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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 10, 1902, Image 9

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THE DRAMA.
V\-TT. T> AF THE CARDINAL.
AMPHION THEATRE.
jW opporttmlty i? afforded, at the Amphlon
Tteatre in Williair.sburp. of *eein& Mr. Wlllard as
Cardinal Giovanni de Medici, in Mr. Loula N.
farker's romantic and poetic drama cf "The Car
«lr.»: ■»« It ought to be Improved,— for the play
ii oce of exceptional Interest and dramatic power
acd Mr. Wiilard's embodiment of Its central char
arter Is a great creation of dramatic art. contaln
jof elamects of moral grandeur and beauty almost
csexappled ln recent years of stage experience.
jlr. Parker's play 6eems to indicate, on the part of
v author, an appreciative knowledge of Mr. Craw
isz&'s rovel cf "Corleone," and perhaps of some
otter still earlier works relative to fatal secrets
letxced fey a priest in the confessional: but a
dramatist. according: to Immemorial custom, takes
JjU aaierials wherever he can find them, and. In
tt<j instance. old expedients have been used in a
tt v way *at with admirah]<=> Kkiil,-so that vary
j2g asMMßta of suspense eucceed each other with
saajsjnMS raptditT. each situation growing strong
fr tiita its predecessor, and all things converging
fuperb climax. The scene is laid in Rome, in
year 1510. under th- pontifical reign of Julius
jj (Jufcan d*:ia Rovere. 1441-1513), and the action
& -s upon Cardinal Giovanni df Medici's knowl
ssf«. obtained at confession, of a rrurder. for
wtJca his own brother, an innocent man, convict
*4 fey circumstantial evidence, is condemned to
«a2er a feMr.'s >ath.
• Ite caaraoter cf the Cardinal,— pure, intellectual,
BPble. rer-lal, -weet. animated by a lofty spiritual
ejnbuion. harboring the most magnificently opulent
dKiStts for the glory of the Cnurch. and graced by
ample anc: elerant scholarshiu and every virtue
that can adorn either pub;i^ station or >>rivate
life.— been outlined *i!h exquisite taste and
■Jdll snd in a beautiful spirit. The st^ry is devel
oped by .ija^'ng the Cardinal (• a succession of
tr^ls. his efforts to save his innocent brother,—
betrothed to the daughter of the rcan who lias
been foully murdered by a malignant rival.— being
at every point defeated, till at last he is over
whelmed •■•-. absolute despair. In the final crisis,
however, this treat soul is suddenly Inspired to
drr-itavent The murderer by craft: he pretends to
fcsve been made Insane by grief, and, having lured
the miscreant to an interview, and arranged that
the chief executive mafiis'rate of Rome shall be
an ui^een witness of it. he artfully contrives that
the assassin shall criminate himself by offering
to c»r. the truth in exchange for the hsnd of the
berctr.e in nidrnage. It is a magnificent dramatic
dtuatlon. and JJr. TVillarJ's acting sustains the
whole passage upon the loftiest piano of simulative
tQMttlß*. The ntIUT great RMMMDta in Mr. Wil
lard's performance are those aat the Cardinal's t-c
ctaEy of eloquence T.hen dilating on his visions and
designs as to the advancement of the Church and
the subjugation of "- ■'. Christendom, and his tre
raeadous iavDcation of the attvtau vengeance upen
the murderer. In the latter c.f xheso two speeches
Mr. Wlllard reached a height to which acting eel
dom attains. iSraadeur of .'' fervor and
splendor of morjil p&«>!<-.p. ai.d glorious volume <'f
me'iOdlc-:s voice, combined with the tense repose
of overwhelming emotion, rr.n^e this outburst com
pletely hrrsaisrrhliT. and created a wonderful effect.
The play contains superrlu:t;ics. such as the Bei:
nr.per (who nowhere touches the action), the Eng
lish Abbot.— truthfully embodied, though, by that
excellent actor. Mr. Ilarrr Cane.— an-1 '.he Strowl
letUr Incident; but it is h capital ;,lay. of a good,
old-fashioned, serious kind, and Mr. vViUard ilchly
Reserves the success and the honor that h» has
jpalned bf sWaaMastasssT it. W. \V.
CAST OF "THE CARDINAL."
CarSiral Giovanni oe Medici Mr. WillarS
Clarlci* £c Me«ld. his toother Marie Linden
Olullano de MedicL hia brother A. S. Homewood
FrtEcejco • H. Q. Lonsdale
L>ulgl .. — W. tdmuais
Pietro O. Gastcn
Baliassarre W. Fowler
Valentino Miss Clalr
ila4lalena - La'Jra Linden
Liaa Alice Lonr.on
Ben»*«tta. . Agr.es Palmer
Igr-az.a Mrs. Lar»«-w-.rthy
BartcJcainjeo Chtg:. a wealthy merchant H. Earfoot
FUlberta. his .Ja-ig.'-.t.fr E!l»n O'Malley
Hoscrla. her companion Efllth Defuastt
Gcldo Begilnnl chief magistrate of Home.. Ernest Etallard
Andrea Strozzl, a F'.orer.tine outlaw.... Sy&r.ey Lawrence
Bcrpo. the tell ringer of the eapltol J. G. Taylor
r*vr P.&mt*m. Abbot of Eherborn«. H. Cane
Mr. Herbert Kelcey an«J Miss Effle Shannon will
appear at the Amphion Th-ratre, Willlameburg, on
JtoMaWy :S, ta a play called "Her Lord and Mas
ter ." This play has met with favor In other cities.
Mr V. C. Goodwin and Miss Marine Elliott, who
have recency returned from England, will act at
the Amphion <m January 30.
The Tribvne Almanac will tell too all
about the armie* and navl<-> of the- world.
For a-ale at newtdfalen' everywhere, or by
mail, tor 25 rents per copy.
DAISIES AXD APPLE BARRELS.
LEGISLATION' TENDING TO THE AESTHETIC
AND TO THE rNVESTHETIC.
This craze for abolishing thingn ought to be abol
ished, or there win be nothing else left imabol
slhexJ. A little whl> agro it was Christmas trees;
aow It Is Caleles. The members of the Assembly
file-ht profitably follow the injunction of Bun
tliorse, to "Me upon the daisies and discourse In
26vel phrases of your complicated state of mind."
Int, no: they will only stamp on the daisies, and
try to unravel the complications of their minds in
the form of laws. What will be left of New-York
Mtr.ery If the evergreens are all cut off for Chrlst
bbm trees, in epite of the ir.wmakers. and the
ealsies are <>s=troy*>d by order of the lawmakers,
tad the Palisades are blown down before the law
makers can get to work to hold them up. and ths
Wagsra River is turned aside to push trolley care
la Buffalo, and the lawmakers etill keep on doing
ecae things and leaving other things undone?
Thus the lawmakers will drive New-Yorkers to
<Wnk, and then keep the barrooms closed on Sun
*»y, when they have most time to think of their
Mrrcwfl.
But a!! this ls rettini? aside from daisies. It Is
to be decreed that daisies are noxious weeds and
t*t7 must be rooted up. If tbn law has aB good
lack ** lh laws of various States against the
Canafia th:«ie have had. the daisy will wax and
*■**»» on lt, and win whiten the hills as snow.
But than is one lawmaker who has really struck
assnalble etreak. He wanta apple barrels to bulge
•• the middle; in ehort, to be barrels, and not
•jUJOSrlcs; boxes. A law to compass thls-ln other
•»rt«. to make an appla barrel hard to compass—
01 rejoice all who love a comfortable winter as
••H as a beautiful summer. Even a lawmaker
*y be created for come good.
LIBERTY BELL AT CHARLESTON.
T » WELCOMED BT CITY AND EXPOSITION
OFFICIALS.
CbtrlKtc^ S. C, Jan. >.-The Liberty Bell, under
••j »*cort of Mayor Ashhrtdge and the delegation
tBI the Philadelphia Council, arrived to-day at
•"dock from Savannah. The irain wjui met at
■••tMlon by Mayor Smythe an<l the Board of
••"toen of Charleston, and President Waggener
••tke directors of the Charleston Exposition
J*^"*- A <!et ch nient of rexulars from the
.■j-^y post and several companies of marines
T* tbc camp at the exposition, with a regiment
* •lllUa, were drawn up at the station when
■•train Wring: the bell rolled la. As the bell
■•» aftea from tne flatcar a salute of thirteen
p~» was nred. Tns historic relic wa» placed on
*cerat«a truck prepared for tne occasion, but
*** round that the «agon would not bear the
jj* 11 * and the bell had to b* replaced on the car
ijiJ'J, 0 to the grounds by rail. At the expo
*tlSL f our ' (5t Mayor Smythe extended a formal
ljhhrM«. t0 li 3« bell and Its escort, and Mayor
sawT* 0 '«r>ondfcj. Several brief addresees were
ifcM'.ru .patriotic airs were sung by two thou
lt« >in°?\ «a»ldren. The bell wlil be placed In
''WUideJphla Building.
* BBB B LOVDON "ARIZONA" PAST.
"AriL^ C Jr ' any which Is to play Augustus Thomas's
a^fr^* it th« Adelphl Theatre, London, gave a
Tfctatr* ° rm nce ot the drama at the Victoria
HKj^, 6 yesterday. There was a considerable
t*-*tXLoH consisting largely of actors. The play
Mrty °? thlsr an< wa " mucn enjoyed. The caßt has
*** toea^* n prtnt in these columns. Several of
?' t £Uvfcr,v';i* P t lt have been seen In their re
*<t M- ?Ej* tn New-York before. After the third
i 'Bomat , was called before the curtain and
BasßssßasT *. *„*• He made a brief and
- 2* »ow'.igs r *»*- tn which he eaid that he thought
-!?«^r.g rnJr^ *«a«rtcan invasion" of London was
2L T *T pvVi. * P art y «*'!• M r Thomas will
■Sf*«y^23i a n*?° ut two weeks later than the
2*»'.c» *t ,, y :U '^ '■' tlm<s for the opening per-
Utet a tht Adelphl He will return a few
ELECTRfriTY POINTS A WAY OUT OF THE STEAM, SMOKE AND FOUL GASES TO SAFETY AND COMFORT-
U. L. HONORS ROOSEVELT.
HE TS UNANIMOUSLY CHOSEN AN HON
ORARY MEMBER-THE TICKET
GOES THROUGH.
President Roosevelt was unanimously elected
an honorary member of the Union League Club
last night at the annual election. He has been
an active member of the club for about eighteen
yearp. He wa? Informed las«t night of the honor
conferred upon him. Presidents Harrison and
McKlnley are the only Chief Executives who
havA been similarly honored by the club. The
proposition to elect him to honorary membership
came before the executive committee on
Wednesday ni?ht. when artlon on his name was
unanimous.
As was foreshadowed recently In Th» Tribune,
the ticket headed by ex-Secretary of the Interior
Ccrr.ellus N. Bliss was elected without opposi
tion. Mr. Bliss succeeds Frederick D. Tappen,
president of the Gailatln National Bank. George
S. Terry was elected secretary for the fifth
time, and William G. White wan elected treas
urer for the ninth time. Ten new members
were elected, but their names were not made
public. Following: is a complete list of those
chosen to office:
President— COßNELlUS N. BLISS.
Vlce-presJflents 'class of UXM)— GEORQB BBTHOTB
ADAMS. MORTIMER C. ADDOMS, JOHN W.
GRIGO3 and JAMES I>. LATNG.
Secrttary — GEORGE S. TERRT.
Treasurer— WlLLlAM O. WHITE.
Executive committee— of 1902, CHARLES W CAR
PENTER. CHARLES K. COX. E. RITZEMA DE
GROVE, JOHN L. DUDLEY and HENRY W. HAY
DEN. r*!a*e Of 1003. GEORGE F. CRANE. CHAIiLFS
DAVIDSON. J. SEAVEU PAGE. THOMAS BTUROIS
and J. LANGDON WARD. Class of 11VH. HERBERT
P. DROWN. JOHN PROCTOR CLARKE. GEORGK
B. FOWLER, FRANCIS G. GORJIAM and GEORGE
H. ROBINSON.
Committee on admissions (class of I»O«>— CHARLBB F.
BROOKER, WALTER R. GILLETTE. F. NORTON
GODDARD. 6. GOLDECKMIDT ar.d .A. BARTON
HEPBURN.
Committee on library an« publications— To f.ll vacancy
class of 1902. CHRISTOPHER R. CORNING. Claae
of 1&04, HENRY A. BRANN, SETH M. MILLIKEN,
Jr.. and EDWARD H. WALES.
Camrr-lttee on ABRAHAM-A. ANDERSON. CLARK
SON- COWL JOSEPH W. HOWE. MORTON C.
NICHOIJ', ROBERT V. V. EBWELL. DAVID B.
SIMPSON and ROBERT W. VAN BOSKERCK.
Committee en political rnPHAS BRAINERD,
JAMES A. BLANCHARX'. EDWARD F. BROWN.
JUSTUS A. B. COWLES, f-HARLEB T. HARBDCK,
WILLIAM M. V. HOFFMAN, WILLIAM H. HOL
LISTER. THOMAS L. JAMES, .TOHN C. CONOR.
JORDAN J. ROLLINS. EDWARD C. VAN OLAHN.
DAVID WILLCOX and JOHN B. WISE.
Auditing eommlttee-^-WILLIAM T. CORNELL, AN
DRBW MILLS and WALTER A. PEASE.
Committee on nomination*— B. EHRHARDT,
JOSEPH E. GAY, AUGUSTUS G. PAINB, 6ALEM
H. WALES. CHARLE3 H. WEBB. W. HULL WICK
HAM and THOMA6 H. WOOD.
MODEL CITY PLAN ACCEPTED.
The schema originated by Charles R. Lamb, of
the Municipal Art Society, of New-York, to hava a
"model city" at the St. Louis Exposition In l&nfl, has
been accepted by the commissioners of the exposi
tion. Mr. Lamb bo Informed a Tribune reporter
yesterday on his return from a trip to Bt. Louis
In company with Charles C. Halicht and Albert E.
Kelsey, of the committee appointed by the Municipal
Art Society, to present the. plans to the. commis
sioners.
The members of the committee, left Xew-York on
Saturday night. On Monday they were entertained
at the St. Louis Club, where they met ex-Governor
Francis, president of the exposition. They visited
the site in the afternoon. A special executive com
mittee meeting was held at which the committees
suggestions were made with reference to the- new
sit* which has been added recently to the fair
scheme. The university hail of the Washington
University, which Is being completed, has been
taken with the ground and buildings. The uni
versity hall will serv*. as tho administration build
ing of the exposition, and a library building will
be erected for the hall of congresses, -where papers
will be read. At the end of the- fair they will ba
turned over to the university.
Th« committee suggested that the rest of the
buildings necessary for the administration work of
the exposition should be. grouped in front of the
university hall, and that the bulldlncs devoted to
education and social economy should be brought
Into the 6Cheme, being placed right and left of the
central avenue. The report of the Municipal Art
Society's committee was accepted, and the execu
tive committee of the fair requested the Municipal
Art Socijty. through its committee, to develop th«
idea of a model city more elaborately. Another
consultation will be held at an early date. Mr.
Taylor, the director of works, approved the scheme
of the model city and promised to give all the as
sistance poseible to carry it out successfully.
NOTES OF THE STAGE.
Krrl* Bellew and his company will give a special
matinee performance of "A Gentleman of France"
at Wallacks Theatre for schoolboys on Friday of
next week. A certain number will be chosen from
each class of each high school in the city, and
these groups will be accompanied by their various
class teachers.
Miss Corinns Parker, Mies Marion Ten Eyck.
Miss Florida Pier and Brandon Hurst have been
added to Mrs. Minnie Maddern Fiske's company.
the tour of which will begin on January 27. The
engagement of J. E. Dodson with Mrs. Flake will
end at the close of her Xew-York season. Harri
son Grey Flake, manager of the Manhattan The
atre., promised some weeks ago to release Mr. Dod
son from his season's engagement, owing to the
desire of Mr. Dodson to remain in Xew-York, and
In accordance ■with the recognition by the manager
and the actor of the fact that there were no avail
able parts In Mr. Dodson's line In the plays which
Mrs. Fiske will give on her tour. It Is probable.
however, that Mr. Dodson may again be seen as a
member of the Manhattan company in later pro
ductions at that theatre.
Henry B. Harris has accepted Augustus Thomas s
stage version of "Soldiers of Fortune." by Richard
Harding Davis, as the first play for Robert Ede
son's starring tour, and will make an immediate
production, instead of deferring it until next Sep
tember, as was originally proposed. Rehearsals
will begin at the. Garrlck Theatre on Monday. Jan
uary 20.
"The Hall of Fame" will have its first production
at iht- .New-York m January 27. supplanting "Floro
dara." which will reach Ute 5uCUi n&ik. in this city
on that date.
.\E\\ -YORK DAILY i-RIBU^. FRIDAY. JAKUAKT 10. 1902.
OBITUARY.
COMMODORE E. E. POTTER.
Belvedere. 111., Jan. —Commodore Edward E
Potter, retired, died from paralysis at bis home. In
this city, last evening. He was born at Medina.
N*. V.. In 1533. He was appointed from Rockford,
111., to the Annapolis Academy, in 1850. and served
in the navy until his retirement as commodore in
1835.
At the outbreak of the Civil "War, Commodore
Potter was with Admiral Schley on the eteara frig
ate Niagara. When Captain McLean learned that
war had begun, he gave the crew a chance to
choose between the North and South. Potter and
Schley were the first to step to the Union aide.
Commodore Potter was sent to Ireland with the
Constellation with provisions to relieve the famine
of ISSO. He had command of the Norfolk Navy
Yard during the World's Fair, when foreign war
ships made it a rendezvous. Hie last charge was
the Naval Home in Philadelphia. His record In
the Civil War was a notable one. He had com
mand of the Ironclad Chlppewa at the siege of
Fort Fisher, and while serving In the Gulf squad
ron, participated In the bombardment and the pas
sage of Forts Jackson and Phillip, and the capture
of New-Orleans.
"WILLIAM H. OWEN.
William H. Owen, who at one tlm« vu a whip
manufacturer at West:lei<l. Mass.. died on Wednes
day r.lght In the Seney Hospital as the. result of
breaking: his hip In falling: down a pair of stairs
In the Young 1 Men's Christian Association building.
In Fulton-st., Brooklyn, last Tuesday. The funeral
will be held to-night at 8 o'clock at Mr. Owen's
h'-me. No. H7 Putnam-ave., Brooklyn. Mr. Owen
was torn In Belchertown, Mas.*.. In 1421. litt worked
his way through Wllilarns College, and on being
graduated from that Institution came to Xew-York
and peddled whips. He gradually worked his way
Into manufacturing and made a fortune In the whip
business to Westfleld. He then cam* to New-York,
believing that he could Increase his fortuno by
speculation. Bad Investment*, however, caused the
greater part of his fortune to vanish. He had a
valuable collection of paintings, and, when he met
with the fatnl accident, had Just b»-en talking with
Professor Hooper, of the Brooklyn Institute, with
a view to Belling his collection. lie le&vei a widow.
PETER YON FINKELSTEIN MAMREOV.
Peter yon Finkelsteln Mamreov, a member of a
well known Russian family, who had galnM some
prominence as a lecturer, died on Wednesday at
his home. No. 529 Franklln-ave.. Brooklyn. Death
was (Vie to heart disease. Hin father, a colonel in
the Kusslan army, wns obliged to leave hl» native
land on account of political troubles, and settled In
Jerusalem, where Petor vraa born about forty-seven
yfars ago. Twenty-five y»ars ago he came to the
United States with his brother Benjamin. Together
with their Bister. Mrs. Lillian Mamreov Momitford
the brothers started to lecture upon the Holy Land
and Biblical topics. They also wrote a life of
Christ. Benjamin Mamreov died about a year ago.
GUT R. BROWN.
Guy R. Brown, who many years age was the
loading hardware merchant in the Eastern District.
Brooklyn, died yesterday at his home. No. 763 Han
cock-st. He was born in Manllus. N. Y-. in 1823
and had lived In Brooklyn since he gained his ma
jority. He leaves one daughter and a grandson.
ELI W. HUMMER.
Whltehouse. X. J., Jan. 9 (Special).— Ellas W.
Hummer, a well known merchant of Annandale for
twenty-five y«*ars, died there yesterday, after a
loner illness. He was conspicuous in church work.
For seventeen years he was leader of the choir in
the Annandala Reformed Church, and for fourteen
years he was superintendent of the Sunday school
Of tru> samp church. Two brothers, L. A. Hummer
and C. M. Hummer, of Plalnneld, survive him.
COLONEL I. E. MESSMORE.
Los AngeU-s, Cal., Jan 9.— Following the death
of his wife last Monday. Colonel I. E. Messmore
died here yesterday, aged eighty. He was a native
of Michigan, and was prominent In organizing the
21st Wisconsin Infantry, which he led in the Civil
War. Afterward he was collector of Internal rev
enue for New-York, and held other positions of
tryst. He was hlKl) In Masonio circles, and was a
member of the G. A. R. of York. His funeral
and that of Mrs. Messmore were held here to
day.
RICHARD HULL.
Richard Hull died at hi« home at Oyster Bay.
Long Island, on Wednesday morning after n. linger
ing illness. He was the son of a general of the
English army and was born in Sicily. He owned
large mills In Brlfast and came to this country in
1861. When he retired from business he came to
live at Oyster R,iy.
EDWARD R. JANES.
Edward R. Janes died on Wednesday from heart
dlpease at his home. No. 258 West One-hundred
and-seventh-st. Mr. Janes waa born in Hartford.
Conn., on May 3, liC?. While Ktlll a hoy he started
In bu«lne=B. Joining his father's firm of Janes. Fow
ler. Beebe & Co., Iron founders. In 1840 the firm
moved to this city, where Mr. Janes had since
lived. It waa this flrm which had charge of the
Iron work on the dome of the Capitol at Wash
ington. The work was begun In 1860, but was held
up because of the war. the Iron girders at one
time being torn down and used to barricade the
Capitol.
Mr. Janes's father. Adrian Janes, was the owner
of the present St. Marys Park. In the Borough of
The Bronx. He named It Mary's Park, after his
daughter Mr .lanes had been living in retirement
for many yt-ars. His business has been continued
by hln sons". Henry E. Janes and Herbert .lanes, un
der tho name of Janes & Klrtland. at No. <2a
Sixth-aye. Mr Janes leaves a widow, four sons—
Henry E.. Herbert. Arthur and Walter— and two
daughters one. unmarried and the other the wife
of F. N. White. A brother of Mr. Janes was the
late Henry Janes, of Baltimore, a partner In the
firm of Enoch Pratt A Bro The funeral will be
held at All Souls' Church. Fourth-aye. and Tw«n
:l<Mh-st.. to-morrow at 10 a. m.
THE REV. DR. X W. HOTT
Dayton. Ohio. Jan. 9— The Rev. Dr. J. W Hott,
one of the most prominent ministers of the United
Brethren Church, died here to-day. He was for
twelve years Editor of "The Religious Telescope."
the official organ of that denomination, and for the
last twelve years a bishop In the church, me
funeral will be held here next Monday.
CAPTAIN JAMES A GROSSMAN.
Captain James A. Crossman died at the home of
his daughter. Mrs. C. H. Ptirdy. No. 312 Mont
gomery-st.. Jersey City, on Wodnesday from pneu
menia. He was born at Hudson. N. V .. In 1542.
He was a veteran of the Civil War having been
an er.sign on the United States ship Chenango.
After the war he was employed by the Ward Line
Steamship Company and was in command of the
llianca when 6h<= was rin -d on by a Spanish man
Of w-r on March 8. ISM. For the last rive years
he had ajcted as port captain and freight agent at
Colon for the Panama Railroad Company He came
North to spend the holidays with his family He
is survived by a widow, two sons and three
'vjghters.
W. F. COCHRAN\S WILL.
LABGE SOI LEFT IN CHARITT, THE RE
MAINDER TO RELATIVES.
The will of William F. Cochran. the phllanthro-
I'ist. of Yonkers. was admitted to probate by Bur
n.fcate Sllkman at White Plains yesterday. The
es-tste. which Is estimated to be worth more than
J5.000.000. is bequeathed to relatives and charitable
institutions. Mr. Cochran was the most charitable
man In Westchester County, and. while living gavt
away more than $1,500,000 in charity in Yonkers.
He endowed churches, gave to hospitals, and built
the Hollywood Inn. the finest club for workingmen
in the State. By his will this institution receives
$1,000 for the purchase of books for its library,
which Is for the free use of Its members. It also
receives $100,000 for an endowment fund.
To his widow. Eva S. Cochran. Mr. Cochran
bequeaths his country seat, Duncraggan, at
Yonkers, with all his horses, rare paintings and
plate, and his town house at No. 5 East Forty
nftn-Bt. Thirty thousand dollars in bonds is set
aside tor the benefit of his niece. Louise C. Dewolf.
To his aunt. Mrs. E. M. Cochran. of Houtenvllle,
X. J., he gives J2S.WO. Peter Mac Donald, a gar
dener. Is to receive $3,000. and two servants, Mary
Foley and Cornelius Coughlin, each $l,oou for "their
long and faithful service."
Th« charttaWe bequests are: The Woman's In
stitute, of Yonkers. $1.«» , the Church Mission for
Deaf Mutes, In Xew-York. $10,000: the widows and
orphans of deceased clergymen of the Episcopal
Church. $10,000; disabled ministers, and the widows
and orphans of clergymen of the Presbyterian
Church, $10,000; Young Men's Christian Association,
of Yonkers, for a building fund. $3,000.
The sum of $30,000 In left to t»ach of his children—
Elinor, the wife of Percy H. Stewart; Alexander
Smith Cochran. William F. Cochran. Jr , Elizabeth
Baldwin Cochran. and Glfford Alexander Cochran.
Tha sum of $00,000 Ls also Het aside for his daugh
ters. Anna C. Ewlng. Elinor Stewart and Elizabeth
Baldwin Cochran.
The num of $100,010 each ls jrlven to his sons.
Alexander Smith Cochran, William F. Cochran,
Jr.. and Glfford Alexander Cochran, In trust. Each
son Is to receive the Income from this sum an
nually. Th<"> residue of the estate is to be divided
between hU widow and his sons Alexander ana
William.
The trustees named are Eva Smith Cochran.
William Francis Cochran, jr.. and Alexander Smith
Cochran. Tlu-y are not required to Rive any bonds
and ar«» not to receive more than $10,<«Xi each for
their services.
The will Is dated March S, 1539, md th» witnesses
are Maltland Triges. of No. 75 East Flfty-fourth-
Ft., New-York <lty; Levy B. Tenney. of Glen Ridge,
N. J., and Duncan Smith, of Xo. 101 Hudson Ter
race. Yonkers.
THE E. RUXGE COLLECTIOX SOLD.
HIS PAIXTTXIS BRIXO $n.522 50 AT AUCTION*.
The Edward Runge collection of palntlnps, which
has been on exhibition for some time In the Ameri
can Art Galleries. Xo. «i East Twenty-thlrd-st., was
sold last night at auction. TIM highest price paid
for any one painting was $I.OfA This amount was
given for a sunset s<"ene by Inness. It was bought
by a Mr. Richmond*. Another landscape by Inness,
"Morning," waa sold to A. A. Healey for tl.Ow).
"Suns«»t on the Coast at Ktretat." also by Inness.
went for $■*!»>, to Robert C. Vose. "A Rlverdale
Moorland." by William Plcknell, went to Thomas
R. Highes for $42".
A landscape near the sea. by Homer Martin, was
sold t» A. A. Healey for S'jS. Another oalntlng by
tho same artist, "Roadside at Monfleur," was
bought by Senator Glbbi for $300. The entire col
lection brought $11,812 ».
SCIEXTIFIC EXPLORERS 7.V SOUTHWEST.
El Paso, Tex.. Jan. o.— Dr. A. Heldllcka and Gus
tavus Meyers, members of one of the most impor
tant scientific expeditions to the Southwest within
recent years, have Just reached El Paso from Xew-
York The scientists represent the American
Museum of Natural History. They will study the
physical character of the extinct and living peoples
of the area once occupied by cliff dwellers,
I'ueblas, Aztecs, Toltecs and Chechemecs.
The Trlhanc Almu.mii* trill tell yon the new
i ini«rf«« diatrlcta of Xcw-York. For sale at
nrmdealern' everywhere, or by ninil, for -.'•
centu per copy.
THE WEATHER REPORT.
YESTERDAY'S RECORD AND TO-DAY'S Tr>RBCAST.
"Washington, Jan. — The feature of special lntertst to
night 1b UH per«l«tenca of the ah-iinr.ally high temp«ra
tur<»» over the entire interior of the country, where thry
ran** from 10 to 20 degrees above the seasonal average.
T&ay have however, fallen iwmewhat in the Northwest and
extre:n» Ontral West. Precipitation <-ontlnu«a light in
quantity and llmlte-1 in «r»«. nnly a lltt!« mow havlnfc
fallen In the jJlchlgan Peninsula, New-York. Northeast
Penn^-lvanla and Ne.v- Jersey.
With th«> exception of local »nnw» or rains FrMay In the
east lower iak» n*toa. the northeast portion of ih« Middle
Atlantic States and West New- England, and Saturday
n-.ir tr.e New-England Toast the weather will be generally
fair f>r the next two day* While there will be no marked
far in temperature. It will ba somewhat colder by Satur
day In th» Ohio and Middle Ml— l— lppl valleys and the
Southwest.
FORECAST FOR TO-DAY AND SATLTtDAY.
For Eastern New-York, cliudy to-day, probably rmln or
mow, Saturday partly cloudy.
For N»w-England. partly cloudy t(V-day. probably snow
in west portion; warmer tn northwest portion; Saturday
cloudy, probably rain or enow on the coast.
For the District of Columbia. Maryland and Delaware,
fair and ("lightly warmer to-day; Saturday fair: light east
erly to southerly winds.
For Eastern Pennsylvania and New-Jersey, cloudy to
day, possibly rain or snow in north portion; slightly
warmer in rauth portion: Saturday fair.
For Western Pennsylvania, cloudy to-day, probably rain
or snow Saturday; .'air. ceMcr in south portion.
For Western New-York, cloudy to-day; probably rain or
anew; Saturday partly cloudy and colder.
TRIBITNB TjDCAL, OBSERVAT.'ONS.
Id this diagram th» continuous white line show« th»
chances in pressure as Indicated by The Tribunes self.
recording barometer. The dotted line shows th« tempera
ture as recorded at Perry's Pharmacy.
The following official record from the Weather Bureau
shows the changes In the. temperature for the last twenty
four hours. In comparison with the corresponding date of
last year:
1902. 1001. 1 1902. 1901.
8 a. m 31 SS 6 p. in S3 45
6a' m SO 38 » p.m..... 31 43
S a. m 30 38 11 p. m 31 «A
12 m.. 32 30112 p. tn — 40
4 p. ra 85 *b|
H;ghe»t temperature yesterday, 86 degrees; lowest. 2S.
average, 32, average for corresponding dtte lut year. 42,
avt-rage for corresponding date last twenty-five years, 31
Local forecast: Cloudy to-day; probably rain or snow,
jtatlonary. temperature; partly cloudy Saturday; variable
witdj. '.•"' ■ .---.,-
THE PASSING THRONG.
Many railway companies no-w hare re#r-Jlarly or
ganized pension funds, under which employes retire
at a stated age npon pensions.
RAILWAY "The Chicago and Northwestern
PENSION Railway." said George B. Burt, of
SYSTEM?. Chicago, at The Imperial Hotel
yesterday, "has recently made a
change In Its pension plan which I consider an ex
cellent one." Mr. Burt is in the accident insurance
business, and does a large business among railroad
men. "The new rule on the Northwestern." con
tinued Mr. Burt. "13 that employes who have been
with the road for twenty years are eligible to retire
upon a pension. This affects twenty-flvr thousand
employes. The rule was formerly thtrty years.
This pives a chance for a man to retire at a com
paratively fair age. It makes way for younger
men and minimizes thp tfrnienoy of m^n to stay in
the service until their physical ability ls greatly
Impaired."
E. J. Radcllffe (not the ac*"ir). formerly of New-
York, who w<»nt to California some years asro for
his health, is in the city visiting
INDIANS Meada\ At the Iranerial Hotel ye?-
A 5 terday Mr. Radeliffe talked *>n-
I*ABORERS. thusiaMicallv about Southern Cali
fornia. He has a large vineyard
there. He says the climate is superb, the soil rich
and the life interesting. "One drawback," said Mr.
Radcliffe. "In operating the vineyards has been
labor. The Mexicans ar» a worthless lot to work.
Otner classes of labor are scarce. Recently, how
ever, many of the vineyard owners have been ex
perimenting with Indians as laborers, and the result
has been most satisfactory. The Indian Isn't sus
ceptlble of a hteh desiee o» mental culture, but he
seems to understand the vines, and he works
patiently and cheerfully. There seems to be some
thin? for the poor Indian to do in this line, even
if he has been a failure everywhere else."
James P. Reilly. of Kenosha. Wis . who for many
years has been In the railway supply business,
■with headauarters tn Chicago, at
SIGNALS the Holland House yesterday, com-
MADE NO mentingr upon the wreck In the
IMPRESSION. Park-aye. tunnel, said:
"The offlcials of the Central seem
to blame the engineer. So far as reports go. it
would seem to be a Just accusation. It appears
that the engineer disregarded a normal danger
signal, or a signal to slow up and keep a sharp
watch: a home signal, which meant to stop com
pletely; a torpedo exploding under his engine; the
waving of a red lantern by a flagman; the shouts
of his own fireman and two lanterns hurled through
the cab. It wouli seem that would be enough to
stop any one; yet he didn't stop. SomeMmes you
cannot account for what a person ordinarily cau
tious and trustworthy will do. Some years ago
there was an accident on the Chicago and North
western Railway. No one was hurt, but the engineer
wa3 rjught up on the carpet. He had a good record,
extending over several years. It seems that he ran
past a normal danger signal, another signal set
dead against him, and allowed his train to be de
railed. It was just ahead of an open drawbridge.
Th<» first slsmal set against him was to warn him
that the bridge might be open, and to slow up. The
second was to stop, as the bridge was open. The
railway company had a derail switch put in for
Just such an emergency as an engineer running
past both signals. In this way the train would be
derailed instead of running Into the water at this
point. Mr. Hughltt. president of the railway,
asked the engineer if be had seen the signals. The
engineer admitted that he had seen both signals.
Asked why he didn't stop, he said simply. 'I don't
know.' and that was all they could ever get out of
him. Of course, he was discharged. He could
never explain his action, and no one else could. It
would seem that his mind was dormant or leth
argic just at that period, and signals made no Im
pression on him. This may be a duplicate ca3e."
COTTLOW'S RECITAL.
Ml«>« Augusta Cottlow Is a young woman with
unmistakable gifts as a pianoforte player who
grave a recital In Mendelssohn Hall last night. She
besran her career as a prodigy, and has been heard
from at Intervals during the last ten or twelve
ypar*. Her playing last night indicated that with
all her natural jrlfts and the excellent training
which she has received she ls still wandering
rather far afield In respect of the most essential
features of pianoforte rlaylngf from the point of
view occupied by music lovers to-day. She has
thought somewhat too much of her fingers and
not enough of her feet; too much of the notes and
not enough of the spirit which ought to an. mate
them. She possesses the means properly to dis
tribute dynamic (and la a leaser degree emottonai)
values, but apparently she forgets the need of
doing so, because of the Inactivity of her poetic
sense. And so her playing, while Inviting respect
ful attention, fails to touch the heart or even
warm the fancy.
7.V MEMORY OF M'KIXLEY.
LEGIRLATrRE WILL HOLD SPECIAL
EXERCISES IX APPRECIATION OF
HIS STATESMANSHIP.
[BT TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBOTE.]
Albany. Jan. 0 — The legislature of the State
of New- York will hold memorial exerciaes In
honor of the late President McKinley in the
n«ar future. In the Senate this morning acon
ni.rrent resolution was Introduced by President
Pro Tern KUsworth. which provides for the ap
pointment of a Joint commltte* of Senators
and Assemblymen to arrange for the meeting.
The resolution ls as follows:
Resolved. If the Assembly concur, that a Joint
committee of tht; legislature be appointed, to
consist of three Setiators. to be appointed by
the President pro tern of the Senate, and five
members of the Assembly, to be appointed by
th.- Speaker of the Assembly, to arrange for
and conduct suitable memorial exercises by
which the legislature may express its apprecia
tion of the statesmanship and virtues of Will
iam McKlnley, late President of the United
States of America, who was assassinated at the
city of Buffalo, in this State, in the month of
September last. Its abhorrence of the crime and
Its sympathy for hla berenved family.
The resolution was adopted, and will be sent
to the Assembly for its action.
XO M'KIXLEY DAY IN BAY STATE.
Boston, Jan. •—Massachusetts will not officially
recognize the birthday of President William Mc-
Kinley on January 2*. On the request of the Na
tloral McKinley Memorial Cotnmlfee, the State
Memorial Committee has decided that It Is not
advisable that such an observance of the day be
made this year.
TO ERECT STATt'E OF M'KINLEY.
Raleigh. N. C, Jan. 9.— lnformation comes from
Dtirha-n. N. C, that J. B. Duke has ordered from
an Italian sculptor, a design for a heroic bronze
statue of President McKinley. Mr. Duke, It is un
derstood, wishes the South to erect the first memo
rial to the martyred president, and will place this
figure in the OOUeste park of Trinity College, at
Durham.
TO OBSERVK M'KINLEY*S BIRTHDAY.
Butte. Mont.. Jan. 9.— A dispatch from Helena
to "The Miner" p.ivs that, acting- on the sugges
tion of Governor Nash of Ohio, Governor Toole has
issued an address in which he asks the school
children of th^ State and the people generally to
observe January 2?, the anniversary of the birth
day of the late President McKlnley. as a holiday.
Hi.rn.-n> Vanilla Extract
is th<» *»st. The grocers know It. Inaist on hvirs It
always, Ir is for your food. Pure and wholesome.
The snrest and safest of Blood Purifiers Is Jsyne's
Alterative.
DIED.
Appleton. ■eresM P. Herron. Gen. Francis J.
Brandon, Flora G. Hull. Richard.
Campbell. Frances M. Jsnes. Edward R.
Chapin. William C. Ketrhum. Mary J.
frosßT Horare F. T-a!dLaw. Henry B.
Doughty William S. Nelsan. Leceister H.
r>u Bols George- W. Plerson. Edward M.
Grttnth. Evan. Shaw, Sarah F.
Hartley. Marcellus. Todd. Elbert.
Haviland. Rob-.t 5. Walton. Ernest F.
APPL.ETON'— Wednesday. January 9. 1902. at her resi
dence No. 122 West 72d-st.. S«rfna Parker, widow of
John 'Adams Appleton. In the T6th year of her age.
Funeral services will be held at the Caurch of the Heav
enly Rest. 3th-ave. and 43th-at . en Saturday. January
11. 1902. at 1:30 p. m.
BRANDON— January a . Flora Ooodrtch Brandon.
widow ef George Brandon and daughter of th- late
Horace and Delia Aiiall Goodrich, of Stockbridge. Mass.
Funeral services at her late residence. No. 12 East
119th-st., on Friday evening. January 10. at 8 o'clock.
CAMPBEXXr— At tb« Barron homestead. Woodbrldge N.
J , Mrs. Frances M. Campbell, in the 69th year of her
age. Services at the house on Friday, at 2 o'clock.
Relatives and friends are Invited. Train leaves New-
Tork on the Pennsylvania Railroad, fooi of 23.1-st.. at
12:40 p. m.
CHAPIN— At the home of his eon. E. P. Cfcapla.
Andover. Mass.. on Tuesday. January 7. Uiiam C
Chapin. Funeral private. Burial at Providence. R. I.
CROSBY At New-Rochelle. X. T.. Horace F.. only son of
Horace and Jennie Croaby. aged twenty-one years.
Relatives and friends are respectfully Invited to attend
the funeral from hia late residence. Trinity-st., N«w-
Kochelle. on Saturday. January 11, at 2 o'clock p. m.
DIED.
DOtXJHTT— At We rssiiiniiL E=g!eweo4. X. J. Jtamar*
9, 19U?. William Stewart Doughty, ta the slxty-elghti
year of his a*e. Funeral at his late realdeace. Engle
st.. January 10. on arrival of train leaving Chambers-
St. at 3:30 p. m. and West Twenty-thlrtJ-at. at 3:33 p. m.
Kindiy omit aowers. Interment at Albany.
BOIS— At Bol— Idaho, en January 3, IMS. Oeorv*
vvells Da Bol*. Funeral service will be SeM «• tie
residence of his father-in-law. Jesse Elting. Xew-Peita.
N. V.. January 10 at 2 o'clock.
GRIFFITH— On Tuesday. January 7. WC2. Evan., eldest
son of the late Charles Trlnder and Ellis. Herrlisan
Gri^th. Funeral serrices Friday. January 10, at his
late residence. No 32 Tompklns Place. Tlissslljii at 3
o clock c. m.
Ha ßTLET— Suddenly, on Wednesday Janua-T *. 1902.
Marcellu* Hartley, aged 7* years. Funeral service at
Madison Square Presbyterian Church. S«th-sc and Ma4l
son-ave.. on Saturday. January 11. at 10 A. M. Pleaa*
oratt flowers.
HAVILAXD— Suddenly, at Cha;T»aqua. N -. T on Ftrrt
Month. »th. Robert 3. Havtland. in the wsth v«sir
of his age. Funeral at Friends' Meeting House. C^ap
pafi'Ja. N. V.. on Second Day. First Montn. 13ti. at l-.*»
p. m. Carriages will meet train leaving Qraad CentreJ
»•*• at 11:3© a. m. Phl!aJf! papers pleas* copy.
HERRON"— On "Wednesday. January <». 1302. General
Francis Jay Herron. aged «8 years. Funeral from tke
residence of Mrs. T. M. McCarthy. N*o. 213 Weat TiH
m. on Friday morning. ServU.es at the Church of the
Blessed Sacrament. Broadway and 71st-et-, at •:»
0 clock. Interment at convenience of family.
HULL — On WeaaaeaaaajßC, January s\ at hia late laeliawe.
Oyster Bay. Long Mai Richard Hull, ln his ninetieth
year. London papers pi<-a*e '-opy.
JANES— Suddenly, on Wednesday. January *. Edward R.
Janes, in the 73<; year ol his age. Funeral services at
All Souls' Church. 4th-ave. and a>th-»t Saturday
morniag. January 11. *• 10 o'clock. Interment private.
K T S HUM ~ At 3an Die*.'. Cal en the 3tn test., ln ker
Ssth year. Mrs. Mary Jane Ketch-am, mothM' of Mary.
wtffe or t^.e Rev. Qservß L. Shearer. D. r . of this city.
LAID LAW — On WssssMaaay svwasaaS January 9. at $:s<>
o'clock, at his residence. No. 31 TV'est 7Sa-eC. Kew-
York City. Henry Bell Laiilaw. in his Sid year. Funeral
services at Trinity Chun-h on 9arar4ey. January U. at
1 o'clock.
NELSON*— On Thursday. ranuan- 9. IW2. of s«fje*eseaass.
Leicester Hubbard Nelson, son of -• Tracy and Cbra>
Hubbard Nelson. Notice of funeral hereafter.
PIERSON— At mmtim N. J.. January 7. IHML E«Sw«rd;
M. Plerson. tn his ,2.1 year FVineral services from,
his late r»?!l«nce. No. 1.144S Brcad-st.. on Saturday, at
3 p n- Relatives and frtends are invited to attend.
SHAW— On January «. Sarah Forgav Shaw, widow of tfce>
late Robert Ludlow Shaw. Fur*»ral service rrorn ker Bste>
r-s.iuence.Xo. 38 West -M'.th-st.. on Saturday montmM.
January 11. at 1 1 r, -lock Relatives an.l frlendi ar*
respectrully invited as attend.
TODD — At his home. No. 4T Ea?«t 23th-st.. aa Tuesday.
h^ h aa ,7f' 190C ' , Pr E;bert Todd - Funeral services wUf
r>* held from his late resllence on Saturday. January 11.
■saw; at 1 afcseckl p. m. Inisreiasi at Kenslco Cemetery.
WALTON— Suddenly, on January *. Ernest F. Walttm.
papers pica - X> T " private. Phlladelpnl*
papers please copy.
spfdat Xotuei.
■*-~ Dr - ■*••»■. I<H TV««t 47rh diseases of Women. Csai
m tVem Physicians personally recommend thlaj
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Poatoffice Xotice.
(SamiM tvr rea.i DAILY by all interested. as eJkßJswssl
may occur at any time.)
Foretar. malls f r the week ending January 11. 1902.
will c!.'»e (promptly in all rases) at the General Post—
pff.--e as follows: Parcels Po»t M:>'.!» -los>e etc WttF;
earlier than closing time shown Dei w Parcels Port
Hails for Germany close M 5 p. m. Friday, per a. a. Orse,
WaMersee. via Hamburg.
Regular anl Supplementary ma:!i clc*e st Wi«lsis(
Branch r:a!f hour later than closing tlm<; shown bekswj
(except that 3upr'emer.tary Mails f>-r Europe an.l Central
America, via Colon, close one hour later at Fortlgn>
Branch).
TRANSATLANTIC M.\!U«.
EATCRDAY— At 4 a. m. IS* Europe, r>er s. s. Mlime -a
apol'.s, via Plymouth (mall for Ireland must be directe<u
"per s. s. Minneapolis '>: at 7:30 a. m. for Netaerlands
direct, per » a. Ry-.!.im .mail must be directed "per
». s. Ryn<Jam">: at 11:30 a. ts. lementary 1 p. ra->
for Europe, per s. s. Sasonla. v!>. Qiieenstown.
•PRINTEO MATTFR. «TC —This steamer takes Printe.il
Matter. Commercial Papers, and Samples for Germany
on.v. The same cla.»s ol mall matter for other parts of i
Europe will not be sent by thU ship unless ap« leliT-i
directed by he-.
After the closing of the Supplementary TranaatsaSjClaW
Ma.ls named above. a1.1.t: >nal Supplementary Malls are]
opened on the pters of the American. EhgHsh. French
and German s:ea:ners. and remain open until ■lUslaM
Ten Minutes of the bour of sailing of steamer.
MAILS FOR SOUTH AND CENTRAL. AMERICA. WESr^
INDIES. ETC.
; FRITaY— At 12 m. for Bahamas aad Mexico, n«r a ' sv.
City of Washington, via Nassau and Tampico (malt
must be directed "per s. s. City of Wasnlngton">.
SATURDAY— At 5:30 a. m. for Argentine. rruajuay aakff
Paraguay, I^r s. s. Ooronda: at t a. m. for Brazil, per
• s vTaierleld (mall for rthcra Praxll. ArgenUa*.
Uruguay and Paraguay must b* directed "per a aw
WakefleM"): at s •- m. for Bl ' rniuli »- per s. a. »wert»;
at S a. m. (supplementary it.M a. i».> (or Porto Rica.
Curacao and V«ne»u*la. per s. a. Caracas (mail tor
■avaailla and Carthagena must he dlreote4 "'per a. s.
Caracas"): at 9 ■• "'• teT P°rto Rico, per a. a. Pajiili
man via Pone* (mall for Porto Rico must be directed
•T>er s. a Buckman): at & a. m. for St. Kltti. also
British Dutch and French Guiana, per a. a. CUer:
at d-30 »• rr! - (supplementary I<V3O a. m.> for rialwa
Island. Jaroaira. Savanllla and rartaaam*. per s. *.
Alleghany (mall for Coata Rica must be direct*' *>»•
a s Auegbany"): at &30 a. m. (supplementary 10:3**'
a" m tot Haiti and Santa Marta. per a. s. Alps; at lOi
■ m. for Cuba. p«r s. •- Mexico, via Havana; a» l»i
a' m. for Grenada. Trtrldad and Cludad Btihv aS
s s Maracas: at 12 SO t>. m. for Cuba, per a. a. Cor!-]
tyba. vta Matanxaa. etc. (ordinary mall oeljr wnicft
must be directed "per j. s. Curtryba"): at til p. m. far*
Bahamas. vU Nassau, per steamer from Miami. Fla. t
Malls for Newfoundland, by rail as North Sydney, aa*
thence by steamer, close at k hls office daily at «3O
p m. iconnecting- ciosc here very Minday. TTsitiieailaj
and £aturday>. Malls for Mique'on. by rail to Boston.
and thence by steamer, close at this office daily at • 3O
•p. m Mails for Cuba, by rail to Port Tampa. Fls. sad
thence by steamer, close at this office; daily at tit a. m.
(i-rnoeetlcns close her* every Sunday. Wednesday ac<3
Frldayi. Malls for Mexico City, overland. aasleaa
aurtal'T addressed (or dispatch by steamer, eles« at
this office daily -t I^3o r. m. and 11 p. m. Malls fo-
Costa Rica, Bell2e. Puerto Cortes and Guatemala, by
rail to New-Orleans, an! thence by atoemer. close a:
this ofßoa dally a» tt*3o p. ra. fe-enneettas; closes her»j
Mondays for Belize. Puerto Cortex and Guatemala, axd
Tuesdays for Costa Rica. tßeglstered mall closes at «
p. m. previous day.
TRANSPACIFIC VAILS.
Malls for Australia fexcept West Austrxlta, which la
fax warded via Europe>. New-Ze«land. FIJI. *not and
Bawall. via Saa Francisco, close here dally at 6:30
p m. after January t5 and up to January til. ln
clusive, or -.r. arrival of s. 1 Etrurta.. due at New-Tors)
January til. for dispatch per s. s. Veatara. }
Mail* foe Hawaii. China. Japan and Phillpetoe Islands,
via San Francisco, close here dally at d:3O p. m. npi
to Januiry tl«. incluaive. for dispatch, par a. s. Gaelic. -
Malls for Haws.ll. vU San Francisco, close hers dally at
4:30 p. rr.. m to January t». Inclusive, for dispatch vu>
s- s. Alameda.
Mills for China, and Japan, via \aaeouver. c!?ae h«r»
daily at •:*» p. m. up to January tn, Uaelusive. for
dispatch per a. a. Enmesa of Japan (registered oaeJl
must be directed "via Veajßeewer." MercksMdiM for the
■:. 8. Postal Agency at Bhangbal cannot be forward**
via Canada). i
Malls for China and Japan, via Taeoma. dose here dally
at 6:30 p m. up to January t2l. inclusive, for diapatcfc
per s. a. Taconsa.
Wills for Tahiti aad Marquesas Islaade. via Sao Fran«
Cisco, cloa* here daily at i:lu p. m, up to February tV
inclusive, tor dispatch per » s. Australia.
Transpaclnc malls are forwarded te port of *ail!".a; da!ly%
and the schedule of dosing Is arranged 03 the prerap^
tlon of their uninterrupted over. and transit. tß*g!eteres
mail closes at o p. m. previous day.
CORNEUC3 VAN COTT. p itaumr. i -
Poatofflce. New-York. >\ T.. January 3. 1902. ' 1 _ ]
£>

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