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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 27, 1901, Image 4

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jNO HURRY ABOUT OFFICES.
MR LOW WILL ANNOUNCE ALL AP
POINTMENTS AT ONE TIME.
. Mayor-elect Low announced yesterday that he
taking his time in making his appointments,
■sd that he did not Intend to make them public
until he had filled up his slate. Then, he said, he
would give out all th» names at once.
"When will that be?" Mr. Low was asked
That is hard to tell, but it will be some time be-
Tore Christmas," hft replied with a laugh.
"Then you may play the rol«* of a Santa Claus."
It -was suggested.
"Well, act quit* as Ist* as that," was the an
ewer.
Mr. Low then said that his conference with Mr
Hives yesterday was only one of many talks which
lift expected to have with the future Corporation
Counsel, and with others with whom he wished to
consult on matters pertaining to the n-w admin
istration.
"There Is a great deal of work, attendant upon
The making of appointments." he added, "and I ex
pect to consult with a great many people."
In speaking of the 2,000 letters which he had re
ceived up to Monday morning Mr. Low said that
not all were from applicants for office, but many
c*me from friends of candidate?, and others were
mere suggestions. Yesterday's mail brought in
•till more applications, which, however, had to be
thrown oat. in accordance with the rule that no
letters from candidates' received later than Satur
day midnight should receive consideration.
Mr- Low did not go to his headquarter? at all
yesterday, but spent the time at his home. So ex
acting has become the Mayor-elect"? task in can
vassing the boat of appointments and studying the
requisites of the different offices that he has given
•up his dally bicycle ride in Central Park.
Few names were brought forward yesterday for
appointments. One mentioned for Dock Ccrnmis
eiontr was that of Charles L. Rickerson. of the
Catskill Evening Line. Mr. Uickerson is a mem
ber of the Chamber of Commerce, the Produce
Exchange, the Hay and Feed Exchange and other
commercial organizations.
WHERE MR. LOW CAS FRCXE.
JPOWERS GIVEN BY THE CHARTER FOR
CUTTING OFF TAMMANY SINECURES.
The new administration will have abundant power
•under th« amended charter to lighten the burdens
Of the taxpayers and stop the waste and extrava
gance of the present Tammany administration by
preatly decreasing the enormous sum paid annually
in salaries in all the departments of the city gov
ernment. Not only can the new administration
abolish thousands of useless offices by which Tam
many political workers have teen allowed to fee<?
at the public crib, but it can also make sweeping
reductions of salaries which have been increased
•without measure or justice in the present adminis
tration.
The reductions in the number of private secre
taries, confidential clerks and messengers, now
everflowing the departments, will have to be made
■by the heads of departments appointed by Mayor
Low That there are thousands of such city em
ployes who could be. spared without Injury to the
public service i* known to every observant person
•who has occasion to transact business in the de
partments. At present there are so many of these
■use.ess officials that they impede work by getting
In law way of competent clerks.
The amended charter gives to the new adminis
tration the right, and lays upon it the duty, to fix
salaries in all the departments, except the Depart
ment of Education. Section ■ of the amended char
ter says in part:
It shall be the duty at the Board of Aldermen.
■upon the recommendation of the Board of Estimate
and Apportionment, to fix the salary of every officer
or person whose compensation is paid out of the
«-lty treasury, other than day laborers and teachers,
examiners and members of the supervising stall of
the Board of Education, irrespective of the amount
fixed by this act. except that no change shall be
made In the salary af an elected officer or head of
« department during his tenure of office.
No time for fixing the salaries is mentioned, but
the section says that all salaries in force on Jan
uary 1. 1932. shall continue In force until fixed by the
Board of Aldermen. Elsewhere in the section is the
following language:
The Board of Aldermen may reduce, but may not
increase, any salary recommended by the Board of
Estimate and Apportionment; but the action of the
Board of Aldermen on reducing any salary so
recommended shall be subject to the veto power of
the Mayor, as provided in Section 40 of this act. In
case the Board of Aldermen shall vote to reduce
more than one salary the Mayor may approve the
reduction of one or more salaries and may disap
prove the reduction of others.
It wili be seen that the Mayor and Board of Esti
mate and Apportionment have the main power to
decide as to reductions in salaries, and their de
cisions, if confirmed by the Board of Aldermen, may
affect salaries in the police force and in the Fire
Department, as well as in other departments, not
withstanding the fact that the salaries of the police
and fireman have been increased several times in
the past by the legislature.
KTNGS REPUBLICAN CHAIRMANSHIP.
"VTILLIAM J. MAXWELL LIKELY TO SUC
1 CEED WALTER B. ATTERBURT.
William J. Maxwell, the Fifth-aye. drygoods
dealer of the Xlth Assembly District, will be the
next chairman of the Kings County General Re
publican Committee to succeed Walter B. Atter
fcury. or at least that is what was being "tipped
off" by the political wiseacres last night. The
reorganization of the committee will take place
next Tuesday night, and it is probable that the
new officer;- of the executive committee will he
elected at the same time.
A'th-- | it seems practically sure that Mr Max
•wirll will be chosen to head the County Committee
it was said last night that there were several other
men in the Held For the purpose of talking over
the merits Ot the various candidates, and in order
that there may be fair play on all sides. Jacob
Brenner, chairman of th» executive committee, has
called a meeting of that committee for next Satur
day afternoon.
Mr. Brenner will undoubtedly be chosen to suc
ceed himself. Not a word against him has been
Tieard in any quarter. On the other hand, he has
been most warmly commended for the way he
handled the recent campaign, which has placed him
on a solia footing with the State leaders. Mr.
Brenner is modest, and says that he will give way
to Mr. Dady if the latter desire? to resume his old
position as chairman: but It is not thought that Mr.
Dady will care to do so.
One of the strongest points in favor of the selec
tion of Mr. Maxwell as chairman of the County
Committee lies in the fact that he is not a member
of the executive committee and has not been in
volved in any of the factional strifes in that body.
As a member of the County Committte for several
years he has done good and faithful work.
"For chairman of the County Committee we want
an able, clear headed man. one who has inde
pendent mean? ar.d time, so that he may be able to
take trips to Washington or Albany, as may be
necessary" said one of the committeemen last
night. "All of these qualifications are possessed by
Mr Maxwell."
PAYNE AGAINST TARIFF CHANGES.
Congressman Serene E. Payne, of Auburn. N. V.,
•was In this city yesterday, and went on to Wash
ington last evening. At th* Fifth Avenue Hotel
la the afternoon he was asued if he expected Con
press would make any change* in the tariff law at
Its comics session, and he replied: "I do not. There
has been some agitation in the "West for a revision
What's the
Tshe GENUINE is a cer
tain cure for all disorders arising
from impaired digestion and is
used by physicians in the treat
ment of physicians in the treat
of gout, rheumatism and
dyspepsia.
NATURAL ALKALINE
... WATER ...
Insist on having
the Genuine
VICHY Hrt*HlSkH
SOLD IN -PINTS AND QUARTS ONLY. 220 Broadway, v. t.
of the law but any chanpes Intended to improve
the law might have a bad effect upon trade
Mr. Payne was asked if he expected a ship suh
sidv bill to pass, and he said he thought that the
bill of last session would be passed with few
change*. A limit of .<:•.•■•.•-• a year Probably
would be fixed, he said, and there would be a
chance in the bill to encourage the building or
American fast liners that could be used as cruisers
in case of war.
LOW GUESTS OF GERMANS.
DINNER IN HIS HONOR AT ARION
HALL AFTER RECEPTION AT
THE BROOKLYN CLUB.
Mayor-elect Seth Low was entertained in Brook
lyn for the first time last nipht since the recen.
election. He was the guest of honor at a reception
in the Brooklyn Club, Pierrepont and Clinton sts
from S until 10 o'clock, when he went to the Eastern
District to attend a dinner given by the German-
American Union for the city and county officers
elected by the fusionists. at Arion Hall. Arion I lace^
near Broadway. When Mr. Low arrived at Anon
Hall, at 10:30 o'clock, the diners, numbering about
one hundred and fifty, arose and gave him three
hearty cheers. Henry Wefsmann. the toastmaster.
introduced him as the standard-bearer of the Ger
man-Amerlcars of Brooklyn. He apologized for not
speaking in German to a German gathering, saying
that he observed that some Irish-Americans were
present. With the Irish-Americans and German-
Americans standing together, corruption must
down he said. Timothy L. Brophy. chairman of
the Iri«=h-American Union, applauded this sentiment
rigorously. Another three cheers and a tiger greeted
Mr. Low when he besran speaking. He said:
It is a pleasure to me to meet you to-nich: ;
this occasion of rejoicing, and l am >;....
your chairman has spoken of me as t ho ~vp b**n
bearer of the German-Americans. As l ha\e D« »-n
prompted to carry your standard to victory in the
„■....,.■ _„ I trust wisdom will be given » to > me
tion so that you may say when the admlniFt™" 011
is ended. I have had your Interests at heart.
Although 1 have not yet assumed
the office of Mayor, there are some thing* I may
say of the city without impropriety, even at* this
time This was an election which turned entirels
on local matters, although efforts were made
to draw national politics Into the. ,»n.!^^. . 1 ■ ■■•
people of th. city of New-York aeterminea to
vote on questions relating to the city alone, and
the result is due to that determination. I tok
therefore that it is particularly interesting to
observe that no election in our city of recent years
*ias attracted surh worldwide attention Tho in
ference to be drawn from that is that when Nejj-
York considers its own welfare and votes upon. its
own interests it la acting in a manner tOMSOm
m>mii the attention of the while civilized world, De
cluee it is so great a city and Its influence is so
CWhlnC^f*cityC Whln C^f*city votes on national Issues, with
which It is concerned only as all other cities are it
attracts comparatively little attention. Among he
cities of the world I fancy there ia_ no other city,
unless it b- London— and even London in its
municipal aspect does not present so mter.stir.K »
problem as ours-there is no city that attracts, 80
much attention. I say that our recent election
attracted worldwide attention. I have received
congratulations from all over Europe, "hey have
come to me from Berlin. Vienna. Munich and from
German officials who are entire strangers to me.
The overthrow of Tammany, the ability of the peo
ple to do that thing, has pent a throb of hope
through the cities of Europe.
One letter I received was from a Japanese who
received his degree from Yale in the same class
that I received mine. He sent me a letter »rom
Paris, in which he said: fit Tammany hab been
■II i sail fill it would have been a profoui discour
agement to young Japan.'" It seems to me that
there is much to inspire us in the contemplation
of that circumstance. What we have succeeded
in doing in our city has been of service to wise
men all over the world I think that gives* in
spiration to those who have been charged with
the duties of the new administration to try to_jus
tify by our work the struggle that has betn waged
and the victory that has been won.
I am on« of tho=e who has always bel f^ed in the
consolidation which has resulted in Th» Present
city of New-York. In the long run I am. persuaded
that it will result in benefit to the entire city. I
m not unaware that parts of the city have thus
far had some of he disadvantages of consolidation
more than they have felt the advantage?, It Is
Hm ear" hope of the new administration that
we' shall be able so to administer the affairs of the
great city that every borough shall realize not onlj
that in union there is strength, but that in union
there is a great advantage for everybody There
is no glory in a city that is simply large, but there
'« great benefit to come from a city that is really
ereat All we want to do is to develope in every
part of our city the spirit of civic pride, a spirit at
civic devotion to the welfare of the entire city, that
every hamlet in the land will look to New-York as
an example when they try rr> think of a city that is
renowned for its citizenship."
The other speakers were Lieutenant Governor
Timothy L. "Woodruff, Ludwlg Ntasen. Edward H.
M. Ecehr, Frar.k Harvey Field, Charles Naeher,
W. John Schli3g*. Otto Kempner and ex-Judge
Jacob Neu.
To the right of Mr. Wetanann. the toastmsster.
sat Mr. Low, Ludwlg Klssen. Herman Ridder,
Frank Harvey Field and Edward H. M. Roehr, and
to the left Lieutenant Governor Woodruff, Con
troller-elect Edward M. Grout, County Clerk-elect
Charles T. Hartzheim. Register-elect John K. X- O.
Register James R. Howe. ex-Judge Jacob Neu and
Coroner-elect Michael J. Flaherty.
Among those at the other tables were Senator
Rudolph C Fuller. ex-Senator George W. Brush.
Naval Officer Robert A. Sharkey. ex-Judge Will
iam Schnitzpan, Magistrate Andrew Lemon and
Assemblyman Harris Wilson.
Early in the, evening Mr. Low was entertained at
an informal dinner by Controller-elect Grout. St.
Clair McKelway, James McKeen, president of the
Hamilton Club; Colonel Willis L. Ogden and Colonel
William Hester.
CANVASS ON VOTES FOR MAYOR.
The Republican Cour.tv Committee last evening
sent out a report of the official canvass of thf- votes
cast for Mayor in the greater city on November o.
to fhow that the Republican vote for Seth Low was
BMttjn or .841 per cent, while- the C: - :z- :.s Onion
vrte was 35,659. of 12 r ; per cent, and the vote- of the
Greater New-York Democracy was 10,712, c
per cent The total vote for Mr. Low was Ml
while the veto for Mr. Shepard was M 5£27
URGING G. LINDENTHALS APPOINTMENT
The German-American Reform Union Is under
stood to be favorable to the naming Of <* -
Lindenthal as Bridge Commissioner by Mayor Low.
ar.d it was- reported last night that Mr. Lindenthal
stood a better chance of appointment than any
one else at th^ present time. Mr. Lindenthal is a
consulting engineer, with an office at Xo. 45 Cedar
tt . and for many years has been chic! ensr!neer of
the North River Bridge Company. He was born
In Austria in 1830. and received his scientific edu a
tion for his profession in Vienna. From :■•■ to
IST4 he was employed as assistant engineer on raii
road and bridge construction in Austria and Switzer
land Ke came to the United States In 1874. and was
one of the engineers f r .r construction of ihf Cent* n
nial Exposition in Philadelphia. In 1888 he moved
f'om Pittsburc to this city. H< has been a natural
ised citizen of 'hi? country for twenty-two years.
He is ;■ member the fol owinj bo leties Amor
Sean 'Society o: Civil Engineers. British Institute of
r -.:' Engineers (London), frinadian Society of Civil
Engineer- Engineers' Club of Cleveland <Ohio,i,
V. •"• n Deuts her Maschinen Ingenleure, in Berlin,
Oermany. and Fellow of the American Association
for the- Advancement of Science, and of oth--r scien
tific bodies.
DAVID ACCUSES CARRIE.
ASKS FOR DIVORCE BECAUSE MRS. NATION' TOOK
HIS FEATHER. BED ANT- »MB
fBT TELEGRAPH TO THE TEIBtXE.I
Medicine Lodge. Kan.. Nov. 26.— divorce suit
brought by David Nation against Carrie Nation, th.»
saloon smasher, began here yesterday. Mr. Na
tion says that his wife took away his feather bed,
drew «fe» from the bank and refused to live with
him. Mrs. Nation's side will be heard to-morrow.
OIL WELL IX IX D I AX TERRITORY.
Red Fork. Ind. T.. No 26.— An oil gusher has
been put in operation here to a depth of six hun
dred feet. It now flows forty feet high and stead
ily The well is regarded by experts as being far
the best in this district.
diff ereriLce ?
Jshe IMITATIONS
charged water containing ab
solutely no medicinal proper
ties and is manufactured with
marble dust and sulphuric acid.
ANALYSIS made by
Frasf.r & Co., ?th Avenue, N.
V.. shows SYPHON Vichy to
be only Croton water charged
with gas.
NEW-YOBK DAILY THIRTY WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 27, 1001.
CROKER HARPS OX PEACE.
BUT FAILS TO STRIKE A RESPONSIVE
CHORD IN THE HEARTS OF
THE HILL MEN.
With the air full of Sheehan tomahawks and
the certainty of a political snowball diet for
1 -s months for many members of the Demo
cratic Club. Richard Croker yesterday at the
Democratic Club told the newspaper men that
he was for harmony. Mr. Croker returned late
on Monday night from Baltimore, and yester
day morning the most interesting bit of politi
cal news v.-as The Tribune's story about the in
tention of the Greater New-York Democracy
leaders to organize in all the boroughs of this
city and then send a contesting set of delegates
to the next State convention.
Mr Croker's harmony harmonica has been on
the junk heap for some years, but he sent for it
yesterday and played an interesting tune.
"The Democratic party." said Mr. Croker,
"will have no chance in the city. State or nation
for years to come unless the Democrats get to
gether right away. Quarrels and bickerings of
all kinds must be stopped. The time has come
for the leaders in this city and throughout, the
State to join and prepare to fight the common
enemy. If they don't the State election next
year 'will go against the Democracy, and there
will be no hope for victory in the Presidential
campaign in 1904. The city and State are nor
mally Democratic, and a Democratic Governor
can be elected next year if all the Democrats
work together. I am willing. to make any rea
sonable concessions to obtain harmony. I have
always been for harmony, and there is nothing
they can ask me to do which I will not do gladly.
If we can't get harmony we might as well throw
up our hands.
••The Republicans," continued Mr. r oker.
"are oppressing the people, and making them
suffer. Give the Democrats a common standard
around which to rally, and they will throw he
Republicans out of power. 1 won't stand in the
way of any proposition for harmony, no matter
what they ask me to do."
When Frank Campbell, chairman of the Dem
ocratic State Committee, one of David B. Hills
lieutenants, was asked what he had heard
about Mr. Croker'B plans for harmony, he said.
"Well, if any one has discovered any particu
larly robust signs of harmony in the Democratic
party in this State in the last few years I would
like to have him point them out."
Elliot Danforth. another Hill man. was quoted
yesterday as saying that a conference looking
to harmony would be held at an early day.
When Mr. Danforth was seen he said:
"I don't know about any harmony confer
ences. I am free to say. however, that it is use
less for us to go into the next State campaign
without harmony in the party. The Republi
cans will renaminate Governor Oder., and he is
rot an easy man to defeat, if we don't get to
gether we might as well give up the fight and
Dot put Si any ticket at all. On the other
]:lj tions get together the Demo
crats will win, as this is a Democratic State.
John C. Sheehan said: "I don't know anything
about any movement for harmony with Tam
many Hall. The Greater New-York Democracy
cannot be dragged off by any shallow plea for
harmony in this city. Our organization stands
for unadulterated Democracy— not government
by a hall. Why should we have a hall running
the Democratic" politics in this city?"
••If Croker were eliminated, would the Greater
New- York Democracy join in a movement for
harmony In this city?" Mr. Sheehan was asked.
"There are other men in Tammany Hall who
are just as objectionable to honest thinking
men as Richard Croker." said Mr. Sheehan.
As noted in The Tribune yesterday, the
Greater New- York Democracy leaden will get.
together on Friday night to discuss the exten
sion of their organization in all the boroughs.
They are determined to drive Croker and Car
roll out of business and keep them out.
There is little doubt that Mr. Sheehan ant)
his friends are acting with the counsel of ex-
Senator David B. Hill. Since the Kansas City
Convention Mr. Hill has hated Tammany with
a hatred seven times hotter. He never had an
overweening love for the Tiger, anyway. It
was recalled last night by one of the old stagers
in Democratic politics at the Hoffman House
that Mr. Hill had not made a speech In Tam
many Hail since the Flower campaign. Then
he cut the business as short as possible He
went with the express understanding that he
was not to tarry. As soon as his speech was
finishf-d he bolted for his carriage, which had
been kept In waiting for him, without stopping
to shake hands with the district leaders
The Hill men do not want much to do with
the management of the next Btate campaign.
Croker can name the ticket if ho will let them
control the State Committee They feel that
Governor Odell will win by a large plurality.
No Hill man yearns for the first place on the
19012 ticket In 1904 the Hill men want to run
Controller Coler for Governor, with the ex
pectation that Mr. Hill at that time will head
the Presidential ticket. At that time they will
be willing to throw a sop to the Tammany tiger
proportionate to the respectability of that
somewhat weather beaten animal. It will not
h? a large sized son at that. Until that time
comes the motto -if the Hill men will be, "Don't
talk to us till you've thrown the thieve* out
of Tammany Hall."
SWITCBMEX TO 00 BACK TO WORK
DISCHARGED ASSISTANT TARDXASTEK OF NEW
YORK. NEW-HAVEN AND HARTFORD KAIL
ROAD COMPANY URGES STRIKERS
TO RETURN.
About one hundred and twenty-five of the switch
men of the York. New-Haven and Hartford
Railroad Company, and about the same number of
trainmen who went on strike last week and did
not return to work when the strike was settled,
met last night, anil, according to Michael J Ryan,
who presided, decided to go to the company's
offices and signify their willingness to go back to
work. Robert Turbush. whose dismissal caused
the strike, Ryan said, spoke to the men and urged
them to return to work. Immediately after the
meeting a number of men who ha.i been employed
at night work went to the yards and reported.
Captain Sheehan and thirty men are still on duty
in the freight yards. The captain said yesterday
that he did not anticipate any trouble, but had his
men there as a precautionary measure.
ALFRED G. IN A SYNDICATE THAT BUYS
WASHINGTON HEIGHTS PROPERTY.
A sale of real estate on Washington Heights was
reported yesterday, which is of interest, not only
because of its importance In size, but because of
the personnel of the buyers. It marked a depart
ure in th-? policy of one of the branches of the
V. <!:<!• rbilt family in its investments. A syndicate
composed, of Alfred Gwyr.ne Vanderbilt. Ogden
Mills. William Lanman Bull and Charles C. Worth
ington, a former president of the Worthington
Pump Company, bought from the New-York Insti
tution for the Instruction of Deaf and Dumb, the
land extending- along- Broadway, from about the
north Bide of One-hundred-and-sixty-second-st. (if
continued) to the south side of One-hundred-and
eixty-h'fth-st., and 738 f«vt in Fort Washington
aye. This is believed to be the first time a member
of the Vanderbilt family has invested heavily in
New- York realty.
The piece of land is not the entire holding of the
Deaf and Dumb Institution. To the west of this
tract, it owns another, extending from Fort Wash
ington-aye. to the Boulevard Lafayette
On the tract which the institution h;is sold for
merly known as the Dickey Homestead an a
larKe two story dwelling house, a lodge, outhouses,
a stable and greenhouses. These were used by the
institution, although not entirely suited to its pur
pose. On th'- westerly tract are large modern
buildings, and ample room for others, which will
probably be erected with the money obtained from
the sale.
The dimensions of the land sold are 727 feet in
Broadway. 519 feet in One-bundred-and-slxty-nfth
st., 738 feft in Fort Washtngton-ave. and 365 feet
on the south side. The tract contains 127 lots. In
buying this property the new syndicate is following
In the footsteps of other conservative investors
who believe that the underground railroad will
greatly enhance the value of real estate on the
upper end of Manhattan Island. ■ ■-; ■ ,
ORANGE OF ROUTE IX LEXOI-ATE.
At the Board of Aldermen meeting yesterday a
report and resolutions from the Raold Transit
Commission asking- for a change of route In
L«nox-ave.. between One-hundred-and-forty-sec
ond-st. and One-hundred-and-fiftleth-st. were re
ceived. It whs vot«4 to defer action until the next
meeting.
IMITATION.
SCIENTIFIC ACQUISITIONS
NEW MATERIAL AT THE NATURAL HIS
TORY MUSEUM.
The last year has been a fortunate one for the
American Museum of Natural History. Many ad
d Sons have been made to its collections by dis
covery purchase or gift, and much material which
had been stored for years is now placed on ex
hibition for the first time. For these reasons the
president and trustees invited the members of the
Muslim organization and their friends to visit that
institution yesterday for a survey of recent acquisi
tions before the general public were admitted. The
opportunity was improved by hundreds.
The Morgan gem collection and the Bement col
lection of minerals were conspicuous novelties.
Both of them were presented by J. Picrpont Mor
gan and neither of them has been shown before.
The mineral collection was described by The Trib
une several months ago. It has been regarded by
experts as the finest in this country outside of a
museum. It was attractively arranged, an.i was
almost as beautiful as Mr. Morgan's other gift.
The gems were displayed in a large recess, sepa
rated from the rest of the hall by a strong but
ornamental grating like that in safety deposit
vaults They are kept under guard at all hours ot
the day In the centre of the space devoted to the
jewels 'was an octagonal case, with horizontal and
upright compartments. In the former were ar
ranged the gems proper, and in the latter the min
erals or other materials from which they were de
rived One sub-division of the octagon was devoted
to pearls, another to the beryl and hyacinth, a
third to the topaz, and so on. and each group was
made up in such a. way as to show the variety of
tints found therein in nature. The size, beauty
and exquisite cutting of many of the jewels were
also features of much interest.
One of the recent acquisitions of the department
of vertebrate fossils, an ichthyosaurus presented
by Professor Fraas. has already been mentioned
by The Tribnne. But there were a number of other
new specimens. Among them were unmounted
skeletons of three, toed horses, the skull and jaws
of a 'mastodon, the remains of a megalosaurus (the
largesi carnivorous animal known), and the most
ancient mammal skeleton in the Museum, that of a
pantalambda.
The novelties in the department of geology in
cluded large Devonian fishes, fossil corals from the
Ohio River, mollusks from New-Jersey and South
Dakot-i an exceptionally large and fine collection
of meteorites (on deposit), and fossils from Mount
Object"' illustrating bygone civilizations [eth
nology have been added in great numbers to the
V u-fum'6 collections of late. The Peruvian an
tiquiUes. which include feather garments textile
fabrics, musical instruments, mummies and articles
for use in ceremonies, were described b> The
Tribune last spring. Ancient Mexico and Central
America have been well represented for the .last
two years, but the Museum has acquired much
mo material of high value. Several elaborate
reproductions of sculpture and pre-Columbian
books and a restoration of the sanctuary of the
Temple of the Cross at Palenque were contributed
by the Duke of Loubat. Sholula pott- a pre-
Columbian painting on cloth and a rare sculpture
from Vera Cruz are among the new treasures
shown yesterday.
Still another ' large. important and unique
archceological feature is the Hyde collection trom
ancient pueblos, cliff houses and burial caves of
the Southwest, and from the present Pueblo Ind
ians. This is now being arranged. The collection
la the gift of the brothers B. Talbot Hyde and
Frederick E. Hyde. Jr.. and Is the result of explora
tions extending over several years A few of the
groups shown came from the pueblo of Bonlto. an
ancient ruin In the Chaco Canyon, New-Mexico.
This" ruin consists of several hundred rooms, and
is being thoroughly explored by the Hyde Expedi
tion ' The pottery from Room 28 of the ruin is a
rema-kab!« series of ceremonial vessels. In Room
3° wer* Obtained a large collection of ceremonial
sticks bunches of arrows with stone points, a club
made of antler and ■ small figure of a bird cut
out of hematite, the wings represented by inlaid
Pieces o' turquoise and shell.
The SO <X>o pieces of turquoise now exhibited were
found in' Boom 88 Many pieces of turquoise were
cut to be ■:? 'i for mosaic work in connection with
pieces of shell and jet found associated with them.
In this same room were found several flutes man*»
of wood Specimens of remarkable workmanship
v". re four.d In Room S& Among tnese is a lifesize
fro* carved from Jet and inlaid with pieces of
turquoise; two Inlaid scrapers made from the leg
bones of the antelope, and several small figure?
of duck? cut from turquoise.
T. lf\ C. A. BUYS FOUR FLATHOUBBB.
THBT ARE TO BE CTOD FOR DORMITORY AND
RESTAURANT PURPOSES BY HAR
frFV BRANCH.
Th*« Harlem. Branch <■<' the young Men's Christian
Association has bought from Samuel Green No. 9
to i!. West One-hundred-and-twents four
five story slngl- flathousM adjoining the associa
tion bulMln*. for dormitory purposes. The price
was SllO.nuO. A restaurant will occupy the ground
floor of the remodelled lings.
LOWERS RECORD TS SPITE OF STORM.
THE KRONPRINZ TVTT.HK!,M MAKES HER FASTEST
WESTWARD TRIP
Th» steamship Kronprlnx Wilhelm. which ar
rived here last evening, lowered her westward rec
ord In spite of the rough weather encountered al
most all th« way across. She made the trip in
live days, nineteen hours and six minutes, cutting
down her best previous westward time by about
two hours. Her time on the voyage which ended
at this port on October 22 of this year was five
cays, twenty-one hours and ten minutes. The
westward record of the Deutschlami is five days.
twelve hours and ' "■ -three minutes, an I that
of the Kaiser Wilhi der Gross? Is five days, six
teen hours and twenty-four minutes The log .-hows
that there was a rough sea every day of the voy
age, and that on almost every day squalls were
experienced. The storm doors were up all of the
trip, and the passengers were not allowed on deck.
To many this was no hardship, as they did not
leave their rooms from the time they went on the
ship until she got Into Quarantine.
On the Kronprlnx was Frank A. Vanderllp, for
mer Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. Mr Van
derlip said he went over a couple of months ago
on tuslncss. He said that on the other side Amer
ica is still the "king bee" In a business way.
Consul General Bianehi. the Italian representative
at New-York was also a passenger. He was re
turning to his post after a six months' vacation
spent in Europe. The assistant consul. Coroner
Zucca, and a party of friends were at the pier to
welcome him.
VINETA TO RF.rUK HERE.
FIR?T WARSHIP PERMITTED TO DOCK IV PRI
VATE TARE
NXvport News. Nov 28.— The German cruiser
Vineta has arrived here from West Indian waters
with her sea valves eorroddd to such an extent that
she will have to b< docked and overhauled. This
vessel will be the first warship of any nation per
mitted to dock in other than government yards.
She W i!l go in or. Thursday ol this week.
Dunnp the Spanish-American War oxen United
States vessels were not permitted to tie up to the
piers it the. shipyard here. The privilege accorded
the German nation excited some interest.
THREE BlsHOps TALK OS MIBSIONB.
Three bishops talked last night at the Church
Club. One was Bishop Row«\ of Alaska, another
Bishop Kir.solvinp, of Brazil, and the third was
Bishop Graves, of Shanghai. Kach spoke of th«
needs of the district wherein he is carrying on
missionary labors. A large number of churchmen
gathered to hear them at the eiubroom«. No. STS
Fifth-aye It was the customary yearly meeting in
furtherance Of missions. President George Maccul
loch Miller presided. The subjects discussed were:
-Missionary Work Along the Arctic Circle." Bishop
Ri.vve "why Have Missions in Brazil?" Bishop
Kinsoiving. and "China's Need and China's Hope,"
Bishop Graves.
67,000
in service
in Manhattan.
Business Rates
from $5 a month.
Residence Rates
from $4 a month.
Now York Telephone Co.
It Der St. 11l West 38th St.
■ .-.'- ;■■; 215 West 125 th St.
MAJOR KEJLEY IS DEAD.
THE WELL KNOWN ROMAN CATHOLIC
LAYMAN OF BROOKLYN SUCCUMBS
TO HEART TROUBLE.
Major John D. Keiley died at his home. No.
213 Sherman-ave., Brooklyn, yesterday after
noon. Death was caused by heart trouble. He
had been confined to his bed for about six
•weeks, though hf had been in bad health since
last April.
Major Keiley was born in Petersburg. aV. In
the Civil War he was a member of the staff of
c,cneral Longstreet in the Confederate army.
He was married in Baltimore In IS6S by Car
dinal Gibbons, who was then Bishop of Balti
more, in 1870 he came to New-York and be
came a writer and business manager of "The
Freeman's Journal." Afterward he engaged in
the shipping and commission business. For
many years he had offices in Whitehall-st., and
his sons will conduct trip business at the same
address.
Major Keiley was a Democrat, but in the cam
paign of 1868 he supported Mr. Schieren for
Mayor, who. after he was elected, made the
major City Treasurer. Hhe held this office until
it was mersred in. the office of County Treasurer.
Mayor Wnrster appointed Mr. Keiley a trustee
of the Brooklyn Boys' Disciplinary Training
School.
Mr. Keiley was one of the most prominent lay
Catholics in this country, and was generally
known for his benevolence to Catholic institu
tions. In ISTS, he was made Knight Com
mander of the Order of Gregory the Great by
Pope Pius IX. This honor was given him be
cause he organized the first pilgrimage to
Luurdes. Major Wei'.ey was a lifelong friend of
Cardinal Gibbons, but was not related to him,
as was generally supposed. The Cardinal al
ways made his home with his friend when he
was in New-York, the last time being a fe-.v
munths ago, when he was returning from Rome.
The extraordinary privilege was given Major
Keiley to have =i private chapel in his home.
This is rarely granted, and only by the Pope.
Major Keiley leaves two brothers, Benjamin
J. Keiley, Bishop of Georgia, and Ant.'t»>ny M.
Keil y, who formerly was Mayor of Richmond,
V.i.. ana is now presiding justice of the Mixed
Tribunal, in Alexandria. Egypt. This is made
up of representatives of various foreign coun
tries, who are appointed by the Cadiz. Mr.
"s brother was appointed on the recom
mendation of President Cleveland. A widow.
three suns and two daughters, one unmarried,
and the other Mrs. Helen M. Sullivan, of Dub
lin, Ireland, survive him. She was married by
Cardinal Gibbons last spring in the private
chap'" 1 ! in Mr. Keiley's home. Tlv wedding at
tracted widespread attention. Another brother
was Father Keiley, of Brooklyn, who died a
few years ago.
The funeral arrangements have not yet h^e n
completed.
THU FAMOUS BLI'E DIAMOND HERE
HISTORIC CrE BOUGHT FROM THE HOPE
ARRIVES ON THE KRONPRINZ WILHELM
The famous blue diamond, which since ISCO has
been in the possession of the Hope, family. Eng
land, arrived here last evening on the steamship
Kronprinz Wilhelm in the possession of Simon
Franks, of the firm of Joseph Frankel's sons, of
this city, who had bought the gem. r. Frankel
had hardly reached the pier before a man who
gave the name of Stern of Fifth-aye. and Thirty
elghth-st.. announced to the reporters that he had
Just offered Frankel 5300.000 for the stone -and that
the offer had been refused. He said that he had
made the offer for a syndicate . - :-:■••
According to Mr. Frankel there la no truth in the
story that the diamond had been bought for a rich
American woman. .
The Hope diamond." he said, "was bought as
a business ..ation and will be resold."
BID* ASKED FOR CITY BONDS.
SALE OF J7.591.000 ANNOUNCED BY THE CON
TROLLER.
Controller Coler in "The City Record" -ad
vertised yesterday a bond salt? of $7,891,000, the
second largest bond sale since he has been in
office, the largest being one of $12,000,000 in
the first year of his administration. The bids
for the bonds will be opsntd at 2 p. m. on
Thursday. December I:.'. The bonds are divided
Into eleven lots, as follows: $2,500,000 for the
rapid transit tunnel. $1,000,000 for schoolhouses
and sites In Manhattan and The Bronx. $900,000
tot schoolhouses and sites in Brooklyn, $200,000
lor schoolhouses and sites in Queens. $750,000
for the New East River Bridge. $750,000 for the
BlackwelTs Island Bridge. $150,000 for the Har
lem River Bridge at One-hundred-and-forty
flfth-st., $250,000 for the same bridge. $850,000
for the Department of Docks and Ferries. $241,
000 for the Fire Department, and $500,000 for
the New Aqueduct.
The bonds are 34 per cent, maturing in rJ4I,
with the exception of the rapid transit bonds,
which mature in 1045.
MFSE OFFICIALS CENSURED.
CORONER'S jury busies underlings for
SMUGGLER-UNION DISASTER.
Tellurlde. Col.. Nov. it— The coroner's jury which
investigated the Smuggler-Union mine disaster, in
which twenty-five men lost their lives, have re
turned a verdict censuring some of the minor offi
cials at the mine for not promptly closing the en
trance to the Bullion tunnel after the fire orig
innted but find that the officers of the company
were not guilty of criminal or wilful negligent.
A BRAy'D SEW RELIGIOX LAI \C II ED.
FOUNDED OX A BOOK CAIXEa> "OAHSFsV
WRITTEN BY AN ANGEL OX A TYPEWRITER.
tBT tei-E'.iiaph TO THE TRIBUNE.]
Syracuse, S. V . Nov. 25.— The Rev. Harry St
Clair is introducing a new religion here, which, he
says, is founded on a book called "Oahspe." He
declares that Dr. J. B. Xewbrough. a New-York
dentist, now dead, received the new bible from an
angel, who wrote it on a typewriter. The doctor
had been investigating spiritualism, and. finally,
after fasting and purifying himself, angels directed
him to get a typewriter, which he did. One morn-
Ing be saw an angel work on the keys, and this
was continued for a long time, the doctor being
directed not to read what was written. Finally it
wig completed, and the doctor was told to send the
book to all parts of the world. Upon his death
Mr St. Clair was told by divine revelation to take
up the work, he says. There are several followers
here, and a temp is to be built. The religion is
one of fasting and self-purification.
The Christmas "EVERYBODY'S"
ILeady Today .'. /. 10 Cents
Just a year ago. this month the name of John VVanamaker first appeared^
EVERYBODY'S MAGAZINE as publisher. "Everybody's was quite a
teresting little magazine, and sold for 10 cents a copy, or a dollar y^'£%
people liked it; but there were a great many better magazines, and a number
better ones at 10 cents— THEN. ' u ~ *hr «?nlec<£^
Look at it now. The October Number, the November Number, the spies*
Christmas Number!— which is just out today. tn«-*r« tff-
Twenty-five superb pictures illustrate Edith Davids' article on ™™*»
teen remarkable bird pictures illuminate the bird story, "hezekiah s Third w
»Be£s*u*ar." the new and brilliant story by William Steams Davis, au~
of "A Friend of Caesar," begins in this number. Other stones and articles ar
The Temptation of Ezekicl . The Parson's Wig The j^W^ &
For Jane's Sake The Haunts of the Beaver ]™??J ? £*£ZLt«'s C.«*
A Summer Tour in Bohemia Th, Pagan to MakTvoS^
The Hypnotizing of Lobelia How to Make Money
A beautiful Christmas magazine for 10 cents. - Eoo^ Stor *' stnt .
JOHN WANAMAKER.^
Forma*" A T. Stewart & Co.. Broadway. Fourth Aye.. Ninth and
NEW-JERSEY NEWS.
A XEW- JERSEY GIRL A HERQiy E
AT THE RISK OF HER OWN I.(FE SHE gAVE 3
HER LITTLE BROTHER FROil
BURNING TO DEATH.
Passaic. Nov. 26. -Only for the prompt and hero!,,
work of Miss Anna Neiman. a twenty-year-old in
her little brother, six years old. would have be
burned to deatn to-day. Shortly after 2 a m IT
Neiman home, in Monroe-st., Garfield."wa3 fO-^f 0 -^
to be on fire. The family awakened just in fc.
to escape in their night clothes. On the s«co n
floor the child was asleep. He had been overlook
in the hurry to escape. M
When the members of the family were fc-dd!**
together in the high wind outside, the mother cr^J
-Where is the baby.'" Though an alarm had been
sent in. the wind prevented the firemen f-om
hearing it. and only a baker's dozen resDonZT
building, now a 8a 8 mass of flames a - ow ard the
nightclothes about her. the girl ran H £n?l S h^
burning stairway to the floor above ° P th »
There, in its little cradle, lav the child mm «i a^.
and almost overcome by smoke Its berdin*'
afire, and in a moment m- .- ■ it would hw & Was
prey to the flames. The grl niatebeduDU^hSS! *
rushed to the hallwa i^lrt^J'^
She ran to the window., now aflre/awuS crV«f
attracted the attention of th* men beloW^^2
threw the child out and it was caught in%rili&
arms. Its hair was singed. Then the^eirf jTiSSS
ami was safely caught in the arms "t" t ti? ped
below. Her dotnjes were afire bu^The fiarn^ en
put out with little Injury to herself Were
to-day. * Neimarl * the herOine of the little borough
The house and its contents, including a «t«.
were totally destroyed. 'n.iiamg a store,
BRIDE OF A MOXTU DEAD.
FALLS A VICTIM TO DROPST AFTER A SHORT
ILLNESS.
Nutley Nov. 26,-Mrs. Calvin Tuers. of Church-
St.. a bride of a month, died at her home yesterday
after a short illness. She was Miss Irene Cueiaaa.
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Cueman aad was'
married four weeks ago to-night, at the Franklin
Reformed Church. Mrs. Tuers had complained of
feeling somewhat ill before the weddin- but »v
thought of postponing the ceremony waS^o^LS
tamed. Her health failed to improve and
dropsy set in. which caused her death. recentl
MR. CLEVELAXD STILL OAIXiXG.
HE EXPECTS TO BE ENTIRELY TTELL IN' A FITT
DATS.
Princeton. Nov. 25 (Special).-Ex-President Clew*
land has so nearly recovered from Hi late illness
that Dr. WikoQT. his attending physician, who ■
himself suffering from a severe cold, did not deem
it necessary to make his usual call to-day Mrs.
Cleveland said to The Tribune ■""■[lsl'lpl to
night: "Mr. Cleveland is still lmorovinsr He T«
gaining a little every day. and his temperature
about at its normal height. We feel very sure
he. will be entirely well in a few days " '
WIXD SPOILS THE LAUXCHIXG.
IT TvAS- CONSIDERED DANGEROUS TO SEND THE
FLORIDA INTO THE "WATER YESTERDAY.
Elizabeth. Nov. 26 (Snecial).-The northwest gale
was responsible to-day for the failure ■- latsch ths
monitor Florida from Lewi3 Nixon's Crescent Ship
yard at Ellzabethport. Lieutenant and Mrs. Nixon
came to this city last night, so as to *!* on hand.
Despite the fierce -wind, over one thousand peopi°
had gathered at the shipyard and in Mi vicinity to
witness the proceedings.
The pale. however, kept the tide from rUing to
within a foot of '- normal heish: a; toai, ar.i
Lieutenant Nixon decided that he would take no
chances, lest some mishap should befall the vessel,
which is the largest thai has been constructed at
the shipyard. The launching will take place on
Friday.
7-V MEMORY OP DR. PERVES.
INTERESTING EXERCISES OVER THE DEAD
PREACHER AT PRINCETON 111 ' ■ II HIT
Princeton. NT. J. Nov. a Special). - Miller Cha;el
at the Theological Seminary was filled (Ml after
noon with students, townspeople and visitors, -srh
had gathered to listen to a. memorial address in
honor of the Key. Dr. George T Puma, recent
pastor of the Fifth Aver.je Presbyterian Church ia
New-York, and formerly professor of Xew Testa
ment literature and exegesis in the seminary.
The Rev. Dr. William M Paxton. senior member
of the faculty, presided. The address was deliv
ered by the Rev. Dr. Benjamin B. Warfleld. of tha
seminary. Amor? th-? others who participated in
the exercises were Professor W. Par* Armstrong.
successor to Tjt. Praxes; Dr. John B- De Witt lad
Dr. Samuel M. Studdifcrd. of Trenton. The widow
of Dr. Purves and several ministers represeatis?
New-Jersey Presbyteries and the PrsahyMs] of
New-York were present.
BARKER* APPEAL SET FOR FEBRUARY.
ARGUMENT WAS TO HAVE EKES HEARD AT THS
DECEMBER TERM.
It was exoected that the appeal of Thomas G.
Barker, who is now servir.s a term In the New-
Jersey State Prison, at Trenton, for shooting th»
Rev. John Keller, at Arlington, en February Z.
would be heard by the Supreme Court -"- the De
cember term. It was learned yesterday, however,
that argument would not be made until '-" "*•*•"
when the objections were allowed. Barker's coun
sel asked to have entered their oo;ection :V.''
trial of their client by a struck jury. Judje 1 °:t:
did not consider this necessary, out the «g*«
was renewed, and after hearing argument on i^on
day Judxa Blair decided to allow the oejec.lu..3
of counsel to the struck jury to be entered on the
record; which fact he at once certif.ed to the su
preme Court. The argument on this point ca-no
be heard under the law until the expiration •.--£>
days from the filln* of the record, and &*&£**
therefore, concluded to let th« whole matter «■
over until February-
XEW-JERSETS OFFICIAL TOTE.
Trenton. Nov. »— State Board of Canvas
sers appointed by the Governor me: this afternoon
and carvassed the vote cast a: the recent election
for Governor. I: was found that Franklin **??
Republican, received IS3.SU votes: if!™? PTOhttE
mour. Democrat. ISS,&>:; John VI B , r - w a. &^
"on. 5.866; Charles H. \ ail. sociaLst. vTaiar-
Frank W. Wilson. Socialist Labor. S.wS. SK. ■»•"
phy's plurality is 17.133.
STEAMER RUXS '- v ™ BRIDGE.
The steamer Sea Bird, of the Merchants* Steam
boat Line, plying between New-York andßju
Bank ana other ports on the SWewsuarr
ran into one end of the fraw of the ..^v' one.
Bridge to-day. No blame is atta ched to Wy^
as some of the bridge machines ca ™ c au was
Part of the housing on the side of ntlStw>
broken, causing about BJN damage, ise »*
turned to Red Bank. a n

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