch to the White House, where, on the Pr< l
dent's return from church, it wai :.1,.1 before
him.
The determination was reached to order Ad
miral Remey, in command of the Asiatic squad
ron, from Manila to Takr, on board of the
armor.-, i cruiser Lfrooklyn. The Secretary and
Admiral Crowninshield returned t.i the Navy
Department, where the > essarj orders were
dlspat.h.d to Admiral Remey. The effect of
this transfer is to make Taku ih.- headquarters
of the Asiatic squadron. The Brooklyn Is ex
pected to sail at one.- , to-day If possible as the
orders sent contemplate getting the Admiral
on the scene at the earliest moment. The a d ■
vantage of ibis, it was officially stated, is not
so much in adding the strength o( the Brook
lyn to the fleet already there, as the fleet is
considered by Sec retary Long to be adequate, a.s
It is in allowing authorities here to deal di
rectly with the situation in China instead of
through the circuitous communications by way
of Manila.
If the Brooklyn starts to-day, as expected, it
will take her fully a vim k to reach Taku, as th-.
trip Is two thousand miles and typhoons ar.»
raging. The determination to carry some of
General MacArthur*a troops on a flagship shows
the emergency of the situation. The troops are
believed to be ready to move, but some d.-i^y
may be cause.) in getting on board sufficient
supplies for a large body of men for a week.
THE AUTHORITIES WORRIED
Admiral Kempffs report that four Americans
Were killed and seven wounded In the ambus
cade <if Waller's force caused the gravest con
cern among officials, but the chief fear was as
to the outcome of the second attack, which the
Admiral reported would begin to-day. This is
little short of the dimensions of a battle, and its
results may be decisive, not only to the imme
diate force employed, but in determining the
fat.- of the legations and foreign settlements at
Tien-Tsin, and also whether the ih:-ue is or is
not to be war with China.
Word reached 'h.- Navy Department to-day
that the battleship Oregon ;rot away from Hong
Kong last night, bound for Taku. This is twu
day» ahead of her expected start. She took on
board I»>4 sailors and marines, brought to Hong
Kong by the Zaflro. The big ship may now
have a i hano to repeal her <\ 1.-hrated run
around the Horn, as she is being crowded for a
fast run to the scene of action. The distance la
about fifteen hundred miles, and if she makes
record time she will be at Taku in six days.
<. oil till ut'il on 1 1. 1 r.l iiukc.
ONLY 2S HOURS TO ST. LOUIS. NO EXTRA
Pennsylvania Limited. Leaves Now York every
morning.— Advt.
A happy anticipation and a pleasant memory are
born- **£ «*• Hiiiinoa River Day fit... trir».— »A4vt.
STREET SCENE IX PEKING.
TWOSCORE LIVES LOST.
TEA IN DISASTERS IN GEORGIA
AND WISCONSIN.
thirty-five PERSONS perish iN
SOUTHERN RAILWAY WASH
OUT AND FIRE.
Atlanta, Ga., June — A passenger train on the
Macon branch of the Southern Railway ran into
a washout one and a half miles north of Mc-
Donough, <; .. last night, and was completely
wrecked. The wreck caught tire and the entire
train, with the exception of the sleeper, was
destroyed. Every person on the train except
the occupants of the Pullman car perished. Not
a member of the train crew escaped. Thirty
live persons in all were killed.
The following la a list of the dead:
r..\K<"I.AY. William A., conductor. Atlanta.
UkJNXKTT, W. \V.. ti.iKEMsein.uricr. Atlanta.
i:i:.\NTI.KV. John. Breman.
UYKI>. Ed., colored, in. in, Atlanta.
CKESSMAX, li U. Pullman on.luclur.
i :;.:.!. . W. «».. bndic<'man. Slookliriifijc.
FLORIDA. J. U.. NashvlUe.
;•!/■: i.N. . <";■ urso W.-, Atlanta.
<;i;i;i:.V. William, . Ktra Biwaan.
GRIFFITH, D. V . ntp«rviaor.
HENSOK. EJdcr, travelling num. ■opposed ti> have
bnn from Florida.
HIGUTOWER, D, C. Btoefc bridge. »".a.
iirSXinTT. J. h.. 'irnluctor. A'.lanta.
Jl'-VUK. \V. w.. M.icon. <:.u
I.A\\'KKXt*B. W. X.. torcmaa extra cans.
MAI>I*>X, T. 1"... rotl.m buyrr. Atlanta.
MORItISETT, \V. U. jiump repairer.
)■ Mi: \V. J . Atlanta.
PATE! -, lw«.'.ve-}eux-L>M sua of \V. J. l'ato,
Atlanta.
nil' >\ ■:.. J. II . Daemon.
SVENCER, Robert, train rter.
1 .' I.I. IVAN. J. T.. engineer.
WOO] J. li.. conductor, Atlanta.
Four i.-ii. arc li milled.
KiKlit negro »rrtton han>ls also pvrishe.l.
The following persons wore rescued without
serious injury: Jesse L. Rohr, Baltimore; Wal
ter Pope, Atlanta; Miss Mary B. Merritt, Bos
ton; Miss Clara Alden. Boston; J. C. Flynn,
Atlanta; K. Schrincr. Chattanooga; E. T. Mack.
Chattanooga; J. J. Quintan, flagman; T. C.
Carter, Pullman porter, and Handy Tomlinson.
HOW DISASTER OCCURRED.
The train left Macon at 7:10 o'clock, and was
due in Atlanta at li:).". o'clock last night. Me-
Donough was reached on time. At this point
connect is made for Columbus, »;a.. and here
every night the Columbus train is coupled and
hauled through t'> Atlanta. i^ist night, how
ever, for the first time in many months, the
Columbus train was reported two hours late on
account of a washout on that branch, and the
Macon train Started on to Atlanta without its
Columbus connect lon.
Tremendous rains, of daily occurrence for th.
last two weeks, have swollen all streams In this
part of the South, and several washouts have
been reported on the different roads. Camp's
Creek, which runs Into the Ocmulgeo, was over
its banks; and its waters had spread to all the
lowlands through which it runs. About a mile
and a half north of McDonough the creek comes
somewhat near the Southern's tracks and runs
alongside of them for some distance. Finally It
passes away under the road by a heavy stone
culvert.
A cloudburst broke over that part of the coun
try about •"» o'clock last night, and shortly after
durk washed out a section of track nearly one
hundred feet in length.
Into this the swiftly moving train plunged.
The storm was still raging and all the car win
dows were closed. The passengers, secure, as
they thought, and sheltered comfortably from
the inclement weather, went to death without
un Instant's warning. The train, consisting of a
baggage car, second class coach, first class coach
and a Pullman sleeper, was knocked into kin
dling wood by the fall. The wreck caught tire
a few minutes after the fall, and all the coaches
were burned except the Pullman car.
ONLY PULLMAN PASSENGERS LAND.
Every person on the train except the occu
pants of the Pullman car perished in the dis
aster.
There was no escape, as the heavy Pullman
car weighted down the others, and the few alive
In the sleeper were unable to render assistance
to their fellow passengers.
For a brief time there was silence. Then the
occupants of the Pullman car recovered from
the bewilderment, and after hard work man
aged to get out of their car and found them
selves on the track in the pouring rain. The
extent of the catastrophe was quickly apparent.
Flames were already seen coming from that
part of the wreckage not covered by the water.
As the wreck began to go to pieces under the
destructive work of both flames and Hood hu
man bodies Boated out from the mass and were
carried down stream by the swift current. The
storm did not abate in fury. Flashes of light
ning added to the steady glow of the burning
train and lit up the scene with fearful distinct
ness.
The flagman. Quintan, who was one of the
first to get out, at one- started for the nearest
telegraph station. Making his way as rapidly
< i. II I 111 lie, l UU -.<«.. 11. 1 putfV.
CHICAGO AND RETURN, $17.
Via. Lackawanna Railroad. Tickets good goias
Jouu & and 2i. Return limit July Advt-
ANSWER TO INSURGENTS.
MACAUTIHU S KKI'LV Ti » APPEAL FOB
PEACE- CHANGE IN TERMS.
Manila. Juiu- L'l. General Mac Arthur has
given a formal answer to the Filipino leaden
who, lust Thursday, submitted to him peace
proposals that had been approved earlier in the
day by a meeting of representative iiusur^.-nts.
In his reply h>' assured them that all personal
rights under the United States Constitution, «-x
cepting trial by jury and the riKht to bear
arms, would b»> guaranteed th.-m.
The promoters of th.- peace movement ar.- now
engaged in reconstructing th.- draft of seven
clauses submitted to c,<-m ral Mac Arthur in
such a way as to render it acceptable to both
sides.
The seventh clause, providing for the ex
pulsion of the friars. General Mac Arthur re
jected, on the ground that the settlement of
this question rests with the Commission headed
by Judge Tuft.
That portion of the-i;;,i Infantry which formerly
garrisoned the island of Sanur will proceed
to the island of Leyte, giving the garrison there
the needed reinforcement.
The- battalion of the 2Dth Infantry which was
sent yesterday to Samar will act as the gar
rison there.
A NEK DEMAND FOR PAT.
FRESH REQUEST I'ull SETTLEMEXI
PRESENTED T< » THE PORTE.
Con June •_■:: -Lloyd C Gri
United states Charge resent
ed .t fresh note to the Ottoman Government, ia
- upon an Immediate reply to the demand
of the United Stat< » i r a settlement
y :n connection with th.- . ■ Ameri
cans at the time of yn- Armenian massacres.
Although vigorously phrased, the note is not
an ultimatum, it la said, .
a dlsa Burprls • the Porte
as it do. s to the Intention of the United States
Government to pursue this matter oi md
to tiiu- eni
READY I'OU ASBAXTEE CAMPAIGN.
ATTEMPT To OPEN COMMUNICATION WITH
COOMASSIE BEGAN YESTERDAY.
Prahsu, June I*:: Sum< lent supplies have *1
last • n collected, and the final advance to open
communications with Coomassie will begin to
morrow.
On the mad from Ashantee to Kwahou are
three villages where ar,- gathered some two
thousand fighting men, who have practised the
rit.-s „f fetich worship an.i pledged them
to help the Ashant.es.
SERIOUS SETBACK FOR HARVARD.
HIGGINSON. THE STKoKK. SPRAINED HIS
ANKLE ANH CANNOT ROW
IN TIIM RACK.
New-London, Conn., June "Jl (Special).— l*. L.
Hlgginson, stroke and captain of th.- Harvard
'varsity eight, met with an unfortunate acci
dent to-night at tiie crew'a Quarters which wilt
necessitate dropping him from the boat in the
race with Yale next Thursday. Higginson was
playing ball with a number of the oarsmen, and
in endeavoring to catch a ball slipped backward
suddenly, twiatin* his right arjkie. He sank to
the ground in a fainting condition.
The other players rushed across th»* neid to
his assistance. Dr. Benedict, a physician who
harpem-d to bo at the quarters, examined Hte
ginson's foot and found that several of the
small boii.s were broken. The injur.-d man
was lifted by his friends and carried to his room
at thr* quarters, where th<- necessary surgical
attention was Ktven.
( '"» lh Storrow and th.. oarsmen here are
greatly depressed at the accident, particularly
the former, who was confident of winning the
rac-. Higginson was his main stay. The latter
lias stroked three Harvard crews to victory
Higginaon's father, at Boston, was informed of
the accident, and is expected at the quarters
as soon as he can get here.
Coach Storrow would not make a statement
to-night as to who lUjTKinson's successor would
be at the sstr..ke oar. In tact, he was too much
cast down to discuss the acci.ii m at all. It is
conceded here that Harvard's chance- of winning
now is rein. te.
At the Vale quarters to-night sympathy was
expressed for the Crimson rivals. It was the
general opinion that with lliK^inson out of tho
Harvard boat on Thursday a victory would bo
an empty one. At both quarters to-day tbe men
]>ut in their time quietly. There were very few
vi&itors.
YALK-I'AKVARP BOAT RACK. CENTRAL
VERMONT RAILWAY. NEW OBSERVA
TION TRAIN.
Finest view of race: Mart to finish. Tickets on
sale. Jii Liroadwuy, York. — Advt.
For uny sort of Cold, no remedy equal*
JAVNE'S EXPECTORAXT.-Advt.
PRICE THREE CENTS.
HILL NOT A CANDIDATE
NEW-YORK DEMOCRACY SEEKS ONLY A
STRONG PLATFORM.
FRANK CAMPBELL BELIEVES BRYAN WILL
LISTEN TO THE PARTY LEADER!
[BY ti::.f>;kai-h to 188 ratal
Albany, June 24.— Frank Campbell, of Bath*
the chairman of the Democratic State Commit
tee, arrived here from his home late last night
and engaged a room at the Ten Eyck HoteL
This morning he visited ex-Senator David B.
Hill at Wolfert's Roost and mad.- arrangemerts
with him to start for the National Democratic
Convention on Friday next. Mr. Campbell de
sires to be in Kansas City early the coming
week in order to attend a meeting of the Demo
cratic National Committee. He and Mr. Hill
will arrive in Kansas City on Saturday evening
next.
Mr. Campbell this evening was asked by The
Tribune correspondent what truth there was in
the report that ex-Senator Hi!! might be nom
inated for Vice-President and also what were
the plans of the delegates of this State to the
Convention. In reply he said:
Under no consideration would Mr. Hill accept
the nomination for the Presidency. It Is
an idle use of words to talk about him and that
office. New-York has not a candidate for any
office nor any ax to grind. Her sole thought
is to use such argument as shall induce the
Convention to adopt such a platform as will en
able the Democrats of New-York State to dc
liv. her thirty-six electoral votes to the candi
date of the Democratic pajty for President.
PLATFORM PARAMOUNT.
The platform is paramount to everything eb*ew
A declaration of party principles can be
framed that will bring to Mr. Bryan's support a
majority of the voters of the country. There is
no man in th.- Democratic- party who is more
patriotic than Mr. Bryan. He desires the adop
tion of such principles as are thoroughly In the
interest of the country. He is honest and he
thoroughly believes in Democratic ideas as they
exist to-day. It is also plain that he does not
wish for the success of the Democratic party so
much from a desire to become President as he
does from a conviction that the country will be
benefited by a Democratic Administration.
Th,- Democrats of New-York State in their
State Convention declared themselves as favor
ing the nomination of Mr. Bryan, and pledged
their support to him as a candidate and the
party platform upon which he will stand. They
go to the Kansas City Convention with the sole
idea of acting in a friendly way with the Demo
crats of other States of the Union and bringing
'about by argument and persuasion the adoption
of a platform upon which Mr. Bryan can be
elected. No one doubts Mr. Bryan's ability to
have his views expressed by the Convention.
He will control, and therefore will be held re
sponslblt for the Convention's action. It is a
position of great gravity. It will be for him to
decide whether there shall be planks in the
platform which will endanger the success of his
party at the polls in November.
BRYAN'S "PATRIOTISM."
I believe that Mr. Bryan will listen to the lead
ers of the Democratic party in the Nation and
concede their right and justice in ;.. adoption
of a platform that shall appeal successfully to
:■■ TVmocrey of every State. Mr. Bryan pub
licly states that h€- believes that a continuance
of a Republican Administration would be dis
astrous to our present form of government. The
Democratic party is opposed to trusts and im
perialism, and to other characteristic traits of
the present Republican Administration; further
more, the Democratic party is united upon these
i«*uies. No man >»-cupying- the position of "Will
lam Jennings Bryan should insist upon the re
aflirm.ition of ideas, although he may believe in
them, that Jeopardise and endanger the .success
of his party at this time, when there is such im
perative need of a great National reform at the
hands* of the D^rriicratic party. I cannot but
believe that Mr. Bryan's patriotic, unselfish de
votion to the Democratic cause and keen desire
for his party's success wi!l alone actuate those
who under his advice will frame the Ka.r.sa.3
City platform.
Kx-Senator Hill was vi^it^d to-day by Senator
William B. Bate, of Tennessee, who is believed
to have gone back to Nashville with some inter
esting facts regarding Mr. Hill's plans for ac
tion at the Democratic National Convention.
The Southern delegates will be highly influen
tial at the- Convention. Democratic leaders hera
are positive that ex-Senator Hill has been seek
ing support among the Southern delegates to
tone down the confiscaiory and anarchistic
planks of the Democratic National platform of
IXm; Mr. Campbell's interesting statement
quoted above doubtless would als«> be made by
ex-Senator Hill if he deemed it good policy at
this time- to talk about the Convention.
CROKERS NEW AMBITION,
REPORT THAT UK WILL BEPUSKfI
NEW-YORK o.\ NATIONAL COMMITTEE.
SAID TO HAVE ACQUIESCED IN A PLAX-TO
DEPOSE FRANK CAMPBELL-GOINO
TO KANSAS CITY SATURDAY.
It has been known for a long time that Rich
ard Croker was desirous of becoming something
more and higher in the Democratic party than,
the mere leader Of Tammany Hall. His am
bitions are fixed on becoming a factor not only
In State, but also in National polities. To the
achievement of that end Mr. Croker has beta
laying his plans, it is understood, for the last
mv years. When it became a practical certain
ty that Bryan would be again the nominee of
the Democratic party Mr. Crates dropped th»
lukewarm attitude which he had previously ex
hibited toward Bryan and came out emphatical
ly and unequivocally in support of the apostle
of free sliver.
That was last year. \\ hen he returned from
Europe; In a statement which he made lor pub
lication he declared that Bryan was the logical
candidate- for the Democratic nomination, that
he was personally n Bpvec e4 the select!
the Nebraskaa and predicted that if Kryan
were chosen it would result in a Democratic
victory. Another straw which tended to show
which way the wind was blowing was the in
struction at Croker's bekjsal Is the delegates ap
pointed at the recent State (.'..invention to vota
tor l'.ryan. While ex-Senator Hill sue ceded In
preventing at the Convention a
of the Chicago platform, it was a. purely nega
tive sort el triumph, inasmuch as the d>. t
were directed to aßfjlWV* any phttforSß dcised.
by the Kansas City Convention.
Having made his Influence and sower in State
polities so stroagty f.-lt at that I'onvention.
Croker is now credited wltk lookinj,- t,. higher
altitudes. Daring the time he has been ■ Eas>
Und, rumors, probably kaSßtred, have from time
to time found their way here, intimating that
Croker would represent New-York State in the
Democratic National Committee. When he was
ask.-d by the reporters who met him down the
Kay on Saturday, when he arrived as) the
Lucama. whether there was any basis for the
reports, Mr. Croker, m that ingenuous manner
which h" adopts osj occasions, deprecated the
idea that any such thinx uas in stora fur hini.
Just as blandly yesterday he admitted that talk
of .i proposal to place him upon the committee
had ...me in his iais, und diffidently said that
LATEST TRAIN FOR ST. LOUIS
And Cincinnati leaves Grand Central Station 'every
day at 3:3> P. M.. via New York Cwitral'^iis Four
Uouttt.-Adv'» * »

xml | txt