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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, September 01, 1901, Image 1

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YouV ou LXI--JS*- 20.M3. _NEW-YORK. SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 1. 1901.-2 PARTS. 26 PAGES. WITH ILLUSTRATED SUPPLEMENT. 16 PAGES. PRICE FIVE CENTS.
OLD DEFENDER'S RACE.
COLUMBIA BEATS CONSTITU
TION IN FAIR TRIAL.
CLEARLY OUTSAILS THE NEW YACHT
45D WINS BY OVER FOUR MINUTES.
IBT TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBUNE-]
Man— ' R- I- Aug. -- In the first official
JaTrace heM by the New-York Yacht Club off
SxFßort to-day the intended defender Con
.Htntir.n suffered another serious defeat at the
ILisof the former Cup defender, the Columbia.
aT victor of 1899. In some few flukes and
igtapawK the Columbia has at times been left
fceyad in w* l'e M airs a 8 are needed for
suture yachts, but she now stands as a
js-ftctically unbeaten boat, having never been
defeated in a fresh breeze except through ac-
Cliesi to her rigging. Her victory to-day was
* Ifcht air - nd when her opponent was tuned
CP to the point at which neither her designer,
jja-aper. skipper nor owners had anything to
gofgttit in the way of further improvement.
Vhese official trials have been prepared for
a3 summer, and, naturally, both yachts came
to tie starting li»je with roseate hopes and in
the pink °- perfection. Seeing that the Con
stitution always had over a minute of time
tUewance to give the Columbia, and yet was
not once in the lead, it may be paid that she
practically was never in the race, from start
to finish.
Barr got the best of the start, and led out into
the ocean at a pace end with a high pointing
course which 'eft no doubt as to the result of
the windward work. Soon after the Mart it was
clear that the only hope of the Constitution was
to make up in running what she would lose in
windward work. Yet. her ability to give the
flaw allowance over sad above a finish on even
terms was doubted by the mast sanguine.
The race was a slow and gradual proof that
the narrow and graceful lines of the older boat
have not been improved upon in that swelling to
greater beam that the Constitution exhibits In
the attempt to get greater sail carrying power.
The Colombia looked like a thoroughbred all the
way. and it was remarked that when the Con
stitution swung her great side high in the air
and sagged to leeward she M not In the same
refined and scientific class. The beat out was
all one sided, and so was the run back in.
though in the latter course there were matters
connected with the trim of the Constitution
which, as told In this story, may be open to
such correction and improvement as may im
prove her chances in the trial races still to
come.
MANY PLEASURE YACHTS WITNESS RACE
The breeze In Newport Bay this morning did
act promise much for the racing outside, but It
was found later on that the ocean wind was
much better than in the harbor. A great many
of the larger steam yachts had come to New
port to witness the trials, and among those that
followed the racers on the ocean were Henry
Walter's Nada. the schooner Emerald, the three
masted Sultana. Colonel J. J. Aster's Nounnahal.
the Josephine, owned by P. A. B. Widener; E. C.
Benedict's" Oneida. and John Q. Herreshoff's
Eugenia; tile Corsair, with J. p. Morgan on
board; the big auxiliary schooner Blsa (formerly
the Black Pearl), the Indolent, the Catina, the
auxiliary brigantine Aloha, the White Heather
and many others.
The Columbia was prompt in getting her sails
hoisted, and with her largest gaff topsail set She
rounded Fort Adams at 10:20. bound out. ar.d
with slackened sheets. The Constitution let go
her moorings five minutes later, and, after
breaking out foresail and jib. paid off into the
port tack to follow out to the lightship. When
clear of Brenton's Reef, the two big 90-footers
found a long roll coming in from the south-
Eoutheast, and the wind was coming southeast
by east, moving at the rate of five miles an
hour.
Instead of using the steam yacht Colonia as
*'as first intended, the race committee went
aboard the steam yacht Sultana, owned by John
R. Drexel. This boat now came out. followed
by the large oceaa tug Coastwise, which was
Intended to be used to set out the windward
•rark. The tug Unique was also present, with a
number of club members who paid for their
passage. Just then the Columbia came past
the press yacht Wanda at a good speed and
with her canvas showing the evidences of con
tinuous care. Herbert Leeds was with Mr. and
Mrs. E. D. Morgan and some friends, who were
tittlng at the companionway.
When the Ccr.stitution circled about her new
mainsail sepmort to have been left as it was
last seen 00 Oyster Bay, and It had about the
same bag in 11 as the Shamrock's has, neither
of these boats having a mainsail which -its with
¦uch drumhead flatness as that of the Columbia,
At about 11 -jo the committee sent up the red
-*£, "Letter B," meaning that the coarse would
"* to windward and return, and five minutes
later the course signals 'D C S" were sent up.
leaning that th* fifteen mile beat would be on
a course south-southeast. On the Constitution
was Been Nat Herreshoff standing beside Skip-
Per Rhodes, as th? yachts passed. The 11:30
preparatory pan was fired and the two yachts
**gan Jockeying for positions. When the 11:3*
warning signal was given, the Columbia was fol
lowing the Constitution en the port tack an<*
on the big boat's weather quarter. Rhodes then
wanted to go about, but Barr evidently refused
to let him do bo. He held his boat still on the
Port tack, and Rhodes had no room to get out
** the same tack. He did not even get up to
fcead wind, but lay there still, partly on the
Port tack til! Barr passed. Then the Columbia
went intr, the starboard tack and beaded back
toward the line, turning close round the com
mittee boat. The Constitution then stepped in
between the Columbia and the Sultana, and
both vessels crossed the line too soon. The re
**ll signal was given and both turned back to
CPO *« again, the Constitution paying off to lee
ward for her gybe and the Columbia making
¦"¦ turn nearer the windward end. As both
*aftg came back across the line at the right
tone, the Columbia was ahead and to windward.
«ejr were officially timed:
gM>W« 11-41-lfi
The Columbia took a little starboard tack to
*J«*»ard of the lightship and then headed
•*T southerly on the port tack, which was the
"••'eg and almost the only leg of the so-called
¦"¦» to th- windward mark. For the first mm*
* trier the start there were no perceptible
ltafr nCeS In the sailing, but at 11:53 the Co
££* Ti u-a i? * oen doing gome fine work, not
£™«iuicfa«;d high, but moving well through
- ,*f ter - i. Th *. Constitution at this moment
caC I?*? Pointing well, a new Performance
Tte S>iH!fi:. ut >ne Wa * not moving as fast,
fast. hSf" 1 . 1^,^-^* n **«>nK «outh by east, half
•«« »h.« **' she eaded off to due south
•¦oj*^?*^* l^ up to her course again. The
*5 i** C° astJtutlon to point higher than
t*?u r an ' improved appearance as
Wtd with, the Columbia and with her
,|, lu^, on »«>c<md page.
UU r kfc 0 ™ TO E UFFALO AT NOON.
&X« %K trß i n mrfflo & £ c £ T M*
CZAR'S FOREIGN VISIT.
REPORT THAT HE WILL NOT HAVE A
CONFERENCE WITH KING EDWARD.
i GOOD RELATIONS MAINTAINED— PRINCE
CHUN'S DELAY— BOER LEADERS BUST.
(Copyright; 1901: By Th« New-York Tribune.)
tBT CABLE to IBS TTUBUXB.]
London, Sept. 1, 1 a. m.— movements and
relations of the royal figures on the European
; stage make up the bulk of the news at midnight.
L It Is reported from Copenhagen that the Czar
I and King- Kdward will not meet at Fredens
| borg. as has been previously announced. If
¦ this rumor be confirmed, it will not be proof
i that anything has pone amiss, but merely that
¦ It has been inconvenient to shorten the King's
stay at Homburg and impracticable to alter the
Czar's engagement at Dantzic. The Czar, while
on good terms with the King and the German
• Emperor, must consider the bearings of the
I dual alliance and give preference to France In
| ceremonial visits. He i«. not likely to single out
i England for a deliberate affront, and there is
' no evidence that he intends to do so.
The Russian press is more hostile to Germany
: than to England, and this is an indication that
the German Emperor rather than Edward VII
would be slighted if the Czar were looking for
an opportunity to discriminate against either
power.
The King's desire to derive all possible benefit
. from the waters at Homburg will be a natural
explanation if the two sovereigns do not meet at
Kredensborg.
The kowtow hitch over Prince Chun's mis
sion Is explained as due to royal sensitiveness.
Prince ("him is indifferent to the feelings of
pubordJnates. and considers it beneath the dig
nity of a Chinese prince to kowtow himself.
This Is a subtle appeal to the German Emperor's
sense of royal privilege, and may result In a
special dispensation relieving Prince Chun from
the humiliating function of prostration and
genuflection, and arranging a suitable substi
tute.
The original tragedy, of the Peking embassies
plays down to the level of comic opera in the
due course of time.
"Topsyturvydom"* is still the word that de
scribes South Africa. "While General French has
been driving the guerillas to the north of the
Orange River. Scheeper's commando seems to
have bolted In the opposite direction and to
have got within striking distance of the south
coast of Cape Colony, two hundred miles east
of Cape Town. Scheeper is one of the youngest
Boer commanders, and may be iris'hlevous
enough to tumble Into Cape Town at the mo
ment when General French Is arranaing ' r| r
entrapping him In the southeast corner of the
Orange River Colony.
Military men are debating solemnly the
chances of, a general surrender of the leaders
during the next fortnight by a preconcerted ar
rar.jren:ent. but It is a far cry from Scheeper at
Ondtshoorn to Botha and De La Rey in the
Eastern Transvaal, and every guerilla leader is
free to go as he pleases.
De Wet has been vaguely reported at Zastron.
in the 'W>i>ener district, but the Flying Dutch
m&n on the wide tea Is not more elusive.
Plet De La Rey is a prisor:^r, but he Is not a
crafty gerera! who hap played skittles with
Aldershot genina, and peace i.- *t\V. a cuckoo
so.jg when I»rd Kitchener la forced to report
a daring Boer raid on the northern line, with the
blowing up of a train and the death of a gal
lant Irish officer. I. N. F.
SAMPSON A VERY SICK MAN.
ALARMING REPORTS FROM LAKE SUNA
PEE ABOUT THE ADMIRAL.
IBT TELEGHAPW TO TTIF TRFBrVE.)
Boston, Aug. 31. — A special from Lake Suna
pee, N. H., says: "Admiral Sampson Is a very
sick man." That is the verdict not only of the
summer tourists who are now on their way
home, but of tho physicians who lrom time to
tin.c have quietly made the journey from Boston
si-d Portsmouth to attend the distinguished
visitor. They railed on him at the Burkeshaven
H'-ail Hotei, and when they left shook their
heads omin>->usiy.
The physicians al 1 refuse to talk to the cor
respondents. One surgeon f : om the Portsmouth
Navy Yard said: 'The admiral Is dflng as well
as can be expected," and such a report from the.
sickroom can he easily translated.
When Admiral Sampson arrived with his de
voted wife, it was tirn.ly expected the change
would result in a marked improvement in his
condition. He was far from being a well man
v.hen he came, but from time to time, instead
of phorvinc a :y improvement, his condition has
grown steadily worse
It was over a week apo that the admiral was
aeen by the townsfolk for the first time. He
was driver: into th» village, but became ho weak
that a hurtif-d return \<- us made to the hotel.
Several physicians, were promptly summoned,
hut th^re was little they could do except ease
th<" ,'idmira! from pain.
The change in his condition If pathetic. He
cannot movf even the shortest diHtance with
out assistance. Mrs. Sampson is invariably at
his Hide, and seems to anticipate his slightest
wish. He acts like one who has not the slight
est interest in life. He is said to he unable to
walk more than a few feet, and his eyes lack
lustre, whtlo hifi face 1b pallid— the color of
parchmenr.
Th<* admiral and those who surround hhn have,
taken every precaution to conceal his condition
even from those who live in the bOteL People
who inquire for him are all given the tame re
ply: "The admiral Is very well and resting,
but he must deny himnelf to visitor;-."
JOHN HOPPER BIER FROM RABIES.
HE WAS BITTEN BY A STRANGE DOC, IN HIS
BARN THREE AND A HALF MONTHS AGO.
Hackensack, K. J.. Aug. 31 . (Special).— John
Hopper, a wealthy man. living en the Hopper
estate on the Pollifly Road, died this afternoon
from hydrophobia. The announcement greatly
shocked his many -friends here. Mr. Hopper
had been on the streets Thursday afternoon.
Three and a half months ago Mr. Hopper was
bitten by a strange dog that had entered his
barn in the night and was found asleep In the
manger. As Mr. Hopper reached over to get
some eggs the dog jumped at him, biting his
upper lip badly. It was not thought that the
dog was mad, but Mr. Hopper had the wound
thoroughly cauterized by Dr. St. John.
Last Thursday morning Mr. Hopper, while
washing his hands and face, was suddenly seized
with a spasm of the throat muscles. He said to
the coachman: "I believe that Is the symptom of
hydrophobia." •
Dr. St. John and Dr. Swayze scarcely left Mr.
Hopper's side after they learned of this attack,
and Dr. Carlos F. Macdonald was summoned
from New-York, but the symptoms developed
rapidly, and the hydrophobia beame pro
nounced early this morning. Spasm followed
spasm, and death came as a relief to the victim.
Mr. - Hopper belonged to one of Bergen
County's oldest families. The Hopper home
etead, still In fine condition, was built before the
Revolution. He was a bachelor, sixty-five years
old, and lived with his ulster and his cousin. Miss
Annie Berdan. He was a recognized "first
nlghter" at New- York theatres, and was a lav
ish entertainer. He was a nephew of the late
Judge John Hopper, of Paterson, after whom he
was named. His father was one of the famous
horsebreedera of his day, having a private track
on his farm. ... - - . •
THE START FOR THE FUTURITY. NO. 5 IS YANKEE, THE WINNER.
NEWS OF TWO CAPITALS
WINNER IN A POLICE PROTECTED POOL
ROOM WAYLAID BY HIGHWAYMEN
IN'ER IN BROAD DAYLIGHT. POOL
3OM WAYLAID BY HIGHWAYMEN
IN BROAD DAYLIGHT.
It Is generally true that where one form of
vice flourishes without restraint in that same
place vice in other forms will soon make Itself
manifest. This is well illustrated in that part
RUSSIA'S ATTITUDE TOWARD PROPOSED of Queens borough known as Maspeth. There,
QUBTTA-NUSHKI ROUTE AROUSES as has been plainly demonstrated in the col
umns of The Tribune, various poolrooms have
GLOOMY FEELINGS IN BRITISH I)een dolng a jsk business for some tlnie . Since
TRADE CIRCLES. Captain Hardy and his men have not inter
(Copyrisht; 1*01: By Th. x^r-Tork Trlbun*.) " fered with the9e «»»"««. it is by no means
[„ CABI.B to r.. ™ n .) astonishing that other kinds of crime are rife
_ in the Seventy-seventh Precinct. On Thursday
London. Aug. 31. An Incident which has a man named Baker, of Brooklyn> was knO cked
escaped general observation in England may dQwn &nd reUeved of &bout N> Baßer had
have a moral for Americans. It is the -tab- wQn the m ft| tM Germanla Club , a 001 .
Hshment of a German coaling station in the roQm m Plu-ll c ., about nalf a mils east
Farsan. or Kermeh group of islands, in the ; of Metropolltan . ave He had left the poolroom .
, ,_. iff Uetropolltan-ave H^ had left the r"<»lrf"^n.
Red Sea. Russia has coveted a harbor In these , . _ „ _ . .
islands, but has not ventured to take possession ! * n J ™ S Walkin * Up »»»»»*'• • Before he
of the group. Germany, without giving offence had PUt a httn ** d >'a rd * between himself and
to England, and probably by preurrnngement. the Gcr ™nla Club the assault took place, in
has obtained a foothold there, and la treating broad ' 1:i - vl! ' ;:ht
the entire group aa a possession of the empire. Eaker was carr!cd tnto a ?aloon near b> *' and
A coaling and naval station will be established i was • ttended a Dr - Dovvd - who !lves in the
and extensive works constructed This has neighborhood. Baker was not seriously hurt.
been done in the interest of German commerce althc>u h he did not go to his home until yes
with the Far Bast and for the sake of strength- day morning. This occurrence serves to il
eninK the navy which the Emperor is building lustrate the general state of things in Maspeth.
as the chief work of his reign The tin- has !In wveral •• : -'-' of The Tribune reporter to that
. . „ t spot no sign of a policeman was at any time to
gone by when Russia can obtain a naval sta- h( , found
tion near Aden and Uaasowah, sine* the Ger- a.i Captain Hardy had repeatedly denied the
man Emperor has closed the question. The existence of poolrooms in his district, and as it
moral of this episode Is that the Emperor may had ''-"'^f evident that nothing could be hoped
v. ... , , ¦ for from him. a higher authority was yesterday
have eyes upon other titea for navul atatlopii Appealed to. in the person of Commissioner Mur
for the development of German roni^nera^ [ phy hlmswlf. T:i»- result was precisely what It
While Amerlcanf- are planning a canal across [ ad been In the case of Hardy A report waa
Nicaragua or Darien. and negotiating over a t how , ny,n * y , Mr Murphy stating that Captain
revision of the dayi >«.Bulwer Tn v , Hurdy had been ordered to investigate the a -
re%lslon of the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty, he may gM un i aW ful proceedings in his precinct. The
be casting about for a naval station at St. report also showed that Captain Hardy had
LONDON.
GERMANY'S NEW ACQUISITION IN TFIE
RED SKA 18 SIGNIFICANT.
YESTFRDAY'S FUTURIT V CROWD ON THE LAWN FN FRONT OF TUB GRAND STAND.
Thomas or in the adjacent islands. Th*» pur
chase of the Danish group by the United States
Government may be the wisest possible measure
for anticipating his enterprise and avoiding an
open challenge of the Monroe Doctrine.
"The Times" has a dismal leader on the oppo
sition offered by Russia to the opening of the
Quetta-Nushkl route between India and Persia.
This route avoids Afghan territory and passes
through Belstan to rtlrjand and Kerman. and is
a shorter and safer channel of trade between
India and the commercial centres of Eastern
Persia than the ordinary Bandar-Abbas route.
Russia, having acquired effective control over
the customs service of Persia by virtue of a
loan contracted last year, Is offering strenuous
resistance to the development of traffic by the
new route. Indian traders are convinced that
Persia is virtually in the Russian sphere of in
fluence, and that British commerce will be
blocked and paralyzed. "The Times" considers
the decline of British trade in that quarter a
natural consequence of the inaction of the gov
ernment when it might have been possible to
secure a loan from London capitalists and avoid
arming Russia with fresh resources for extend
ing her influence over Persia. It urges the ne
cessity of more resolute British statesmanship,
but clearly is not hopeful that anything can be
done. The British Foreign Office has been fortu
nate in having few advantages taken by rival
powers of the opportunity offered by the South
African war. It owes its immunity from at
tacks mainly to the pacific purposes of the Czar
and to the close relations of the British royal
family with the Continental- courts. The block
ing of the Persian trade route is not a large
gain for Russia.
No progress has been made toward a solution
of the problem of diplomatic ritual involved in
the genuflection and prostration of the Chinese
mission before the German throne in expiation
of the Peking outrage.
The Czar, having made engagements with the
French President and with Edward VII, is Im
portuned by Dr. Leyds for an Interview with
Continued on I -Mirth y«*c.
ROBBERY IN MASPETH.
done as ordered and had found no poolrooms.
The report also showed a statement from Com
missioner Murphy to Inspector Clayton, saying
that the commissioner was satisfied no pool
rooms existed in the Seventy-seventh Precinct.
CHILI TO BE REPRESENTED.
APPROPRIATION VOTED TOR PAN-AMER
ICAN CONGRESS DELEGATION.
G. t,. Duval. of No. 25 Broad-st, yesterday
received a cable message from a correspondent
in Chili, saying that the Chilian Congress has
appropriated the money necessary to pay the
expenses of a delegation to the Pan-American
Congress to be h-'M in the City of Mexico in
'•(•tol.er.
WORK OF NICABAGUAN CONGRESS.
TRKATY WITH MEXICO APPROVE!*—AMERI
CAN RELATIONS UNCHANGED.
Managua, Aug. 31.— The Nlcaraguan Congress
has approved the treaty of amity and commerce
with Mexico, postponed the Merry-Sanson com
mercial treaty with the Tnlted States, and in
dorsed President Zelaya's acts of the last year,
through his Cabinet officials.
GOVERNOR SHAW AND PRESIDENCY.
Dcs Molncs, lowa.. Aug. 31. — Governor Leslie M.
Shaw arrived here this afternoon. With regard
to the interview with Benator Dolllver. in which
it was stated that Governor Shaw will be a can
didate for Presidential honors in 1904, he said:
No I am not a candidate for President. The
Senator DolUver interview wail as unexpected as
it was kind I like business better than politics,
and the two will not mix. I shall be slow to
break away from my previous Intention of keep
ins out of politics. It is too early to decide and
too early to talk about it. The one thing to t>«
considered now la the campaign upon which we
are entering.
Sunday and Labor Day str. Chester W. Chapln
to New Haven.,. A day oaL.L Sound. See adv.—
'Advt. . '
(COpyrlffht; IKM; B» The rrvs«ik»
VI-XEZUELA AGGRESSIVE
EXEQUATURS OF COLOMBIAN
CONSULS REVOKED.
A NEW AND SERIOUS MOTE IN THE
COMPLICATIONS BETWEEN THE
TWO SOUTHERN REPUBLICS.
Willemstad. Island of Curagoa, Aug. 31.— The
exequaturs of all consuls of the United States of
Colombia in Venezuela have been withdrawn.
An exequatur is a document Issued to a con
sul by the government to wnlch he Is accredited,
giving him official recognition and authorizing
him to exercls- his powers. If withdrawn
tan no longer act r.s cons ji. Ac<- -rding to the
above dispatch it wou'.rl se^rti that the Colom
bian consuls have pract'cally been expelled
from Venezuela— a step of serious significance.
VENEZUELANS ON FRONTIER.
\ SAID TO BE READY TO AID COLOMBIA?:
REVOLUTIONARY PARTY- OVT
BRKAK FK.VRED.
Port of Spain. Island of Trinidad, Aug. 31. —
There are massed near San Cristobal and Cu
| cuta, on the Colombian frontier, 9 "•»*} Venei*
i uelans, under Generals Echeverria and Davila,
! In constant readiness to support the Colombian
revolutionary party. It is reported that Co
lombian regular forces to th« number of 5.4«"*>
are near Cwmta, and serious complications are
feared.
PEKt'S CABINET MAY RESIGN.
Lima, Aujr. SL— HIM resignation of the Peru-
vtan Cabinet seems to be imminent. In conse
quence of the legislative tangie which exists.
THE CONTRACT FOR HAVANA.
CHANGES INT REQUIREMENTS FOR BIDS
ELECTORAL LAW APPROVED.
Havana, Aug. 31.— Mr. Barden has written a
letter to the municipality of Havana to the
effect that Governor-General Wood approved of
the chanjes In the specifications and conditions
for letting the contract for the sewering and
paving of Havana. These changes are that on
the bidding a deposit of only $UIM,uOO cash or a
certified check to that amount shall be required.
with an additional deposit of $300.01i0 on the
obtaining of the contract, and also that instead
of 10 per cent being deducted every month from
the estimates until the contract shall be fin
ished. 10 per cent shall be deducted until
fRHfcOOO is held back, thus leaving a total re
serve of $1,250,000. This amount is to be paid
In five annual payments, beginning immediately
upon the completion of the contract.
There is also a change in the matter of paving.
Mr. Barden will test three kinds of paving ma
terial for streets on which there is heavy traf- ,
flc, sections being paved with vitrified brick,
granite blocks and Medina sandstone, the one
lasting the best to be selected.
The Constitutional Convention met to-day and
read over the electoral law, which was approved
in Us entirety.
The Banco Naclonal has deposited $1,386,000
with the island treasurer, and it will be allowed
to hold government funds to that extent.
ROBBERY OF GERMAN BANK
Havana, Aug. 31.— The "Discusion" says to
day that Upmann & Co., German bankers of Ha
vana, have been robbed of $28,000 by the same I
man who recently robbed the Spanish bank. Mr.
Upraann rttuses to say anything regarding the
affair. .J
YANKEE WINS FUTURITY
HANOVER COLTS RECORD
TIME VICTORY.
NASTTTRTirM NEVER IX THE H~\T—
UTS. CASTA SECOND AND BARRON
THIRD— PERFECT COXPfTIONS
AKD 810 CROWD FOR
THE GREAT RACE.
John E. Maddens Hanover — Correction eort
Tankee yesterday won the classic Futurity, at
Sheepshead Bay, fn the presence of twenty-five
thousand cheering spectators, in the fastest tima>
j on record for the celebrated race.
The race was another demonstration of fhe>
j oft proved fact that nothing on this terrestrial
; globe is more uncertain than horseractng. tar
, far away in the rear— so far away that many
¦ of the spectators did not even see him finish—
¦ galloped Nasturtium, the fine, powerful Water
; cress colt for which William C. Whitney paid)
somewhere between $50,000 and $75,000 with)
the definite purpose of training him for fh*
Futurity and of winning that event with ntm.
For all that, a fine colt, bred in the niiiulsl
and son of one of the greatest racehorses eves 1
foaled in this or any other country, waa tte
winner, and incidentally confirmed the Judg~
¦ ment of his owner in paying $20,000 for him &m
I a yearling.
Many wise turfmen shook their heads wbni
| Mr. Madden paid this lr.rge sura for the sea eft
i Hanover, and. In view of the many, many risks.
: that attend the life and training of thorough
j breds. it took a deal of courage on Mr. Maddens)
; part to risk that sum on an equine infant, bo*.
: the risk has been rewarded, for Yankee won*
$36,910 for his owner yesterday, or more thjuS
$16,000 above the price paid for him.
The big stake, the richest fixture on the Anmvw
| lean turf, was worth this year a total of $48,910.
| and of this »urn the Albemarle Stable receives
$4,166 tJ6 for Lux Casta's second, and John Daly
$2,083 34 for Barron's third. Morris & Younaj
j get $2,000 as nominators of the winner, the es-.
, tate cf Marcus Daly $1,250 for entering L«ra
i Casta. and J. B. Haggln $500 as the nominates)
j of r.arroo, the third horse. Not since 1885 has
i the Futurity been so well worth winning. I»
: that year it amounted to a total of $53,190. Last
year the total value of the stake that BaUyhoo>
Bey won was $33,580.
The time of the race. 1:091-5. speaks for itseltt
The conditions were perfection, and no Fu
| turity winner ever covered the course so fast.
; And yet what of Nasturtium, the grand colt upo»
whose chances so many hopes were built, who.
with his stable mate, Kirg Hanover, was always
a strong favorite tn the betting, and who waa
! nsver for an instant in the breathless strugg!»
j for the rich prise and greater glory? It appears
that the race, splendidly contested and brilliant
ly won as it waa. showed absolutely nothing as
to the merits of this costly colt. When the
starter's flag fell every horse was in line, and It
locked to be a perfect start. The son of Water.
c ress, however, was apparently not well into his
stride At any rate, within a few yards the rest
t tr.e n>ld had « **• him two lengths behind, and
had c!osed tn ahead of him so compactly that
. he never had an opportunity to gret through, and
; Turner, when he saw that the case was hopeless.
• wlsel> eased him up at th<? turn. If anybody is
to blame it is the jockey, but the case appeared
to be one of bad racing luck, pure and simple.
No Futurity was ever run under finer condi
tions. The day was apparently sliced out of
the Indian summer bo<]'.ly and brought forward
six weeks or so. The air was soft and the sua
mild and grateful, while a cool breeze blew in
from the sea over the white sails of scores of
vessels, that could be seen afar off from tha
top of the grandstand.
The crowd waa rather late In arriving, but
¦when it came it came with a rush. At noon
the grandstand and the lawns were as quiet as
a. village churchyard, but two hours later not a
seat was to be had within the whole spacious^
lnclosure. Hour after hour the horde pouredi
In — horsemen, brokers, bankers, touts, clerks.,
mechanics, clubmen, society folk from New
port, Southampton or the mountains — all bent
upon seeing the famous contest between the
princes of the thoroughbred world, and most of,
them Intent upon exercising their skill at plck^
Ing the winning horse.
Just as big crowds have been at the beauttfaf 4
home of the Coney Island Jockey Club before*
but no throng more representative of the wealth,
and fashion of this city and its environs ever
assembled at a racetrack. It was notable that,
a goodly number of the thousands were of the
sort not numbered among the regulars.
Daintily gowned women and escorts no less
Ignorant of horse racing than themselves^
strolled about the lawns or gathered In the*
clubhouse boxes by hundreds, while men of
wealth and Influence in tfce weightiest affair*.
of the city were to be seen on every hand.
Among the better kno*rn men to b« met witlk
In the clubhouse or the paddoclt were the fol
lowing: August Belmont. Perry Belmont, James
; R. Keene. J. G. Follansbee. John Sanford, WUI
| lam C. Whitney. Harry Payne Whitney. Harry
i W. Smith. Thomas Hitchcock. Jr.; Francis K_
Hitchcock. Sidney Paget. Joseph E. Wldener.
Philip J. Dwyer. Craig Wadsworth. James S.
Wadsworth. Clarence H. Mackay. William
H-ndrie, James S. Ferguson, Sidney Smith.
John EL Madden. Captain S. S. Brown, James
B. Haggln. Colonel Green Clay. Edward Gardi
ner, Julius Fleischmann, William H. Seeley.
Benjamin Oxnard. Henry T. Oxnard. James T.
Oxnard. A. H. Morris. Charles J. Enright, Albert
Featherstone. David Gideon. John Daly. I* 3.
Thompson. General William H. Jackson, Wynd
ham Walden. William Laimbeer, William C
Hayes, Cornelius Fellowes, Andrew Miller. J.
Robinson Beard and Colonel James E. Pepper.
Of course, all talk centred on the big racew
and comment, gossip and rumor were busy with
the various candidates from the moment the
gates opened. It was generally admitted that
In the light of past performances Nasturtium's
chances looked the brightest. Just how much
the public judgment was affected by the fact
that a record price had been paid by Mr. Whit
ney for the colt it is impossible to say. but there
was never any doubt that the Whitney stable
would go to the post a strong first choice. Every
eye was anxiously directed to the official board
while the first three races were being run, tat
none of the candidates for the Futurity were
withdrawn until the third race. Then the man
with the chalk wrote the name of Goktanitta
among the scratches. This caused little sur
prise, as It was thought this Meddler colt, who
was to carry the top weight of 131 pounds, waa
overburdened. It was. moreover. Interpreted as
an indication of confidence on the part of Mr.
Whitney's trainer In Nasturtium's ability to
perform the task required of him. A \ttle later
Carroll D. was scratched, and wisely. ?or he had
no possible chance. Neither sad Gunfire, far,
that matter, but very likely Mr. Madden reck~
MAN-A-CEA! MAN-A-CEA! MAN-A-CEA!
Doctors report this Wonderful Manganese Saraw
Water Cures Catarrh of the Stomach, Gastritis. I
when all Medicines fa Then -why experiment? •
Vrutgists, or Sea K. Curtis. 13'Stona 3u— AivV_J

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