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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 09, 1902, Image 1

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V OL LXI- -N°- 20.174.
NEWS OF TWO CAPITALS
LONDON.
PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE DEBA
DRAGS ALONG
EFFECT OF END OF WAR OX INDUSTRIES—
CORONATION MAKES TRADE LIVELY
PLAYS AND NOTES.
(Copyright : 15K;2: By The Tribune Association )
[BY CABLE TO THE TKIBTTVE]
Lonficn, Feb. Parliament continues to re
flect the general opinion that party 6trife is ill
adapted to the holiday mood of coronation
year, and controversial questions are avoided as
l^ad form. The Opposition front bench has re
pulsed the overtures of the extreme Radicals to
ra'f? a debate on Lord Lansdowne's reply to
the Dutch note. Closure was sprung upon the
harmless debating exercise of talking out the
marriace of a deceased wife's sister bill. A
fair start has been made in discussing the new
rules cf procedure, and, while the opposition
1? stronger than expected, Mr. Balfour has made
It p'.ain that the government desires to minister
to the comfort and convenience of the House
find wi'l make any changes which the members
r e. While the debate may be prolonged a
fortnight or a month, there can be little bitter
rc .cc when the ministers seem barely half In
earnest, and decline to take a resolute stand
■where details re concerned. The postpone
ment of the question hour and the earlier hour
of the meeting of the House may not be re-
Xfi.ir.ei. and even a longer interval for dinner
with fixity imparted to the hour may be re
jected as si attempt to convert Westminster
Into a boys' school.
Veterans of the Commons whimsically declare
that the only group capable of amending the
rules in an effective way for the prevention of
the waste of time and the obstruction of busi
ness are the Nationalists. They understand
♦-very wheel and cog in the mechanism Of legis
lation ar.d procedure, for they have made it
their [ness year after year to interfere with
the normal action and block all work. They
rduld frame rules which would tie their own
hands an i deliver the Commons from their own
conspiracy for making themselves so disagree
able that Home Rule might finally be adopted.
They only laugh behind their sleeves when pro
cedure is taken in hand, for they understand the
facility with which a fresh set of rules can be
broken through. There has been no finer irony
than Mr. Redmond's sympathetic expressions of
respect for the English feeling of reverence for
the traditions of the Commons at the time when
creeping paralysis had overtaken it.
The only question which excites acrid discus
non In these stagnant times is the purchase of
horses for the army. Mr. Brodrick has tried to
Stave off further debate by dispensing with the
pervices at'Aldershot of the officer charged with
receiving a commission on the purchase of Hun
garian horses, and promising an inquiry respect
ing the conduct of another officer implicated in
The doubtful proceedings. Some of the most
stalwart "Unionists assert that he is playing
with the subject, and ought to institute a search
ing investigation into all transactions respect
fjt^thepnrchsLse of remounts. The Education bill,
jrwfcich is expected when the procedure of debate
is. may bring on a strenuous party struggle.
It is not known whether this bill, in handing
ever the control of the schools to local authori
ties, will make It discretionary or compulsory
for them to grant aid to voluntary schools.
That is a question which may divide the un
manageable government majority Into irrecon
cilable factions. The Irish land measure of
Fmall calibre promised by Mr. Wyndham may
blfo be a source of trouble now that the Ulsj^r
Unionists are menaced with a formidable seces-
Fion movement, headed by T. W. Russell. Mm
Ssrers. with these two dangerous centres of dis
turbance ahead, are content to have the proced
ure of debate drag in a leisurely way at the
risk of being exposed to Captain Bowles's cut
ting sarcasms.
The stock market has shown a reduction of
the volume of business during the week, and is
closing sluggishly, yet firmly. The reduction
cf the bank rate was the logical sequence of
the extremely free applications for various new
Issues. There are abundant resources of capital
for 3 par cent investment, provided Industrial
risks are not too serious. The mining market
remains active, but speculators are too eager
to engineer the South African boom. While the
Kaffir ring is scheming for a general advance of
stocks based on pacification in the Rand, many
lines of mercantile business are already slug
r'-sh in consequence of the prospect of the early
close of hostile operations. The woollen trade, as
well as the war Industries, like arms and ammu
nition, will have a stagnant period when the re
duction of the army Is ordered. Bradford is al
ready working with a smaller wool margin, and
shrinkage rather than expansion of foreign trade
Is expected. On the other hand, many branches
if home trade are already Improving In conse
quence of the social revelry of the coronation
f*ason. Two transepts of the Abbey will be
filled with peers and peeresses with costly cos
tumes, which must be made in the next three
months, and the nave and every gallery of the
west end will be crowded with a brilliantly
firessed assemblage. Dressmakers, tailors, fur
riers and jewellers are expecting a great rush of
work and high prices when the full revision of
the earl marshal's original order regulating the
coronation costume is effected. The Queen Is
the real arbiter of the coronation clothes, and is
gradually relaxing the court requirement, so
bs to reduce the weight and rigidity of the cos
tume and produce greater elegance of effect.
Since the robe or mantle must be of crimson
velvet, furred with miniver and ermine, with a
train three feet on the ground, white or delicate
pink Is almost the only color available for the
underdrew scheme. The color of the corona
tion scene will be crimson and white, with
touches of black. This will be a combination
which will warm the cockles of Edwin Abbey's
heart when he paints the historic picture. In
dividual taste is allowed full license in gold
embroideries, lace ruffles and the trimming of
*he undtrdress, and Jewels can be conspicuously
"worn in coronets. Tiaras will require dex
terous adjustment, and the Queen is expected to
favor further relaxation of the regulations re
specting coiffures, in order to admit new modes
Of dressing tha hair. Two tendencies are al
ready apparent in the court; one is the en
couragement of the use of homemade materials
and work, and the other is a disposition to pro
more lavish expenditures in the interest of the
tradesman class.
The coronation season will be brilliant, whether
the war in South Africa Is over or not. It will
-pen toon after the King's return from the
Kiviera, but the theatres have already received
•- fillip from royal patronage, and while there
Coatlnned on fourth pagr.
TO THE SOCTHWEST VIA ATLANTA AND
MONTGOMERY.
?r*? d S. v \ n Atlanta, using Seaboard Air Line Ry's
*J? l s,|'. known as "Seaboard Fast Mail." leaving
ik'-r^i« itrest Ferry - p R " R - 12:10 A. M - Sleeper
*■** 10 P. M Office. 1.183 Broadway.— Advt :
NEW-YORK. SUNDAY. FEBRUARY_ai9O2. -2 PARTsT^X^T^TH ILLUSTRATED SUPPLEMEXT~WPAGES:
SEVERAL FIREMEN MAY DIE.
FALLING WALLS CRUSH THEM IN'
BROOKLYN BLAZE.
EIGHTEEN HORSES PERISH-CAPTAIN RID
ING WITH CHIEF CROKER MADE UN
CONSCIOUS BY LIVE WIRE
Just before midnight fire broke out in rh»
wheelwright and truck factory of John Shadbolt,
■ four story, brick building, at No. 1 to 13 Cum
bprland-Ft.. at Flushing-aye.. Brooklyn. The
flame? spread rapidly through the building.
When the firemen arrived ei^htepn horses be
longing to W. C. Chaddcn, stabled in one of th*>
had been suffocated or burned to death.
Half an hour aftpv the firemen came the walls
fell .one of them crashing through a two story
tenement house adjoining the factory. Half a
dozen adjoining tenements were threatened for
•i time; also the stationery factory appnstte.
owned by J k. Parker.
There were a Dumber of firemen hurt, and
peveral may die. Patrick Kevins, of Engine No.
10, chief of the construction department of the
Brooklyn Fire Department, in Canton-st., was
standing near the engine when the cupola <.f
the building fell and crushed him. Pour other
firemen standing nearby were also struck and
sustained fractured skulls and other injuries.
They were William ICoran and O^orpe Oorman,
of Engine Company No. 10, and two others
whopp names wer» I i-ned.
Chief Croker. after the fourth alarm, went to
thp fire in his automobile. He was accom
panied by Captain Osbold. of Engine Company
No. 33, of On the Flushing-aye.
side Osbold was struck on the head by a broken
live electric wire and became unconscious from
the shock. Chief Croker barely escaped contact
with the wire.
Ambulance! were called from thp Long Island
College and Brooklyn hospitals. Two citizens.
Joseph Reilly. of No. T^A Clinton-aye.. and
Louis Jerowsky, address not known, were struok
by flying brick? and were removed to hospital-.
Deputy Chief Pamuel Duff was hit by a falling
brick and was removed to the Wllliamsburg
Hospital
At 2 o'clock this morning the fire was under
control. The loss was estimated at about
?2<v>,onn.
A REPLY TO GEN. H ERR ERA.
FOREIGN CONSULS AT PANAMA DE
CLINK TO INTERFERE.
REBEL CHIEF'S SUGGESTION REGARDING
PANAMA RAILWAY IDEAL BUT
IMPRACTICABLE.
Panama, Feb. 8. — The foreign consuls here
have agreed to send to the insurgent General
Herrera the following answer to his note ad
dressed to the American. French. ■ British and
German consuls: z££.'' '"
His excellency. Acting GovernoyjJ» r *tStldes Ar-
Jona, kindly delivered to certain Jtfrfcons of the
consular body letters from you. We understand
they were intended for all the consular chirps,
and. therefore, through the Governor, we beg. to
Teply that the proposal declaring Panama, Colon
and the railroad line a neutral zone is Ideal' and
something that we, representing foreign Inter
ests, would gladly hall as an accomplished fact.
However, as we see it at present, and in view
of existing laws, we recognize the difficulty, if
not the Impossiblity, of its accomplishment. It
could be done only by agreement between the
contending parties to this unpleasant and unfor
tunate trouble. We .ire extremely anxious to Jo
all in our power to lessen the mortality and use
less waste of property, vet it must be ever and
positively understood that we have been and
will continue to remain neutral.
As regards the advising of their respective
governments, each consul will exercise his in
dividual Judgment. In case the contending
forces submit to us or to any member of our
body any matter and ask advice for its de
termination, we shall be ready and willing to
act. If the same is within the scope of our
duties, but any and all initial measures must be
taken by the two contending parties and first
agreed upon by them. Any other course would
subject us to the charge of meddling in local
affairs, which is not our province, purpose or
desire.
Foreigners and foreign property have a. right
to full and ample protection, and this we shall
under all circumstances insist upon. The gov
ernments having special treaty rights will, we
presume, see that they are not violated.
In the hope that there •will be an early ter
mination of the civil strife which has existed for
over two years, I beg to subscribe myself, in
behalf of the consular corps, very truly,
H. A. GUDGER, Dean, Consular Corps.
A vessel from Citre, which arrived last night,
brings news from the government General Cas
tro, who has concentrated his forces i*t Aqua
Dulce. In an official report General Castro says
he has not been attacked, and that he believes
provisions are scarce in the revolutionary
camps. He also announces the death from
fever of Major Payan, the leader of the forces
engaged in the first fight with General Herrera's
troops after their landing.
General Triana has been appointed to receive
the cruiser President Pino, recently bought by
Colombia from Chili.
The news from General Castro was received
with enthusiasm in government circles here.
BOER DELEGATES TTELMXCf
A REPORT THAT THEY WILL SUBMIT TO
LORD LANSDOWNE'P CONDITIONS
London, Feb. 8. — A dispatch to a news agency
from Brussels says:
It Is understood here that the Boer delegates
have decided to submit to the conditions laid
down in Lord Lansdowne's communication to
the Dutch Government, and are preparing a
communication to the British Government a:k
ing permission to visit South Africa, an<* -ottlns
forth the object of the proposed visit. It is ex
pected that the request will reach England next
week.
DELEGATES MAY LEAVE HOLLAND?
OFFENDED AT THE ACTION TAKEN PV DB
KUTPEB
London. Feb. R.— A dispatch to the Exchange
Telegraph Company from Utrecht indi<vit*i the
probability of the removal of the Boer headquar
ters to Geneva on account of friction between
Mr. Kriiger and his associates ;nd the Dutch
Government.
Dr Leyds, representative in Europ* of the
Transvaal, is reported as declaring that 'he re
cent proposals looking to the establishment of
peace in South Africa made ny the Dutch Pre
mier, Dr. Kuyper. were an unwarrantable in
terference in the affairs of the Transvaal. Some
of thp Boer delegates, It is. said, ar< &t variance
with Dr. Loyds.
NEW YORK TO ST AUGUSTINE
In 24 hOWS Without change of rarp. by using the
Florida A Metropolitan Limited leaving West 23d
St. fprry daily at 12:56 noon for Pinehurst, South
ern Pine*. Ciimden via Florida, via P. R. R and
Seaboard Air Lina Rv. Office. LIS3 Broadway —
I
LONDON ELECTRIC TRANSIT
A NEW-JERSEY CORPORATION TO PRO
MOTE ITS DEVELOPMENT.
F/SHIONABLE WEDDINGS IX THE METROP
OLIS-MEMORIAL TO RUSKIN
UNVEILED.
fOp>Ti ? ht: IMS: By Th* Tribune Association.)
(BY CABLE TO THE TRIBUNE]
London, Feb. 8, 1 a. m— formation of the
♦"Treat Britain Railways Development Corpora*
tion under the laws of New-Jersey for extensive
operations in building and purchasing electric
lines in London and elsewhere is not commented
upon by the press. a Conservative member of
Parliament smiled blandly and remarked that
"the Americans are coming on fast, and will
soon be running everything in this ti^ht little
island." Parliament itself is the greatest drag
upon the electric transit schemes of the metrop
olis, scores of projects being now hung up await
ing its sanction, with little probability that
much legislation can be secured this year.
The London County Council is greatly exor
cised over foreign interference with metropol
itan transit, but the Progressive majority re
ceives little encouragement from Westminster,
for it has comprehensive plans of its own for
electric lines and subways. American energy
and reserves of capital offer the best hope for
an early solution of the transit problem of the
central belt of London.
The most conspicuous wedding yesterday was
'hat of Philip Morrell, of Black Hall. Oxford,
and Lady Ottoiinc Cavendish P.entim k, at St
Peters. Eaton Square. The Bishop of Rochester
was behind the rail, and thp Duke- of Portland
gave the bride away. Two nephews of the
bridegroona were pages, and there were three
bridesmaids. A lar^e number of titled people
in the pows, and many oxford friends of
the bridegroom. About throp hundred presents
n-*re displayed at thp reception, in Orosvenor
Place.
St. oporge's, Hanover Square, was also
crowded with pr-ople of fashion for the wedding
of Captain WotnbweU and thp Hon. Myrtle Mos
tyn. Lord Vaux and Harrowden conducted his
sister to the chancel, wh^r- her mother gavp
her away. Bishop Barry conducting the service
There were two bridesmaids and two pages, and
four hundred presents were displayed. The n*
cr-ptk.n was at Berkeley Square.
<~>n?low Fords last work, n memorial tablet .->f
John Ruskin, was unveiled .-it ".Vestniinster Ab
bey, in the pre?. nco of I>e.m Bradley and a
small company of artists. Mrs. Walter Severn
pulling the cloth away and disclosing the bronze
medallion above the bust of Scott In thp Poets'
Corner. It was thp anniversary of Ruskin's
birthday, and Mrs. Severn remarked that his
motto had been "To-day."
Lord Duilerln's condition remained critical at
midnight, with no si| tatement of )iis
weakness. I N. V.
POSSE AFTER DESPERADO.
HE ESCAPED TO THE WOODS AFTER,
SHOOTING MAN WHO TRIED TO
DEFEND FATHER.
A posse of armed constable.* assisted by po- i
lie** from Mount Vernon searched the woods of i
Tuckahoe last night for "Kit" Reed, who shot i
and fatally wounded Ferdinand Klepfer in ■
Thomas Harrlgan's road house, at Union Cor
ners, on the outskirts of Mount Vernon. Klep
fer was shot while defending his aged father,
Jacob Klepfer. !
Reed, who is known in TuckahOC as a desper- I
ate character, according to the statements of ;
Harrigan and other witnesses, went to the road \
house about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon. He
had been drinking and was ill tempered. He I
first picked a quarrel with Joseph Dunn and j
knocked him down. Harrigan then ordered i
Reed out of the place, but Instead" of going he j
drew a revolver and began to fire at the mir- j
ror?. Everybody in the house fled, and then j
Reed tried to strike old Mr. Klepfer, who is j
past seventy. The old man's son sprang be- |
tween him and his assailant, and as he did so !
Reed drew his revolver. "I'll put your lamp j
out," he exclaimed as he fired
Thf younger Klepfer fell and Reed ran for
the wools The wounded man wa.s carried to
the home of I>r. William I). Granger, who keeps
a sanatorluTi near by, and the police of Mount
Vernon and constables of Tuckahoe and Bronx
viile were Informed. They got earring's and
lanterns at once and started in pursuit of Rped.
COASTER RUNS UNDER CAR.
HIS INJURIES THOUGHT TO BE FATAL
COMING DOWN HILL WHICH
CROSSED TROLLEY
TRACKS.
As th> result Of a coasting accident, Benjamin
BurnaU, fourteen years old, sun or Oharies I3ur
nell, wno lives in Hudson-a\e . near Thtrd^st .
Guttenborg, lies fa tally iniured in the North Hud
son Hospital. T'nion Hill, N. .1. Between Second
avl Third sts.. In Hudson-aye., there [i .
bill fi'iwn which the children in the neighborhood
coast when the conditions permit. Through Bee
or»i-st run the tracks of the Hudson Heights trol
ley line.
On Friday night a number of boys and girls
■were cOßSting down the hill They h.iri stationed
at the foot a boy named Newman, whose duty it
was to wave a red lantern on the approach of a
car. Just after Burnell started from the top of th.
hill Newman waved his lantern, and several of the
children sho-itcd to Burnell teiijng him to steer
toward the sidewalk.
Either the boy did not hear the warnings m
else he was unable to control his sled. Just as the
car reached the north side of the avenue Burne'ii
came dashing down the hill, and his sled ran in
under the car. The sled was smashed into kindling
wood, and the boy was dragged thirty feet be
fore the car could be stopped.
His body was shockingly lacerated and his skull
was fractured. He was attended by Dr Van der
Bach and then taken to the hospital. wh»p it was
snld his Injuries were probably ratal
TEE CRAMPS TO BUILD IX GERMANY f
Berlin. Feb. The "Lokal Anzeiger" says the
Cramps, of Philadelphia, project building a ship
yard in Germany, with the co-operation of Sir Ed
v.ard Used, th« former chief constructor of the
BrUish Navy. The paper asserts that the Cramps
have secured through a large Berlin bank an
option upon land at Stettin and Kiel, and that they
intend bidding for the construction of German war
vessels, merchantman' and yachts upon American
models.
Philadelphia, Feb. B— Charley H. Cramp, presi
dent of the Tyilliam. Cramp Ship and Engine
Building Company. to-night denied the report,
published In Berlin, that the Cramp: intend build
ing a shipyard in Stettin and Kiel. Germany. He
said the story was absolutely without foundation.
and the Cramp company had not considered the
Idea of establishing a shipbuilding plant in Europe.
YOrXG BLACKBUJIX DYIXG.
Frankfort. Ky .. Feb. S — Joseph C. S. Blackburn.
Jr., son of the Senator. it barely alive, and is not
•xcected to live ''to . th* nieht-'
CANTOR READS A RIOT ACT
SHEEHAN HAS BEEN TOO FREE TVII H
BOROUGH PRESIDENTS PLACES.
MEN SHOVED IN" THROIT.H HEADS OF DE
PARTMENTS AND ECONOMY PLAN'S ARE
SERIOUSLY INTERFERED WITH.
Tmuble of a rather serious nature Is brewing
between John C. Sheehan and Borougn Presi
dent Cantor over the distribution of patronage.
It was learned last night at he Pequod Club
that there had been an angry outbreak at Presi
dent Cantor's regular cabinet meeting at the
•'•ty Hal! yesterday afu-rnoon. md that the bu
reau heads had been taken to task by the Bor
"usrh President for allowing Mr. Sheehan ,«iioh
f ree rein with reference to ih» appointment of
men In thp various departments in the jurisdic
tion of Mr. Cantor.
As near as could be learnpd from ron\ rrsnti.-vi
with Bonw of Mr. Bheehan'a Mends at the dub.
Mr. Cantor objects to the practice w! Ich has
suddenly sprung up among the frienda of Mr.
Sbeehan. The district leade-? of the Greater
N'ow-York nomocracy of late have pT.e direct
t" the heads of bureaux md obtained piacos
without fully informing Mr. i'ant»r aboal what
was going on.
If s- ems that when Mr Sheehan found thai it
was slow husinoss gettine BOOM of his friends
appointed, ho had his friends go direel to the
heads of bureaus, representing that they were
all right." ordinarily this has secured from
rhp heads and from thp engineers an informal
appointment wni<-h would be ijui^k'y sent to
Borough President Cantor for formal action.
Thp nani's, coming as they did apparently from
tho heads of departments, had the appear
br-ing selections that tin- heads of depv.tments
could not do without, and Mr. Cantor put them
through. Last wf^k he discovered that the
salary rolls were filling up with alarming rapid
Ity, and thai it would be Impossible ■ i m.ike
much of a showing of economy, as compared *»fth
the Tammany administration, unless an Imme
diate halt was caP»d in putting men 10 work.
This is what he did yesterday.
No sooner had the cabinet meeting been
called to order than Mr. Cantor began to censure
certain Of his subordinates for taking for
granted that the men suggested by Mr. Sheehan
to i. accepted without consulting him
(Cantor). He told his cabinet that hereafter
the business of appointing employes would be
concentrated absolutely in his office, and that
whenever any one was to be appointed the head
of department must not take any one's word
out must report the name to the Borough
dent. Mr. Cantor demanded explanations
from two or thre* of his subordinates, and when
they admitted that th^y had not maintained
striit supervision <>f the appointing power he
read what one of them described as 'the rior
act" to them.
The session of the cabinet lasted from 2
o'clock until •'V and little but the matter of ap
pointments was discussed. All the heads of
departments and bureaus were on hand. They
were Public Works Commissioner Livingston,
Perez M. Stewart, Superintendent of Buililiii^rs.
Sewer Superintendent Micbalea, Superintendent
c.iiiins of the Department of Highways. Pup-^r
Intendent Walker of Buildings and Offices, and
KriKincrrs Loomls and Webster.
Mr. Cantor is on the speakers" list for th«*
Ph.'^han dinner o. i Tv 's'.tv next at. Sherry*,
and it was a matter of lively go.-sip last night
■ whether he would be present.
Mr. Sheehan's friends said that, while the
f(TP and a]2pqjr.tment matter had been
thoroughly thrashed 'over at the cabinet meet
ing. Mr. Cantor did not so much blame Mr.
Sbeehan as he did the men who took it for
granted that whatever Mr. Sheehan wan' d
was to b»> approved without full consultation
with the Borough President. They said that
Mi. Canto r was justified in standing for the
prerogatives of his office, but that Mr. St.
had not ■••- proper bounds in securing
the appointment to office of Greater JCew-Torh
I ■ racy men.
srnww ro. to keep tvxsel.
IT WIT. OPERATE THE RAPID TRANSIT
ROAD WHEN IT IP FINISHED.
Because of the persistent rumors which in
cluded the proposed rapid transit system in the
plans, or designs, of the securities company said
to be contemplating a lease, or merger, of all
the lines in New- York City, August Relmont,
president of the Rapid Transit Subway Con
struction Company, when asked yesterday if
there was any foundation for these rumors, said:
"I usually do not speak of such matters for
publication, hut 1 feel that the interests asso-
. lated with the enterprise and the public are en
titled to know that th-^re is not a vestige of
foundation for including the rapid transit sys
tem in the various rumors respecting the securi
impany.
The interests in the Rapid Transit Subway
Construction company have organised to oper
ate tb^ir own load when completed, and do not
propose to dispose of it to an\ one. It would
be a breach of trust on my part to be in any
negotiations contemplating anything else, both
toward the interests of the company of which
I am president and the plnns find purposes of
the Rapid Transit Commission."
VAX VAXGLED BY A TROLLEY V \R
SON OF NEWARK'S FORMER CONTROLLER
WAS CROSSING STREET WITH
HIS HEAD DOWN.
Daniel \V. Baker, jr., son of the late Con
troller Baker of Newark, was instantly killed
yesterday afternoon by .1 trolley car of tn-^
Elizabeth line at Green and Broad sts.. Newark
He was crossing the street with n setter at his
he<>ls. and had his head lowered on account of
the wind, when he walked in front of the c*T.
which was going at high speed, and went under
th^ fender. 10 bp mangled by the motor case.
Mr Baker was about forty years old and
weighed nearly two hundred pounds. He was
engaged with his brother, Cyrus O. Baker, in
platinum refining, under the firm name of Baker
& Co., in Newark. Hf loaves a widow.
Michael Barron. the motorman of the car, was
held on a charge of manslaughter. He could
not explain the circumstances of the accident
Th« police have been unable to find any wit
nesses
FOREIGX PROFESSORS DISMISS ED
RADICAL ACTION TAKEN BY THE CHINBBK
GOVERNMENT.
Peking. Feb. B.— The Chinese Government to
day dismissed all the European professors from
the Imperial University. To the president. Mr
Martin, has been offered a subordinate position.
The term "university" has been largely a mis
nomer. The instruction was chiefly in la: ?uan?s
and the elementary branches. Trie Chinese di
rectors say that elementary schools are more
needed.
UTfiSi WAVVA'S EXGAGFVFXT.
SENATOR'S ELDEST DAUGHTER TO BE MARRIED
TO HARRY A. PARSONS.'
Cleveland. Feb. B.— lt Is authoritatively stated that
Miss Mabel Hanna, eldest daughter of Senator M.
A. Hanna, is engaged to be married to Harry A.
Parson? of Cleveland. Mr. Parsons is a friend of
Senator Hanna In whom the Senator became Inter
ested because of work In the last Presidential cant-
PRESIDENT'S SON NO WORSE.
NO CHANGE IN CONDITION
ROOSEVELT AT GROTON.
Groton. Mass., Feb. S.— From th» meagre in
formation that can be obtained from the physi
cians in attendance, it is learned that the con
dition of Theodore Roosevelt, jr.. is 35 com
fortable as could be expected to-night, and that
no decided change in his symptoms has occurred
during the day. The physicians look for no ma
terial improvement for at least a day or two.
and will be satisfied if he shows no change ' or
the worse during that period.
Mrs. Roosevelt, who arrived at the school this
forenoon, has be^n in constant attendance upon
her son. and her presence has cheered the lad
up wonderfully. The President is kept informed
of everything that takes place.
There has been considerable activity about the
school to-day, owing to the departure of stu
dents, nearly all of whom have now left for their
homes.
Mrs. Roosevelt reached here just after I*-*
o'clock this morning, having made the trip from
Washington without unusual incident and with
out delay. The train which she took at Boston
reached Ayer, the nearest station to Groton,
shortly after 0 o'clock.
The Rev. Bherrard Billing assistant to Presi
dent Peabody. of the Groton school, ivas wait
ing with a carriage when the train arrived, and
Mrs. .Roosevelt said her maid were on the way
hither almost immediately. a crowd bad
gathered at Ayer to see Mrs. Roosevelt, hut
there iras no demonstration of any sort as she
walked to the carriage. The drive of three
miles to the school took about an hour, as Us!
roads were rough from freezing.
The mother of the sick boy was received by
President Pea body, and as soon as possible she
was at her son's bedside. No one outside of the
school was present hen Mrs. Roosevelt and her
maid arrived.
Mrs. Roosevelt was of rhe opinion. Preside At
Peabody said, as her husband, that all necessary
information concerning tho lad's condition
should b« transmitted to President Roosevelt,
who should determine utvn n»ns should sr'ven
to the public
Mrs. Roosevelt will accept the hosptta
Mr. and Mrs. W. B c.ar.'.ner whil-^ here. Mr
Gardner is a patron of the Oroton SrhOOl, M
well as beine an instructor. Most of the moth
er's time will he spent with the sick boy, ?o,that
the courtesy of the Gardner family will be avail
able <-.nlv for periods of real
ROOSEVELT GOES TO GROTO.\
HURRYING ON A SPECIAL TRAIN TO SEE
HIS SICK SON.
TRY TF.LE'iEAPH TO TH.S TRIBUNE ]
Washington. Feb. S.— President Roosevelt left
Washington to-night in a special train over
the Pennsylvania Railroad at 12:10 o'clock for
Groton. Mass., where his eldest son. The
odore, is seriously ill from pneumonia.
About 0 o'clock the President decided to
instruct the railroad officials that he would
start at that hour, and to have the special train,
which has been held in waiting all day. ready
for him. He was accompanied by Secretary
Cortelyui and a clerk.
.When the train stops at Jersey City .the Presi
dent's car will be shifted and placed on one of
the barges and taken up the Harlem River and
from there direct to Boston, and thence to Gro
ton. The President will return in the Rambler,
the car on which he left Washington to-day.
President Roosevelt decided to go to the sick
bed of his son, it Is said, not because he re
ceived word that his son's condition was be
coming worse, but because of the anxiety he has
felt since the first news of his illness was sent
to the White House. The latest dispatches at
the White House reported no change in Theo
dore's condition since early this afternoon.
Just after 9' o'clock Mrs. Roosevelt left the
sickroom of her son to go to the home cT one
of the college professors. This would seem to
Indicate, it is thought at the White House, that
the President's son was resting easy.
There is* no doubt, however, that the Presi
dent and Mrs. Roosevelt are much alarmed
over the condition of their son. and there is a
belief here that the President left Washington
for Groton on the advice of physicians attend
ing young Theodore. President Roosevelt's
special train will have a clear track as soon ?.s
it leaves Washington, and the engineer win be
instructed to make all possible speed. It is
due to arrive in New-York at 7:15 a. m. The
President will take the 10 o'clock train cut of
New-York for Boston, which is due to arrive
in that city at 4:30 p. m. He will probably ride
in a special train from Boston and arrive at
Groton shortly after 6 o'clock to-morrow. How
long the President will remain at Groton will.
of course, depend entirely upon the condition of
his sen.
NO CAUSE FOR ALARM.
Groton. Mass.. Feb. B.— At midnight it was
stated at the Groton school that then was ab
solutely no cause for alarming reports as to the
condition of Theodore Roosevelt, jr. The lad
condition was, if anything, slightly improved,
and there was no change for the worse that
would call for the President's presence.
CHARLESTON DISAPPOINTED.
Charleston. S. C. Feb. B.— The greatest disap
pointment Is felt in all circles her- at I M aban
donment of the President's proposed trip to
Charleston. Arrangements had been m.':d« (or a
splendid reception, and everybody was looking to
the occasion as the great day of the exposition
These will have to be cancelled, A3 the President
was the central figure of the programme. .
FAMILY THRIFT OfT IXTO COLD.
EVICTED BECAUSE THEY COULD NOT PAY
RKNT, PARENTS AND FTVE CHII.DRKN
SUFFER ON BTOKWAUC
With what furniture they .had piled o n the
sidewalk in front of the tenemen' bouse at No.
2,067 Second-aye., from which they had been
evicted. Edward frTonnsll. his wife, Margaret,
and their five children, one an infant three
weeks old, shivered from the eo'd last evening.
Poorly clad, the destitute family huddled on the
sidewalk, while a crowd of people around them
extended sympathy. The cold blasts of wind
urged the onlookers to hurry to their homes
and the povertystricken family soon left
alone. Finally, several men. moved by the pitia
ble plight of the homeless family, bought a
quantity of the furniture /or $1 ( >
A few weeks ago O'Conrel! lost his place in
a machine shop, the little money he had saved
waa soon spent for food for the children, and
since a week ago there has not been a cent in
the house. The first of the month the rent was
due, and when it was not forthcoming the agent
evicted them, despite their condition.
O'Connell went to the East One-hundred-and
fourth-st. police station last night and told Ser
geant Wolff that his family waa homeless and
destitute. The Outdoor Poor Department and
the Children's Society were informed, and Agent
King, of the latter organization, was sent to the
relief. Meantime an ambulance had been called
from the Harlem Hospital and four of the chil
dren. Joseph, eleven years old: Agnes, eight
years old; John, six years old, and Ralph, two
years old, were sent to the hospital. O'Connell,
his wife and the baby were cared for by the
housekeeper of the place from which they were
evicted.
FLORIDA.— Enjoy summer climate in winter at
Tampa Bay Hotel. Information at 3 P»rk Piace and
""ant System. 2W Broadway.— Aovt.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
STATE NUFFIC IUKT.
HEAVY SNOW IN NORTHERN
AND CENTRAL NEW-YORK.
RAILROAD TRAINS BEHIND T!)f|
STREETCAR LINES lIAMPKRFD.
[BT TELEGBAI-U TO THE TTMSCNE.J
Syracuse. Feb. S.-Another severe nxowstona
began last night and continued th-ou-h th*
day and night. As a result of the h«aw fall of
snow and high wind, transportation Is b.dly it,
terfered with in Central. Western and North
ern New-York. The early reports showed thit
the greatest trouble was experienced on th*
Auburn branch of the Central. The train dv*
in this city at (MB a. m was abandon d' Th»
storm was especially severe on the railroad*
because they had not entirely revered from
the effects Of the one in the first ,lnv S of the
week.
To the north, the road between this city and
Orwego was also a storm centre. v par ty of
290 endeavored to get from Long Branch last
night on the Syracuse. Lakeside and Balwins
ville Railway, and was compelled to spend th«
night in the cars.
On the Delaware. Lacknwanna and Western
all efforts to move freight were abandoned. The
greatest trouble Is experienced north of this city '
especially around Fulton. Or- train did not
reach this city until 11 o'clock last night, more
than five hours late, having been stalled near
Fulton. To the south only one track between
Apulia and Cortland is open. No sooner is th*
track cleared than the sno\^ drifts back in
again. The tracks were reported open to-day,
but the -schedule time is practically impossible^
the trains averaging about thirty minutes late
On the New-York Central the trains from the
est are again delayed from one to three hours.
While the Rome, Watertown and Ogdensbursr
was not blocked, the trains were considerably
delayed. All were sent out according to sched
ule, but their arrival at terminals was anywhere
from a half hour to two hours late.
The Auburn road trains also were dispatched
as usual, but the snow interfered considerably
with the running time.
Locally, the rapid transit lines were open
The snow ploughs and sweepers were started
out at 3 a. m. Considerable trouble was ex
perienced on the East Syracuse division and
in the outlying sections.
The Suburban also had trouble keeping the
road open. The indications are for more snow
to-morrow.
WATERTOWN ISOLATED.
RAILROAD TRAINS AND STREET CAR
LINES TIED UP.
[BT TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBUNE.]
Watertown. N. V . Feb. S.— The worst blizzard
that Northern New-York has experienced in
years has created havoc this week, and the
snowstorm is still raging with unabated fury.
The steam railroads have been blockaded, street
railroads are completely snowed under, and out
side towns are isolated, all country roads beinsr
impassable. The storm will cost the railroad
companies thousands of dollars, but will give
oyment to an army of men in removing
-snow from railroads, streets and, houses and la
opening roads. The New- York Central Railroad
Company has been running snow ploughs all
the week, and freight trains have been aban
doned.
More than five feet of snow fell on the level hi
this city, and the high wind has made drifts o*
it over thirty feet high in places. In front of
business blocks in Watertown there are snow
banks thirty feet high. There is no mail or
stage service to out- towns, and the street
railroad la buried under several feet of snow.
A theatrical company was snowbound five
miles from the city, while the opera house was
crowded with people awaiting th^ir arrival.
The company remained in the drifts from ti
p. m till 2 a. m.
The New-York Air Brake Works, the Inter
national Paper Mills and all other factories hay»
run short of soft coal, and unless the sicrm
abates these factories will be obliged to do;?
down. The snow is light and drifts easily. A
high wind easily fills up the railroad cuts an<l
drifts the snow in mammoth banks on the
highways.
HEAVY DRIFTS IN ROCHESTER.
[BT TELEOIS.\rn TO THE TRIBOTE. ]
Rochester, Feb. S.— A terrific blizzard StnKfl
town this afternoon at o o'clock. The wind I*
blowing a gale, and the snow is blinding. At
S:3O o'clock the streets were almost impassable
for pedestrians, the drifts being in many place*
six feet in depth. The streetcar service is prac
tically at a standstill, and thr railroads are
blockaded in all directions. From present indi
cations the storm bids fair to be more furious
and far reaching in its effect on traffic than th?
blizzard of las- Sunday.
MERCURY FALLS IN UTICA.
Tbt TELEORAITt T<"> th TRinrNT.]
T'tic.-i. N. V . Feb. >.— ln the last twelve hours
there has been .1 heavy fall of snow throughout
Central New- York. and. as the wind has been
blowing a gale of over fifty miles an hour, traf
fic generally is considerably interrupted. Th*
fall of snow has been steadier in the last few
hours than it was in the bis blizzard a week
ago, and to-night there an no signs of it
abating. It is thought that about rift-en inches
of snow has already fallen. The mercury has
been going down steadily from 22 degrees above
zero to 1." in this city. Further north, where
there seems to be less snow, there v.ere re
ports this evening of from S to 20 decrees be
low zero, with the prospects that before morn
ing the cold weather record of the season In
the Adirondack Mountains will be broken.
In Utica many of the electric car Uses hay»
been abandoned, and on the lines of th? steam
railways the trains irs from four to five hours
late. The effort to keep the tracks of th^ Rome.
Watertown and Ogdensburg Railroad open has
been a severe one all .the afternoon, and a!!
local trains have been abandoned. The official*
are trying to get the through trains through, but
it looks as though the road would be tied up
completely.
THE BLIZZARD AT MALONE.
Malone. N. V.. Feb. S.— Another storm of
similar severity to that of a week ago has pre
vailed in this section during the afternoon, and
is on in all Its fury to-night. Country roads ar*
full, and even in the village drifts are already
two and three feet deep. The railroads hay«
started the snowploughs. and are using everr
endeavor to keep the roads open. Except in
sheltered places, it is Impossible to see across
the street because of the driving snow.
TO STOP TISITIMj XICARAGCAS PORTS.
Managua, Nicaragua. Feb. S.— The Pacific Mat!
Steamship Company's vessels wilt, it Ii announced,
cease visiting Nioara- ports, as the company
Insists upon certain conditions which the govern
ment refuses to grant.
TICE-CHAXCELLOR EMERY REAPPOIXTED.
Trenton. N. J . Feb. S.— Chancellor Magic to-day
reappointed Vice-Chancellor John R. Emery for »
term of seven years at a salary of 13.CC0 a year.
This is the Vice-Chancellor's second terns, he bar
ing been first appointed on January 29. 1535. to suc
ceed the late Vlee-Chancellor Van Fleete.
Vice-Chance! lor Emery was born in FlemiagtOß.
X. J.. on July 6. 1542. He was graduated from
Princeton University in ISBI. In 15t5 he was ad
mitted to the bar. He has never held any point
office.
FLORIDA-THOMASVTLLE-HAVAN |
"X. Y. & Fla. Special" 2:10 p. m. • other train.*.
Excursion tickets allow stop off Charleston Expo
sition. Apply Atlantic Coast Line, I.l*l Broadway.
— Advt. w

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