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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, August 06, 1901, Image 1

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V *LXI..-.N°- 19.987.
EXPLOSION KILLS MANY.
fIYF BUILDINGS WRECKED
Of PHILADELPHIA.
JEN TO TWENTY PEOPLE DEAD AND
MORE THAN A SCORE INJURED—
THE RUIN'S TAKE FIRE.
Philadelphia, Aug. 5. — A terrific explosion in
hlock of six buildings in Locut-st.. above
"ynth-Ft.. to-night wrecked five of the struc
tures and caused the death of from ten to
♦renty or more persons. Over twenty others
• ere more or less seriously injured. Some of
,1-ose taken to the hospitals will die. It is estt
maxei that at least thirty-Jive pSTSSBSI were in
the five buildings when the explosion occurred,
gsd the exact number of dead will probably not
be known for tv.enty-four hours.
yyf buildiiJg ß were occupied as follows:
jCo. l."" f lisl at . Houseman's pool and
billiard rooms.
•Co. 1 MO, Mortis EtoaenthsJ's second hand
rii?thinp rt'">re. occupied by Rosenthal. his wife
aw five children.
j;o. LOU. William Jones's restaurant, occu
riid b>' Jones and about fifteen boarders.
no. 1.014. George McClemmy's grocery store.
(tl^, v . . by McClemmy. a clerk and a servant
riri
So- 1,016 Patrick Quigiey's grocery store, oc
cupied by Quigley. his wife, three children and
hif mirle.
So. LOlfiL Albert Mountain's grocery and meat
ftcre. occupied by Mountain, his mother, sister
and clerk.
PEOBABLY A GASOLENE EXPLOSION.
jbe explosion occurred about fl:3<> o'clock.
gSjgl exploded and how it happened is not
fcaovni at this time, but it Is believed to have
been a barrel of gasolene in one of the three
procery stores. With the exception of No. 1.008,
thf front walls of the buildings were blown out
*Er<3 into the street, while the floors and the
roofs were blown upward, and fell straight to
the ground. Almost every building in a radius
ef two blocks about the scene of the explosion
tad windows shattered and was otherwise dam
4T*d. Every building on the opposite side of
2/>eust-st. was damaged, but none of them fell.
A terrible cry w«= nt up from the ruins the mo
jnfnt the explosion occurred. Women, children
an 1 ! men. occupants of the wrecked houses,
could be seen crawling out. while the agonizing
cries of others were heard in the wreckage.
From all the surrounding buildings injured peo
ple came running and fell in the street uncon
scious.
FIRF BREAKS OUT.
To ass] to the horror, fire broke out. and in
lew than five minutes the great pile of ruins
was burning fiercely from end to end. A gen
eral alarm was turned in for fire apparatus and
ambulances, and in the mean time the work of
rwr-ue vt-fiti voluntarily begun by those in the
neighborhood that were, not Injured. Here and
there a person was dragged from the ruins be
fore the fire could reach the victim, several lives
being saved by this prompt work.
s/hea the firemen reached the scene the flame*
had made great headway, and were igniting th»
builrtmgs across the street. The fire, however,
was soon under control, and, with the excep
tion of a small blaze here and there, was ex
...REftuahetl in a f"™r r" '""'"*«
DIGGING IN THE RUINS.
The work ol digging away the ruins was then
bfgun in earnest. Near th»» edge of the debris
teveral colored men were taken out. and sent
to the hospitals. While the firrmen and police
men were digging and hauling away heavy
timbers cries were heard coming from the cellar
of Mountain's grocery store. Fifty men, with
rope and tackle, were immediately put to work
it that point, and pulled away the roofing and
•oorinr; which had fallen into a heap. From the
bottom of the pile, doubled up. a man and a
woman were taken. The man was able to speak,
but the woman was apparently dead.
While the work' of rescue was going on hos
pital attendants and others reached all the dam
aged houses on the opposite Fide of the street.
and almost a score of persons were taken to
tarious hospitals from these places.
The Jefferson and the Pennsylvania hospital) 1 ,
v/hirh are nearest to the scene of the explo
sion, were Boon crowded with the injured. None
c? those taken to the hospitals had died up to
m'dnljrht. Two hundred men are now at work
clearing away the wreckage.
The buildings containing the poolrooms, cloth
ing store and the restaurant were three story
trick structures, while the other three buildings
•ere tv and one-half stories.
TMAXBPORT6 SOLD CHEAP.
THE MPHERSON GOES FOR r.8.?00 AND THE
TERRY FOR $19,600.
At the M gas Iron Works. Fifty-sixth-st.,
Brooklyn, the United States Government pastor
*•>■■ sold at auction the transports M- I'herson
M Terry to the highest bidders. The Mc-
Pberson was Bold for ?15.7<"»0 to K. H. Parsons.
of Baltimore, who is said to represent the Penn-.
•J'lvania Railroad. Miles K. Barry, general
nanarer of the Chicago and Muskegon Trans
portation Company, bought th.- Terry for $11),
•■' She will ba placed in service on Lake
Jllihipan.
Poth boats went at an absurdly low figure,
•»eeia!'.y the MePheraon, which is said to have
«*t the Fovernment $:!<JO.<KX) at the outbreak of
tfce Spanish war. She was formerly the trans
ttlwtie liner Obdam, is 410 feet over all, and
*»« built in Belfast. Ireland, in l*S<i. During
••times of the transport service between New
*«* and Porto Rico and Cuba the McPherson
a* considered one of the beat boats on the run.
** has only recently bees brought North after
"«>» on the rocks off Cuba for several months.
■ ■ believed that the government has lost
*"**>■ in removing the McPherson from the reef
t?s:oo :nfi:ißg h * r Nortn to ** Bold for only
T^ Terry was formerly the Hartford, and ran
"■ tiong l«i a nd Bound. She is a twin screw
£ PM^ a>er - ~ 8 **** in and was built
* Philadelphia in 1802
JChGE DfDtCTED FOR FRA I D.
fcßl'El Or GOVERNMENT MONET AT TEI.I.ER
city ALLEGED.
J^^* - W ** h « Auf. *•— "The Teller News of
Jufc^" rec * iv to-day, says that E. Q. Ro K non.
t . j^ the United States Commissioner'!! Court
mir* ' '"*'• has i *' en l'Mii»-t.-<! |j >" the Federal
ro v«J" ry * n<l •"''•ted for alleged ml»use of
Used 7* nt mor.r-y. it Ik charged that the Judge
*'"••* "•— r.t mont -"y for llle purchase of BBS)-
KWctS^ »"Jll<HriK which, he alleged, was for
rr * r '**-532: *"*• J1< * *■*'" that n<> lla<l ■**•• ar
l>r<M^,.{y" *n«"eby the government !c amply
hh * v<? I^. ,m ' '""•• ail<l thai "'• matter should
tvJ t. haji. •«i<: «uuM have .-••• Fettled by a civil
Hiioi been for the activity of his entail**.
Th, UW EI * ACI = IN ADVANCE.
* ru «ninr fiii '-""""I of the New York Central
25 *6\«nce i ' it in nw "*-e«ary to engage apace days
*T"*l*r.d ft, or<Je * ♦<* Set Ju«t what you want
Adi^™*** 0 * &d St. Louis passengers, please
THR rNTTF.D STATER CRT'TSER COLUMBIA-
That will take the place of the old Vermont as receiving ship at the Brooklyn Navy Yard
SAVE THE OLD VERMONT.
MANY PROTESTS RAISED 4OAINBT PLAN
TO DESTROY HER.
■ DR. ALVAH H. DOTY SCOUTS IDEA THAT
SHE IS GERM LADEN — RETIRED
NAVAL OFFICER TELLS HOW
TO PRESERVE HER.
The old receiving ship Vermont may not be
broken up for Junk. The first angry muttering*
of what is likely in be a mighty protest were
h°ard yesterday. Many people already ridicule
the suggestion of the department officials In
Washington that the Vermont is soaked with
direa.'e germs. Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes
saved 'Old Ironsides." as the Constitution -was
railed, by penning a patriotic poem. That fa
mous ship is afloat to-day. It would not be a
wholesome pro seeding for any one to advocate
breaking her up for her copper and oak. It was
suggested yesterday that if the Vermont is
loaded up with microbes the Constitution is In
even worse condition, and that Nelson's old
flagship, the Victory, almost worshipped by Brit
ish tars, must be doubly and trebly soaked with
them.
As a matter of fart, the disease germ theory Is
regarded by many prominent physicians as the
silliest nonsense. The proposition to destroy
the Vermont came with all the suddenness of a
shot from ambush. The prediction was made
yesterday that before the week is out the idea
will be regarded as the scheme of a thought
less official devoid of patriotic sentiment
CAN BE EASILY CLEANSED.
Dr. Doty, Health Officer of this port, who has
made an exhaustive study of disinfection, said
yesterday:
There Is no ship in our navy that need be de
stroyed because of danger of Infection. The Ver
mont could easily be cleared of any germs that
might be in her by a thorough fumigation with
sulphur dioxide. It is absurd to say that the
•rood Is so Impregnated with the germ* of disease
that nothing can be done with It The ship has
never as I understand, been vised as a hospital,
and she certainly has not lain in water that would
(■oak her with disease.
! •' tl c Vermont had lain outside of • •■• of the
rivers of Cuba or at a place In the harbor of
Havana where «he would have been in the way of
fewaee that contained the firms of yellow fever
her hull infcht have become so saturated with
disease germr that it would be necessary to build
that part anew. There Is i•■ assertion madci_th;u
the hull- l« Impregnated, but rather that the In
terior woodwork of the vessel Is full of germs.
Even If the old vessel had been used as a hos
pital ship, or had at some time been filled with
person* suffering from Infectious disease, there
would be no dancer, Germs are not only easy to
kill, but It is difficult to keep them alive. After .1
reasonable time has .-;.<:.-■ succeeding the dis
ease the germs die from contact ■with the air, and
; there is actually no need for even fumigation. S.>,
even if the vessel had some time ago been filled
with the organisms which convey disease, there
would now be no danger.
For many years DO* the vessel has lain In clean
waters and could not possibly have gathered dis
ease germs, so I can see no earthly reason for de
straying her. ]•■ Is possible that we may need a
better vessel for a receiving ship, but If so we ran
have it without destroying this relic of our early
r.aval history.
Of course, I do not wish to appear as opposed to
any move that the authorities may see nt to make,
and then may be reasons for the destruction of
the Vermont with which I an not familiar.
If it could be true that the wood In the vessel
were Impregnated with germs, there is no possible
way in which they could be exterminated, because
the steam, which would tie the only method of
fumigation, would not penetrate far enough Into
the wood to >>. effective Hut germs do not, where
the material i* dry wood, penetrate to the interior.
They lie on the surface. By this you ran •>.<■*■ that
it is Impossible for the alleged hypothesis of ab
solute Impregnation to exist.
MIGHT BE USED AS A MUSEUM.
Retired naval officers living in New-York and
those who have left the service to go into other
professions have been doing considerable think
ing since the announcement was made that the
old Vermont was to be broken up and sold for
Junk. Many of them would like to see her pre
served in Borne way or other, even though her
days of practical usefulness are past.
William H. Stayton, Of No. .'SO Broad-st., who
resigned his captaincy in the United States Ma
rine Corps to resume the practice of law. Is op
posed to the destruction of the Vermont, He
said:
The oH Vermont hns been the home of more
landsmen than any other vessel In the navy to-day.
Hundreds of men, probably some or, every big ship
in the navy, <-:m remember spending their first
days In the service on th< Vermont. If. retention
and preservation would please more of the sailors
than anything else tho Navy Department could
do.
Mr. Ktayton believes that the Vermont could
be preserved for years at a very little expense
to the government by following the example of
the English government In the preservation of
Admiral Nelson's Bacahlp and two other his
toric vessels. He says:
They shoald do with the Vermont as the British
did with the Victory, which bore Admiral Nelsons
flag so bravely, and with several other vessels.
They moved them into shallow water, where they
were protected from the Kind. Then they filled the
hulls with cement, which preserved the rotting
timbers and made a firm foundation for the upper
works.
The Vermont could be moved inside the Whitney
basin si the navy yard. Ii Is to be dredged out in
! order to afford more dock room. If the old re
ceiving ship gives up her present berth for one in
■Me the basin the yard will not need the small
space which she would occupy. She could easily be
turned into a museum after her timbers had been
fumigated and the disease germs driven out. That
there is need of a museum or trophy room of tome
kind at the navy yard no one doubts who has
visited the yard. Some of the most valuable war
relics lie in the open yard, absolutely unprotected
from the weather. Many of them have already
been Injured by rust. The others are in a room
1 above the commandant's office, where there is not
•sufficient space to show them off to the greatest ad
vantage. The room now used as a museum is
needed for offices. The ship could be preserved by
the cement process for an indefinite time. It costs
only $3 or $1 a cubic yard for cement, and the lines
of the historic old vessel would be bettor preserved
than by the us.- of wood or brick.
If there is not room at the navy yard for a relic
*hlp let h«-r be removed to some other place where
there Is still water. An anchorage could probably
be found »i Quarantine, in the Lower Bay. Sandy
Hook would be another good place for a permanent
berth Philadelphia abounds In sites that could
' well be used for the purpose, and I think the
'Quakers would be ml(?hty glsd to add the Vermont
to their collection of relics. It will be ■ shame if
the government lets her go to the Junk men. and
I • m glad that The Tribune Is sounding public
K*ntim.-nt on the proposition.
TIMIJKKS SOUND AS EVER.
OJ!i> ■♦•!•« at the Brooklyn Navy Yard do not
entirely approve the abandonment of the historic
old Veimont as a receiving ship. Many of them
contend that her timbers are as ur.d as ever,
and that what little disease there has been
aboard her has been caused by refuse on the
Cob Dock. "It is untrue," said one of the offi
cers yesterday. "that the timbers have dry rot
NEW-YORK. TUESDAY. AT (UST 6. 1901. -FOURTEEN PAGFA- byT -;r«i l!1M
or wet rot or any other kind of rot. They are of
goc-d, solid oak, and as for your sticking your
finger in them I will defy any man to drive a
wire mill In them without bending it. "
Rear-Admiral Barker says that he has no
Idea what the Xavy Department will do with
the Vermont, but h« is sure that she will not be
burned. To burn the old craft would be to de
stroy what many sailors love more dearly than
their early homes. If the Vermont were s°ld she
would prove a rich prize. In all the decks there
are copper holts, placed a f>-\v inches apart, and
th<> sale of this metal alone would net many
thousands of dollars.
REASONS FOR THE REMOVAL.
DISEASE GERMS SAID TO BE IN THE VER
MONT—OPPOSITION TO THE CO
LUMBIA AS RECEIVING SHIP.
Inr TELEGRAra to tup: tribune.]
Washington. Aug. s.— Efforts that may be
made to secure the retention of the old Vermont
as the receiving ship of the New-York Navy
Yard are likely to prove futile, and there Is ap
rarently no disposition on the part of naval
officials to maintain the ship there longer, on
account of her unsanitary condition after years
of service. It is alleged that there are no
sentimental reasons in addition, for while many
of the ships of her period and class were notable
products of the Civil War period, this cannot be
said of the Vermont, which has a most mediocre
career and never was regarded as a typical
vessel of her date. She has proved a derided
menace to the health of seamen and ap
prentices at the yard for the last two years,
and her removal is said to be demanded by
rmctical men at toned there. Disease germs
are understood to be in her timbers, and the
longer she is kept at the yard the greater the
danger of those on board.
Acting Secretary Ha 'keti stated this evening
that it was unlikely the orders for the Columbia
to replace her as a receiving ship would be
countermanded, as the Vermont was too far gone
to warrant her being maintained in the naval
service.
Admiral Melville resents the employment of
this fin* vessel for the purpose ordered, and
says she is less adapted for a receiving vessel
than almost any ship of her size in the navy.
While long and lean, she has little berthing
space, nearly all the Interior being taken up
with powerful machinery and the equipment and
fittings necessary for a vessel of her great speed
and steaming radius of action. The contention
is made by the Admiral that better ore could
he found for the Columbia than the undignified
service as a receivln< ship, .1 duty that ha been
preformed at all navy yards since the Civil
War by ohju>iat« ships at that fc*rlod.
TIIE COLUMBIA EXPECTED DAT.
CRUISER COMES TO TAKE THE PLACE OF
THE VERMONT TEMPORARILY.
The cruiser ColumMn, * hl<-h la to ' ike the pl«'-.'
Of the old receiving xhlp Vermont, at the Brooklyn
Navy Yard, i- expected to arrive to-da] She Is on
her way from Philadelphia In tow of three tuics.
The Columbia Ii one of the show ships Of th«
navy, and there are many who regret her assign
ment to such a berth a.« the one for which she Is
Blated. Her lines are beautiful and Indicative of
her pr-.-it f»peed. and the mechanism used In her
construction Is of the best.
As a cruiser, however. !n times of peace she If
considered impracticable by naval experts. She has
Kulned the reputation of being a 'Vonl eater." On«
of the off iit rs who knows her said yesterday: "Shi
Is this kind of m ship: You coal her for ■ seven
days' run and find her bunkers empty In two days."
The Columbia has been lying In the League Island
Navy Yard. Philadelphia, for .1 long time, out of
commission. Her complement of officers and crew
is set at 477. It I* thoußht that with her gui dis
mounted and her decks cleared she will be able to
accommodate about eight hundred man. This, by
the way. la several hundred less than the old Ver
mont can care for. Besides, the quarters of men
and oflicers will be more crowded and less com
fortable.
It is promised that the appointment of the Co
lumbia to be a receiving ship is only temporary, as
the proposition to construct permanent receiving
quarters on the Cob 1 > ■■■ '. Ii now being considered
and may soon bo carried Into effect, dolnir away
with any recelvltiß sh'p.
ENGEL TO DAZZLE NEWPORT.
TAMMANY LEADER WILL VISIT THK UK-
S'IHT WITH FORTY SUITS <»F CLOTHEi
AND MANY DIAMONDS
As soon «s the North Atlantic Squadron will
make room, Martin Bngel, Tammany leader of
"De Ate" Assembly District, Is going to New
pert, with forty trunks, forty milts of clothes
and about a peck, mor • or less, of real dia
monds iie win not take a valet, however.
•You <an aay dat dey ain't nuttln* in o>
rumor dat I'm going t>> have ■ rally." aald
lie yesterday. "Ham Miner took a vail* wld
htm to Washington ;ifte r be was elected Con
gressman, an' it broke him in de deestiic*. De
East Side won't stands for valttes, an* I don't
blame 'em, «ith'-r. Every guy has to lace in*
own shoes on de Bast Side."
After doing Newport Mr. Engel will go to
Saratoga, taking, as before, his forty trunks,
forty Kuits of clothes and pr-ck of precious
Ftoneß. He will be accompanied by Alexandei
liosmthal. a lawy*"**; ex-Asseml-lyman Isadora
< ohen, l>r. l>*-on Cbemg, ex-Aiderman Philip
Benjamin, Alderman Max Forges and Joseph
Levy.
SIX BURGLARS CIA H A WOMAN.
THEY THEN TIE HER TO A BEDPOST. AND
SHE IS FOUND UNCONSCIOUS BY
HER NEIGHBORS.
Plainfleld. N. J.. Aug. ."» (Special).— Six men
entered the home of Mrs. Stephen Demko, in
Dunellen-ave., this afternoon, and threw her
out of the house. She returned for her children,
and the burglars knocked her down with a club
and then bound her to the bedpost with ropes
and tied a pillow case over her head, nearly
suffocating her. They th.-ii ransacked the house,
taking $IMN in cash, which was the property of
four boarders.
The woman was found by some of her neigh
bors after she had become unconscious. She Is
now in a precarious condition. Chief Kieley
was informed, and sent out the police reserves
on bicycles in search of the men. It is believed
that the men were foreigners who had known
Demko and his wife when they lived in Rarltan.
Poland: Poland: poland: Poland:
Purest natural »prlng water la the world.— Advt.
OFF WITH THEIR QUEUES
CHINESE "REFORMERS" IX AMERICA
ORDERED TO GET RID OF
THE PIGTAIL.
"All good Chinamen who are interested In
the cause of reform, and who desire to better
the condition of their native land and to im
prove their position in this, the land of their
adoption, will at once proceed to cut off their
queues."
This is a translation of an order which was
received yesterday in Chinatown by many of
the prominent reformers of the colony. It came
from the chief mogul of the Chinese Reform
Association, who has his headquarters in San
Francisco. Upon the members of the associa
tion it will i. more binding than an Imperial
edict from the hand of the Emperor of China.
In fact, the latter would not be binding at all.
for the overthrow of the present dynasty is
the main object of the association and the chief
hoi of all its members.
•Cut off your queues." is the order which will
drive '■■■■'■■:■ a Chinaman to opium or to drink.
for a Chinaman hates parting with his queue
almost a* much a? a young man dislikes losing
his first efforts at mustache growing. It will
effect several hundred Chinese in this city, al
though as yet no branch of the association has
been fo rm e,l here. In California the associa
tion has ♦;.<•<■, members, and the few Chinese
barbers will be sadly overworked.
Only one Chinese barber could be found in
Mott-st. yesterday afternoon, and he was not
rushed with business. when asked what he
thoutrht of the reform order he said:
"No makee muchee difference here If China
man have queue or ,ut him off. if he go back
to China, then him wish him never get one hair
cut. Him be velly much out of It."
"It ought to help your business, John," ven
tured the reporter.
"Not muchee." replied the yellow faced razor
hnndW. "Chinaman cut off him queue In white
man's barber shop. No comee to good barber
like me."
It Is said In Chinatown that the order which
has Just been received, from the West means
more than the loss of a few queues. It means
that the reform association is ready to spread
over th«» whole country, and that It will estab
:r»l. *»r%nrhr* In eVrry large i-ity. Members of
the. association in this city are expecting organ
izers from Ban Francisco In a short time.
An attempt ■•*.■* made to start a branch of the
Chinese Reform Association In this city two
years ago, but (he organizers were driven out
by order of the I'hinese consul-general, Chow
Tux Chi, who lias a great deal of power over the
Chinese residents. His influence was so strong
that those Interested in the reform movement
were persuaded to give it up. They wen- afraid
that membership would hurt their business.
The consul-general is said to nave sen 1 this
message to the big Tong, which virtually runs
things In the quarter, when the reform associ
ation tried to get a foothold before:
'II is easy to destroy, but hard to build up
again. Reform for China must be work out
under the present rulers."
"Yes, Chow Tin Chi is a very clever man."
said a Chinese professional man In discussing
the mutter yesterday. ■, if course, he would
stand by the ruler who pays him his salary He
cannot stop the reform movement this time, no
matter how hard he tries. It Is coming from
t!it» West with too much strength behind it.
I Hiring the next few months a great many will
cut '■' their queues, and soon the Chinaman
with one will be the oddity, not the one who
1 is adopted the American fashion."
The association believes that It will make the
position of the Chinese In this country more
!irm if more of them adopt American customs.
NOT ANNEXA TIONJSTS.
GOMEZ DENIES A REPORT ATTACK ON
MARTI IN Till-: HAVANA
CONVENTION,
Havana, Aug. .". <:.nernl Maximo iloine?; has
written t.. ins friend Genera] Vega regarding the
reporta thai he had described hints.-ir and Seflor
Estrada Palma ;!•■' annexatlonlsta After re
marking thai he had conic upon a reference to
the matter In a local paper in Puerto Principe,
he .-ays;
To pretend that Beftor Palma and i are an
nexationtsts is madness. The best way to carry
>ut a plan la t^. speak mu< h '<f it. Kur this rea
son it appeals that many Cubans desire annex
ation, and look to most of the prominent chiefs
of the revolution to support the movement, but
they have tried to convert to the doctrine some
very old heretics. The Plati law solves the
Question. The co nstituti o 111 1 :i 1 convention was
not to blame, as it had tired the last cartridge in
defi-tn f absolute Independence.
There was no meeting of the constitutional
convention to-day, only twenty delegates pre
sentiiiK themselves. The convention is gradv*
ally becoming a lauphinK stock.
SeAor Gtbergs recently refused to subscribe to
a fund being raised In the convention in aid of
the mother of Marti, declaring that Marti was
the evil genius of Cuba, ami that his memory
would be execrated by history.
Seftor daneroa urged the convention to exact
an apology from Besoi i!lberj?a >r to comrfl
him to resign.
Sefior Olberga declares that he will not return
to his seat in the convention until the matter
Is settled, and that he will publish a manifesto
to the country giving his reasons for thinking as
he does of Marti.
PABIB BRUSSELS FAST I.l\E.
TITANS TO KIN TRAINS FBOM r-ATITAt. To CAi-I
TAI, IN AN H«>IK ANI> A HALF.
Washington. Aug. ■">. » 'onsul-Ceneral Hughes
at Cobura;, Gormaajr, reports to the State De
partment that v French- Belgian syndicate is
reported to be planning, under the patronage
of the King of the Belgians, to build an oIOCtIM
express line for passengers and light freight be
tween Paris and Brussels, and from the l.itt-r
place to Antwerp. The trip from Paris to Brus
sels is expected to be made in one and a half
hours*, and from BrOMela to Antwerp in ten
minutes.
ALL MEALS IN DINING CARS
on the "Overland Limited." the. luxurious train Chi
cago to San Francisco, via Chicago and North-
Western. Union Pacific and Southern Pacific Rys.
Particular* at North-Western Line Office, 461 B'way.
-Adv*
LULL IN THE BIG STEEL STRIKE
PRESIDES T SI I. I FFKR M'PA /. //A" TL V HESITA TES TO ORDER
ALL UNION MEN OIL.
HUMORS OF IMPEMHXi. H/m.KMENT REVIVED.
It is believed in Pittsbnrg that President Shatter ol the Amalgamated As
sociation will not is>ue an order for a general strike for at least a week or ten
days. The delay i- distasteful to the Strikers, who are anxious to force the tight
ing, and ijives ri>c to rumors of a settlement.
The strike leaders denied that they had ar.y intention of organizing an
armed force to oppose National Guardsmen, shook] the necessity arise tor call
ing on the militia to protect property.
The Hyde Park mill of the American Shoot Steel Company restttned oper
ations with non-union men.
Aid for the strikers was promised by the leaders of several labor organiza
tions. Chief Arthur, however, said that the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engi
neers would remain neutral.
Conservative Wall Street operators did nor think the strike would reach
the proportions threatened by some of the leaders. The stc I not
suffer much in the market.
STATISTICS OK THE STRIKE.
Subsidiary rompnnle» of the I nltrtl MaMM f Sabaldlarr rompnnirs that may be affected!
Steel Corporation at present nOortnl by the ! by the strike:
" trlkes Estimated.
Estimated I Men nun dally
tlen on Men at dally I employed. wi(M,
atrlke. work. n«i;r». ' r>«leri»! Steel—
American Sheet Steel.. lti.<MN» O.<MM> *<m».inm» ! I nion milN !».«MM» $30,000
American Tin Plate.... U^.IMMI «MM» 7O,«HM> \ \ntional «teel—
American Steel Hoop.. S.OOO ::»N» 23,« MM» I 1 nlon mill* aVBSS 30.0M>
I >on-nnlon mills H.OOO SO.OOO
Totals 46.1M)0 O,SK>O $17.",00t> ; National Tnlte—
I I nlon plant. SIKOCO 6O,IHX>
.Non-union plant. ."..".(Mm ISBUSSSJ
— — — •— • —^—^-^"—1
- Total* 7!>.m»i> ?•_•,-. i>. ( »e>
A SETTLEMENT POSSIBLE.
PREBIDENT SHAFFERS STATF.MF.NT
CAUSES A FAINT ttLBASI OF FIOPK—
NOT Tv CBAXGB HIS POLICT.
(By The Associated Pr»»».)
Pittsbunr. Aug. s.— Just a faint glimmer of
hope that the Kreat steel workers' strike will be
settled was embodied in a statement made by
President Shaffer of the Amalgamated Associa
tion to-night. When asked if he would pursue
the same policy in ordering a strike in the mills
of the Federal Steel, the National Steel and the
National Tube companies as he did in calling
out the men in the mills of the American Tin
Plate Company he replied:
If It hud not hern for thin dftfrmlnnllon
on my purl, the xrnrrnl strike would half
brrn ordered on Saturday ni»ihl.
Pefote calling out the tin workers and after
failing to get any satisfaction from the officers)
of the American Sheet and the American Hoop
companies. Preside Shaffer sent a telegram to
Vice-President Warner Arms of the American
Tin Plate Company informing him that under
Article XIX, Section .*?."». of the constitution (f
the. ,, Amalgamated -Association h» would be
rd .ltc-d to call rut the tin workers In all the
mills owned by the United States Steel Corpo
ration unless the difficulty was settled within
ten days. As a result of this notice. Mr Arms
succeeded in getting together another confer
ence, and a vain attempt was made to settle the
dispute and prevent a strike which would in
volve the tin mills. That conference was the
one that broke up In the Hotel Lincoln three
weeks ago last Saturday
In order to be equally fair to the other con
stituent companies of the United States Steel
Coiporatkm, and give>them the same treatment.
President Shaffer has sent a similar notice to the
officers of the Federal Steel Company, the Na
tional steel Company and the National Tube
Company, giving them the same time in which
to make any effort the] may desire to bring
about a settlement, or he will put in force this
same clause in the Amalgamated Association
constitution. it is presumed that the delay in
Issuing the general order will be at least until
the end of the present week. Possibly it Will
not be issued until early next week. In the
mean time the men In the mills of these three
companies will be prepared to coma out \vh>»n
the strike order Is Issued.
The poooibllttT of a settlement is based on the
bare hope that the officials of the three addi
tional companies will bring to bear sufficient in
fluence to urge an adjustment of the difficulties*
fore the strike order is issued. President
Shaffer did not express an) hope that this would
be done, nor did he even discuss the matter, but
the Inference was quickly seen that there was
such a probability In sight. It is a faint one,
though, and little Interest was taken in it in the
general offices of the association ■ -day.
WALL STREET NorKFCL.
STEEL STOTKS Not MTCH AFFECTED
< nNSEKVATIVE OPKRATOaUI DO SMKI
FEAR GENERAL KXTKNSIOX
The l>i^' steel strik-'. which thraatoaa to grow
l>lpE;er. was a cause foi mu<-h illscussion. apaca-
Intlon, surmise and bMjaJvy in the financial dis
trict Of the city yesterday. Wall Street did not
pet much news about Urn strike situation, but
there was no end of gossip, and while fresh fhcta
were scan-- opinions were plentiful. The gen
eral opinion seemed to he indicated by the sales
of I'niied States Steal stocks in the market.
Those Mocks declined three points below the
prices of Saturday, but closed three points higher
than the low water mark they reached two
wet ks ago. The common atodl went down to
4<> yesterday and closed at fhit figure, while two
weeks a^o it was down to 'M V< st-rday's sales
amounted to ISScTOD shares. The preferred stock
went below Sl». 1 losing three-fourths of a point
higher, and Hi2oo shares changed hinds. Many
brokers said that while the ate*] .stocks prohably
wtre depressed some by the general weakness
of the mar Vet. the steel strike did not have
much effect in causing the declines in railway
stocks.
Sentiment In the Street seemed to be against
the leaders of the strike, and there was a re
newal of talk about some of the leaders being
engaged in speculation. No names were men
tioned, but there were reports that some of the
strike promoters were Interested in deals in Steel
stocks which had be,en made through Pittsburg
and Chicago houses within a few days. It was
declared that one sale of eleven thousand shares
short last week had been made for members
Of the executive board of the Am;-.lpamated As
sociation Brokers who talked about the deal
yesterday said they did not believe President
Shaffer was Interested In It. but they thought
some of his associates were in the deal.
Confidence in the ability of the I'nited >
£ tl » e l Corporation to weather the strike without
great damage |o Ita resourr-s was expressed free
ly by financiers, w ho said that the corporation had
jo(Ht.<KH».(NH» of underwriting on which it could
draw, if necessary, and. while the business of
Continued on if ul pane.
PRICE THREE CENTS.
SHAFFER DELAYS ORDER.
THE STRIKERS WANT THE FIOHTIXO.
FORCED. BIT THEIR LEADER
HOLDS BACK.
Tut TFT.F-.PArH to thk TRI"'
Plttsbursr. Avar. .">.— It will he a week or ten
days before President Shaffer issues his call to
all the union mi'!* of the United States Steel
Corporation to close. "I have good reasons for
the delay." he said to-day. The strikers had
hoped to hear the orders for a general strike
before this tim». Th desire prompt action, and
chafe at President Shaffer's delay. They be
lieve that a bold stroke will win. Mr. Shaffer
knows better. He argues that his opponents
are not of the class that are easily subdued, and;
the fight '-vill last Into the coming winter If he
depends on the United States Steel Corporation
Id surrender. Cold weather "ill soon end the
•strike and defeat the association. Th- warm
weather continues to aid the men.
CARNEGIE PLANTS HARD TO CRIPPLE.
> Scores of organizers and sympathizers of the
i Amalgamated, are at work among th» employes
j of the Carnegie Steel Company and the Na
: tional Tube Company. It has been asserted
, that here and triers among the leading men at
j Homestead. Durjuesne and Bradrt<-ck union sym
[ pathizers have been found, and that Mr. Shaf
fer hopes to secure enough of these men to
crippl* the Carnegie plants. This will he almost
; impossible, as the machinery at these plants la
i so automatic that new men ran soon be broken
in. ant' the men who step out will be out for
good. Every heat of metal and every lot that
is finished are tested by chemists and expert 3
to such an extent that nothing is left to chance
In thfsf* mammoth plants. The experts are not
sympathizers with the strikers, and with their
aid the plants co.ild almost be run with men
who had never seen a steel plant.
Tk( si conditions do not obtain In the other
mills of the United States Steel Corporation-
Some of these are old fashioned and require a
complement of experienced men far in excess of
, the up to date plants. The "rule of thumb**
method h» still in vogue, and it is Impossible
to operate them without the most skilled labor.
It is in these ; 'is that the strikers are most
Independent and defiant, as they helieve that
none can be taught tn do their work This 13
the condition of more than three-fourths of th»
steel hoop plants. The sheet mills can on
count one or two modern mills, and the Apollo
mill at Vandergrift. Perm.. th<=> largest in the
world, is in operation, with every mill running
night and day. Tir.plate making requires a
high degree of prortciency. and the American
Tin Plate Company is .---.... ; of tha
strikers.
One peculiar feature of the hoop mills h UM
j importance of the boys. Both sides are cnurt
! ing their favor. If they refuse to work with
! new men It will be impossible to operate the
hoop plants. It requires six men and eight bnya
to operate .i hoop mill one turn. The boys carry
, ends of the bands and hoops from . ■:; to roll
under the old system, and an unskilled boy la
liable to he cut to pieces and roasted to death.
In the loops or ruin the output of the mill by
improperly twisting the ends as they are entered
in the rolls. When the boys strike or quit work
the hoop mills have to shut down. This la not
the case in modern hoop mills, of which there
are only two. The boys are dispersed with, and,
all the ha will of the metal hi automatic. The
boys at the Clark Mills have signified their In
tention of aiding the strikers by refusing to
work with new men.
A rougher at Ml of the local mills, who is a
member of the Amalgamated Association, said
to-day that, while the strikers at the plant h©
worked at would stand by their organization.
yet he believed the strike was ill timed and 111
advised. He said the question at stake was not
broad enough ■•• involve so many men in tha
strike, and the men could not become enthusi
astic on the subject. They merely followed
their leaders blindly, criticising them while do
ing so.
STANDING BY THE MEN.
Mr. Shaffer was asked if he delayed the call
ing out of all the mills so as to give the men at
Lindsay & McCutcheon's. Clark's and Painter's a
chance to return to work, and thus remove one
of the great obstacles of I settlement. He said
no. that the association would stand by these
men as they were behaving nobly toward the
union cause. The Lindsay & McCutcheon
plant Is torn up. so their no start can be made
■within two weeks. Reports were sent out that
it would »>.- put in operation this morning.
There are no signs of activity at any of the
other idle plants, all of which are guarded, night
and day. by the regular watchmen and one
police officer. The gains made by the corpora
tion it Wellsville and the manner in which the
men in the Kiskeminetas Valley are standing by
their employers are the only encouraging
aspects of the strike to the steel corporation.
President Shaffer says thit he did not believe
<>ne-half as many. men would respond to his call
as thf-re did. hence he believes he will not have
any trouble in closing down most of the plants
ot the corporation in his second call.
With this kind of talk rumors are rife of.
an Impending settlement. The fact that Mr.
Shaffer has full authority looks suspicious to
those familiar with the traditions o; t&e AmaJ-

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