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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 05, 1901, Image 1

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X ou LX-..N°- 10.774.
LATEST LONDON COMMENT
£4RL ROBERTS SETTLES DOWN AT
ARMY HEADQUARTERS
PROBLEMS THAT CONFRONT THE XTTCV
COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF — ROYAL
ACADEMY EXHIBITION.
fCnpTTitfaf. 1001: By The New-York Trlbiae.)
[BT CABLE TO TBS TBlßtm.]
j/jadon. Jan. 5. 6 a. m.— Earl Roberts settled
down to work yesterday In the "War Office with
a businesslike air. His Influence is so great
Hiat any measures which he may recommend for
the defence of Cape Colony and for bringing' the
campaign to an end will be adopted by Mr.
Brodrick. Probably he has not waited for spe
cial reports before advising the Secretary for
War respecting the conduct of the campaign.
His presence at headquarters is a source of
gtrengtn to the Government. There Is already a
gore buoyant feeling respecting the military
operations. Nobody can understand what Is
going on in the Great Karoo region, where the
binds of marauding: Boers are crossing a bar
tea and desolate district and looting the farms
cf the "poor white trash," or In Bechuanaland.
where a mysterious westward trek Is In prog
ress. The dispatches from Cape Town describ
ing the landing of marines and guns and the
enrolment of a new colonial defensive force are
res.i with amazement, especially when the In
vaders are reported to be without guns and only
a few hundreds in strength. While the situation
Is perplexing, there Is no feeling of anxiety
bete, for Earl Roberts, who knows what Is
wanted, is where he can strengthen Lord
Kitchener's hands and wind up the campaign.
The friends of Sir Henry Colvile are seeking
to stir up strife In military circles. They are
asserting that Lord Lansdowne consulted Lord
Wokwler before exonerating Colvile and assign
ing him to duty at Gibraltar, and that Lord
Inserts, hearing at Madeira what had been
Isbb, intervened and insisted that Mr. Brodrick
SsMld recall him. They also assume that Sir
Evelyn Wood was not consulted, but that the
Secretary for War acted in a most arbitrary way.
These stories are probably as Irresponsible as
the current gossip that the Colvile affair marks
the final stage of an old feud between Lord
Wolseley and Lord Roberts. General Colvile has
lost the sympathy of military men by his Indis
cretion In bringing on a trial by newspaper and
In reproaching' Lords Roberts and Kitchener for
the failures of staff officers.
The return of Generals Kelly-Kenny and lan
Hamilton has been celebrated already by their
Alder-shot friends. Neither made any mistake
nor was defeated in South Africa.
The only division commanders remaining In
the field, out of a dozen sent out a year ago, are
Generals Rundle, French and Methuen.
Lord Roberts needs the protection of his most
efficient staff officer. Countess Roberta, for ward-
Ing off the hospitality with which he Is menaced.
He has already received Invitations to scores of
dinners, but insists that the entertainments must
be private.
The appointments announced by the Colonial
Office to-day are quite In accordance with public
* anticipation, filr Alfred Milner, as indeed Mr.
Chamberlain had foreshadowed, becomes Qc*
ernor of the Transvaal and the Orange River
Colony, and. of course, retains the post of High
Commissioner for South Africa. Be is suc
ceeded as Governor of the Cape by Sir Walter
F. Hely-Hutchinson, who during- his seven years*
tenure of the Governorship of Natal won the
esteem and affection of all the inhabitants of
"The Garden Colony," as 'Natal' proudly cl»l"ia
to be. The vacancy at Pletermaritzburg Is to
be filled by the transfer of Sir Henry MeOallum,
who has shown much tact and discretion In
Newfoundland. Major Goold-Adams should
make a, successful Lieutenant-Governor of the
Orange River Colony. He Is a great authority
on the native question, which will at once be
come acute when hostilities are terminated In
South Africa,
The winter exhibition of the Royal Academy
will be opened to private view to-day. It la a
brilliant loan collection of English art of the last
century. About eighty public and private gal
leries are represented, Humphrey Roberts, Sir
William Aguew, Henry Burton and H. J. Turner
being among: the largest contributors. Burne-
Jones*s "Flamma Vestalls," Frederick Walker's
"Bathers" and Turner's "Venice" are gem* In
the first room. Sir Francis Grant's portrait of
the Queen with two children and George Mason's
"Return from Ploughing" are transferred to the
fceeond room from the walls of Buckingham Pal
ace, and the third and fourth rooms are en
riched with works like Rossetti's "Vision of
Fiammetta," Turner's "Wreck of the Minotaur"
and "Conway Castle," Landseer's "Stag at Bay"
and Millals's "White Cockade." The water
color room contains one of the most varied col
lections ever exhibited here.
Poultaey Blgelow*s new book. "Colonization
and Its Problems," will be published in March
by McClure. It will embody the results of
travel and study In various lands, and will have
a direct bearing on many American questions.
I. N. P.
BRITISH COLONIAL APPOINTMENTS.
NEW HEADS OF THE CIVIL ADMINISTRA
TION IN SOUTH AFRICA.
London. Jan. 4.— Th* following Colonial Office
appointments were announced this evening:
Sir Alfred M liner to b« Governor of the Trans
vaal and British High Commissioner.
The Hon. Sir Walter Francis Hely-Hutchin
*on (Governor of Natal and Zululand since
18543) to be Governor of Ctpe Colony.
Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Henry C. McCallum
(Governor of Newfoundland since 1898, and aide
de-camp to the Queen since 1900) to be Gov
ernor of Natal.
Major Hamilton John Goob -Adams (Resident
Commissioner of the Becluanaland Protec
torate) to be Lieutenant-Governor of the Or
ange River Colony.
The seven nominees of th« Earl of Mlnto.
Governor-General of Canada, lave been gazet
ted second lieutenants In line battalions.
Y.\V.\. ROBERTS THANKS 111 i: PUBLIC.
London. Jan. 4.— Lord Roberta, a communi
cation to the public expressing his thanks for
the reception tendered him, eulogizes the sol
diers In South Africa. and appeals for contribu
tions to the Soldiers and Sailors Association,
seconding the efforts of the Prlnct of Wales to
take care of the families of the tno.n who are
fighting. £, -v, ¦, : i .
i',\r,o\ r\ a nnnw\ \<><,
TRAPTIC INTBttRUPTED 4KI> THOr<U»n* ronrr.o
TO STOP WORK
London, Jan. 4/— A. ohokirg; brown foe fnvelop^d
London for t-.-v.-ral hours This mornlrg, causing
• Kr.-i>. Jnconv*riJpn<~''. Ther« w.-r<- man» collisions
Jt> the stress and t-f;veral casualties, Tlnuaanda of
outdoor workf-rs wr* compelled ¦to stipend i their
l*bor«, : the -, railroad* experienced delaj j; in train
... **4v*J* and river truffle w*ia completely ¦ lopped.
Nmtyotk Xrilmtu*
BOFRS HKTTRING NORTH.
TWO HUNDRED RATPF.RR RECROSS THE
ORANGE RIVER FROM CAPE COLONY.
Cape Town, Jan. 4.— Two hundred Boers have
recrossed the Orange River, going north.
The Russian Commandants Petrowsk and Dv
Plooy were killed in the fighting at Utrecht on
December 25.
A quantity of ammunition has been captured
from sympathizers with the Invaders in the
neighborhood of Paarl.
London, Jan. 5. — Earl Roberts of Kandahar
and Pretoria Is already immersed in his arduous
new duties at the War Office. He will take no
holiday.
There is no further news from Lord Kitchener,
who, according to a Cape Town dispatch, is
calling for five thousand men to guard the Rand
m<nes Enlisting in Cape Colony continues ac
tive, and five hundred men will leave Cape Town
for the north within the next few days.
Information regarding the invasion is scanty.
Colonel Williams attacked the eastern invaders
on January 1 near Middelburg, but failed to dis
lodge them. He has since been Joined by Lieu
tenant-Colonel Grenfell. and the Boers have
retired. General Brabant has arrived at Graaf
Reinet.
Advices from Maseru. Basutoland, dated yes
terday, cay that three separate columns are still
pursuing General De Wet, but with no success
beyond taking twenty-eight prisoners. Cannon
firing is continually heard.
All the English have deserted Flcksburg, tak
ing their stocks of grain across the border, and
the Boers have looted the town.
According to "The Daily Mall's" correspondent
at The Hague, the directorates of the Nether
lands South African Railway has applied to
the Amsterdam courts for a suspension of pay
ments.
LAURIER AS PEACE COMMISSIONER.
MOVEMENT TO SEND THE CANADIAN PRE
MIER TO SOUTH AFRICA.
London, Jan. 5. — "The Daily Chronicle" ad
vises that favorable attention should be given
to a movement, reported by its Montreal corre
spondent, \o Induce Sir Wilfrid Laurler, the
Dominion, Premier, provided the Colonial Office
consents, to proceed to South Africa as a Com
missioner empowered to Intervene with a view
to the restoration of peace.
LANSDOWNE HAS THE TREATY.
AMENDED CANAL CONVENTION FORMALLY
PRESENTED BY AMBASSADOR CHOATE.
London, Jan. 4. — The United States Ambassa
•¦•} Joseph H. Choate, presented the Hay-
Pauncefote Treaty amendments to the Secretary
of State for Foreign Affairs, the Marquis of
Lansdowne, to-day.
No discussion occurred, and the nature^ of
Lord Lansdowne's answer is not indicated. Mr.
Choate simply gave notice to the Secretary of
State for Foreign Affairs that he had sent him
a document forwarded by the State Department.
An answer, probably, will not be sent until the
Cabinet discusses the matter fully.
The interview between Mr. Choate and Lord
Lansdowne was chiefly devoted to an expression
of the letter's views on China's answer to the
demands of the Powers. It Is understood that
Secretary Hay desired to know what Great
Britain thought of those points which China, in
her answer, said she was unable to fulfil at
present. No difference of opinion appears to
exist between Secretary Hay and Lord Lans
downe. "While further negotiations between the
Powers are necessary. It is believed there are
no very serious difficulties in the way of a set
tlement that will be satisfactory to all nations.
THE NEWS FROM MANILA.
i
INSURGENT CAMPS DESTROYED— WORK OF
THE COMMISSION.
Manila. Jan. 4. — Generals Wheaton and Bates
report many small captures, the destruction of
Insurgent camps and the seizure of supplies,
animals and other necessities. Among the capt
ures in Smith's district was Colonel Techon,
the insurgent Governor of Tarlac.
General Grant Is personally In command of a
mounted expedition In the mountains of South
ern Pampangas, which, he says, is the only lo
cality where the Insurgents are In force In his
district.
Insurgents entered Gapan and San Isidro. in
General Funston's district, during the night,
and burned a score of houses. Their firing was
Ineffective. :
General Mac Arthur has commuted several
death sentences of military courts to imprison
ment.
Judge Tan's written opinion on the San Jose
College case was considered and Indorsed by the
Philippine Commission this afternoon. It will
be made public to-morrow.*
The enactment of the School bill has been de
ferred on account of the desire of the Filipinos
to be heard on the bill, as completed. It differs
radically from the one prepared by Superin
tendent Atkinson and indorsed by General Mac-
Arthur. The latter appropriated $1,650,000 out
right, to be disbursed through Mr. Atkinson
under the supervision of General Mac Arthur.
The completed bill directly appropriates only
$40,000, and reserves to the Commission au
thority over plans for schoolhouses. and also
requires Mr Atkinson to report to both General
Mo Arthur and "Commission.
The Commission has authorized the Depart
ment of Public Instruction to proceed with th
business Intrusted to Its administration.
Many Inquiries have been received here from
the provinces concerning the Federal party. The
organizers are establishing a daily newspaper
and three weeklies, to 1... published in Spanish
and Tagalog, in thf> provinces of Pampanga.
"• I -AST TRAIN FOR ST. LOUIS
Via New-York Central-Big Four, K..ir. ;,.,.-„
Grand Central Station 6:30 p. m.; arrive St." Louis
9:50 n«-xt evening. Closo 'connection for Kansas
City. - No axceM fax*.— AdvL _
NEW- YORK. SATURDAY. JANUARY 5, 1901. -SIXTEEN PAGES.-,, Th fS f ilSu naß .
I^OrTS J. GRANT.
<~ouns»I for Herlihy.
BERNARD J. YORK,
President of Polio* Board.
IT ANNA OX SHIPPING BILL.
CONFIDENT OP PASSAGE AT TUTS SKS
SIOX OF CONGRESS.
THE MEAST'RE MAY BE BROADENED IN ITS
SCOPE, so AS TO DISTRIBUTE THE
ST-BSTDT EQUITABLY.
(by telegraph to the tribise]
Washington. Jan. 4.— lnstead of being discour
aged by the displacement In the Senate of the
Ship Subsidy bill in favor of the Army Reor
ganization bill, the friends of the former meas
ure are more hopeful to-day of its passage at
this session than they have been for a week or
more.
In a brief talk to-night with a correspondent
of the Tribune. Senator Hanna displayed al
most boundless confidence in the success of the
Shipping bill before the expiration of the LVlth
Congress. Senator Hanna did not say so, but
It is understood that the supporters of the
Hanna-Fayne bill arc now willing to make such
liberal concessions to the opponents of this
measure in the way of amendments as to leave
no ground of opposition to those who favor the
principle of Government aid to the merchant
marine. In view of this understanding it is be
lieved that the Bcope of the original measure
will be so broadened as to distribute the bene
fits of the subsidy equitably among the various
shipping interests of the country which have
been antagonistic to the Hanna- Payne bill. No
body has authority to say so. but It Is neverthe
less reported in well informed circles that Sena
tors Allison and McMillan, who have been lead-
Ing the opposition to the bill, will not lend the
aid of their powerful Influence to the enemies of
an enlarged and more secure merchant marine
after the scope of the measure is broadened by
the concessions which Its friends ar- willing to
make.
S'-nator Hanna talked to-night with the ut
most frankness concerning the j>ror--tit t>arlla
mentary status and prospects of the bill as af
fected by the action of the Senate yost*-rda:'.
though he said he was not yet ready to di»<-UPH
the proposed amendments'.
THK SENATES ACTION KXi'LAINKD.
"Tbere is a general misapprehension as to the
causes and purposes of the Senate's action In
giving th» Army bill the right of way over tho
Shipping bill." said the St-nator. "It was the
frif nds of the Shipping bill, and not Its enemies,
who put It behind the Army bill. The latter is
an emergency measure, and by agreement
among the supporters of the Ship Subsidy bill
it was arranged that all obstacles should he re
moved from the path of Army reorganization.
By a majority vote th^ shipping bill ran be re
stored to its position of privilege, from which
it was removed simply to make way for the
Army bill. I have no doubt that we <an K»-t
this vote Just as gonn as the Army bill is out ««f
the way; and if we are able to command a ma
jority votp to put the Shlpiilng bill back In Its
privileged position I see no reason for fear that
this vote will not be held together for the
passage of the bill. Just as soon as Army l«">ds
lation is out of the way we shall bring forward
the Shipping bill, and again make It the unfin
ished business of the Senate. Then we can keep
at it until it is disposed of. So you see, instead
of belns disappointed or angered by the action
of the Senate in displacing the Ship Subsidy bill.
lam entirely satisfied with It. Indeed. I should
have been disappointed if the Senate had not
done exactly what It did on Thursday. I want
to repeat that it is all nonsense to declare that
yesterday's action kills the bill, or even post
pones flnal action on it until the meeting of the
next Congress. The course laid out for the Ship
ping bill by Its friends has thus far been fol
lowed exactly In the Senate."
When asked to discuss In detail the present
provisions of the bill, or to Intimate what amend
ments would probably meet the approval of him
self and other friends of the measure. Senator
Hanna declined on the ground that "this was
not the time to talk. And besides," he added,
"I have Just got back from my Christmas holi
day, and haven't caught up with the procession
yet."
THREE i/EX TORN TO PIECES.
FATAL EXPLOSION IN A POWDER MILT. AT
OIBBSTOWN. N. J.
Woodbury, N. J.. Jan.. 4.— Three men were
torn to pieces at noon to-day by an explosion in
the punching house of the Refauno Chemical
Company, at Gibbstown. on the Delaware River,
below this city. The men killed were:
KIBBY. John. Thoroughfare.
STIL.VAINE. Oliver, Glbbttown.
WHINE, J. W«lt«r, Qtbbstown.
The building was blown to atoms, and the
rhock was plainly felt In Camdon, twelve miles
distant. Several of the workmen In the neigh
boring buildlnga were stunned by the force of
the explosion, but no one was seriously Injured.
Pieces of the flesh of the men who were killed
were picked up a hundrd feet from the wrecked
building. They had been punching powder into
8-inch paper shells, which are used in Misting.
The origin of the explosion Is unknown. The
officers of the company say that they cannot
accurately estimate the loss, but that it will
be more than $5,000.
AU FERUoi II FtEY REIXsT \Th r>.
TO DISPLACE MUBTAPHA BET AS TURKISH M : N'
ISTER-«AT WASHINGTON.
London. Jan. 5. — "All Ferrouh Bey, who was
recently displaced as Turkish Minister in Wash
ington In favor of Mustapha Bey, has been re
instated," says the Constantinople correspond
ent of "The Times," "because of the fear that
he might Join the Young Turkey party. He will
receive £10,000 as commission on the new Otto
man cruiser to be built by the Cramp Ship
building Company."
AMERICAN STEAMERS FOR THE TMAMt*.
London, Jan. s.— "The Daily Express." which
continues to publish instanr.s of BBffttsil an.)
other European contracts for iron works an.i the
like going to the United ¦tfttsa, nnr in -^ t.
day the probability that an aJMctou ifa '¦¦ <'•¦
will provide a summer pteasjur snyiee oa th-
Th. lines.
•This AintTH-an invasion." ii says, "is much
more scrinus than the fio^r invasion of Cape
Colony, lint it servvs the Britishers right for
their discouragement of Inventors and their ne
glect of Uic oioicrtuniUes of vrogiesa."
FIGURES IN THE HERI.IHY TRIAL.
rOLTCH CAPTAIN HKEI.THT
The accused man.
NEW RECORD FOR WALL-ST
AUCREGATE TRANSACTIONS GRKATER
THAN F.VFR RKKORF
BULLS ROUT THE BEARS AND SEND
PRICES PLYING UPWARD ON
ALL SIDES.
Wall Street will long remember yesterday as a
day notable from more than one point of view.
For one thing, a new high record of colossal
proportions was established for volume of trans
actions on the Stock Exchange, for the sales
yesterday. 1.821.268 shares, exceeded those of
November 12. 1900. theretofore the record day.
by 217.649 chares, or 13% per cent.
Even more ¦ remarkable than this enormous
showing of activity In the trading, however, was
the course of prices in the market. The sharp
declines in so many stocks on Thursday had
created a general bnpresstosi that the end had
been reached of the bull movement, which has
been In progress for many weeks, a consumma
tion which the whole speculative community
has of late been nervously watching for and
devoutly praying to be able to recognize when It
shculd occur. It was therefore the common
feeling yesterday that stocks were going lower,
despite the continued ease of money and the
absence of unfavorable developments from any
domestic quarter. But It was the unexpected
that happened, and stocks, after a half hour or
so of initial bearish trend, suddenly began to
rise, and kept on rising until they had not
only recovered the losses suffered on the pre
ceding day. but In several instances, notably St.
Paul, the leader of the list, established new
high records. There Is one pre-eminently power
ful group of market interests able at will to
effect such a phenomenon, the Standard Oil, and
by common consent it was these men who
turned the tide yesterday.
John W. Gates, who has figured of late as a
market factor, is In Chicago, and Chicago houses
on Thursday were among the heaviest sellers
of securities on the New -York Stock Exchange.
The Standard Oil r. it Is said, bought stocks
on the way down In Thursday's market, al
though not giving active support to any issues.
Mr. Gates is not only a master of the steel
business, but is also credited with having in the
last year or two acquired sufficient knowledge
of the Intricacies of stock speculation to war
rant him In making occasional ventures with
his associates on the bear side, a side which
"beginners" In the Street rarely dare to take.
The Chicago houses were relatively small pur
i chasers here yesterday, although It is under
stood that they covered a few short lines put
out on Thursday for their Important customers.
! It is believed in the Street that it rests with the
Standard Oil group whether or not it shall prove
advisable for some of the other short contracts
for the same Western account to be closed out
within the next few days. James R. Keene. It
Is said, made a profitable trip down the line on
Thursday, but was shrewd enough and lucky
enough to catch the up train yesterday. The
"'Western shorts were rumored In various quar
ters to have lost as much as $1.r>00.000.
London was again a heavy seller, though less
so. according to report, than on the previous
day. St. Paul made an advance of more than 1
¦ per cent from the lowest, in spite of what
seemed to be a direct drive against the stock.
The shares of Louisville and Nashville. Union
Pacific. Missouri Pacific and the Atchison issues
all recovered.
In the Industrial list Sugar made a 2 per cent
gain soon after the opening, and recoveries were
the rule In Federal Steel. People's Gas. Amal
gamated Copper and American Steel and Wire.
The change of speculative sentiment had the
effect of a wholesale covering movement by the
short Interest. At the lower prices it was no
ticed, too, that Investment buying played an im
portant part.
St. Paul, as already noted, scored the greatest
gain yesterday, closing at l.'^u. a net advance
of 12% points, as compared with Thursday's net
decline of 2^4 per cent.
Some of the other contrasts were:
N*t advance N«t ton*
Stock. yest»rtlay. Thursday.
Burlington 37»3 7 » 3';
Northwestern 4 2
Roc!: Island 4 24
Bis Four 2S '«
Great Northern preferred « ¦•»
IlltnoU Central l i 8
Missouri Paclne 3*» 1*»
New-York Central.... 2H 2}»
Pennsylvania 4*i 2**
Reading 27»2 7 » 2H
Readmit flrnt ptefrrred *. 2Vi 2
Unlrn Pacific 2 » »'*
Atchtson preferred 2*» 2%
Baltimore and Ohio 2 l « .2**
Central of New-Jereey ¦ »'4 **
Surar 4% *%
Tin Plate ••• 8J? " ]H
People's Gas 2H 8%
Consolidated Oa« .• 2J» • i\
Erie. flint preferred 3> . ¦ 2H
Brie second preferred 2> 3-
Federal Steel.... ••• 2*4 • • 1
i>/i:s \i i\t i/¦ \h's i /¦¦/•/¦: ,v rv.n'RY.
LANDSCAPE PAINTER STRUCK BY TROLLEY
CAR SUCCUMBS TO EPILEPSY AND
HEMORRHAGE.
Warren Collins Briggs. thirty-six years old.
an artist. living; with ; his mother at No. 108
West One-hundred-and-twenty-flrst-st.. was
found dead in bed yesterday afternoon. His
death was caused by a hemorrhage and epilepsy
brought on by a ' trolley accident In Brooklyn
seven years ago !
. Dr. Trautman. the family physician, of No. 332
Lexlngton-ave.. said Mr. Briggs had been a suf
ferer ever since the. trolley _' accident. Th.> fu
neral will take place on Monday morning, and
the burial will bo In Woodlawn.
Mr. Briffgs's father. Thomas Jefferson Brlggs.
was a well known art connoisseur, and was. Ii
is said, th- first wallpaper manufacturer in this
State. Warren Collins Brlggs was a pupil of
James" M Mart, and a landscape an.l cattle
painter. He won a prize in in the National
Academy of Design. ¦ , ' ¦ r>'-.-r',i
'deerfoot farm -sausages. .
• With ¦Increasing' knowledge -of the ¦ danger 'to
health through carelessly prepared food, consumer^
grow more fastidious In their selection.- "Deerfoot"
n.«&&« xmrlur. dataUnau and cleanlineM.-AdvL
THB . REV. ROBERT 1,. TADDOCK.
The complainant against Herlihy.
• .graph by Rockwood.) •
TT- TO. K. OLCCOT.
Gxaai'l Xcr tie pxosecutlca.
A RFCORD YFAR FOR YTXITOR*.
TRANSATLANTIC LINERS BROUGHT THIRTT
THOUSAND MORE CABIN PASSENGERS
THAN IN 18».
The transatlantic passenger traffic between
this port and Eur ue in 1900 showed a marked
increase over that of several previous years. A
table published yesterday by William C. Moore,
the landing agent of the Immigration Bureau,
showed that 137.852 cabin and 403.491 steerage
passengers were landed at this port in 1900 by
twenty regular steamship lines and a few unat
tached steamers. The number of cabin passen
gers landed here in 1S9!» was 107.415 and in 1898
80.586. This increase of 50,000 in two years was
undoubtedly due in part to the prosperity of the
country. The Paris Exposition, the desire of
foreigners to visit this country and growing
commerce are also causes for the increased
travel to the United States.
The figures for nearly every steamship line
show an increase over last year, and the big
liies made large gains. The greatest gains were
made by the Hamburg-American and North
German Lloyd lines, the owners of the big
record breaking passengers steamers Deutsch
land and Kaiser Wilhelm d»T Grosse. These
lines brought 2a.271> cabin and «5,384 steerage
and 23.."{50 cabin and 64.C98 steerage passengers,
respectively. No other single line carried half
the number of steerage passengers brought by
either of these two lines.
The Cunard Iflne brought :S>,000; the American
Line 1t».435 and the White Star Line 14.948
cabin passengers. These four lines transported
nearly one hundred thousand of the 137,852
cabin passengers who came. The number of
steerage passengers landed here in IS9O was
30K.762. In 18D8 !t was -M0.H51 Nearly all of
these were Immigrants.
A PARALYTIC DIES AT A FIRE.
HER BODY FOUND AFTER A BLAZE IN A
BOARDING HOUSE HAD BEEN TUT OUT.
Mrs. Bessie Kenny. wfcx> occupied a room on
the fourth floor of the boarding house kept by
Mrs. Anna Wellman al No. !3H East Flfty
eighth-st.. was found lying dead on the floor cf
her room soon after firemen had extinguished
a lire in the house yesterday afternoon.
The fire broke out on the first floor, occupied
by Dr. William Ferguson, and was discovered
by a servant. Before the firemen could extin
guish the flames a loss of $5,000 had been caused.
Captain Lantry. of the East Fifty-flrst-st. sta
tion, was making a search of the house, when
he found the dead woman. Mrs. Kenny had
been a paralytic for some time. It Is thought
»he was trying to make her way to the hall
way when overcome by the smoke.
Mrs. Kenny was a patient of Dr. Ferguson.
Her body was sent by her husband. Thomas
Kenny, to an undertaker's shop.
The cause of the fire is unknown.
JOSEPH JEFFERSON A ffrV.4IT.4T.
GRANDSON OF THE ACTOR LEAVES SCHOOL
AND SPENDS NIGHT IN POLICE STATION.
The Yonkers police station had as a lodger on
Thursday night Joseph Jefferson, twelve years
old. son of Thomas Jefferson and grandson of
Joseph Jefferson, the actor. Young Joseph was
a runaway and a truant from school. His home
Is In Montclalr. N. J. On Thursday morning he
was delivered to a military school in Dobbs
Ferry, where he was to remain until the close of
the school term, next June.
The contemplation of these long, weary months
was too much for the boy. Joseph obtained per
mission to leave his classroom. Down the lawn
he went, ard soon was lost from sight of the
school behind the high hedge south of the
grounds. He took to the railroad and trudged
along to the south until about 6 o'clock. At
that time he climbed the stairs to Tower House
No. 16. on the New -York Central and Hudson
River Railroad, and knocked. The towerman
opened the door.
'"What time Is it. mister?" asked Joseph.
"About 6 o'clock."
"Why. I thought It was about 12 o'clock," re
plied the boy. The towerman invited him in io
get warm, and Joseph went.
"I thank you. sir," he said. "I'm very cold,
but I must be hurrying on my way home. I live
In Montclair. N. J."
The towerman told him that Montclalr was
about one hundred miles away, and asked a
passerby to inform the Yonkers police that a
runaway was In the tower. Detectives Robinson
and Connolly, of Yonkers, went for Joseph Jef
ferson and too* him to Police Headquarters.
Joseph had left his overcoat at Dobbs Ferry.
He refused to go back to the school. A good
supper and a comfortable bed were provided for
him, and he slept well. Yesterday William J.
Bright, of Yonkers. took the boy to his home In
.11 h'Y L'FVFRSi:i> TffF COT'RT.
ORDERED TO riND A PRISONER GUILTY.
THEY ACQUITTED HIM.
Ilackensack, N. J.. Jan. 4 (Special).— There
were twelve indignant men In. Hackensack to
day. They constituted the panel of Jurors drawn
to try John Scudder. colored, indicted for assault i
and battery on Richard O'Brien, of LodL When
all the evidence was in and Lawyer Archibald
C. Hart faced the jury to sum up Judge Za
brlskle.sald:
It isn't necessary for you to say anything-.
Mr Hart. the prisoner's evidence convicted
him. Gentlemen of the Jury, you will find a
verdict of guilty
The jurors retired, and . after an absence of
fifty minutes returned .1 verdict of acquittal.
The judge was so displeased that he discharged
the twelve jurymen for. the term, whereupon
they left the courtroom and indulged in remarks
somewhat uncomplimentary to the Court. They
declared that there was not even a reasonable
doubt upon which to. convict, and quoted law
yers for the opinion' that the Court has no right
to order a conviction in a criminal prosecution.
"Millions of bad Colds. have been cured with
JAYNE*S EXPECTORANT.^Advt.
PRICK THREE CENTS.
WHY DEVEKV STICKS.
IXELIGIBT F FOR RETIREMENT ON PEN
SION ON HIS OWN \PPI.I«-ATION.
AT THE MERCY OF THE COMM!??I^N p R.*
AND THE MAYOR-HK FRIENDS
AWAIT DEVELOPMENTS
AT ALBANY
Chief of Police Devery is not eligible for **¦
tirement on a pension upon his own application.
That fact will explain why Devery has refused
to listen to the persuasive eloquence of mem
bers of the Tammany Committee of Five ami
others who have suggested his voluntary an;! ¦
graceful retirement from office. The provision*
of lsw for the retirement of a policeman are ex
plicit. A policeman who has reached the age «•*
flfty-flve years and has served twenty years on
the force may be retired upon bis own appli
cation or upon a certificate by the surgeons that
he is not able to perform poMee duty. A police
man who has served twenty-five years oats»a ts»
force must be retired upon his own application
provided there are no charges pending against
him.
Devery has not been a policeman twenty -fly»l v»
years, and he is not fifty-five years old. He H
too strong and robust to permit the issue of a
surgeon's certificate of unfltness for pone* duty
Devery became a policeman on June 19, 1ST 1 *
Taking no account of the year that he was sj(
| the force, because he was reinstated by the
courts after being dismissed by the Police Board.
j he has a term of service of only twenty-tw-
I years and six months. He was born in 1854. sjsjj
I is not much over forty-six years old. He would
: be unable, therefore, to force his retirement oa
j a pension by making application for retirement-
There is a special provision in the charter by
which a chief of police can be retired, without hit
j own application, by the unanimous vote of the
Commissioners, or by the votes of three Corn
' missioners and the vote of the Mayor. It wa I
under that provision that John McCullagh was
retired from the office of Chief of Police, to
I make room for Devery. The Mayor removal
I Commissioners Hamilton and Philips from oftV"
j and filled one of the vacancies by appoint! r>-
I Commissioner Hess. Then Commissione-? Y.->r'«.
Sexton and Hess and the Mayor voted to retire
McCullagh. Later Commissioner A bell was ar
j pointed. Devery can be retired if all four Com
| missioners vorV for his retirement, or If three
of them and the Mayor vote for his ii Hie— aa>
The Chief, therefore, is at the mercy Off the
Commissioners and the Mayor, and cannot gf>:
out of the fix he is in by applying for retire —sat.
He may be kept in his place until he is legislated
out of office without a pension by the passage
I of a new police law.
Well informed police officials said yesterday
that Devery »s *»"* to be retired, at least not for
I the present. If it becomes certain that the
Legislature will pass a bill to legislate him out
of office. hi.< friends in the Police Board ma>
vote to give him a retiring pension.
HERLIHY SEEKIXG DELAY.
a belief HELD that HIS trial CAN
be DRAGGED ALONG UNTIL THE
POLICE board IS legis
lated out* of OFFICE.
When the trial of Captain Herlihy was «*«• —
at Police Headquarters yesterday afternoon. ex-
Judge Olcott. for the prosecution, said he espect
ed to call only about a dozen more witnesses, but
It might require several days to get the restimon.
of those witnesses on the record. There has been
expressed a belief that if the trial of Captain Her-
Uhy can be dragged along for a few weeks, th«
present Police Board will be legislated out of of
fice and the trial of Herlihy will fail of any result.
Mr. Olcott said yesterday afternooon that a new
Commissioner, taking the place of the present
Board of Police, could not act upon the testimony
taken by the present Board.
Mr. Olcott also said that he had expected to call
James B. Reynolds as the chief witness of the day.
but Mr. Reynolds had an attack of the grip and
could not appear. John Becker, a manufacturer
of overalls at No. 53 Allen-st.. was called to the
stand to testify abo- t women who had infested the
lower floors of the tenement houses Nos. 48 and J»
Allen-st. The women, he testified, stood on the
stoop or at the windows of the houses and called
to men who passed by. The witness identi
fied his signature to a letter, signed by several per
sons, appealing to »he Mayor to have the disgrace
ful scenes in Allen-st. stopped.
Appended to the letter was a report by Captain
Herlihy. and Mr. Olcott wanted Herlihy to admit
his signature on the report. Mr. Grant. Herlihy'*
counsel, objected vigorously until Mr. Olcott saM
It would be necessary to call the Mayor as a wit
ness. Then the fact that the report was made by
Herlihy was admitted by the defence.
Mr. Grant, on cross-examination, ascertained the
fact that Becker signed the letter at the request of
his landlord. He could not read, but it was read to
him. and he understood that it was a complaint to
Mayor Van Wyck. There were other signers. "I
was willing to sign it if it would make the street
clean." he said.
•Did you ever complain to the police?"
"No."
"But you saw girls arrested, didn't you?"
"Why. no." replied the witness, seemingly •"-•
prised at the question.
Miss Becky Goodman, of No. 47 Allen-st. testJneA
about the women at the houses Not*. 48 and CO
AUen-st.. saying they called to men.
The letter shown to Becker was shown to her. and
she identified it. She showed her own signature.
"B. Goodman." * j
"You see my name is Becky, "she explained. "In/
this affair you are calling me Rebecca, bat my/
right name is Becky." /
Once or twice the women made remarks a? sM
passed, she said. "Come right in. there'll be room
for you to-morrow." was on« remark. •'Come right
up; you can make $1 easy." they said to her OS)
another occasion.
Mr. Olcott stated before the adjournment ass
taken that he had intended to call Chief Devery
and all the deputy chiefs to see If Captain Herlihy
over applied to any of them for a "chiefs war
rant." as he could do under Section 318 of the
charter. He asked Mr. Grant If he would admit
that he had not to save time.
Mr. Grant said that he would give him an an<» ¦
at the opening of the next session of the trial. Mr.
Grant asked for an adjournment to the middle off
next week in order that he might conduct a case
in court.
"Counsel can easily delay this trial for a month
under the same excuse." replied Commissioner
York. It was Anally decided to adjourn until 4
p. m. on Monday, when there will be an evening
session.
COMMITTEE OF FIFTEEN PLANS.
CHAIRMAN BALDWIN SATS IT WILL TAX*
STEPS TO PREVENT TAX DODGING
AS WELL AS GAMBLING.
William H. Baldwin. Jr.. the chairman of the
Committee of Fifteen, said yesterday that he knew
of no movement to have John D. « *rt retrains suc
i ceed him as chairman of the committee. Illness
! has kept Mr. Baldwin quiet for some day*, and he
said yesterday that he thought his absence from
i the headquarters of the committee hau given rts*
to talk for which there was small foundation. "Mr.
j Crimmins Is a good man. either on or off the com
1 mittee." he said.
Mr. Baldwin said that he did not know th .
; the committee would offer any evidence to the
January Grand Jury, but he would be glad to hear
that the Tammany Committee of Five had work
for the Grand Jury.
"The scope of our committee's work is a3 wide
; as the city." he said, "and If It la our duty to B
; after gambling places In the Tenderloin it la also
I our duty to look after bucket sh'«ps in Wan Street.
I If the Police Department to to bY kept from 2
: tectlng vice x cannot see way the Tax Department
• should not be, kepi from allowing .sands .of I
: dollars to slip away from the city trea-t:ry through
the dodging ai some projvrty owners. I do no
-• - why tfu> coinrnUten should not »K-i some steps
•to prevent tux dot'einsr." sgsSßi&t&Pm ¦""¦SSBttMKI
(Former Police Commissioner Frank ; Mom yes- ¦
terday denied that -he "had been approached -by; '.
members of "the "Committee ofiFtfteen and" offered
the charge of Its investigations. He further said

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