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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 11, 1901, Image 1

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VOLV 0L LXI-.N°- 20,084.
DffIjONIALB NOT INVITED.
BfIBES CONSERVATISM AT THE LORD
MAYOR'S BANQUET.
BRITISH TRAMWAY BIDDERS AND AMERI
CA—A. WAITING WINSTON CHURCH
ILL'S LEAD.
—j^-^j*,.. i<w,i . By The New-Tork Tribune.)
IBT CABLE TO THE TRIBUNE- 3
t/mdon Nov. 11. 1 a. m.— Without doubt the
-" o' London Corporation is one of the most
bodies in the civilized world. Year
X year representatives of the self-governing
Monies are passed over in issuing invitations
707 0 the Lord Mayor's banquet. This year the
rents general actually caused a request to be
rade to the Lord Mayor that greater Britain
cfcnuld in -me way be suitably represented at
th e Guildhall, having regard to the tour of the
Prince aid Princess of Wales, and the prominent
nan the colonies had taken in assisting the
Mother country in South Africa. The civic au
thorities recognized the colonies by a special car
,- the annual street pageant, but they cou.d
rot « re their way to comply with the suggestion
cf the agents general, the excuse being that all
available space in the Guildhall had already
been allotted. Its antiquated invitation Hat is
one of the several things the Corporation of
London faithfully adheres to, and there are
many pe-sor.s of do political, social or commer
cial influence who are supposed to have a tradi
tinal right to attend the banquet. Not a few be
lieve the Guildhall ceremony should really be
what the procession purports to be. a summing
up of the events of the previous twelve months.
If this principle had been adopted, the colonies
would certainly not have been ignored.
yews reaches here from Berlin to the effect
•hat representations are being made to the Ger
-ar. Ministry of Commerce as to the necessity
4 .-mediate alterations in the commercial laws
fasblingr manufacturers and others interested in
an industry to combine and regulate the markets
wider certain conditions. These representations,
it is understood, are due to the belief that Amer
ican capitalists are endeavoring to acquire con
trolling interests in undertakings having busi
ness relations with the State and desire to de
feat them.
British tramway interests appear as yet a long
tray from feeing able to meet American competi
tion, Judging from the tenders tor contracts in
vited by the London County Council in connec
tion with the electrification of its southern sys
tem. Six firms, on which one was American.
tendered for the execution of the road work and
plate laying. The American firm sent in several
tenders, the highest being £183.131, as compared
■Ml the lowest British tender. £183.631- The
lowest American tender was £16T»,3>4. and the
highest British tender. £230,932, the difference
being £Gs,.>lS, or. roughly. 30 per cent.
Most of the Unionist papers this morning en
deavor to extract consolation out of Lord Salis
bury's speech at the Guildhall, but "The Mail"
Is disappointed, and describes It as not one of
his happiest eSorta, while the pro-Boer journals
complain that It adds nothing to the knowledge
of the nation.
It 5s reported that the appointment of General
1 lan Hamilton as Lord Kitchener's chief of staff
is part of a. scheme which was propounded im
mediately after the return of th* Kin? from the
Continent about six weeks ago. with the object
of bringing the war to an end before the corona
tion festivities. A more aggressive attitude than
has been followed by the British troops for some
months past la to be adopted. A new campaign
has, it is said, been planned at home, and unless
Lord Kitchener should decline to be complaisant
it ought to be developed about Mew Year's Day.
According to the Berlin correspondent of "Th"
Chronicle." the German railway authorities are
arranging to run a train in connection with the
arrival of the North German Lloyd steamer?,
which wjil leave Hamburg and Bremen twice
weekly, and travel via Berlin to Genoa, return
ing from Genoa via Frankfurt. It is believed
that if this plan can be carried out it will divert
much of the American passenger traffic which
at present passes through Liverpool and Lon
don for Southern Europe.
It is with not quite placM interest that the
rroceedineF at (he Constitutional Club to-mor
row Bight are being awaited. Winston Churchill
Is then to initiate a dlUL— lnn on the future
policy of the Unionist party, and the line he will
take is b matter of some importance, seeing that
he is already a considerable person in politics.
The man:;- of his father has fallen upon him.
ard It Is then fore not difficult to foreshadow his
lead He will doubtless pr p ach a strong imperial
and fnrc-:gr, policy, and advocate social reform
ud economy in finance. Many who follow his
career with Interest trust that he will not make
■ - stake of his father, who allowed economy
at ar.y price to run away with him. to his own
etc.- I. K. F.
TO FREE CAPE COTTONY.
■MTiSH FORCES FALL BACK ON THE
LOYALISTS TO DO THE WORK,
baadon, Nov. 11— In a letter dated October 23
Ife Ca;- Town correspondent of "The Daily
Mail- taya:
Lord Kitchener and Sir John Gorden Sprigg
<ite Cape Premier) have arranged a scheme for
°* espulEion of the Invaders from Cape Colony.
-- total commission of imperial and colonial mi.i--
chief? has been Fitting here for some days
***■ to draft a scheme. .
■ is understood that this provides for the
■*«* taking a large share in th» future of the
campaign and contributing largely toward its
CDst . - Apparently a levy of loyalists en masse
11 &c ilea Involved.
Wkbaxs saucy message.
CE *ERAL SMITH EXPECTS TO CAPTURE
THE REBEL CHIEF SOON.
Manila, Nov. lo— According to advices from
Ck'-aiogan, capital of the island of Samar. Luk
bat t!^t Insurgent leader, has sent a message to
Gene Smith declaring that he will not listen
10 'foliations for surrender until ail the Ameri
cans have withdrawn from the Gandara Valley.
General Smith has ordered every American
"**** fa the islands of Esmar and Leyte never
*° be without arms, even at meal time. He is
c««xniiaed that there shall be no more surprises.
*«<5 commanding oncers will be held responsible.
General Smith also directs that scouting must
continue incessantly, and that all rice and hemp
capture must be destroyed. He considers the
«hort tT ° f Lukba « oni . v a question of a very
F EI>ERAL CONVENTION does little.
uck of harmony characterizes ITS
t SESSIONS IN manila.
Manila; N '"' "' 10.— The Federal Convention
of nt " nu *"B" B its meetings, but these axe. as a rule.
tor^ ** !bultnt character, and very little is ac-
***" Personal bickerings prevent har
; ; y- Sefior Buencammo challenged Seflor
Velasco to a duel, but the latter refused to
fight on account of the ace of the challenerer.
Many provincial delegates have already left
In disgust. Sefior Sabella Reyes wanted to enter
upon the minutes of the convention an expres
sion of the regTet felt by the delegates at the
iack of interest displayed in the work of political
organization. Thrice Senor Ruenoamino left the
room saying he would never return. In each
instance he yielded to the persuasion of his
friends that he should go back, and finally he
formally tendered his resignation, but only to
appear again at the evening session.
The question of the friars has been occupying
much of the time of the convention. Intense
antipathy is shown toward them, and the sense
of the convention was practically unanimous
that they must go.
BULGARIA WARXED.
MAY BE HELD RESPONSIBLE. SHOULD
THE BRIGANDS KILL MISS STONE.
Sofia, Bulgaria, Nov. 10. — Information has
been received here from Doubnitza that the
band of brigands holding captive Miss Ellen M.
Stone, the American missionary, called about a
fortnight ago at the village of Smetchevo and
subsequently proceeded to the monastery of
Rilo, but the movements of the troops compelled
the brigands to flee toward the frontier, where
they are now in hiding.
It Is also asserted that the brigands have re
cently been treating Miss Stone with more
severity In order to exercise pressure and to
compel a more ready acceptance of their condi
tions.
Consul General Dickinson is inflexible. He
insists that the surrender of Miss Stone must
precede or be simultaneous with the payment of
the ransom. His attitude is justified by the
known determination of some members of the
band, particularly the captain. Yanne San
daneky. to kill Miss Stone and her companions
so soon as the ransom is received, owing to the
fact that the captives have now acquired in
formation concerning the secret committees.
Competent persons, however, express the opin
ion that the cupidity of the brigands will over
come their fear of revelations, and all such ap
prove the declaration of Mr. Dickinson.
Yesterday Mr. Dickinson made energetic rep
resentations to the Bulgarian Government
against the movements of the Bulgarian troops,
reproaching the officials with the fact that.
notwithstanding their solemn promises to give
him all assistance in their power, their action
was embarrassing the negotiations, retarding a
settlement and placing in jeopardy the life of
Miss Stone. He made a definite declaration
that the Bulgarian Government would be held
responsible for the death of Miss Stone and of
all the consequences of her death, should it be
proved that the attitude of the Bulgarian Gov
ernment forced the brigands to kill their cap
tives.
FREXCH VICTORY COMPLETE.
SI'LTAN GRANTS EVERY DEMAND AND
THE SQUADRON HAS BEEN OR
DERED FROM MITYLENE.
Paris, Nov. 10— The French Foreign Office has
announced that the Pulran has signed an irade
for the execution cf his engagements with the
French Government, and that the Franco-Turk
ish dispute is now at an *-nd.
Tewfik Pacha. Ottoman Minister of Foreign
Affairs, wrote a letter to m. Bapst. councillor of
the French Embassy in Constantinople, giving
notice to him of the signing of the irade. which,
while settling the original French demands, ac
cepts the fresh demands as set forth in a dis
patch to the "Temps" from Constantinople Fri
day, and cabled to The Associated Press, to
gether with an additional clause by which the
Sultan pledges himself to consider "as author
ized in full right the foundations, extensions,
constructions and repairs of the schools and re
ligious and hospitable establishments which
Prance may desire to carry out if the Porte is
advised of her intentions, and makes no ob
jection within five months "
France has thus received full satisfaction, and
M. Delcasse. on the receipt of M. Bapst's dis
patch this morning, telegraphed him to inform
Tewfik Pacha that diplomati.-; relations had been
resumed, and that tL ' anst should consider
himself as regularly charged with the affairs
of xh* embassy.
Instructions were also sent to Admiral Call
lard, at Mitylene, • re-embark the marines and
to return to CJreefl waters, which is understood
to nr-an the vicinage of the island of Syra. Ad
miral Caillard will remain in the Levant some
time longer.
M. Constans. the French Ambassador, will re
turn to Constantinople shortly.
The additional clause was conceded at the re
quest of France in ord*-r to prevent future diffi
culties, such as the Turkish provincial author
ities have often raised. r-irlK-r on their own initi
ative or in consequence of instigation by the
Porte.
The "Temps." which describes the result as "a
brilliant victory for French diplomacy,"' says:
The great merit of the government was in be
ing able to restrict its action. Very serious diffi
culties might have arisen had France departed
from her reserve. The favorable disposition
shown to our representations abroad has been
due to the fact that the civilized world has had
opportunity during the last seven yetir.s to ob
serv< » the progress of the anti-European move
ment in the Sultan's councils. Frenchmen,
Americans. Austrians, Italians and Britons have
all been cheated by the Sultan and his council
lors. After the Armenian massacres and the
successful war with Greece, they thought every
thing was permitted to them.
We hope the Sultan will now understand his
duties toward the civilized powers and toward
his own ■Objects, unto wnom he has taken sol
emn engagements which he has always disre
garded. Otherwise Europe, which, thanks to
the energetic action of France, is now able to
reassume at Constantinople the authority she
lost seven years ago, will applaud the initiative
which the signatory powers of the Berlin Treaty
are reported to be about to take to extort from
the .Sultan the execution of clauses too long
fallen into disuse.
Constantinople. Nov. 10.— M. Bapst has re
ceived a dispatch from M. Delcasse authorizing
him to resume displomatic relations with the
Porte to-morrow. It is understood that M.
Constant will soon return to Constantinople.
AI'STRIA ALSO GETS SATISFACTION.
Constantinople. Nov. 10.— Baron de Calice, the
Austro-Hungarian Ambassador, has secured
from the Porte a satisfactory settlement of sev
eral questions that were pending between Tur
key and Austria-Hungary.
LMEBtCAV SCHOONER SEIZED.
CHARGED BY PORTUGUESE AUTHORITIES AT
FAYAL WITH AN ILLEGAL ACT.
London, Nov. 10.— The Exchange Telegraph
Company' has received a dispatch from Lisbon
announcing that a Portuguese gunboat has
seized the American schooner Nettie and Lottie
It Horta island of Fayal. the Azores, for clan
destinely' conveying twenty-six emigrants wb»
were trying to avoid military service.
ROUND TRIP TICKETS TO CALIFORNIA
r\r- X ale at all ticket offices,- offering: diversity of
On •~ alf ' rL " d returning via Chicago & North-
Wr-err Union Pacific "and Southern Pacific Rall
wa?» Offices. 461. 257 awl 349 Broad wav.-Aiivt.
NEW-YORK. MONDAY. NOVEMBER 11. 1901. -TWELVE PAGESr-brThS^A*.
CONVICTS HOLD SHERIFF.
HE AND A DEPUTY PRISONERS EH A
FARMHOUSE-POLICE HAVE TO
LET CONVICTS ESCAPE.
Topeka. Kan.. Nov. 10.— Sheriff Cook and Dep
uty Sheriff Williams, of this county, were capt
ured by two escaped convicts from the Fort
Leavenworth military prison this afternoon at
Pauline, five miles south of Topeka, and held
prisoners in the^ farmhouse of a man named
■Wooster for several hours. The convicts finally
escaped between a line of police sent from To
peka to reinforce the sheriff, and are now at
large. Both were slightly wounded. TVooster
was badly wounded by one of the convicts when
he tried to fire on them. Mrs. Wooster and
Sheriff Cook were held before the convicts as a
shield by the prisoners in making their escape.
A posse is in pursuit to-night.
At 230 o'clock this afternoon some farmer
boys near Pauline learned that the convicts
were in the neighborhood. Hastily forming a
posse, armed with target rifles, pistols and
clubs, they gave chase. Neither of the convicts
was armed, and they were unable to make a
stand. Later Sheriff Cook and Deputy "Will
iams arrived. Coming upon the convicts both
officers fired, wounding the men. but not dis
abling them.
The convicts then fled through a small open
ing in the timber and ran into the house of
Wooster. Sheriff Cook telephoned to Topeka
for assistance and then took up the chase.
Thinking the convicts had run around the
house. Cook darted through the open door, in
tending to surprise them at the rear door. But
instead of this the convicts had gone into the
house, and the officer almost fell into their
arms.
Sheriff Cook was ordered to give up his gun,
which he did. Deputy Williams by this time
had reached the house and entered, without
knowing what had happened inside, and he.
too. was made captive by the convicts.
In the mean time. Chief Stan!, of Topeka, and
eight officers, were on their way. They arrived
at the Wooster house about an hour after the
officers had been imprisoned. Chief Stahl im
mediately began negotiations with the convicts
to give up their prisoners and to surrender them
selves, but the convicts only laughed. Wooster
then managed to get a gun. and was about to
make an attack on the convicts, when one of
them laid him low with a blow from the butt of
a revolver taken from one of their captives.
The convict broke Wooster'a right hand, and
made an ugly gash in his head.
One of the convicts told Sheriff Cook that he
would be killed if he made the slightest move
looking toward their capture. In the mean time
the police officers on the outside had surrounded
the building, but were afraid to make a move
for fear that Cook and Williams would suffer.
Mrs. Wooster had fainted in the excitement.
She finally revived, and at 7 o'clock the con
victs placed the woman and Sheriff Cook in
front of them as shields and made for the door.
Then, after exacting a promise from the
Sheriff that he would not permit any of the
officers outside to fire on them, they started for
the open.
As they left the house, the frightened farmer.
his wife and the submissive Sheriff before them,
the convicts passer} between a cordon of police.
who easily could have captured them, and start
ed for the railroad track. The Sheriff in turn
had. exacted a promise from the police th.it
they would not molest the convicts, and they
did not.
After covering a considerable distance down
the track the convicts suddenly disappeared
through a hedge fence, bidding the officers a
mocking farewell. One of the police sergeants
later said he could easily have touched the le.vl
ing convict with his hand as be paspod.
Th" convicts bad secured a good start before
the officers had recovered from their surprise.
Then some of the policemen wanted to pursue.
but Sheriff Cook would not permit it. as he had
promised the convicts Immunity from arrest.
Chief Stahl left some of his 'non on the scene,
and with the others started back to Tcpeka to
take up the chase later on. From Topeka a
posse was started out. and Chief Stahl expressed
the opinion to-nighi thai be would land the men
before morning. The convicts are well armed,
and have taken all the guns in the farmhouse,
Including those of the Sheriff and his deputy.
They are both white men, but their Identity '.vas
not learned.
VEXEZI ELA \s WORRIED.
DISTURBED BY A REPORT THAT THE
UNITED STATES CONTEMPLATED
MEDIATION.
Wffiemstad, Island of Curacao, Nov. 10. Ad
vices received here from Capacho Vlejo, dated
November."), say that the report t:om President
■ to his brother, Celestino Castro, at San
Cristobal, to tN- effect that the Uni!<-,| States
Government 'insists upon mediating between
Venezuela and Colombia" ;aused the greatesi
excitement among the troops on the frontier.
General Crihe-Uribe and General Modesto ''as
tro Immediately set out for San Cristobal to ob
tain details.
It seems that General Dribe-Urlbe refused to
believe the report, declaring thnt he had no
fears as to the future of the Liberal cause, be
cause Preside! I Castro had given him a cast
iron pledge no! tc forsake him. "Should Presi
dent Castro prove untrue to th<"- Liberal cause,"
exclaimed General Urlbe-Uribe, "the result would
be his ruin. Tlr> war will enter Colombia before
Christmas."
There is considerable feeling against the
Castro family among th<- Colombian Liberals
and along the frontier in consequence of a wide
spread rumor that Celestino Castro, who is
commander-in-chief at San Cristobal, hns been
privately selling cattle to the enemy, the cattle
being whisked across th>- frontier by means of
alleged raids of Colombian Conservatives. Dur
ing one of these raids a dozen soldiers were
killed on both sides. It is said that tht- .-att!'
change hands at a prearranged price of s".<i a
head. The blood thus Bpilled is (hart;*'.! directly
to Celestino Castro by the indignant people of
Tachira.
From San Cristobal General Urtbe-i'ribe pro
ceeded for Maracaibo.
Dr. BduardO Blanco, Venezuelan Minister of
Foreign Affairs, has resigned his portfolio. He
will be succeeded by Dr. Pachano. The cause
of hip resignation was a disagreement regarding
thf- Colombian question, particularly the answer
of President Castro to the Pan-American Con
gress in the City of Mexico, which was sent
without Dr. Blanco's knowledge.
WHALE FISHING EXPERIENCES.
THE JOHN AND WI.VTHKOP ONLY GOT NINE
SPERM WHALES.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBUNE.]
San Francisco, Nov. 10.— One of the poorest
whaling catches reported this season was made by
the bark John and Winthrop, Captain M&comber,
which made report to-day from the Japanese coast,
thirty-four days from the sperm whaling grounds.
The vessel left this port on December 17. and nine
whales'." "producing 325 barrels of oil. represent the
total catch. The John and VUnthrop did no so
to the Okhotsk Sea region of right and bow head
whales and therefore had no opportunity to.ob
tair whalobone. At Hakodate several sailors de
.4 ted Oft the Japan coast the phenomenon of
four waterspouts at the same time in different
directions was seen by the men. but fortunately the
vessel escaped contact with any of them. *Wle
off the Japan coast also the John and \\ intnrop
was for four hours in the worst gale experienced
b * the vessel, and the fact that a whale was
deck and fat was nvlng around made the situation
decWedlv ' interesting. , The ale carried away two
boats, the main topsail and the mainsail. .'.,-."
• EARTHQUAKE SHAKES- ERZEROUM.
Constantinople. Nov. 10.-A severe <***» I "**
occurred on Friday at Erzeroum. Many hou^«
were destroyed, and the inhabitants sought safety
In the open.
A LA XVYER IX THE TOILS.
HE IS CHARGED WITH FORGING A
CHECK IN A PLAY TO CON
TROL A PATENT.
Everett Bodlne Latham, twenty-seven years
old, a lawyer, was arrested at his home. No. 4
West Forty-seventh-st.. yesterday, and locked
up in the West Thirtleth-st. station. He is held
on the charge of forging the certification to a
check for $5,000. The complainant is Lee A.
Atjnew. who lives at the Murray Hill Hotel, and
is president of the Agnew Auto Mailing Machine
Company, at No. 14H Centre-st.
According to the story told by Agnew and his
lawyer. James C. Lenney, of No. 140 Broadway,
Latham ingratiated himself into the confidence
of the former with the intention of setting con
trol of the patent on the machine which Agnew
invented. Agnew said that ho had spent ?4<U>oo
In the last ten years perfecting his invention.
In September. 1900, he met Latham, whom he
told of his invention. Latham, it is said, prom
ised to interest some capitalists in the device.
En May Lenney made a contract with Agne*r
by which the former was to pay $120,000 for the
patent. He paid Agnew $7,600, and was to have
paid $25,000 Wy January. Meantime, Agnew
says, Latham came to him and offered to give
$80,000 in cash for the patent, saying that
$250,000 in stock would be allowed to the in
ventor out of a million dollar capitalization of
the Auto Mailing Company. Agnew asked Len
ney to cancel the contract with him. Lenney
consented, when Latham, it is charged, present
ed a check purporting to be certified by the
Knickerbocker Trust Company. The check was
deposited in the Nassau Bank. Agnew later
went to the Knickerbocker Trust Company and
was told there by Secretary King that no check
had been certified by the company for Latham
Before Agnew's suspicions were aroused.
Latham went to the Patent Office and bad the
patent transferred to him. it is alleged. '
Th* prisoner says he is a graduate of Harvard
University, and a member of the law firm or
Latham & Latham, of Detroit. Mich. He will
be arraigned in Jefferson Market court to-day.
LIVELY EIGHT WITH BEAR*.
CUB DROPS AMONG HUNTERS AT LUNCH
EON, MOTHER AND ANOTHER BRUIN
QUICKLY FOLLOW.
[BT TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBUNE.]
Goshen. N. V., Nov. 10.— New-York hunt
ers. F. W. Low and Joshua Sands, and a friend,
Augustus Schneider, of Nyack. had a desperate
fight with two bears at Claraville on Saturday.
The hunters had been after partridges, and when
the noon hour came sat down to eat their
luncheon. A good sized bear cub tumbled down
among them from an overhanging spur of rock.
Almost at the same moment the mother bear
and a nearly grown young bear were upon them.
Low seized his gun and sent a charge of small
bird shot into the mother bear's eye. She went
down, but was quickly up and at him again.
With unerring aim Low sent a charge into the
other eye and hastily slipping another shell into
th- gun, finished her by a charge in the throat.
The claws tore his trousers as the bear fell.
The younger bear pursued Schneider and
Bands, whose guns had been left some distance
away. Sands reached the guns first and ran
back to his friend's assistance. His first charge
tor* the nose of the bear and his second lodged
to Its foreleg. It came on and reared to strike
•im At that moment Schneider poked his gun
over his friend's shoulder and stopped the bear
with a charge in the centre of the forehead. It
fell to the ground and Sands finished the brute.
All three men were more or less scratched. The
cub escaped.
SPEEDING "AVTO" HITS TREK.
OCCUPANTS ESCAPE DEATH BT A NARROW
IfARGIN-WOMAN AT THE L.EVEB
Tho details of nn automobile smashup which
um d in Yonkers on Saturday nighl on War
burton-ave reached tho authorities in Yonkers
to-day. Two automobiles, it Is said, were speed-
Ing along side by (ride at high speed There
were ti.r, mpants in one and two in the
other The vehicle which contained the thr^o
was a gasolene machine, ami was proceeding
a!.,n S the river side of the street toward Yon
kers. When the vehicles reached Bal k Place.
on Warburton-ave.. the machine on the river
side suddenly swerved, and in a twinkling it
crashed into a tree at the roadside. The three
occupants were thrown Into the air One, a
woman, struck on h<>r head, but rallied quickly
and rose to her feel before the male members
of the party, who had been hurled into the
middle of the street, could go to her assistance.
Tho firs; to aid the Injured parties were those
who occupied the other machine. Dr Holden,
who Mves near by. -.va.« summoned to attend th*>
t l , injured ones. No bones were broken, al
though a» bore severe cuts and bruises. Th<>
automobile waa a tangled heap of wreckage.
Th.> wreck was put into a wagon and carted to
New- York
The injured persons made a determined effort
to conceal their identity. It was learned, how
ever that the woman and one of the other
members of the party were Mr. and Mrs. Gold-
Ing of New-York City, but neither their address
nor the names of the others could be learned.
It was paid that the party had come from Ards
ley-on-the-Hudson. Mrs. Holding's injuries
were the most serious. Mrs. Golding. who. It
is said i* the owner of the machine, was operat
ing it herself at the time of the accident. The
avenue from Hayings Village to honkers is. a
level stretch of macadam and asphalt that in
vitea fast time. The place where the accident
occurred was on the asphalt pavement.
It is said that the chief cause of the crash
was probably a defective strip In the pavement
which was left by the local water department
after making an excavation to repair a water
main When the wheels of the vehicle encoun
tered this depression in the street it caused
the machine to swerve violently toward the
curb and. before it could be righted, it jumped
over" the curb and plunged into a tree, almost
thirty feet from the rut. Had it not been for
the tree the machine would have smashed into
the large plate glass window of a drug store
only a few feet away and directly in line with
the automobile. The injured persons boarded a
train for NVw-Ynrk. The accident occurred
about 5 o'clock.
ADRIFT OX SOUND IN OPEN BOAT.
TWO PISHEKMKX AT THE MERCT OF THE
WAVES-LITTLE HOPE OF RESCUE.
Milford. Conn.. Nov. 10.— Early this morning
two unknown men, supposed to have come from
New-Haven, rented a rowboat at Woodmont and
Btarted out fishing. When a short distance from
land they broke an oar. A strong east wind
was blowing off shore, and the men found it im
possible to put the boat about and return, and
they swiftly drifted out into the Sound. Will
iam Hall and Clifford Merwin put out in a row
boat after the unfortunate men. but after two
hours' work were compelled to return.
The New-Haven police were informed and two
tugs were sent out to look for the drifting craft,
but after searching for some hours they put
back to the city unsuccessful.
A high wind has been blowing- all day. the
water is extremely rough, and it is doubtful if
the small craft will live outside the breakwater.
If the men escape drowning it is probable that
they will be frozen to death, as they were in
sufficiently clothed for such an experience.
Croup can be cured with
JAI'XE'S EXPECTORANT.— AdvL
DESPERATE CHASE X AVENUE.
ANGRY MOB WATCHES FOLICEMAX'S FIGHT FOR LIFE
WITH ARMED PRISOXER.
MAN CHASE IX FIFTH-AYE.
TWO MEN IX DAYLIGHT ROBBED AT
THE MOT'TH OF A REVOLVER.
Two men were held up at 2 p. m. yesterday at
the mouth of a pistol and robbed of $i& Fol
lowing the robbery there was an exciting chase
down Fifth-aye. by a bicycle policeman and a
terrific struggle for the possession of the revol
ver, with which the prisoner attempted to shoot
his castor.
Intense excitement prevailed in Fifth-aye.
while a mob of several hundred persons joined
in the chase. They yelled threateningly at the
struggling prisoner, who fought desperately to
get free, but they feared to take a hand until
the pistol was wrested from him. Then they
crowded around the prisoner and tried to take
the law into their own hands by beating him.
The policeman held the mob off by the use of his
stick, and succeeded in reaching the station be
fore his prisoner could be taken away from
him.
Jacob Jaschernoritz and Robert Bonhi, Bo
hemians, were on their way to the Grand Cen
tral Station to board a train for the western
part of Pennsylvania, where they were to go to
work in the mines. They both had come from
Maspeth, Long Island, where they had been
working on a farm.
In a Madison-aye. car they met an affable
young man who said he was positive that he
had met them somewhere. They could not recall
any such meeting. The stranger offered to give
them any assistance in his power. When they
told him that they were on their way to the coal
mines he volunteered what they thought invalu
able information. He had been there, he said,
and knew all the ropes, and would have no diffi
culty in sending them to a mine where they
would get immediate employment, as he had
been part owner of the mine, and any one he
would recommend would be put right to work.
The Bohemians were profuse in their thanks,
and when he suggested getting off the car at
Forty-fourth-st. to walk to the Grand Central
Station they readily consented. He stood on the
sidewalk with the Bohemians for a while. talk-
Ing about mining and the amount of money
they could make.
SHOWED HIS MONEY TO THE STRANGER
"But have you enough money to pay for your
tickets 0 " asked the stranger, addressing Jascher
noritz. The latter replied that he thought so.
and to prove it drew a roll of bills from his
pocket He counted $4o\ and was about to put
the money ba-k in his pocket when the stranger
laid a hand on his arm.
"One minute, there. Bill." said the stranger,
and when Jasr-hf-rnoritz faced about h» looked
into the muzzle of a revolver. The Bohemian
tried to thrust the money In his pocket.
"None of that, now." s;iid th<- stranger, wrest
ing the money from the laborer: "if you begin to
howl I'll blow your h*ad off."
The Bohemians were dumb with fright, and
did not move until they saw the stranger turn-
Ing down Fifth-aye.
"Stop thief!" they yelled and started after
him.
A bier crowd was soon in pursuit. Bicycle
Roundsman Eugene Casey was standing at
Forty-seventh-st.. and at once mounted his
wheel and darted off in the chase. The straneer
was a Rood sprinter and of an athletic build.
Casey had soon passed the crowd and was clos
ing on the fleeing man
At Forty-second-st. the stranger turrit
toward the railroad station. Casey prabbed him
just east of Kifth-ave.
Th- deperado pointed his revolver at Casey.
The latter struck the prisoner's arm and d^alt
him .1 blow over the head with his billy. The
prisoner fought furiously to pet free. He had
wedged his fingers in some manner under the
trigger, and It seemed th».t the revolver would
explode any minute.
FIGHT WITH THK DESPERADO.
When the crowd came up the struggling pair
were locked together on the sidewalk, and it
5 .... m ,-.rl as if the policeman was getting tJr=>
worse ot it
"Drag 'he thief off 1 " the people yelled, but
when they caught a glimpse of the pistol they
.;. . ■,<. d thai it would be better to let Casey have
the tight out alone.
\fter rolling from one side of the street to
rhf other for about fifteen minutes. Casey man
ag*d f 1 pel Ms antagonist his back in the
gutter He clutched the hand holding the re
,n<l sank his knee in the German's abdo
men until he howled with pain. Th« prisoner
suddenly relaxed his hold on the revolver Just
as it was aimed at the policeman's head.
Lynch the thisf!" "Murderer:" and "Kill
him!" shouted the crowd.
At the Bicycle Squad station the prisoner said
he was Max Wiess, thirty years old, of No. 519
Sixth-st. He refused to say anything more
about himself.
Jaschernoritz and Boron i identified Wle P3 as
the affable German who had held them up.
When searched exactly $48 was found in the
prisoner's pocket. This Jaschernoritz identified
as his Wiess was locked up in the West Forty
seventh-st. station. He will be arraigned in the
West H i'i' 1 Court to-day on a charge of highway
robl cry.
Casey, in the fight with Wless. received con
tusions anil abrasions about the head and body.
He was relieved from duty and sent home.
where he was attended by the police surgeon
TWO HEADED BNAKB AT THE PARK.
THK REMARKABLE FREAK LIKKI.Y TO
STARVE BECAUSE IT FIGHTS WITH
ITSELF OVER FOOD.
A snake with two distinct heads is a much
prized acquisition to the serpent population of
the Now-York Zoological Park. It is only a lit
tle milk snake, about ten inches long, but as a
freak it is almost perfect. It was caught three
days ago in Pelham-ave.. where that thorough
fare crosses The Bronx Park.
V'hen the snake was first seen it was lying in
the road, and ooula easily have escaped had not
one head wanted to go one way and the other
head the other.
The keeper in charge of the snakes is much
afraid that the freak will die, for it will not eat.
It drinks all right, but when food is placed be
fore it the two heads fall to fighting and try to
bite each other.
In oher ways, however, the two heads show a
commendable inclination to co-operate. The
little serpent has been shedding its skin. When
the discarding of the old coat had got as far a*>
the junction of the necks, the heads combined
their efforts to finishing the Job. It was hoped
that this display of brotherly Wins °" he
part of the two heads meant a reformation, but
hope died away when the snake was tempted
To eat a-ain The heads renewed their fight.
Mr p'tmars was worried yesterday over the
Sir 33S Fulton-st_ Brooklyn— Advt
PRICE THREE CENTS.
BOYS BATTLE AT BATTERY,
WASHINGTON-ST. AND RR'>.\D -ST. GANG 3
FIGHT FIERCELY TO a FINISH.
The boys of lower Washington -sr and tooas
of Broad-st. have for many yarp kecSj en»mi»s.
Battle after battle has b-=>en fought between tho
two factions.
One day last week the leader of the Bros '. =t.
gang, who is known as "Wall Street Mike.' "
strayed into the enemy's territory. "Mike" was
alone and unarmed. It did not rake long for
some of the Washington-st. gang to "spot"
"Mike." and when he at lust reached him* th»
bumps and bruises on his face made h/m hardly
recognizable.
After a few days' recuperation "Mike" gath
ered about fifty of his friends Th" Washinsr
ton-st. boys, knowing that an attempt would be
made to avenge the punishment administered to>
"Mike." set about patherin~ their forces.
Yesterday morning the two gangs met outside
the north end of Battery Park. All the b^y«,
whose ages ranged from seven to fifteen years,
were armed with sticks and stones. The fight
lasted about two hours, and was frequently
broken up by the police. At last the Washing
ton-st. gang had to admit itself conquered for*
the time, most of the boys having received black
eyes and bloody noses.
The Broad-st. gang, headed hy "Mike." re
turned to their homes for dinner, rejoicing.
While the Brrad-st. boys were washing th e lr
faces and were dressing for ?'jr.day school, their
enemies were planning a swift revenge. Nearly
all the Broad-st. boys attend the Sunday school
in the Sisters of the Holy Rosary Mission, at No.
7 State-st. Sunday school there begins at 2
p. m., and ends at ?>.
When the boj s went into the mission every
thing in the street was quiet. During the Sun
day school session small boys gathered in front
of the mission. They were quiet and well be
haved. When the mission bell rang the Broad
st. boys began to file out. Suddenly one of them
spied a small form hiding behind a tree in tha
park. He told his companion, and then it was
noticed that a lot of similar forms were flitting
about here and there behind piles of paving
stones and elevated railway pillars. One of this
Broai-st. hoys ran back and told Father Bro?
nan. tho boys' teacher. When Father Brosnan
came out he was horrified to see- his pupils fight-
Ing with a lot of stranere hoys. In vain he shout
ed to them to stop. It was '~nly when the
Broad-st. boys say» up the unequal fight that
the battle was ended. The "Wash ns»ton-st. gang
i.^n- considers its revenge complete.
PANIC FOLLOWS COLLISIOX.
ONE MAN INJURED AND SEVERAL
WOMEN FAINT AFTER GARS CRASH.
Two cars loaded with passengers came into
collision at Fulton and Greenwich sts. yesterday
afternoon. The passengers were thrown into a
panic The right ankle of John German, forty
years old. of No. 24 Hart aw Jersey City.
was broken. He was taken to the Hudson Street
Hospital.
The collision was between cars of the Sixth
ave. and Eighth-aye. line? At Fulton and
Greenwich sts. there is a switch. The Sixth-aye.
car was bound to the Cortlandt-st. ferry, and
the front trucks took the switch, but the rear
truck wheels in some way turned up the Fulton
st. tracks. This threw the car off the track.
The Eighth-aye. car was close behind, and be
fore the motorman could stop it the car crashed
into the other one. Nearly every pane of gla«s
in both cars was smashed. Fortunately all the
passengers escaped injury except German, who
was on the Eighth-aye. car.
The passengers pushed their way out of th<»
Eighth-aye. car. some of them trampling on
German, who was unable to rise from the floor.
The scene in the Sftxth-ave. car was the same.
Men and women made a wild scramble for botn
doors. Policemen attracted by the screams of
the women finally mar.ag-d to qnict the pas
sengers.
Many of the women had fainted Th»y were
attended by Dr. Johnson, who cam** with an
ambulance.
The police did not make any arrests. Both
lines wer- blocked f r over an hour by th? col
lision.
MIBS WILLIAMS EOTXD.
MISSING DAUGHTER OF DR. G. A. WILLIAMS.
OF BROOKLYN. IN GREAT BAR
RINGTON. MASS.
Great Harrington. Mass.. Nov. 10.— Augusta
i Williams, daughter of Dr. G. A. Williams, of No.
440 Hancock-st.. Brooklyn, has been at the
home of Mrs. Ella Stiles since her sudden de
parture from her home last Friday. This after
noon she disappeared from Mrs. Stiles'a house
and was found to-night at the home of Samuel
Williams, near North Egremont. by Clarence
B. Rowe and W. W. Norton, who drove there
in search of her. She was taken to the home of
John Walsh, where she will be kept until th®
i arrival of Dr. Williams, who is expected here to
night from Hudson. The girl has acted
strangely and was hysterical to-night.
Dr. and Mrs. Williams, who believed that their
daughter went away while suffering from tem
porary aberration, were worried almost to dis
traction, when, about 2 o'clock yesterday after
noon. Dr. Williams was called to the telephone
in his house. A voice at the other end of the
wire said that Miss Williams was in Great Bar
rington, safe and sound, and wanted to talk to
her father. The girl did not explain why she
had left home, but said she was well, and would
come home at once. Then she would tell all
about her strange trip. Fearing that the girl
might not have fully recovered her reason. Dr.
Williams decided to go to Great Barrington and
bring her home himself.
When Miss Williams first disappeared her
father communicated with a number of places
where he thought she might have gone. Among
them was Great Barri.gton. where the girl spent
the vacation last summer with friends. At that
time he was told that nothing had been seen of
When'she left Brooklyn MM Williams carried
her SI- or $20 which she had saved in the
last two or three years. About six months ago
t» £h had a fall from a bicycle, since when
she has Sad much sickness. Her father thinks
thlt a sudden desire for new surroundings was
responsible for the girl's disappearance.
STEEL TRUST AFTER TROT PLAXT.
Troy. N. V.. Oct. 10.— Negotiations are being
carried on for the sale of the Breaker Island
plant of the Troy Steel Company to the United
Stales Steel Corporation. The plant, which is the
largest in the State, has been idle for five years,
and is now in the hands of a receiver. At one
time it employed more than three thousand men.
Last summer the buildings and furnaces w«r»
repaired at a larjje expense.

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