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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, July 25, 1900, Image 1

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EUROPE REMAINS IN DOUBT.
LITTLE TRUST PLACED IN CHINESE REPORTS OF THE
SAFETY OF THE LEGATIONS AT PEKING.
GERMANY NOT TO MEDIATE-SQUABBLE AMONG POWERS
The British Foreign Office received a letter from Sir Claude M. Macdonald,
stcr at Peking, dated July 4. It stated that there was urgent need of re
mforcerr.ents. Sentiment abroad regarding the massacre of the Ministers has
rgone little change.
Germany has refused to attempt mediation between China and the Powers
- further assurances of China's good faith are forthcoming.
Dispatches from Tien-Tsin told of the fight and capture of the city. The
it conduct of the I'nited States troops was praised. The total losses of the
allied forces were about eight hundred men.
The Chinese Government's appeal and President McKinley's reply were
made public. Washington officials believe there is slight chance of successful
mediation on account of the hostile sentiment of European Powers toward China.
MORE RUMORS OF SAFETY.
SURING MESSAGES AT ST. PETERS-
BURG AND ROME.
[CoSVtiSjM; 1900: By The Xew-York Tribune.]
[BY CABLE TO THE TOOTHS.]
Lrndon. July 25. 6 a. m.— Further rumors
Indicating the safety of the Europeans at Pe
king have been received this morning. "The
Standard's" correspondent at Che-Foo for
wards a message from Peking, dated July 10,
w'rich s-tates that the British Legation on that
day was in urgent need of relief. The Chi
r.psr- troops in the town were attacking the
Legation, but those in the forts had so far
ab=tained from Joining in the assault. There
v.as much sickness among the garrison.
"The Telegraph's" Rome correspondent states
that the Italian Foreign Office has received a
highly satisfactory dispatch from the Italian
nsiil at Shanghai, transmitting a direct mes
sage from the Italian Minister at Peking, con
firming the reported safety of the Legation.
"The Times'?" correspondent at St. Peters
burg states that the Chinese Legation there
learns that on July IS the Tsung-11-Yamen
deputed an official to see the foreign Minis
ters and found all veil and uninjured. They
■were supplied with everything they required.
The Chinese Foreign Minister proposed that
until the population became quiet the Minis
ters should remove to Tien-Tsin. The Chinese
Legation at St. Petersburg declares that this
message is authentic.
"The Times's" Shanghai correspondent has
had an interview with Li Hung Chang, who
expressed the fullest confidence in the safety
of the" Ministers and other foreigners in Pe
king. Hi.« information came from a messenger
who had seen the British Minister on some
date subsequent to July 13. I. N. F.
VIEWS DIVIDED IN BRITAIN.
818 CLAUDE'S MESSAGE STRENGTHENS
OPTIMISTS AND PESSIMISTS.
- . By The Kew-Tocfe Trthur*.]
[BT CAnLE TO THE TRIBUNE.]
London. July 25, 1 a. m— The Foreign Office
lay morning a belated message
fr^rn the British Minister at Peking and gave it
It was a letter to the
a* Tien-Tsin asking for relief
•'ing that forty-four had been killed and
wounded.
ppesite inferences were drawn from
I July 4. which was delivered seven
teen days after it was written. A prominent
: m«» that he considered it proof that
■ of the massacre were correct, since
I L loss of over one hundred and
rive killed and wounded two days before
LBstgned f^>r the final attack. The
"h their guards probably numbered
Bye hundred and fifty, and refugees, mlssion
. r. d women may have increased the num
" foreigners und^r fir*- to- .seven hundred or
hundred.
' 1 1 inmentators on the dispatch took a
topeful view. They laid etress upon the
♦ Sir Clay.de M. Macdonald's appeal was
Bdent In tone than Sir Robert Hart's
ring message, which had been sent ten
■-. and that the losses during that
. I not been so serious as might have
-d from the earlier summons. They
ted attention to the fact that Sir
.-tated that provisions would last for a
*. which would have carried the garri
the alleged date r.f Mr. Conger's message.
iaude Macdonald's message was not in
.-;r,d this was an Indirect proof that Mr.
would not have employed cipher If he
-• nding a dispatch about the same
pj^ntly that the use of cipher
•;.< ie evidence that the message from
Mr. Hay's dispatch.
- reasoned last night that as the lega
• : t out from June 20 to July 4 they
continued the defence for another
I days, until July IK especially as they
'■ Opinion ran heavily, however, in the
D. I have strong reasons for
ior.-ign Office rejects outright
■ that Mr. Conger's message was in
■• H&y'P dispatch. Veterans of
- me that they are
ithoot hope that any of the foreigners
. ■ . and ihat they are amazed by the
' ■■ Of the Americans in being duped by
ndadty.
Ajart from Sir Claude M. Macdonald'a mes
6*ge there was little news except a series of
from the French Consul at Tien-Tsin
information without a date from
F *^ng. As the casualties of the legations were
r< -port*-d to be thirty-three, this was apparently
■S tarller bulletin than Sir Claude's.
There are no details her*» of the Russian oper
ations at New-Chwang.
A Berlin dispatch gives the contents of a re
markable message from the Emperor of China
*' the German Emperor imploring him to save
the empire from the Indignation of Europe.
Th's has a most ominous sound, and does not
p*ar out the optimists' views respecting the
•aft! of the legation*. I. N. F.
THROUGH CINCINNATI TO THE SOUTH
* fine route Is via New York Central, Lake Shore
ar.d Big Four; splendid trains; quick time; Juxuri
31-8 n<je. See N»w York Contra! time tt-blc. Trains
•""*• «U. 1:1* ton +&& iJio p. iL-Advt
NO HOPE LEFT IN EXGLAXD
MACDONALD'S MESSAGE ADDS TO GLOOM
—ALLIES HAMPERED.
(By The Associated Preßß.)
London, July 25.— Sir Claude M. Macdonald's
message, dated July 4, appealing for relief, is re*
garded in London as only a prelude to the abso
lute confirmation of the massacre. This is the
opinion also of the Japanese Minister here. The
newspapers suggest that the British Minister's
dispatch was held back and released about the
same time as Mr. Conger's undated message.
Although the American and British forces are
■working harmoniously, the question of means
of communication between Taku and Peking
show jealousies between the Powers, and other
dispatches from Tien-Tsin say that the lan
guage difficulty has been hampering the military
operations.
A dispatch to "The Daily News" from Tlen-
Tsin, dated July 14. and describing the fighting,
says:
Colonel Liscum mistook the road and was
nearly isolated. General Dorward, on a pre
mature report from the Japanese commander
that the city had been entered, ordered a general
advance, which proved a costly error.
Much valuable time was lost and trouble oc
casioned yesterday afternoon because the mes
sengers between General Fukishima and General
Dorward did not understand each other's lan
guage.
The Tien-Tsin correspondent of "The Dally
Mail" says that when the Chinese regulars saw
the Boxers, who led the attack, being killed,
they began to retire. He asserts that th» Ad
mirals have decided that it would be useless to
move toward Peking without at least flO.OfiO
men.
In an editorial referring to this statement,
"The Daily AfaU" comments upon the American
proposal to advance with 7.000 men. It says:
We have learned in Africa how dangerous it
is to despise our enemies, and in the interest of
civilization -we do not wish to see such a lesson
read to the United States by the "Heathen
Chinee."
MASS OF SILVER CAPTURED.
A batch of Tien-Tsin dispatches are published
to-day. All praise the gallantry of the Ameri
cans and Japanese. "The Standard's" corre
spondent says that the Americans at first made
a mistake in underestimating the fighting ra
pacity of the Chinese, whose fire was really ter
rific. He expresses some doubt about the ability
of the allies to hold the positions captured un
less they are r^inforepd. It appears that large
hauls of silver were made by the allies, the
metal being carried away !n buckets, and th»
Chinese calmly assisting.
Requests for mediation addressed to foreign
Powers are interpreted here to be a preparation
for the acceptance of foreign aid to repress the
rebellion, and Li Hung Chang's statement that
he could restore order with twenty thousand
white troops is looked upon as a subtle argu
ment in favor of appointing: him to the com
mand of the allied forces, to the exclusion of a
Japanese.
LI'S VIEWS ON THE STRUGGLE.
The Shanghai correspondent of "The Times,"
telegraphing on Monday, says:
In an interview to-day Li Hung Chang re
iterated his statement that if the Manchu party
had been guilty of the horrible treachery in
volved in a massacre of the members of the lega
tions, he would absolutely refuse to attempt to
negotiate. He said the present intention of tlv?
Tsung-li-Yamen was to memorialize the Em
press Dov/ager to revictual the legations and
then to arrange to send them to Tien-Tsin under
the escort of General Sun Wad Lin. He declared
that the fighting had ceased, and that the for
eign troops were holding' a position south of the
Yu-Ho bridge, while General Tung Fuh Slang's
forces were on the north.
Earl Li expressed the intention to wait for
news of the movement of the foreign legations
before proceeding northward. On receiving this
he will be escorted by ten thousand troops, who
are now mustering in this province.
Regarding the negotiations he said he be
lieved China's finances would debar her from
paying indemnity, and that the people would
never submit to further annexations of territory.
He thinks the Powers ought to accept assur
ances of a reformed administration and of the
removal of the officials responsible for the crisis.
BLACK FLAGS HELD BACK.
The Hong-Kong correspondent of "The Times"
says that before leaving LI Hung Chang: count
ermanded his order for the Black Flags to
march on Peking, and that they are now en
camped outside of Canton.
The Shanghai correspondent of "The Dally
Mall" records the gallant action of a Japanese
soldier In the attack on the gates of the city of
Tien-Tsin. A dynamite train failed to explode.
Seeing this, the soldier ran forward with a
torch, causing an immediate explosion, by which
the brave fellow was blown to atom«.
"The Standard's" correspondent at Tien-Tsin
sends a "urious statement to the effect that tho
Russians aU&g<" that their forces occupied Peking
two days agf> «nd that all the foreigners were
cafe.
"The Daily Telegraph" has advices from Tokio,
dated July 23, saying that the rail-way battalion
organized in 1895 has started for China, to
gether with a force of coolies and artillery.
The Hong-Kong correspondent of "The Daily
Conttnned on second page.
NEW YORK. WEDNESDAY. JULY 25. 1900. -FOURTEEN PAGES.-* T h. c^V£s^
Tin: TRANSPORT CROOK. WITH THE STFT REGIMENT FROM CUBA, NOW o.> THEIR \\.\f TO CHINA
THE FTGHT AT TIENTSIN.
GALLANT WORK OF AMERICANS TOTAL
LOSSES BIGHT HUNDRED.
Tien-Tsin. July 14, via Che-Foo. July 16, and
Shanghai, July IM. - The ftth Regiment, Tnited
States Infantry, entered the fight at Tien-Tsin
with 4rtO men. An Incomplete list of casualties
shows eighteen killed, seventy-five wounded and
two missing. The marines had four killed and
eighteen wounded.
Major James Regan. Oth Infantry, was
wounded in the leg; Captain Edwin V. Book
miller, :ith Infantry, in the Ie? and groin; First
Lieutenant Smedley P. Butler. United States
Marine Corps, in the leg; Captain William B.
Lemly, United States Marine Corps, in the arm,
and Second Lieutenant Frank R Lang. !Hh In
fantry, in the foot.
First Lieutenant Henry 1.-'-narrt. of the Ma
rine Corps, carried Lieutenant Butler from the
field under a fierce fire. He was shot in the
upper left arm while returning:, but ran and
swam a mil<» under fire, getting to the rear.
The surgeons hope to save Lieutenant Leonard's
arm.
Captain Charles R Noyes, who had been
slightly wounded in the arm and leg, swam a
mile to deliver a request for reinforcements.
First Lieutenant Louis B, Lawton, of the 'Mh
Tnfantry, made a dash for reinforcements under
lire, and received three slight wounds.
Colonel -Liscum was sh"t '.n the abdomen, and
died half an hou»- later. His lnst words were
"Keep up firing."
HARDSHIPS OF THE NINTH
The ftth was ordered to support the Japanese,
who were receiving an i ntilading fire. A'ter
crossing a mud wall half a mile from the city
wall the Oth shifted, advancing against the
flanking fire, and reached a marsh beside the
river at the southwest corner of the city. A
body of Chinese in a burned village under the
wall just across the river, where they were
strongly barricaded, poured In a fire, and when
ever an American raised a hand he was shot. A
Xordenfeidt gun and two small cannon were also
trained upon them.
The men lay in the mud all day. without a
surgeon to attend to their wounded, without
food, and drinking the canal water. They had
exhausted their ammunition, except a fen
rounds which they retained In order to repel
a charge if it should bfl made. None expected
to escape. A. few reaching the rear, reported
that half of the command had been killed .-r
wounded, including heat prostrations In the
estimate.
After th» Americans had retired under cover
of the darkness, they struggled back to
Tien-Tsin in squads all night, pitifully ex
hausted and carrying their wounded. The
Americans' hospital was crowded and short of
surgeons, there having h^en no expectation of
such losses.
RECOVERING THE BODIES
To-day squads searched the fields, collecting
the dead and wounded. Colonel Liscum's body
was escorted to a boat this evening by two bat
talions of English troops, with a general and a
colonel at th^ir head. Lleutenant-Co!.->nel Coo
lidge, who is now commanding the regiment,
and Major Lee, wore among the pallbearers.
Th^ chaplain of the Marine Corps read the ser
vice at the canal lock. The bc.dy will be shipp' d
to San Francisco.
The total losses of the allies are about eight
hundred. The British lost fifty. The Japanese
estimate their killed at fifty and wounded :lt
250. The Russians estimate their casualties
at 150.
All day long the work of bringing in the dead
and wounded was continued.
The Japanese were the heroes of the battle.
Their righting was remarkably brave and was
praised by all their colleagues. When some of
the foreign officers counselled retreat last night
the Japanese General said: "When my men move
it will be forward." This morning they charged
the breaches In the wall made by the artillery,
and fought hand to hand in the streets. Their
conduct after the fight was equally good, as
they refrained from looting, while some of the
European soldiers were having an orgy.
Dead Chinamen cover the walls and streets
of Tien-Tsin.
Fifty guns were captured. The place was
full of munitions of war. Many fires have been
started.
The Chinese are retreating toward Peking.
JAPANESE TAKE THE ARSENAL
July 18.— After fighting all day a force of
2.000 Japanese, supported by British and Rus
sians, captured the Chinese fortified arsenal two
miles east of the city, making a night attack.
The foreigners charged under a heavy fire from
the arsenal, following the Chinamen and killing
400 of them. The foreign loss was heavy.
The Chinese bombarded the foreign city of
Tlen-Tsin heavily for three days, and killed
some British sailors on a tug to-day, besides
several Frenchmen.
The foreigners are mounting heavy guns from
the fleet, among them being four 12-pounders
and four 4-inch guns, and will attempt to locate
and silence the Chinese guns.
An explosion of dynamite killed twenty Rus
sians.
Two battalions of the Oth United States In
fantry and. 300 marines from the cruiser Brook
lyn disembarked and started for Tien-Tsin to
day on lighters. As they went up the river the
foreign ships cheered them heartily.
Refugees of all nationalities will be taken to
Japan by the transport Logan.
HORRIBLE SCENES AFTER THE BATTLE.
July 15 — Chinese from the walled city, report
that the foreigners in Peking are living, having
taken shelter In a bombproof. About eeven
thousand Chinese were engaged in the battle
here on July 13. Many more are coming from
Peking.
General Nieh waa Imprisoned because he op
posed making war on the foreigners, but after
ward was released on the condition that he fight
them. To this ha acceded with lukewarmness.
After the battle he committed suicide.
A large part of the walled city was burned
last night, and to-day the Chinese held a perfect
orgy, plundering, smashing- houses and fighting
like demons over stores of silks, furs and Jew
elry. Hundreds of dead Chinamen along the
walls, or women and children killed by shrap
nel, are lying among the smoking ruins.
It Is reported that some correspond have
in their dispatchea asserted that General Dor
ward thinks Colonel Llscum blundered In taking
the 9th Regiment to the right Instead of to the
left, and that the feeling Is strained between
the Americans and British. The fact is, the
greatest harmony and co-operation exist. Gen
eral Dorward has asked the name* of Americans
to report them for gallantry. Ail the wounded
n1» <tt*i%\m |^£l|» i
CHINA'S REPLY AWAITED
CONDITIONS OF MEDIATION
MADE KNOWN.
FEELING IN EUBOPE I.TKKI.Y TO PRE
VENT BUCCEB& LEADING POSITION
OF THE UNITED STATES.
[BT TBLK6BAPB To TTIK THIHINE.I
Washington. July 24. The President's rp-
Sponse and the Chinese Emperor's appeal to him
to take the lead in a concert of the Powers to
restore order and peace were published at the
State department this morning in the following
statement, which was simultaneously delivered
to all the Governments concerned hy the dip
lomatic representatives of the I'nited States:
Translation of a cal>lf» dispatch received by
Minister Wu on July L'n. I!mhi from th* Taotai
01 Shanghai, dated July lft, 1900:
Have received a teh-aram from Governor
Yuan (of Shan-Tuns;), dated 23d day of this
moon (July 19), who, having received from the
Privy Council , at Peking) a dispatch embody
ing an Imperial letter to the President of the
United States, has instructed m» to transmit it
to Tour Excellency. The Imperial message Is
!• spi ctfully transmitted as follows:
The Emperor of China to His Excellency the
Presideni <,f the Knited States.
Grei ting: China has long maintained friendly
relations with the United States, and is deeply
conscious that the object of the United States
is Internationa] commerce. Neither country en
tertains the least Buspicion or distrust toward
the other. Recent outbreaks of mutual an
tipathy between the people and Christian mis
sions caused the foreign Powers to view with
suspicion the position of the imperial Govern
ment as favorable to the people and prejudicial
to the missions, with the result that the Taku
forts were attacked and captured. Conse
quently, there has been clashing of the forces
with calamitous consequences. The situation
has become more and more serious and critical.
We have Just received a telegraphic memorial
from our Envoy. Wu Ting Fang, and it is
highly gratifying to us to learn that the Tnited
Government, having in view the friendly
relations between the two countries, has taken
p interest in the present situation.
Now China, driven by the irresistible course
of events, has unfortunately incurred wellnigh
universal indignation. For settling the present
difficulty China places special reliance In the
United States. We address this message to
Your Excellency in all sincerity and cand : dness,
with the hope that Your Excellency will/devise
res and take the initiative in brlngine
about a concert of the Powers for the restora
tion of order and peace. The favor of a kind
reply is earnestly requested and awaited with
the greatest anxiety. KWANG SU.
Twenty-sixth year, fith moon, 23d tJuly 19.
1900).
It is therefore my duty to transmit the above
with the request that Your Excellency, in re
spectful obedience of Imperial wishes, will de
liver the same to its high destination and favor
me with a reply. TTJ LJEN YUEN,
Taotai at Shanghai.
Kwang-Su, 20th year, fith moon, 23d day (July
If>. 1900).
PRESIDENT STATES CONDITIONS.
This dispatch was at once communicated to
the president at Oan;on, and the following is
his reply:
The President of the I'nited States to the
Emperor of China.
Greeting;: l have received Tour Majesty's mes
sage of the I!>rh of July, and am glad to know
that Your Majesty recognizes the fact that the
Government and people of the United States
desire of China nothing but what is just and
equitable. The purpose for which we landed
troops In China was the rescue of our Legation
from grave danger and the protection of the
lives and property of Americans who were so
journing in China in the enjoyment of rights
guaranteed them by treaty and by international
law. The same purposes are publicly declared
by all the Powers which have landed military
forces in Your Majesty's Empire.
I am to infer from Your Majesty's 1-tter that
the malefactors who have disturbed the peace
Of China, who have murdered the Minister of
Germany and a member of the Japanese Lega
tion, and who now hold besieged in Peking those
foreign diplomatists who still survive, have not
only not received any favor or encouragement
from Your Majesty, but are actually fn rebellion
against the Imperial authorities. If this be the
«;ise I most solemnly urge upon Your Majesty's
Government to give public assurance whether
the foreign Ministers are alive, and. if so. in
what condition.
Second — To put the diplomatic representatives
of the Powers in immediate and free communica
tion with their re-spective Governments and to
remove all danger to their lives and liberty
Third -To place the Imperial authorities of
China in communication with the relief expedi
tion, so that co-operation may be secured be
tween them for the liberation of the Legations,
the protection of foreigners and the restoration
of order.
If these objects are accomplished, It is the be
lief of this Government that no obstacles will be
found to exist on the part of the Powers to an
amicable settlement of all th* questions arising
out of the recent troubles, and the friendly good
offices of this Government will, with the assent
of the other Powers, be cheerfully placed at
Your Majesty's disposition for that purpose.
WILLIAM MTKINLET.
July 23. 1900.
By the President:
JOHN HAY. Secretary of State.
THE UNITED STATES IN THE LEAD
The Imperial request. If its authenticity is ad
mitted, serves to emphasize again the leading
rart in the solution of the entire Chinese prob
lem the United States has been destined to take
ever since the open door negotiations w?re Ini
tiated, and particularly the acknowledged lead
ership in a possible peaceful settlement of the
present acute crisis since the declaration of
Intentions mid? by this Government just threo
weeks ago.
The Emperor, in crediting Wu Ting Fatyf'a
memorial with suggesting a resort to the good
offices of the I'nited States, unmistakably con
firms the great effect produced, even in Peking,
sfter the Taku forts had fallen and Tien-Tsln
was under fire, by the receipt from the Chinese
Minister at Washington of Secretary Hay's cir
cular of July 3 to the Powers, defining the Amer
ican attitude.
The State Department is again in a waiting
attitude regarding China. It has frankiy.
promptly and fully answered the Chinese Em
peror's appeal for mediation, and the corre
spondence made public to-day shows that the
next move is for the Chinese Government It is
expnted to accept or reject the President's
Continued ol * second page.
POLAND WATER! POLAND WATER!
Celebrated for us great medicinal properties.—
CLARK SAYS HE'LL WIN.
DECLAREB HE IS "THE DULI APPOINT
ED SENATOR FROM MONTANA."
HIS TART REFERENCES TO .MARCUS DALY
WILL SAY NOTHING ABOUT CAM
PAIGN- CONTRIBUTIONS.
William A. Clark, of Montana, broke a long
silence last night at the Waldorf-Astoria by as
serting that his credentials as United States
Senator from Montana were perfectly good; that
had it not been for the treachery of Marcus
Daly there would not have been a Republican
Senator from Montana since 1888; that he an
his friends had control of the machinery of the
Democratic party of Montana, and that Bryan
would without doubt get the electoral vote of
the State in the coming election.
Mr. Clark was with a friend at a table in the
cafe of the Astoria when he waa seen by a
Tribune reporter. Ha is to sail on the Lucania
on Saturday for a five or six weeks' trip in
Europe, where several members of his family
now are. Mr. Clark has been saying little or
nothing since the adjournment of Congress. He
seemed to be in a comfortable and communi
cative frame of mind last night, however, and he
said a number of things which will he likely to
arouse the righting blood of the friends of
Marcus Daly, his long time rival in business and
politics.
■\ "It is reported. Senator," said the reporter,
"that you have sent the Democrats of this State
a check for $100,000. Is the story true?"
"I haven't anything to say about campaign
contributions," answered Mr. Clark.
What is your status as a Representative at the
present time?" he was next asked.
"I am the duly appointed Senator from the
State of Montana. The best constitutional
lawyers in the United States and elsewhere
have pronounced my credentials to be legal and
binding. They will be considered at the next
session of the Senate, and I expect to take my
1 seat."
"it is reported that the Daly people in Mon
tana will throw their support to the Republicans
sooner than see you retain control of the Mon
tana Legislature," it was suggested.
"Yes," said the Montana man icily. "I heard
something about that at the Kansas City Con
vention. Before the Contest Committee Martin
Maglnnfs, leader of*The-Daljr'a>fega*ri6'h;"saia,"
when he found that he was likely to be disap
pointed, that it would cost the Democratic party
two United States Senators. Mr. Maloney, of
Colorado— a splendid man, by the way— told Ma
ginnis that if he had had any doubt before about
the Democracy of the Daly people it was all dis
pelled at his declaration, and the quicker he
went over to the Republicans, where he be
longed, the better it would be for all concerned.
That's about what I think of it. too. But for
the treachery of Marcus Daly there would not
have been a Republican United States Senator
from Montana since the year 1888. We have
control of the Democratic election machinery in
the State, and the National Convention recog
nized us as the regular Democratic party of the
State. The Electoral vote of the State will be
cast for Bryan this fall. The only following of
consequence that Daly has in the State is to be
found In the counties of Silver Bow and Deer
Lodge, where his friends elect about twenty of
the members of the Legislature, the other "sev
enty odd being our people."
"What about the results of the eight-hour
system started by F. A. Heinze and yourself?
It is understood that it was designed to cripple
the Daly people?"
"Well, they have not acceded to the demands
of the unions for an eight-hour day yet." said
Mr. Clark. "We put the eight-hour day into ef
fect on the twenty-second anniversary of the
organization of the labor union of the State.
It is a mistake to assume that I am not a large
employer of labor in Montana. I have between
3,500 and 4.000 men in my employ there. I sup
pose the Daly people have 10.000 or 11.000. The
eight-hour day affects the underground workers.
The eight-hour schedule is also in force at the
United Verde mine in Arizona, The men there
appreciate it. They serenaded me when the
order was given changing the hours."
"By the way. Senator," said the reporter,
"where is your neighbor, Marcus Daly, these
days?"
"Well— er—er— you see, we don't exchange let
ters very much these days, and I can't say as I
know just where he is," answered Mr. Clark,
with a perfectly straight face.
Mr. Clark added that he had not seen any of
the National Democratic leaders lately, with the
exception of Senator Jones, whom he met in Chi
cago. He expects to be back in Montana in time
for the fall campaign.
SHERIFFS PROTECT PRISOXERS.
SOUTH CAROLINA MOBS SEEK TO LYNCH
TWO NEGROES. BUT THEIR FURY
WAS ELUDED.
Columbia. S. C. July 24 (Special).— After dodging
mobs for three days, who pursued them alternately
across country and In chartered trains, the Sheriffs
of Marion and Florence counties reached Columbia
after an all night's ride in a special train with
"Jim" Clink and John Livingston, negroes charge.!
with assaulting a white girl. The men had re
sisted arrest, and Livingston Is probably fatally
wounded. He had a thigh broken, and had cut
his own throat seriously when lunging at an officer.
The wounded man received medical attention on th*
train, and was made as comfortable as possible on
a Utter.
The Sheriffs were accompanied by forty armed
men, ordered by the Governor to protect the pris
oners, but the fury of the people In th-» counties
was such that they dreaded a conflict. They were
chased from point to point, and the mobs being In
possession of the stations between them and
Columbia the officers were anally forced to take
their prisoners and military company to North
Carolina, reaching this city by making a wide cir
cuit In their chartered train. The people of Flor
ence in mass meeting to-day demanded that the
Governor return the prisoners. This he refused Ie
do. saying the penitentiary would hold them safely
until their trial. Governor Ti.lman complied with
such a demand, and the man was speedily lynched.
DECLINED BY GEORGE U. CURTIS. .
Washington, July 24.— Ex-Representative George
M. Curtis, of lowa, has declined th.- office of First
Assistant Postmaster-General. Postmaster-Gen
eral Smith said after the close of office hours to
day that the place had been offered to no one else.
POLAND WATER DEPOT. 3 PARK PL. N. Y.
Carloads received dally, orders promptly Oiled.
— Adv*
PRICE THREE CENTS.
THE CROPS NEED RAIN.
CONTINI'ED DROUTB IN NEW
YORK AND NK\V-ENGI.\XD.
THE HAY CROP SERIOUSLY AFFECTED
AND THE YIELD OF HOPS LIGHT
FOOD FOR CATTLE WILL
BE SHORT.
Th*» drouth whi.-h has prevailed general!*
In the New-England States and in New- York.
New Jersey and Delaware since March, has had
■ serious effect on many of the crops, the recent
local showers asTordlßg little relief to the
farmers.
In New York Stale the hop crop si seriously
affeit.il. and the yield will be less than it has
been for many years: th* farmers also report a
groat shortage in lac hay no* and scarcity of
food for cattle through the coming winter is
anticipated.
In .Middle and Southern New-England the con
tinued lark of rain is threatening the later
crops, and in Massachusetts the early corn crop
Is a failure*.
NEW-YORK STATE DRY.
HAY AND TOBACCO CROPS AFFECTED
SCARCITY OF FOOD FOR CATTLE.
Elmira. N. V., July M (Special).— The fanner* hi
this section are much discouraged over the crop
conditions. They say that hay an<» tobacco hare
been affected to a great extent by the drouth
which lasted from March to July. While last year
an acre yielded two tons of hay. this year an acre
Will yield only a quarter of a ton. There will be a
light crop of tobacco. Oats are not growing more
than one foot high this year. The normal height
is about three feet.
The drouth has made conditions in the farming
districts worse than they have been in a dozen
years, according to prominent farmers. They are
becoming alarmed at the prospect of a stock food,
famine that is staring them in the face, and are
selling off their stock rapidly. Every week car
load after carload of cattle ■ sent •„ New-York
and other points. Most of the farmers have gath
ered in all their hay crop. When this work 13
finished some of the farmers are planning- to Bell
off most of their stock. A good milk producing
cow can be bought at the present time, It Is said.
tor ■ ridiculously low price.
The farmers believe that they will have to send
outside of this section to procure food for their
stock this winter.
EARLY GRAIN HEADED UP WELL.
Albany July 24 (Special).— While the rainfall In
this locality shows a deficiency, crops are not Buf
fering to any great extent. Early train headed up
well and ripened nicely; berries of all "kinds and
frjlts from this vicinity .ire of nearly If not quite
the usual excellence. It Is several years Bine© Al
bany and adjacent county farmers have suffered
any serious effects from drouth. Sine* March
there has been a deficiency in the rainfall of one
and three-quarter Inches, while the temperature is
many degrees In excess of the normal. Heavy thun
storms have tangled the straw considerably
and In some localities potatoes fared badly. The
hay crop Is harvested, and is of the usual yield.
Corn is making excellent growth.'
JHOr. CROP FAR BELOW THE AVERAGE.
UUca. N. T.. July 24 (Special).— conditions
throughout Central New-York are above the stand
ard, although the Indications are that the hop crop
will fall far be!ow the average. The present condi
tion of all growing crops is encouraging. The month
thus far has been remarkable for showers, without
being accompanied by destructive winds. There
was comparatively little rainfall in May and Jure,
but the earth at no time suffered from drouth.
Seeds were placed in the ground without much ob
struction in the spring, and now crops are In some
places above the average.
The hop crop, it Is thought, will be the smallest
for the last twenty-five years, but the quality will
be exceptionally good. There are Indications for
a good hay crop, and vegetables for canning 1 never
looked better than now in this section, which lias
thus far escaped severe drouth.
HIGH PRICES FOR HAT.
< r.rtiand. N. Y. Juiy 21 (Special*.— Frequent show
ers during the last three weeks have done much to
relieve the conditions of drouth prevailing through
out Co rt land County. Rain is still much needed.
however, as relief afforded by showers has been only
temporary. The amount of rainfall In this section
since April 1 Is the smallest on record, the total
for April amounting to 1.43 Inches; May. 1.03; June,
2.20. while July to date Is four Inches. ,
Hay and oats have suffered most from the pro
tracted dry weather. Haying is nearly finished,
and is less than half a crop. The price for hay Is
correspondingly high, good quality selling readily
for $16 right from the field. The oat crop will be
only fair: the straw is short, but as a general rule
is filling well. Recent warm weather and rains
have given corn a good start, and the crop prom
ises to be unusually large. Farmers are depend
ing upon the corn to help our on the short hay
crop. The acreage is larger than usual. Plenty
of rain from this time on will help potatoes, ■which,
as a rule, are looking well.
Owing to the dry weather farmers were delayed
in getting in their cabbage crop, which has coma
la he an important product in this section. Much
of the seed sown failed to grow, and there has
been a gr=>at demand for plants for setting. It Is
too early yet to state definitely in reference to cab
bage, but the outlook is favorable. More than the
usual amount has beer planted. Pastures have
been freshened and revived by recent rains and
fruit prospects are above the average.
\E\Y EMU A YD.
THE DROUTH SERIOUS AND SHORT
CROPS GENERALLY REPORTED.
Boston. July 24 (Special).— The continued drouth
In middle and southern New-England has this
week begun to threaten the later crops. in Massa
chusetts the early corn Is a failure, and the pota
toes, though well grown. «re bedded in dust, and
cannot do any more without rain soon. Only Main*
ami the northern counties in NVw-H.imfshlr- an 1
Vermont report sufficient rains during the last
week. In the South there has been steady and
general complaint of the drouth. In some places
the Injury to crops Is alre-idy Irreparable. Several
places have hail temperatures of Ml degre'-s or
over.
The condition of the crops is serious. There has
been no rain beyond local showers anywhere in the
.iiatrict for two weeks. Th* yhow«»rs were suffi
cient for the needs of the crops only in Maine.
Where the showers have occurred vegetables and
fruit have ma rapid growth, but by far the
greater part of the crops is "suffering. Berries and
other fruits, except applies, which have been drop
pins considerably, are doing well.
The Northern districts have not been able to do
much toward harvesting hay. because of rain,
anomalous as It seems. The crop in general 19
estimated to be below the average yield, and unless
rain come* noon and plenteously there will be
no second crop. In many sections of Middle New-
England the pasturage is short, and farmers art
already feeding their stock In their barr.s.
Corn Is rood, especially In Maine, and Is begin
ning to tassel.
The tobacco- crop is rapidly reaching? maturity,
and topping has already begun In early planted
fields. The plants are short, with thick leaf, in
Western Massachusetts, although already blos
soming.
Generally speaking, white the drouth Is serious.
It Joes not as yet threaten a famine for this year.
POLAND* POLAND! POLAND? POLAND!
la the purest natural spring water la ife* ■<■>*
— JA\L

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