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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 26, 1902, Image 1

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V OL LXI-.--N 0 - 20.160.
HARD TIMES IN GERMANY.
%THY BERLIN* HAS FELT THEM
SEVERELY.
CITY GAY FOR EMPERORS BIRTHDAY
LIVELY AMERICAN COLONY.
W2: By The Tribune Association.)
(BT CABI.T. TO THE TRIBfNKI
Berlin, Jan. 25. — The times may be hard, but
Berlin does not mope. It has felt the pressure
of commercial depression more keenly than the
oiher industrial centres of Germany, for the
temple reason that it supplies goods in ordinary
cf.nditions f"r the home trade within the em
j .re rather than to foreign markets, and the do-
BMStiC rather than the foreign trade has been
(U moralized. During the last year a large pro
pr.rti.in of the working population has been
thrown out < f employment, and as the three
pystems of state insurances embrace accidents,
chronic il!nep 8 and old age. but not nervous ex
haUFtion of the country itself, induced by over
production and undue expansion of business in
ure?ts, a direct provision has been required in
the form of public works and soup kitchens.
Banking combinations under the leadership of
Berlin financiers have husbanded the resources
of capital, and trade syndicates have steadied
foreign commerce by limiting production, pre
venting ruinous competition and maintaining
prices, but artisans, whether unemployed or
~ half Has*, have been left dependent
hit. m*fgf* savings or municipal works and
pubic siup kitchens, yet the burdens have been
bsnsC irtt* exemplary patience and military
Otocfpltes, and the imperial capital on the eve
of the Emperor's birthday has not lost an air cf
Ifcbt bearteo gayety.
The most encouraging fign of this week has
Veen tha remarkable demonstration that the
IBlfrirr has enormous reserves of capital and
credit which are awaiting the restoration of
nee. The imperial and Prussian loans,
about H3.000,0Wi have been subscribed for
fifty times over from the banking reserves and
jnvate beards. Even when allowance has been
made for tho low rate of German and Prussian
I"? sad tar a margin of profit by speculators
j n p r o cr : r. be DO surer indication that the times
fre rr.er..iir.=r. as the leading bankers have been
assertine since the opening of the year.
ThP industrial depression of the last twelve
rr. rr.hs has resembled the financial revolution of
1837 la the Doited States, with the important
exception that the collapse of all business in
tensts, although generally apprehended, has
BS4 Isipumrl Th" chief cause of depression
v a« the < xpansion of domestic trade and build
ing enterprise en speculative lines, when the re
frves of carital and the resources of organiza
tion lacking Ist financing operations of ex
•raordinary magnitude. Cold water is not an
regmun when financiers, specu
i»tois and manufacturers have been drinking
.y for a long period, but the sobering effect,
whi'.t graiuai. is inevitable.
nililhw financiers, v.ho have been wonder-
Ing whether the bottom would fall out of every
thing, are now convinced that the. resumption of
Lusinefs activities is impending. A remarkable
feature cf the protracted period of depression
has bees the steadiness of foreign trade. The
judgment of manufacturers and merchants, who
have bees fighting their way Into foreign mar
kets for a quarter cf a century, has been re
rr.Erkably vindicated. Foreign trade has been
:hc; anchor to uindward during the protracted
period of storm and sires;. The German ship
has righted herself, because heavily ballasted
pith foreign corr.m^rc^. This supplies the mer
ohar.ts of Hamburg, Brem<n and the frontier
towns with a strong argument against the new
Tariff bill, by r.hich reciprocity arrangements
v.ill lie Imperilled and foreign trade restricted.
Even more effective objections come from the
Hocia'.ists and National Liberals, who Inveigh
Bgainrt increased taxation on Imported food
when the ertfcara class is out of work and en
titled :o the minimum cost of living.
It is now an open question whether any com
bination of the groups in the Reichstag is prac
ticable tor securing the passage of a tariff bill
Sith IncreaFod protection for agricultural prod
ucts. Th - failure of the tariff scheme is prob
able, even if thf; rumors of the projected com
nercial coalitlon of Russia and Austrla-Hun
pary are not svefl founded. While the German
Emperor expects the ministers either to con
ciliate or to manage the Arrarians by setting
up one group against another, he is not per
ronally interested In the tariff scheme,-, as he has
ben in the naval policy. Foreign relations are
fllrectly under liis control, especially when Eng
land Is involved.
The entertainment of the Prince of Wales will
not lack either heartiness or statellness. There
en no breach of the relations of the two
Psyal houses, and the Emperor has too true an
sr.F;in<n in forecasting the trend of race tenden
cies and events not to perceive that England
and Germany will l>" natural allies in the future,
■ten the flurry Of excitement over the Boer
war passes. There Is every indication that the
US of the two countries will improve In
;iK-nce of the brief visit of the Prince of
ITales, and that the military and court func
tinns connected with the birthday celebration
is of unwonted splendor.
Americans are represented by the Continental
Journal* as receiving ardent attentions from two
fmk us suitors, each eager to supplant the other.
ling; to some cynical humorists. It i.-* a
ftarre of "Codlln's the friend, not Short." The
norf rational view is that the United States,
England and Germany are in line with one an
r>thfr as progressive maritime nations, and have
•hing to gain by beins friendly with "ne
IMCker. The German Emperor is paying both na
tions compliments in turn in receiving the Prince
lies and sendlßS Prince Henry across the
t tiar.ti. .-. Moreovsr, there is no evidence of any
thing save friendly feeling in the relations of
Gtrrr.any and the United States. The canal
4|u<!stlon has not been raised in any form at
Bftrlin. There are no signs in Germany of hos
tility toward the American acquisition of the
Danish West Indies, and the Monroe Doctrine
♦ 111 nt be chafleneed in the coercive measures
for the enforcement of the Venezuelan financial
The tariff bill, if It be enacted, will
•* directed against Ru-sia. Austria-Hungary
ar.d France, as well as against the United States.
Brtn the drastic insurance law, which has ex
cited protests from powerful American life in
surance companies, is aimed equally against all
foreign companies, and has already driven the
English companies out of Germany. One great
f an company has decided to comply with
MsjsjHtt X rovisions, two other American
••Sapaniee are hesitating and undecided. Even
Inturance question, v hlle imposing |ard
h! P» upon vested American Interests, must be
m THE SCHLEY INQUIRY
tbe Judges were divided. In the champagne contro-
Itriy an onncisseurs agree that Mumm'o Extra
o»ei its (superiority to It* unsurpassed qual-
Sf- It« import* in mi were. 120.359 cases— nearly
■WB roor«s than any other br*nd. Immense reserves
; . tu&rantee the ssamtenanes si lti quality.—
-/r^'nolsseure th« world over prefer Otard's to any
. * W> « brandy.-AdvU .. ' ■
*T\^k >^ ™ S» U^VW «h^s if^i^^ _ r^te*** sik a 'yuo
NEW- YORK. SUNDAY. JANUABY 20. 1902.-2 PARTS, 28 PAGES. WITH ILLUSTRATED SUPPLEMENT. 16 PAGES.
regarded as an Imperial or anti-foreign rather
than an anti-American measure.
The streets of Berlin are gay and animated,
and there are no signs of the prevailing depres
sion. The opera is crowded nightly, and the
theatres are not suffering for lack of patronage.
The concert season is unusually brilliant. The
American colony, with a swarm of students of
art, music and medicine, is having a gay winter,
the wife of the popular and efficient Consul Gen
eral Frank H. Mason being the natural leader.
It is probably the most democratic American
colony in Europe, and does not draw the line at
minstrel shows for charity's sake.
Owing to the interest of the colony in stu
dent life and customs, the fatal duel between
Falkenhagen and Yon Binnigsen, with gossip
about firing hefore the signal, and morals
against the whole hideous practice, has been
generally discussed this week.
The publishing trarlo h:iß come off lightly dur
ing the period of depression. The leading houses
of Leijisie. Stuttgart and Berlin have not been
seriously affected by the hard times. The sale
of the two supplementary volumes of Bismarck's
correspondence with the Emperor and other men
of the time has been remarkably large. Rooks
have not been cheapened to suit-the exigencies
of the times, and costly editions have not been
abandoned. Cornelius Guiiltto's erudite history
of art from the earliest ape has recently been
issued at Stuttgart in two volumes, at 44 shil
ling?. A more costly enterprise still has been
undertaken by Ashii. in Berlin. This is a 15
guinea work on the famous Daessler collection
of Peruvian antiquities, superbly illustrated.
I. N. F.
BRITISH PRINCE IS' BERLIN.
HEIR. TO THRONE WELCOMED BY THE
KAISER AND PRINCE HENRY.
Berlin, Jan. 25. — Thp Prince of Wales, who has
come to Berlin to represent King Edward at the
celebration of the anniversary of the birth of
Emperor William next Monday, was received
with the greatest ceremony upon his arrival
this evening. Emperor William, wearing the
uniform of the Ist Royal Dragoons, accom
panied by his second srni, Princ« Wilhe'm Eitel-
Friedrich; Prince Henry of Prussia, a number
of other piir.ces, th Duke of Baxe-Coburg and
fiotha. the British Ambassador and his staff
and numerous distinguished persons awaited on
the station platform the arrival of the prince's
train.
The Prince of Wales, also wearing the uni
form of the Ist Royal Dragoons, upon alighting
from the train, was greeted by the Emperor.
who advanced and warmly shook his hand.
The station was filled with a brilliantly uni
formed guard. The prince and the Emperor,
side by side, passed down the line of the guard
while the band played the British anthem. The
military escort passed in review before the Em
peror and his royal visitor, who afterward' drove
in a state carriage to the palace, where they
dined with the imperial family.
According to En.peror William's special order
an unusual number of police occupied the
streets. Tne crowds, however, were small and
showed little interest.
The celebrations in honor of the Prince of
Wales have been limited to the greatest possible
extent, owing to the existing dlslske for Great
Britain. Nevertheless, the prince will take
luncheon to-morrow with the officers of the Ist
Royal Dragoons, Queen Victoria's Own. Em
peror William is expected to speak.
PALM A ON SUt rA 8 TA RIFF.
SAYS CONCESSIONS SHOULD ; REACH 50
PER CENT OF PRESENT DUTIES.
Central Valley. N. T.. Jan. 25 (Special).— T.
Estrada Palnia, President-elect of Cuba, gave
to The Tribune correspondent to-day his views
on the question of tariff concessions by the
United States for Cuban products. The general
has been watching closely every move that is
made in Washington that bears on the ful>
ject. On the action that Congress will take.
General Pa.ma believes, depends the entire
future happiness and prosperity of. the island.
No other Cuban Is more directly interested in
the disposition of the question, for on the flrat
chief executive will devolve much of the re
sponsibility for a Huccessful free government,
and without the desired tariff concessions on
tobacco and sugar he fears the latter will never
be a success. General Palma said yesterday:
The proeperity of Cuba depends to a great
extent upon the attitude of the United States
toward the now forming republic. The full
moral obligation of th:s great nation to Cuba
will be discharged when the United States has
opened the only market that is possible to
Cuban products. We must have this market.
Unless we receive a reasonable reduction on
sugar and tobacco, prospi rity will be an im
posslbility. If this is tenled it will be the ruina
tion of the country. . It is Impossible to im
prove the bad condition of our principal staple,
i-ui<ar, by reducing the American duty one
third. In that way the problem will not be
solved at aH. The clamor for further reduction
will continue. The producer, unreleased from
the embarrassing condition* which confront him
now, would be unable to operate his mills for
lack of money or credit to meet the expenses.
me figures will clearly explain that the re
duction of one-third of the actual duties is not
sufficient to place our t;ugar on the fooling
needed to give the growers some benefit. Under
tho present scarcity of labor, increased taxes
and scantier yield from neglected and im
■ poverished fields, the average cost of production
may be reckoned as not less than .$- "lh a hun
dred pounds.
Then General Palma went to his desk and
compiled the following table to substantiate
hia urgument:
Coet production, per 100 pound* : ;-* 225
Transportation from inland mill to seaboard. Includ
ing railway frelrtit. wharfage, etc 20
Freight, Ou.ia to New-York, and marine in«urance.
1 par cent on f. o. b.. and landlnr charges In New-
VY,rk i-tO • •••• "O
may. 'two-third* of I«*s cents •• "2
Total ■SSCnsSi • • • ..-. %\ J}7
QNM niarket value in New-^ork • • ■* in
Net lo^s per 100 poun'la iprol<ably more) 1-
Continuing, he said:
Therefore, it is absolutely necessary that the
concessions should reach 50 per cent of the
actual duties, co as to give the producer a rea
sonable gain. The question of reduction for
Cuban products Is certainly one of the most im
portant problems that the United States has to
deal with, and much depends on Its solution.
"BUT ONE SALVATION FOR CUBA."
Mr. Agulrre, necretnry of the American
League, has received the following letter from ex-
Senator J. B. Henderson, of Missouri:
Dear Sir: Yours of December 30 received. I flo
not wish at my age to enter upon new business
enterprises. There Is but one salvation for < üba,
and that Is admission into the L'r.ited States as a
tovenlgn Stale of our Union. That alone gives
h-r B,BSOlUt« free trade witH her greatest customer,
and Rlvea to her people American products without
tariffs and taxes. Such a course places Cuba at
once among the first in wealth and prosperity of
the American States. Let Cuba avoid, as she
would a deadly contagion, any proposition to
occupy the position of a territory of the United
State?. Under the decisions of our Supreme Court
this might make her a mere vassal to the pro
tected interests of America. On the contrary, let
Cuba enter into the Union as a fullfledgod State, or
else not enter at all. Let her at once frame a con
stitution, republican in form, and ask admission
into the Union. If admitted. Cuba immediately be
comes the great market for the tropical com
modities of the Western world. Sho would Im
mediately absorb all the wealth and power of the
West Indies. If not promptly admitted on applica
tion, she could "till stand upon her strength and
dignity as an independent State, with the perfect
confidence that her proposition would soon b« fol
lowed by trade, concessions in the United States
which no political party here could safely resist.
WINTER HOMES FOLDERS.
The SEABOARD AIR LINE R'way have issued
for the public a "Winter Homes" folder, which is
very complete. Write Office. 1.183 B'way. for a
copy, which will be sent on application.— Advt.
m
POLAND! POLAND!! POLAND!!!
"mottled iit the Famous I'olund Spring, Me.— Advt.
CONCESSIONS TO CUBA.
RECIPROCITY BILL READY
FOR CONGRESS.
THE WHOLE FORCE OF THE ADMINIS
TRATION BACK OF THE WAB DE
PARTMENT'S MEASURE.
fnT TKI.Er.RAPH TO THF. TBIBIXE.]
Washington, Jan. 2.".— 1t was learned to-day
that the War Department had completed its bill
for reciprocity with Cuba, which provides for
concessions in excess of 25 per cent and It is
believed that this bill will be sent to the House
on Monday. It goes without saying that the
whole force of the administration will bo back
of the measure.
NEEDS OF CUBA URGENT.
COLONEL BLIBB SHOWS HOW A MONOP
OLY OF THE ISLAND'S TRADE
MIGHT BE SECURED.
[nr TKt.rr.RArn to tub TKinrNE.]
Washington. Jan. 25. — The Ways and Means
Committee to-day listened to some plain facts,
touched with a tinge of pathos, concerning the
necessity, economic, political and moral, of mak
ing liberal tariff concessions to Cuba. The hear
ing was devoted wholly to representations In
favor of a policy on the part of this country
toward Cuba which would serve the double pur
pose of rehabilitating the island and preventing
annexation. Colonel Tanker H. Bliss, an officer
of the United States Army, who has been col
lector of customs at Havana ever since Amer
ican occupation was established, told the com
mittee that there could be such a readjustment
of the tariff relations between Cuba and the
United States as would give to this country
a practical nsODOpoij of the trade and com
merce of the island and thus destroy Ger
man and English domination of that trade.
He described the terrible depression that
now exists in the Cuban sugar business,
and declared that this could be relieved
only by the tariff concessions sought. The
leading bankers of Havana were refusing
further credit to the planters, said Colonel Bliss,
and when this occurred it was a sure sign of
the distress of the planters. He roughly esti
mated the sugar Industry of the island at
$'J00,000.000. and declared that about three
fourths of the people depended In one way or
another on the sugar business. H-» submitted a
list of articles on which a differential of about
33 per cent In favor of the United States as
against other countries would give this coun
try the trade of the Island. He explained that
in reporting this to the War Department the
condition had been imposed on him not to re
duce the revenues of Cuba. Under such cir
cumstances, he thought It would be necessary
first to raise Cuba's tariff rates for purposes
of revenue, ana then readjust them with a BUin
'cient differential to give th<* United States-con
trol.of the' trade. TU«. he iilJ.*wasi only* one
Of the plans proposed by the War Department.
When asked if he thought the people of Cub*
would vote for annexation. Colonel Bliss said
he thought they would, but thut a commercial
union with the United States would satlsry
tl.em even better than annexation. His state
ment eet/med to make a deeper impression on
the committee than that made thus far by any
one else.
PLEAS OF CUBAN DELEGATES.
Colonel Bllsb was followed by several mem
bers of the Cuban delegation h<-re representing
variouß lines of industry in the island. Seftor
Place grew eloquent and pathetic In his plea for
help to the island. "For every dullar we ask
from you we are willing to give you one in re
turn," he said. Sertor Mendoza called attention
to the •well known fact that before the Cuban
Constitutional Convention incorporated th<-
Platt amendment into the organic law of the
island President McKinley and members of the
Cabinet had promised the concessions now
sought, and, therefore, the object of the Platt
amendment would not be effected until these
concessions are tn.uli .
In beginning his statement Colonel Kliss
disclaimed authority a* a sugar expert, and sau
his knowledge was confined to that of an ob
server for three jears in an office dealing wilh
the trade of Cuba. This led him to hope thai
if there was any change in the tariff it would be
such an adjustment as would throw into th<
hands of the United States tne large amount of
Cuban trade now taken by foreign countries.
Chairman I'ayiif asked Colonel IJliss to specify
what advantages the Inited States could gain
from Cuba, and called attention to the low tariff
rate Cuba imp-^sed against the Tnited States.
AMERICAN TRADE WOULD GAIN.
Colonel Bliss said the average ad valorem rate
was about lil per cent, and he presented tables
designed to show how a tariff readjustment
could throw practically all of the Cuban trade
into the hands of American producers. At pres
ent, he saifl, Cuba bought !S<»u,lM>O,<>UO, of which
the United States furnished and .the
balance of about 937.0QQ.000 came from foreign
countries. On many articles, such as fresh be-^f,
railroad Iron and other specified articles, the
United States had a practical monopoly of the
trade, but on many other articles, totalling
about |45.O0(fcO00, the Tnited States had only
$10,000,000 of the trade. "Hy a reasonable mod
ification of the Cuban taritT." said Colonel Bliss,
"at least SG per cent of this trade can be thrown
to the United States."
The members of the committee questioned
Colonel Bliss on the details of the proposed
readjustment. Representative Newlands, of
Nevada, suggested that without political control
of Cuba there might be servile labor to compete
with American labor. He added: "Are the
Cuban people prepared to come into political
relations with the United States?"
ANNEXATION SENTIMENT IN CUBA.
"I think a great majority of the Cubans arc
ready to come in," Colonel Bliss replied.
"As a Territory or a State?" asked Mr. New
laads,
"They would be glad to come in as a State or
a Territory or under the military authority—
almost any way in order to come under the au
thority of the L'nlted States."
-If Invited to come in first as a Territory,
then as a State, would this be accepted?"
"I think it would."
Colonel Bliss said he thought commercial union
wljh Cuba would postpone political union. Per-
( oiillunrd on third pane-
PINBHURST "THE BEAUTIFUL."
'Hie beautitul Now England village, located among
the lone leafed pines of North Carolina, offers a
delightful home to tourists daring the winter.
Reached quicker and with more comfort via Sea
board Air Line Ry. Through Pullman sleepers.
Write office, 1,18.1 Broac wa> -Advt.
POLAND! POLAND!! POLAND.::
Greatest Natural Mediciual Water Known.-Advt.
France asd Spanish war
PULL FACTS MAY BE DISCLOSED IN
CHAMBER OF DEPUTIES.
(Copyright: t»02: By The Tribune Association.)
[BT CABLE TO THE TRIBOJE.I
Paris. Jan. 2ft.— The explanations of the for
eign offices at Paris, Berlin. St. Petersburg and
Vienna, elicited by Lord Cranborne"s statement
regarding the alleged proposals of the Conti
nental powers to intervene in favor of Spain
during the Spanish- American War are published
to-day in the French papers, and It is deemed
probable that eventually the question will be
put in the Chamber of Deputies to M. Deleasse,
Minister of Foreign Affairs, railing for the pro
duction of the documents and dispatches show-
Ing exactly what was the attitude of the French
Government toward the United States in March
and April, ISI>B. Some time must, however,
elapse before making public the correspondence,
because by diplomatic usage in such cases the
assent of those concerned must previously be
obtained.
The various branches of the Organization Alli
ance Franc.ai.se express the desire that the full
official correspondence should be disclosed, in
the firm belief that the friendly attitude at that
period of the French Government toward the
United States will thereby be established beyond
any doubt.
Notwithstanding the difficulty with which
French diplomacy is confronted, namely, with
proving a negative— that is to say. In demon
strating that France was never a party to any-
Joint or collective proposal of intervention—
those who originally selected the Paris cable
service of The Tribune as the medium of put
ting the Continental case before the American
public, and which has resulted in drawing from
Lord Cranborne and from the foreign offices
of the European capitals so much light on this
point of history, now disclaim the endeavor to
prove too much. They admit that England's
friendship toward the United States in the spring
of IHQS was unquestioned and patent to the
world, but what they object to is that the fre
quently reiterated protestations of that friend
ship should invariably be coupled with asser
tions that the governments of France and Rus
sia during the spring of 1SJ»8 were unfriendly
toward the United States.
They declare that General Porter, at present
in St. Petersburg, is cognizant of facts which, if
he deems the moment opportune to disclose
them, would furnish ample testimony to the
pood will of the French Cabinet toward the
United States in the March and April previous
to the Spanish-American War. and while the
war lasted. It is pointed out that in March and
April, 1886, there was extreme tension between
the cabinets of France and England about the
Niger question, and also between the cabinets
of Russia and England, owing to the occupation
of a port in China. The Austrian and Spanish
ambassadors at the Court of St. James are ac
cused of profiting by this tension, and making
Mr. Balfour, who conducted the negotiations In
Downing Street at the time, believe that there
really did exist a coalition of the Continental
powers.
Anyhow, the feeling in French diplomatic cir
cles is that at the present moment, when Eng
land and Germany are acting in such zealous
rivalry to win the smiles and good graces of the
Unitftd State*, it is unfair that France should
be made to appt at ab having frowned upon her
sister republic during the critical period of the
Spanish-American War, and when the noisy
barks and growls of the Nationalists and the
Catholic reaction were mistaken abroad for the
voice of the masses of the French people, whose
real feelings of friendship and interest toward
the United States were represented by the
French Government. c. I. B.
CONSTRUCTORS OF SHAMROCK 111.
THORNBTCROrn TO BUILD SIR THOMAS
LIPTUNS NEW YACHT.
Glasgow. Jan. 25— As the result of an exhaustive
examination of Shamrock I the first offer of a
contract to build Shamrock 111 will go to tho
Thorneycrofts. The examination, which has just
been completed, was made with the special object
of determining the relative merits of the workman
ship of Shamrock 1 arid of Shamrock 11. and
William Fife is ho batisned with the condition of
Sir Thomas Upton's first challenger for the Amer
ica's <'ui> that he wants the Thorneycrofts to try
uftaln on Shamrock 111. it has been found that
;li»- old boat, « xrept where aluminum was used, has
stood the Strain and wear admirably. The plating
wa« always truer than in Shamrock 11. and her
underbi.dy h;is iit-vcr .shown Urn W— IniSSS in the
rivetiiiS which 1-auw'd so much trouble in the case
of tho last challenger.
TO PREVENT STRIKE IX ROME.
GOVERNMENT MEANS TO CHECK ACTION
BY RAILWAY KMPLOYES.
Rome, Jan. 25.— The "Official Journal" an
nounces to-night that the government has taken
a decided stand In view of the rumors of an Im
pending strike upon all the great railways in
Italy. The Cabinet announces that it cannot
consider a railway strike, affecting, as it does,
great public interest 01 , in the same category
with a strike of ordinary workers, but will
class such an action as a strike of public ser
vants, punishable under the penal code.
While determined not to allow a railway
strike, the Cabinet recognizes the right of the
working classes to improve their own condi
tion, and therefore the government has ap
proached the railway companies with a view of
obtaining the desired concessions, which it Is
confident it can do.
BOERS TO FKIHT BOERs.
ANOTHER CORPS TO BE RAISED— CAPTIVES
SAID TO BE OPPOSED TO THE WAR.
Pretoria, Jan. 115. — Lord Kitchener has au
thorized General Vilonel. a burgher who sur
rr-ndered, to raise an additional Boer corps of
I,: Tkn> men General Vilonel has written a letter
to ex-President Steyn warning the latter o?
his intention to form such a corps, and adding
that the Boers in the concentration camps are
tired of the useless struggle, and are determined
to help the British end it.
Nt: BLOwnz xot to retire.
London. Jan. 25.— The Associated Press is re
quested to say that the statement which appeared
tn "The Candid Friend" (a weekly paper), and
which was transmitted to the United Stutes in
these dispatches on January 1, saying that M. de
Blowltz was retiring from '"The London Times"
and would be succeeded as Paris correspondent of
that paper by William Morton Fullerton, an Amer
ican, is entirely unfounded.
FLORIDA AND THE SOFTH.
Via Southern Ry. The most perfect service ever
offered before. Pullman Sleeping and Dining Car
on all trains. The route of the famous Southern's
Palm Limited. Leave New York daily except Sun
day !2:40 noon, earliest afternoon arrival St. Au
gustine. — Advt.
MARDI GRAS EXCURSION.
$37 50 round trip from N Y. via New Orleans Short
Line Dining car service and sleeping cars thro
from N. T. Address Norfolk & Western, No. oM
B'way. — Advt. • •
POLAND. POLAND'! POLAND.::
Poland water, flrit amont nature* remedies.— Advt.
[Copyright: 19O2: By Th*> Tr:>un» AMOcUUon.]
BIG FUND FOR COOPER UNION.
COOPER AND HEWITT FAMILIES ADD $600,000 TO CAR
NEGIE'S SECOND GIFT OF $300,000.
TO STRENGTHEN AND EXTEND THE CURRICULUM.
Announcement was made yesterday afternoon
that ex-Mayor Edward Cooper, his sister, MHs
Sarah Amelia Coopor, and ex-Mayor Ahram S.
Hewitt and his family had given MMtMi as an
endowment fund to Cooper Union. This an
nouncement was made by Mr Hewitt shortly
after he had confirmed the report that Andrew
Carnegie last week save $300.««l)0, also as an en
dowment fund, to the same institution. This
is Mr. Carnegie's second gift to Cooper Union.
the first one, made about two years ago, being of
a like amount. Thus Cooper Union is $'.M)O,<lO0
richer than it was two years ago.
Mr. Hewitt, who is secretary of the institu
tion, said yesterday at his home. No. 9 Lexing
ton -a vc:
"Last week Mr. Carnegie gave Cooper Union
i?»io,i*»O. This made his total gifts to the In
stitution SKOO.OOO. When the Cooper family
heard of Mr. Carnegie's generous Intention to
give a second $300,000 they felt that they
should meet him halt way. When Peter Cooper,
my father-in-law, died, in ISS3, he left an en
dowment fund fir the institution. This fund
was not to go to the Union until the death of his
children. The determination of the children to
forego their right to the annuities from this
fund transfers StiOO.OOO to the Union which it
might not have received for thirty or forty
years. The surrendering of these annuities Is
certainly a creditable thing for the Cooper fam
ily to have don».
"The income whi-^h will be derived from these
gifts, with what the Institution already has. will
enable it to increase greatly its sphere of use
fulness. It will enable us to occupy practically
the entire building. Hitherto we have been
compelled, because of the expenses incurred in
the projection of improvements in the cur
riculum, etc.. to rent four stores on the ground
floor. We have been gradually taking over these
stores, and now we hope soon to occupy all the
space at our disposal. We have no intention of
constructing another building, preferring to
strengthen the faculty and courses of study.
'•Last year we expended SIS.OOO more than
our Income in our efforts to enlarge the use
fulness of the school. We desire to make Cooper
Union as complete an institution as possible.
The money will be used to pay our teachers
higher salaries. We shall give more advantages
yO FEARS FOR MAXCHURIA.
OPINION THAT TREATY WILL NOT AFFECT
RISSIAS POLICY.
Peking. Jan. 25.— The Manchurian treaty is
expected to be signed within a week. The dip
lomats here do not manifest much interest in
it. as they do not believe any written treaties
will in the slightest degree affect the poMcy of
liussia in Manchuria. A separate contract with
the Russo-Chinese Bank secures to the bank
complete control of the railroads and mines.
TRANSFER OK CANTON CUSTOMS.
Canton, Jan. 2.">.— The native custom? will be
transferred to the Imperial Maritime Depart
ment about February L'O.
$65000 TO INSTITUTIONS.
MISS TULLY REMEMBERS ROMAN CATH
OLICS IN HER WILL.
[BT TKI.EC.RArH TO THE TS.ITIS ]
Boston. Jan. 2o. — The will of Miss Cecelia
Tully. who in this city lived at No. 43 East
Newton-st.. which was rileil in the Suffolk Pro
bate office on Friday, contains about $tiT>,ooo in
bequests, among wales are $500 each to the
Little Sisters of the Poor, tae Home for Desti
tute Catholic Children, the House of the Good
Shepherd, and the Carney Hospital; $1,000 to the
Religious Society of the Sisters of Mount Car
mel. $2.<»>o to the Working Boys' Home. $10,000
to Archbishop Williams, to be devoted to the
use of St. John's Seminary; $30.01 M to Wood
stock College. $5,000 to the Apostolic College,
County Limerick, Ireland; $1,000 to the Oblate
Fathers NovUuito at Dublin, and $4,000 to the
trustees of Boston College for two scholarships.
REPORT ABOIT HARTLEY ESTATE.
WELL INFORMED PERSONS DO NOT BE
LIEVE THAT IT HAS ALL BEEN LHFT
TO ONE GRANDSON.
There were reports In circulation yesterday that
the estate of Marceilus Hartley would amount to
$60,000,000. and that by the terms of his will the bulk
of the estate would ko to Marcellus Hartley Dodge,
his grandson, who Is twenty-one years old and a
member of the junior class in Columbia University.
Persons In position to be well informed said last
evening that the reports probably were not true.
At the same time it was said that the estate of Mr.
Hartley probably would be found to be larger by
many millions than it was generally believed to be
at the time of his death.
Mr. Hartley died suddenly about two weeks ago
when he was attending a meeting of the executive
committee of the American Surety Company. l"p
to last evening his will had not been filed at the
Surrogate's office. A business associate, who was
one of Mr. Hartley's confidential advi<ers. told a
Tribune, reporter that the delay in filing the will
had been made MCCMSarj by the many sad varied
financial enterprises in which Mr. Hartley was in
terested at the time of his sudden death. It would
take some time, he said, to ascertain the extent of
an estate so diversified. Mr. Hartley had been the
head of several corporations in which he held
large Interests. At present. The Tribune's In
formant said, there had not been an estimate of
the estate of Mr. Hartley.
The mother of Marcellus Hartley Dodge was the
first wife of Norman W. Dodge. She died about
twenty years asro. Another daughter of Mr. Hurt
ley was Mrs. James Stores, and It was said last
evening that she died without issue. The only liv
ing child of Mr. Hartley is Mrs. George W. Jenkins.
of Morristown. She has three children. It was said
last evening by a relative of Marcellus Hartley
Doige that the report that the young man had been
named as sole heir to the Hartley millions prob
ably was not true, because Mrs. Jenkins and her
children were natural heirs.
It was raid last evening that the will of Mr. Hart
ley found after his death was made about sixteen
years ag>. Mr. Hartley was over seventy years
old at the time of his death. He had been active in
business In the city more than fifty years.
ARREST OF ADOLF SCHVTDT.
Paris, Jan. 25.— Adolf Schmidt, the fugitive
director of the Cassel Treber-Trocknung Company,
who disappeared in July last at the time of the
failure of that concern, has been arrested Ik
response to Germany's request for his extradition.
QUICKEST TO FLORIDA-NASSAU-HAVANA.
Morning Afternoon and Night Trains -N. Y. A
Ha Special." 2:10 p. m. Excursion Tickets allow
stop off Charleston Exposition. Apply Atlantic
Coast Line. 1.161 Broadway. 'JTth-st.— Advt.
FLORIDA.— En.loy summer climate in winter at
Tampa Buy Hotel. Information at 3 Park Place and
Plant System. 9H Broadway — A»vt.
PINEHURST, N. C. VIA siHTHKIiN' RY.
: .,. New York 4:C5 p. m.. arrive Pinehurst following
morning. Sleeping and dining car service. N. V
Offices. 271 & 1.155 Broadway.— Advt.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
to students in mathematics and mechanics. Th«
free evening classes in science and art for
young men and vomen will be strengthened, and
an effort will be made to give instruction co a
greater number of students. The physical
laboratories will doubtless be enlarged, so that
in the coming year there will be increased facili
ties for instruction In electricity. The reading
room, to which three thousand persons of all
ages dally resort, will he made more attractive.
"The additional funds will also enable us to
accommodate more day pupils. Sixty student*
who earn their own living now come to ta»
Union for special instruction in the arts and
sciences. This number can be largely increased.
We had hoped at the inception of the day school
Idea to teach only graduates of high schools,
but the Utter have not taken advantage of our
courses to the extent that we had supposed
they would. There are more applicants for ad
mission to the Union than ever before. We are)
giving instruction to 2.500 students. Wa can
now take in two hundred more."
Ex-Mayor Cooper, president of Cooper Union,
said yesterday at the Union Club, that the trus
tees did not intend to make the institution *
great technical school.
"We wish to carry out the policy of th»
founder," he said. "To do so we shall simply
make stronger our corps of teachers and the
courses themselves. My family gave 5600.000.
How much each member of the family has con
tributed to this sum is of no Interest to ta«
puolic. We intend to make of the Union a free
popular educator, and not a competitor to th»
great American technical schools."
The Cooper Union for the Advancement of
Science and Art. incorporated In 1^57. occupies
the s*»ven story brownstone building bounded
by Third and Fourth ayes. and Seventh and
Eighth sts. Before Mr. Carnegie's first gift of
$300,000, in 1900. its annual receipts were $oS,
490: expenditures. fOMtV; permanent fund.
9033.150. The officers of the institution ara
Edward Cooper, president: Abram S. H-^wlrt,
secretary, and L. C. Levin Jordan, assistant sec
retary. Mr. Hewitt has lone much to raaks>
Cooper Union one of the best organizations in
the country for the practical instruction of
workingmen and artisans. The union la 'Medi
cated to -Science, to make life intelligent, and lo
Art, to make life beautiful."
WILES XOT A CAX'DIDATF.
SAYS REPORTS THAT HE SEEKS THE PRESI
DENCY ARE FALSE.
[BT TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBC~\K. 1
Hnsmn. Jip. Js.— Lieutenant General Nelann
A. Miles denies the report that he Is a candi
date for the Presidency of tba United ftfr— .
In answer to a letter of inquiry written to him
by George F. Washburn. president of the Com
monw^ahh Club of Massachusetts, the General.
under >late of January 2.". responds:
Your favor of the lMh inst. reached me to
day. Tou desire information as to the truth or
falsity of the newspaper reports f'om Washing
ton, making me an active candidate for th«
Presidency.
I deeply regret these rei^rts. Like many oth
ers in the past, they are absolutely unauthorized.
They do not emanate from myself nor from my
friends, and I trust that the public will not be
misled by them. I hiive not been and am not
now a seeker for Presidential honors. My ambi
tion has ever been to faithfully serve my coun
try in whatever sphere- duty may have dictated,
and this will be my tole purpose in the future.
Rirfi ACCI SES XKELY.
SERIOUS CHARGE MADE IX REGARD TO
CUBAN POSTAL SCANDAL.
Havana Jan. '2Zk — At the hearing to-day of fhs>
charges growing out of the allege 1 Cuban postal
frauds. Corydon M. Rich, C. F. W. Neely*s for
mer assistant in the Department of Finance of
the Cuban Postal Service, testified that MBS%
gave to him fifty thousand 10-cent stamps th»
night before he fNeely) left Havana, tellin? him
to sell them and divide the proceeds. Rich said
he turned the stamps over to Governor General
Wood. Rich further testified that he was on»
of the three partners in Neely's brick plant In
Havana, but that he did not put any money
into the concern. Neither, he said, did Smith.
the other partner. He supposed that Neely pttt
in the whole sum of $18,000. Rathbone. Rlet*
declared, had no interest in the plant.
BRTAX AXD THE POSTAL LAWB*
A CHECK IMPOSED ON "THE « MMONER'9*
FREE LIST. BUT NOT FOR PO
LITICAL REASONS*
[BT TELEGRAF' TO THE IU8IXI.)
Washington. Jan *.— Acting on th« report «f
one of the special inspectors, postofflce oUctete
sent an exceedingly courteous official letter to
William Jennings Bryan to-day. Informing him
that the postal regulations prohibited pubUbJBOTS)
from sending periodicals in the United States malls)
at regular newspaper rates when the purpose la to
Increase circulation by advertisement or otherwise.
He was also Informed that his paper could no
longer be delivered to the Democratic members tn
Congress whom the business manager of "The
Commoner" had placed on the fr*« list, bscausr it
Is said that the papers sent to th«se *MB*s*rs ar«
sample copies, which cannot be sent in tbe mails
under present regulations unless full poatage 13
paid. It would, of course, be too expensive to ?»y
the maximum rates, so it is assumed that
manager of "The Commoner'" wishes to tncreass)
his circulation list among Democratic politicians,
solicitors will have to be employed to secure paid
up subscriptions.
This check on the delivery among the free lists
of Mr. Bryan's paper is not imposed for any par
tisan reasons, and any other publisher whom the
postofflce inspectors discover overlooking the rules
will also be informed of the oversight. Officials
say that although Mr. Bryan may be Inclined to
regard the action of the department as an unduo
hardship, there was no alternative, and that th*
laws must be obeyed and enforced.
pope's priyy cn.iMBERL.UX.
Rome. Jan. 35.— J. P. Farrelly. of Na*hvfl!sw
Term secretary ot th- American College here, has
been "appointed Privy Chamberlain to the Pope.

NEW YORK TO NEW ORLEANS
& RETURN. MARDI GRAS. $37 £0.
Tickets on sale Feb'y 3d to 9th via P. R R. 3outh«
crn Ry.. a. & W. P.. W. of Ala.. L. • N. Tha
route of the Special Sunset '.iinite.l Ar.r car. X.r.
New York 4:S p. m. dail\ Throu^ sleeping & din
ing car service. X. Y. OAces, J7l and I.ISS Broad
way.—Advt. '. ' -
POLAND! POLAND!! POLAXX>!!I
Purest Natural Spring Water Known.— Adrt.

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