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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, April 02, 1902, Image 1

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VolV o1 LXI - X°' 1*0.226.
A 1 HANCE FOR PEACE.
AGENTS OF BOERS RUNNING
SHORT OF FUNDS.
gfjXORS OF NEW TA NATION — MISS
STONE MAY PROLONG VISIT
HENRY h;vin.;-s RETURN.
( ropv-j cw : IT>O2: By rbe Tribune Association.)
[Fr* r ' al *• ~ rh " TVihunf by FV»Tich <"üb>.l
j-^oaVjn, April •_• 1 ■ m.— The ministers re
jEain In holiday retirement, and Lord Kitchener
continues to organize fresh drives, and to report
propres? one* ■ week. Nobody on the British
titi? seems to he •!■''. concern«*<l regarding the
r>?ace conferences among the Boers, and hostile
opora Tigris arc not suspended in any quarter.
tm* m<>re than ate tho preparations for Fending
rut reinforcements this month, yet peace is
viih^'J* <3oubt nearrr than superficial observers
nippof..-
The British Government, after rejecting th**
scheme of the r»utch (s*»\-ernment for enabling
ihf Boer leaderji t<> <■■ nf-r. is virtually carrying
it out. Dr. I>"vds remains uncompromising in
his talk, but there ■- Indubitable evidence That
the Boer agents in Europe have run short of
mon^y. and arc anxious to have Ihe curtain
rung down ui«>n th*> meiodraina of hopeless
•warfare. If Generals Botha and i '■■■>*. c
dlpr ir> s-<^- lo make peace, as is generally be
lieved !•>' Dutch pyTin.athizf-rs in Holland, Mr.
Fteyn a:id General !>" •.V. i will Ix obstinate
lnri-.d if they jHrslst in holding <>vi. J^outh
Africans, however, alxi-ays describe Steyn as
the most pelf-Rilled and Irreconcilable Boer in
Africa.
So far no news is fortliooining to indicate the
cause of the railway [dent at Bari>erton. in
lac Transvaal Colony, in which Dhlrty-nine Brit
ish soldiers were killed and forty-five injure I.
Barb«-rt^n 1s a station on the Pretoria-I'elago.T
Bay Railway. -V.I miles from the Transvaal
capital, and eighty miles from the Portuguese
frontier. After Mr. Kriiger fiv-d from Pretoria
!«?f<-.re the British occupation In June. ISM*, be
made Barbertmi his headquarters for some lime.
living there in a saloon carriage.
The Atlantic passenger carrying company
which have been hatching a mysterious com
bination for the last re« months, offered the
result of -.heir conspiracy to the public yester
day. All "lines except the Beaver have drawn
up a new schedule of saloon rates, to com.' into
operation almost immediately. The general ef
fect is that ;he price of saloon passages is
raised fr":r. to-day by sums varying from £3
to £7.
Budget forecasts are plentiful. It is admitted
that more money must be raised in order to
meet th«- cost of the war. and Sir Michael Hioks-
Beach daily receives numerous letters advising
him now to act. A committee of the Cobden
Club has [sail a pamphlet urging the exten
ticn of the income tax to all incomes of over
•I<V>, and recommending that any further reve
nue required should be raised by increas
ing The rate of the income tax. or increasing th«
ceATh duties upon larger > state?, or adding to
the taxation of tobacco aad intoxicants. Brit
ish taxpayers will not have to wait long be
♦cre Jicy know; 'he worst, «•« the Chancellor of
the Exchequer will probably make his annual
financial statement in the House of Commons
before th<= end of next week.
VAre Stone returned here yesterday afternoon
from Bournemouth, and took op her residence
■nith Mends la Torrington Square. Bloomsbury.
Efforts are being made to Induce the American
missionary to deliver an address In London on
her experiences during her captivity. Her orig
inal intention was to leave England for America
en Saturday, but from inquiries made last night
Jt is not improbable that she win delay her d-
j>arture.
Reports from America that Henry White is a
candidate for ambassador to Italy are not cred
ited toy his embassy colleagues here. He is
row at Florence on a abort holiday journey, but
■will soon be back at his residence at Whitehall
Gardens. His friends, •while admitting his fli
ngs for any diplomatic post, smile incredulously
'••- the idea that he will ever leave London.
fiftr Henry [rving*a position as the leading;
English actor -was acknowledged when a com
pany of friends, comprising Charles Wyndham.
Georpe Alexander.- Forbes Robertson and many
other stage celebrities went to meet him and
offer their congratulations on his American tour.
Pi- Henry showed no signs of fatigue from his
arduous labors, and had a bright smile and a
cheery word for every one. l. N. F.
MEETING OF BOER LEADERS.
GENERAL ROTHA MAY BE PRESENT
ANOTHER TRAP SET TOR DE WET.
Pretoria, March 3L— President Bteyn and
General Delarey have i,,-en located, and a meet
ing between them and Mr. Rchalkburger is ox
j^rted to be arranged without further delay.
It la reported that General Botha will also at
tend ihe conference.
::andatr. Mean has sort word that his
eammar-i will ahide by the <!•-' Ision of th» Boer
Q •ent.
I Commandant De Villiers. who has been oper
•ting in the Kimberley district, has sent it. a
flap of truce, asking for terms.
The peace movement, however, has In no way
interfered with the military operations. The
British ■;- a.pnir. sweeping the northwest dis
tricts of the Orange River Colony, where. it is
believed, they have about a thousand of General
I >«. Wet's men within a cordon.
I DISCUSSING PLAN OF SURRENDER.
Hei<3e!berp. Transvaal Colony. March 31.—
Commandant Alberta has called a meeting of
the Boers in his district to take place thirty-
Sve miles esu=t of the Springs Station, in order
to discuss the proposal tor a general surrender.
H is said that General Hans Botha has sum
»lt it. said (Seaeral Hans Botha baa bbmh
mont-d a Kimilar meeti;.K at Amsterdam.
A party of constabulary and native scouts
"was ambushed near here on March 30 Six were
killed. The Hoera »;i;ci.<i pursuit.
Surrenders are occurring «iaily in the Stand
baji nccurrtng ..a.iy in the Btand
en«iTs district.
THIRTY-NINE SOLDIERS KILLED.
HAMPSHIRE nF-f.IMKNTH HEAVY LOSS IN
RAILROAD ACCIDENT.
I Pretoria. April I.— Thirty-nine British soldier?
*^rt kli;»r! ar.rl forty-five were Injured In a rail
road wreck on March 30 near Barberton, Trans
vaal Colony.
London. April I.— The War Office in reporting
the ■ reck merely psyp that it wan accidental.
The victims nearly all belong*-*! to th* Hamp
eh!r*» H«>clT/er,i.
THE MOP— DINING CAR.
A* v.fcp<l en PennFvlvanla Railroad trains to the
\j>et. ««coajUfl— tn« Ll»tit»i typa of •aulfrocat.—
POPE AND THE PHILIPPINES
BOPES FOB A BPEEDT UNDERSTANDING
—WILL PROMULGATE A BULL.
(Cop>Ticht; I9OS: By Tbe Tribun* Aaaoclatian.)
[Sptdml to Tbe Tribune t.v Fren b Cable.]
Rome, April 1 The Pope, speakinK to-day
about the T'liilijirines Commission, said he
hoped for a speedy understanding*. Governor
Taft. he said, was the man most conversant
with the question. The pope will afterward
promulgate a huH on the Church in the Phil-
Pl m-'s.
He desires tn mention in the allocution at th»
next consistory the appointment of the com
mission, which he considers one of the greatest
events of his pontificate, announcing also the
kind of concordat which he trusts then to have
arranged
GRAND HARyfONY SCHEME.
BROKERS CLIP. TO [IKINC CLEVELAND
am» BRYAN t^;i:tiu:i:.
Th» board of governors of th( Democratic
riub met last .--veiling and evolved one of th»
most allurinK harmony schemes that has been
given to th* public since Lewis Nixon began hi
career as a harmony producer. "The club" pro
posef to bring together on April 11 the lions of
Th" gold standard and the lambs of free silver
•or vice versa), and the vision of the prophet
Is to l" real! right here and now.
.Vniong 'hi--- to whom invitations are to he
seni are ex-Presid*»nt Cleveland. William J.
Bryan. William C. Whitney. David B. Hill. John
<;. Carlisle. Daniel S. Lamont. ex-Senator Gor
man and .ill the Democratic Senators and Flep
resontatives. -\n • •""• will '•'•• " de to eclipse
the reception of the Manhattan Club on Fen
niary "_"_'. It is the first time the Democratic
Club hj!s tt upted to bring together Lhe rep
resentatives of those warring factions, each >•''
whom declares that the uthei Is no Democrat
at all.
It was at first intended to have the fair on
Jefferson's birthday, but it was found impossi
ble to arrange for that in time and the "at
booM ' was d- • ii;. d on for a week from Monday.
i ■'.;■ of lh< l<o;:rd of governors broached the
Idea at an effort at harmony, in which he said
The Democratic Club ought not to be behind
This was Immediately agreed upon. There la
a pretty sentiment in the fact that the names of
Cleveland and Bryan were put down side by
side on it..- list, with the hope that they would
be actually as near together at the harmony
feast.
There will be a reception at the clubhouse at
s-.:'.it p. m. A supper will follow at in o'clock.
No agreement was reached last night about
speeches, but this will be decided upon soon
]f Mr. Bryan ( "«!' !l< * •"' hand he will '■■• asked, to
give a talk, and so will Mr. Cleveland and Mr.
Hill, and perhaps the others.
Th. trustful souls In the board of governors
last nitrhT said that they hoped all these great
Democrats would accept.
"BIG GRAY WOLF" WINS.
"BATHHOUSE JOHN" TRIUMPHS OVER
REFORM IN CHICAGO.
(8V TE!.E<:R»I'H TO THE TRIBtNE-l
Chicago, April I.— One of the most hotly con
tested municipal elections in the history of Chi
cago came to a close this evening after ■ atren
uoua campaign of six weeks. It was a strugg
betivetia Die so-called reform element." as per-
Vonified by the Municipal Voter?' League, and
the "Gray Wolves,'.' as the alleged corrupt alder
men are designated by the "purity in politics"
people. It resulted In an almost complete vic
tory for the "Gray Wolves." for nearly every
one of the "pack" was returned by a plurality
sufficient to insure to him a clear title to his
Feat In the City Council.
• In the fierce struggle that was waged the
power, influ.-r.ee and finances of the reformers
were mainly directed to defeating; John J. Cough
lln. better known as "Bathhouse John." To
t.PHt him the Municipal Voters' League ex
hausted every effort, feeling that if be aloi I
the whole pa.«.k of -Hr-jy Wolves" was defeated
it would mean th- downfall of the "gang."
Hut the "Bathhouse." that picturesque In
dividual who d"mlnate«i politically the richest
Tvnrd in any of the big American cities, came
forth rrom th<> hardest battle ever foucht by a
candidate in the First Ward with 2.50U votes
to cparo "Bathhouae John" c.usrhl'.n \s „,,w
the dinner of the greatest victory of hip life.
David I-. Frank, his apponent. the candidate „f
the Municipal Voters* League, failed to develop
the wtrer.Kth that was expected. In the lodging
house precincts the highly respectable candidate
was not in it" at all. In the chief "silk stock-
Ing" precincts, where it was predicted that
"Bathhouse" would go down In Inglorious de
feat, the "Big Graj Wolf got more votes than
his most MUMfuine friends counted on.
The strife «as fit-r< •■ all day. Strange police
men from other districts were sent Into the
Ktsi AVard to replace the bin. ats regularly
stationed there, and who are supposed to be
friendly to Cougnlin'e Interests: Besides, sixty
or more strapping athletes from the University
of Chicago were stationed at the various polls
in the ward to overawe by muscular display the
"toughs" of the Tenderloin district. Fet In
Ft-ite of all. the rormer bathhouse rubber, who
poses a^ statesman, banker, souk composer and
i,emi In dr.ss. won a notable victory, after a
campaign in w!li ' h s " nit nr 1h " m s?fj V ,"' U ','h' 1
and effective apeakers of the city, hired bj the
reformers, had denounced him In the open as
••a daylight robber and buffoon.**
The "Bathhouse" appreciated the full effect ot
hie victory, by disappearing from bte usual
haunts after the count was over, thus escaping
the "touches" and Importunities of his loyal
adherents in the lev.- district.
With Coughlin are also returned tothe ' ouncil
Buch other leaders of the Gray Wolves as
•Blind Billy" Kent. Novak. Stanley Kunz.
••Johnny" Powers and "Tom" Carey
Election Interest was In the questions of the
referendum, abolition of town organizations and
publi< ownership of street railways and gas and
electric iißht utilities, which were carried by an
overwhelming vote, being stmplj an expression
of BentJment by the voters.
NEW MOVE ON RUSSIA'S PART
CHINESE ALLOWED TO KEEP FORCE IX
MANCHURIA— ACTIVITY AT
NKYV CM \V.\\C,
Peking. April -The Manchurlan Conven
tion. th» main conditions at which were recently
agreed upon by Paul Lesaar. Russia's Minister
to China, and Prince China;, president of the
Chinese Foreign Office, permits china to main
i tain the force which she thinks necessary In
Manchuria after the evacuation of that terri
tory
official reports received here from New
1 Chwang declare the Russians to be displaying
Kr... military activity there Ten thousand
: troops have been recently moved to Port Arthur
and cv- drafts are arriving. An extensive and
permanent tH.graph system is being con-
Ftructed. ____»__
RUSSIA TO LEAVE NEW-CHWANG.
London. April 2.-A dispatch from Peking to
-The Times 11 says that Russia now undertakes
1 to withdraw from New-Chwang within eight
I S^ Tlen-Tsln provisional government.
ANOTHER INDEMNITY PAYMENT.
NEW- YORK WEDNESDAY. APRIL L\ 1 00i>. -FOI RTEEX PA< IKS.-* „ £,ir:w
NEW-JEBBEY STATE OFFICIALS WHO ASSUMED OFFICE YESTERDAI
THOMAS N. M'CARTEII, FAMrKT, T\ mrKIXFOX.
Attorney General. Secretary of State
<<Y>pyr!Rht, 1902 by ."hapman..
MR. M'OARTER'S RAPID RISE. '
Thomas N. McCarter is the youngest man ever
chosen for the high office of Attorney General of
New-Jersey. He lacks six months of being thirty
five years old He Is a .-on of the late Thomas N.
McCarter. who was for many years one of the
aliirst and most cohsplcuo is lawyers In the State
and hasi developed In public affairs at such a r;ipid
rate as to dazzle most observers. The young At
torney General's growth began Immediately on his
entrance to the Slat.- Senate three years ago, and
li.ir.lv :. year had passed before he was one of the
most Influential members of that body. lie ma.:>
the speech nominating Franklin Murphy for •;.).
< rnor las: fall, and was .1 leading figure in the
management of the ensuing campaign.
TEN THOUSAND STRIKE.
WILL RESIST ATTEMPT TO
FILL THEIR PLACES.
KOCHERTEH AND IM'l TSIMTj; MIXERS
M.\^ CAI SE THE COAL MIXES
TO BE FLOODED.
Altoona. Perm.. April 1. -After holding mass
meetings, the Rochester and Pittsburg Coal and
Iron Company's miners at Punxsutawney and
SykesviHe to-day formally declared the threat
ened strike. The sulk'- Involves ten thousand
miner.'-, and will have the effect of curtailing the
employment of nearly as many more railroad
men employed by the Buffalo. Rochester and
Pittsourg Railroad Company, whose freight
I raffle will be nearly paralysed in consequence of
the strike. Not a mine worker employed by the
Rochester and Pittsburg company will be at
•work to-morrow except the pumpers and track
layers, it being agreed to keep these men at
\<f.ik i" ;..-..i..; ..-..i.. • 'be mines.
It whs decided by a vote, however, that If
General Manager L. W. Robinson should at
tempt to evict the Strikers from their homes,
many of which are owned by the company, the
pumpers and track layers will also be called
out and water let into th« mines. It was also
decided that any overtures for a settlement
must come from Mr. Robinson.
Any fit tempi lo Import Other niJll.T^ i\ll!
lt<- re»iKt«Ml.
The strikers have assurance of support from
the district and national treasuries of th"
I'nltr-f] Mine Work.-rs of America.
The f> ( rik>- is ordered not for an advance In
wages, but becaus< Lucien W. Robinson, gen
eral manager of the Rochester and Pittsburg
Coal and Iron Company, ha" refused t.> sign
the agreement of the Miners .-md Operators'
Conference at Altoona last week. The agree
ment .-it that conference waa the same as that
..f la>; year, except that in the mines along the
, Rochestei and Pittsburg Railroad, all
of which are managed hy Mr Robinson, th>
miners were granted their demand t.> have
mules haul the cars oat Instead of making th>
rn^n push th<~m.
LINEMEN STRIKE FOR MORE PAY.
PittSbUTK. April I.— The electric linemen of rit!«=
l-.Mri; and Allegh :ny struck to-daj for ;.n Increase
of pay fr..in J-' .'■■'' t" J" for a nin*- hour day. About
flve hundred men are out. The ,-trtk.- Involves
about all the big office buildings In course of erec
tion in the downtown district, except the Frick
Building, w '■■'.<■•■■<■ the men are at work, satisfactory
arrangements having been made with the con
tractors.
THE I si \l, /.' iLKA V \\ iR CLOUD
TROUBLE ONCE MORE REPORTED BREWING
BETWEEN TI'IIKKV \M' BULGARIA.
London, April -. U\ a dispatch from Vienna
the correspondent of "The Daily Telegraph"
says he believes from the Indications -that the
Balkan situation has reached a critical stage.
Reports of atrocities committed by Bulgarian
bands are received dally, says the correspond
ent, and yesterday the heads of seven Bulgarian
brigands were brought to Salonica and hung up
In th>- prison courtyard. The Turkish agent at
Ivanco. who w-is Instrumental In capturing a
Bulgarian band, has been murdered In revenge.
Ii is reported that M Sarafoff, the leader of
the Macedonian Committee, is planning the
capture of an Influential foreign consul In Mace
donia.
The Turkish Ambassador at Vienna has de
. lared the reported death of Mohammed Rechad,
the brother of the Sultan of Turkey, to i" % ""
true.
ATTEMPT TO KILL Moscow's PREFECT.
MoBK STI'UHST TROI'BLES IN GREAT RUSSIAN
St. Petersburg, April I. The Police Prefect of
MOSCOW M Trepoff, had .1 narrow escape from as-
Basalnatlon yesterday While receiving visitors a
governess named Allan suddenly drew a revolver,
placed Its muszle at th< offlcial's breast and pulled
the trigger. The weapon, however, i-,iss. .1 flrc. In
the subsequent excitement th. woman tried to es
,',,„ but was arrested, it Is believed that the at
tempi was connected with the recent \ student
trouble b.
Berlin. April I. A dispatch to th« "Tageblatt"
from St Petersburg, dated Monday. March :u. says
tne students are organizing a fresh revolutionary
meeting and have succeeded In mailing ten thou-
Sand cU-culars, mostly addressed to persons belong
r.K to the educated classes. Imploring them to at
end. armed If possible, a revolutionary demonstra
tton i' 1 front " f tn " Kiiz:in Cathedral to-day.
IV OFFICER KILLED "\ PARAIiE.
<■ petersbors April 1 While the Mirgorod
Rejrimenl wa= parading on the barracks square
?t Kieff yesterday Captain Sofronoff shot and
Wiled Lieutenant Grodskl for maligning the for
nr~r man's famllr-
For all Colds use th" raanedy-
JAVNE'3 EXPKCTORANT.-AdvU
That was hardly over before a vacancy hi the
United States .Senate, thrust into Mr. McCarter's
hands »n opportunity to champion the election of
Ins friend Join; K. Dry den, and it Is conqeded that
Mr Dryden'a triumph was largely 'ii;.- to Mr Mc-
Carter'a management <> r the contest Mr, McCar
ter, ilk- his brother. Is closely Identified with the
principal Financial Institutions of Newark.
THE NEW SECRETARY OF STATE.
colonel Samuel D. Dickinson is known t "cry
! politician In New-Jersej Kor many years he has
: been the Republican lender In Hudson County, He
is a sturdy, alert, soldierly look ix man. in the
prime of lif'-. He waa „<.--tm..ster of Jersey City.
and subsequent!) Collector of th. Fort there.
PROFITS ON BEET SUGAR.
smoyvinc maim: i.v jiik American
COMPANY.
; ES3 FOR THE OUTPUT IN 1901 THAN IN MM
Higher prices for sugar prophe
sied AS A RESULT OF BRUS
SELS I■' (XFERENCE.
Th^ annual meeting of the stockholders of the
American Beel Sugar Companj was held \"-;
terda) In Jersey City. The company has a cap
ital of .<.-,.( mmmm mi preferred stock, and $15.0W>.
000 common st< i-k. The following dlrei tors were
elected: W. Bayard Cutting, !:. Fulton Cutting,
Henry T. Oxnard Jam< G Oxnard, Dumont
• Mark.. George Foster Peabody. Edwin M.
Bulkley. Kalman H»a«. James <'•. Hamilton,
Robert Oxnard and James A. Murray, the only
change in I helng the election of Mr.
Murray. t<-. fill the vacancj caused l>y the death
of Dennlstoun Wood.
Th. following financial statement va< pre
sented, summarizing the resuita "f the op..ra
tion of ;h<- company for the year ended De
. ember .".I :
10.11. lpoo rh» n p»«.
Pu«(kr - ■ "•' »•.*>% T7.958.500 33.351.56 A Ino H.MO.Mn
Total rr«!lt $3.821.0« »J. 931. Inc. $1,580,341
Total <•■"( "* operation. XWT.UU 1.258.341 Inc. 1.403,4.88
.:™« profit!. ... $sSI.<M« ?.-.»>v i.w Inc. f185.553
.-■ of maintenance... "82.711 24Z531> Inc. IW.IM
Profit of carapalßn... B-tOI 07 842S 83fl Inc. $«.".. Hit
(estimates for the fiscal year ending June .': i;
I!*i2. 1901 Chant
• •amp.ilsn profits ?:•»:'. $.".n ■■•:: Inc. *:t>>. ;.".s
OampalKn loss 313 -:• 7.- Dec. 27.21.'.
NVI factory profits. .. Mfl ** $4».«W Inc. «6." 673
la-m expense* atri Int.". 225.1 M) ''- : - '"" In.-. 90 ■• >
Balance . »2W.:»N s.'.r. .;:;.-. I>ec. *2!».:r."7
ls-r-9 prrfprr<>,l .!lvi<l«.ni!. -J*".!""' 240.000
Surplili $28,308 $35,633 Dee $-•'.
W. Bayard Cutting, chairman of the board of
directors of the company, in his annual report
to the stockholders called attention at the out
set to the fact that large sums had been ex
pended during the year for alterations and Im
provements to the company's plants, the latest
manufacturing facilities having been Introduced
The drouth it: Southern California, be said, had
Interfered with th.' beet industry, but in Colo
rado th." conditions were encouraging, ar^l in
Nebraska they were more favorable than they
had been. Continuing. Mr. Cutting said:
"Everything looks more favorable for a satis
factory campaign for 1902 than at any time in
the writer's experience, If the price of sugar
be Krepted. The abnormally low price of sugar
In th" world's markets is causing us. In common
with every sugar producer here and elsewhere,
a reduction of business profits below what Is
reasonable.
"In !'.*"• we aggregated ■>."._• rents a pound
!",,• our output, which was much smaller than
t[ input of !'.»>i For V.h>\ we will average,
after all our sugar is sold, n.>t over 4. 40 cents.
The difference between these figures would have
amounted on our output for 1!X>1 w about
$.~><iO.Ooo, „, about 3*4 per cent of the common
stock. Your chairman docs not venture to
proph.sy as to sugar prices. He believes them
to be. In certain parts of the country, below
the cost of production as Indicated by the mar
ket price of raw sugar, the expense of refining
and th. transportation charges. He believes
that your plants can manufacture the refined
product more cheaply than any other beet sugar
factories in the United States, and. therefore,
below Mi" cst of granulated sugar mad.- from
Imported raws.
"The abolition "f the sugar bounties recently
recommended and adopted by the Brussels Con
ference v .1 certainly tend toward higher prt ea
for suKais throughout the world, as operating to
reduce the production of beet sugar In th»- Euro
pean countries that now produce two-thirds of
the world's consumption. The experts of Eu
rope are quoted «a statins; that the reduction in
beet planted acreage in Europe will amount to
]•'' . per coin of this year's .rop, an amount
estimated at about eight hundred thousand tons*.
• \i this h. must leave the subject. You are
probably as well abl • as he to Indulge in proph
ecy as to tills branch of the business. On the
agricultural and operating side, the officers of
your company are able to make a pleasant
showing for the next campaign. Th<- sugar mar
ket is not within their control. When they have
prepared themselves to meet the ni.-irk.-t with a
cost product lower than that of any competitor,
they have done all in their power-all that you
or any reasonable person should expect."
//./.i / \ Ll\ / > LOST AT si: I.
BRITISH sun- scsk by a CHANNEL stbambr.
London, April I.— Kiev, n men were drowned as
the result of a collision this morning near the
Nab Lightship between the channel passenger
steamer Alrm and the British ship Cambrian
Princess, Captain Roberts, from Peru for Ant
„■... The latter vessel sank Immediately, and
eleven of fur crew perished. The Alma returned
m Southampton; badly damaged.
Th.. coUtel .n occurred at :-■" a. m. In foggy
wfUiht-r The Alma struck th? Cambrian Princess
on th- starboard quarter, ripping her aide open.
•im, Vhin heeled over and sank in four minute?.
Tv!« eleven survivors were hauled on board the
Anna.' by means of ropes. The steamer's bows
were stove in
Th.- Cambrian Prfnces? was built at Southamp
ton in iR7T She was of 1,275 tons net register, and
was owned by. . W. Thomas & Co.. of Liverpool.
CAPTAIN FOODY TO GO OX TRIAL
OTHER PRF.CmCI COMMANDERS WILL FOLLOW HIM AS
RESULT OF POLICE REVOLT.
EVIDENCE AGAINST FOODY
OBTAINED BY JEROME'S DETECTIVES—
I>EVERY SAYS ".MKN MIST BE
LOOKED OUT FOR."
Police Captain Michael E. Foody, in whose
precinct policemen demonstrated their ability to
enforce the excise law on Sunday evening, is to
be placed on trial for neglect of duty. District
Attorney Jerome made the announcement yes
terlay afternoon, after , he had talked wiUt
I- ,;.;•• Commissioner Partridge. The trial of
Captain Foody is to be followed by the trials of
other captains. The revolt of -he patrolmen
wm spreading to several precincts yesterday.
It bids fair to extend throughout the city.
"We have 14911 specifications of violations ol
th • law in Captain Foody's precinct.*" Mr. Je
rome said, -and all the proof was obtained by
men in my office. I cannot go into toe details
of the specification* at present, but I expect
to make the formal charges against Captain
Foody this week. Ad to charges against other
captains; I will say only that they will not be
brought this week '
Captain Foody commands the police of the
Twentieth Precinct, the station of which is in
West Thirty-seventh-st. He baa been on the
sick list more than a week. At his home in
Morris-are., near One-hundred-and-eiglJty
fourth-st.. it was said yesterday that he was
still too ill to report for duty. He was in charge
of the Jefferson Market Court squad for several
years as a sergeant before he was made a cap
tain by the Tammany Police Board that was
legislated out of office. After he was made a
captain he was in command at the Macdougal
st. station for a time, and then he changed
precincts with Captain Cooney, who had been in
West Thirty-seventh-st.
It is regarded as significant that the police
men of the Macdougal-st. station were the first
to join in the revolt started by the men of the
West Thirty-seventh-st. station. Captain
Cooney was on the sick list. too. on Monday
afternoon when his men went to the Jefferson
Market court and asked for summonses for
saloonkeepers who had not obeyed the excise
law on Sunday. Cooney recovered his health
in amazingly quick time. He was back in his
precinct yesterday. Cooney is credited with
norse sense. He Is said to be able to turn a
corner quickly. As soon as he returned to duty
he declared that he was in full sympathy with
the policemen who wanted to enforce the law.
He even went to the police court and proclaimed
his friendship for the patrolmen who wanted
to do their duty.
COONEY A FRIEND OF DEVERY.
Cooney has been a dose friend of ex-Chief
I .every, and yesterday Devery broke the ■than
in which he had been enveloped since his retire
ment to say that he beloved the patrolmen
should tight for their rights. "If the policeman
. n the street thinks his position hi in jeopardy,
said Devery, "1 Indorse the stand he has taken.
The captains have got to understand that the
patrolmen must be looked out for. The patrol
man has as much authority on the sidewalk as
a captain Kaa."
The policemen of the Weal Thirty-seventh-st.
station who made eighteen arrests on Sunday
right wen- at the District Attorney's office y«
terday afternoon before Mr. Jerome announced
that charges were <■ be made against Captain
Foody. "I believe." Mr. Jerome said later, "that
the policemen revolted because they were tired
of being hounded and handled the way they
have beer They have had a hard time of It of
late. They want to do their duty, and they have
.-.sserted their independence."
Mr Jerome declared that he would do every
thing In his power to aid the patrolmen in the
enforcement of the law. He said he thought
Commissioner Partridge was taking the right
course in encouraging the men to do their duty.
Then he added:
There are not many policemen Colonel Partridge
! can trust and I think If he goes along the line
,f captains servants and others and breaks a
■ „'v he will be doing the right thine and going; Ml
; :he right plan. If be transferred *«*«««
"fur. the work be i.- trying »o mo. A captain then
".,!,! have the excuse that be had no tin,, to get
I- inu-d with hi, precinct But If he take, i:;>
nrVclnrt after precinct, and works on that line
and breaks four or nve captains, It will have the
! ,■.;■..';.. r salutary effect on the department It takes
a month or ,ix weeks to Ret evidenced these
i precincts, and he will w..rk bard on a sins i»re-
Cincl and do what can be d...,- there. It w;;< . :ffl-
I ,i ;t; t t., %.-t th. evidence In the !■" Ideations
against i- iv. and It could not be .lone in a little
; time.
i WHAT TO I><> WITH CAPTAIN*
! Leave a captain i'l a precinct, and if he is do
i ing boocl work, all right, if be isn't. then-Ret
evidence against him. catch him and break him.
! it does no Rood. ths> igh. to transfer him. some
i time* a captain cannot possibly get evidenc
■ against gambling houses and other places, but the
' bulk of th.in can do so.
Whin asked if it was significant that the po
i lice bad let the town run wide npen recently,
I Mr. Jerome replied: "Yes. it is significant, it
I means that blackmail is being paid yet. Not
I so much as In the old days, but it is being col
! , ted all the same."
Speaking of special orders about polite '•:-;
i pess. he said: "I am glad to see that Colonel
j Partridge does not issue such orders. To Issue
1 a special order to captains. to stop all Sunday
' liquor selling and close all the gambling houses
! would be like issuing an order to all pickpockets
j to stop picking pockets after such a date."
} Mr. Jerome was asked if he thought it was the
' duty of Captain Titus of the Detective Bureau
. to get evidence against Rambling houses, and
he said: "It certainly is his duty, and the l>>
i tective Bureau could get evidence if it wanted
in do it but look at Titus's men. Great Scot!
Murphy' saddled him with a lot of men you
i wouldn't trust across the street with a nickel.
In regard to getting money to procure en
: dence against gambling, places, the District At
! tome! said: "If I want money to procure cvi
i dence i can get it. There will be no bother
'■ about that. 1 know four or live men who will
net me all the money i want for that purpose,
i and I won't have to account for a cent of It
j Mr. Baldwin would get me money, I m sure, if
1 I wanted it."
ROOF GARDEN CASE POSTPONED.
! Lionel K. Lawrence, stase manager of the *«■
I York Theatre Winter Garden, who was arrested on
■ Monday night charged with conducting a theatrical
! performance without ■ license, was arraigned be-
I fere Magistrate Pool In the West Side Court yes
i terday The case was postponed till April S. and
! the bon.l was extended, Mr. Lawrence told the
! magistrate that a, on* cne admission fee was
! .harmed for both th.' show in the theatre proper
' -nd thai on the roof garden, he did not think two
licenses necessary, Until th.' day of the hear S
{he rerforrnance will be continued under protection
of an Injunction.
LOSS BY FIRE IS 7.1/M\.
Yokohama April 1.-The ■"" from'' the .'Or. at
! !--rkiii n< ii tii • northwest COWI of th ■ Island of
Hr.n-.hVn wliTf four thousand houses were de
i stroyed. is estimated at MM»«
•8 HOUR! TO THE MISSISSIPPI.
Th rennsylva-^ Limited k»ni New-Tort daily
i for It Louis. Perfect equipment. No extra fare.
1 — Advt. . .- . . . . . .
PRICE TTIKEE CENTS.
SAY MKN ARK D!?GIITNTLH)
captains DECLARE REVENCE TOM
LOSS OF THREE PLATOON PLAN*
IS MOTIVE OF REVOLTERS.
Police inspectors and captains who talked
yesterday with a Tribune reporter about th»
revolt in the Twentieth Precinct, and »ha spread
of the movement m other precincts, declared
that they thought the nun wished to have re
\ -ngc on Mayor Low. Police Commissioner
Partridge- and hislvr ■ i: : - wot the police force
i e«ause the three platoon system had b^«>n abol
iched. The ld«?a that the patrolmen were moved
solely by a desire to do Ikrii ■''■■■ »a» declared
to be* absurd.
"The patrohnen who ;:r<> n^st active in this
movement," said one of the inspectors, "are the
men who have rt-en most active in trying to
saddle the three platoon system on the depart
ment. They want to have only eight hours*
duty a day. keeping tbttr high pay and pensions.
They blame Mayor Low. Commis.-ioner Par
tridge and *•■ officers of th"- force for abolish
ing the 1 three plat... system which Commis
sioner Murphy loaded on the department. They
have a notion that the present administration
is under some pledge to enforce the excise law
liberally, and not pound the aalo»nh*ep«ta They
believe that they ■ in strike at the administra
tion by enforcing the law severely against th«»
saloonkeepers. They are cutting off their noses
to spite their fa«es. Sin- they have shown
that they can enforce the law if they want to.
they will get into trouble if they stop enforc
ing it."
SAYS THE MEN' ARE SORE.
•The men are sore." said the captain of a
downtown precinct whose met: were reported
yesterday to be raadfj "• join In the revolt.
•They want to get even with Commissioner
Partridge for knocking out the three platoon
system. Didn't they have the gall to take a lot
of ministers to Albany and try to get a thre*
platoon bill through the legislature? Didn t
they have a area! crowd of women and chUdreu
storm th. City Ban in an effort to scare Mayor
Low into ordering Commissioner Partridge t.»
take the three platoon system back? They
think they can make trouble for the administrat
ion by attacking the saloonkeepers. They know
all the officers el the force were against m*
three platoon system, and they think they car.
punish the officers in the same way. Why. tn«
three platoon system was the greatest swindle
ever perpetrated in this city. There were a. f«
policemen •> post at night that people rr
being held up and robbed in •WJT I^ .*
The system enabled the men to sh.rk dv
eveowhere. Now that they have m earn thei
n lv acalr they ar- sore Im Klad they M
that they can th, exc^ law.
1 comm^.oner^aVtridge'hcld. , *<*J*»l\;~
or tne situation apparently He said J»l »■
, think that Sr-rtetfhe^lSve %3Z~*Z
Uetß Prajfci r / n t '^% l^ m Virh Ido not thinle
yon may „ ' ,;V^r/by then,
: progr< --
| TREATED MEN FAIRLY.
ariaaj lha m»n tha» t
. Le to bT*."SS SS
I ; ifhli towtimSt do everythmg that the men
|
a r«t them
Thil exXli.« the action or the men who ,m
i «tartins "j*i* thVir eltrtj without rear or favor.
T'l "thinkt hink ll»i »«cn a condition as Ibto has
I ..xNtr-i in the Ponce Departmenl f>>r a lon« time
• l?tea siibJt^Jttal advance. I said when I came In
' lhat tl.:. -r.i c DepartßM-ni .out,! no! he rerormM
i |nn a a cta3 Substantial advances rnk^ time Tarn
i . „'i=,vn"t" thai Ibis shews a aubstantlal advance.
1 There S*eio»nkti b« more M.ivan,-s. (Mißllto
1 natrolmen In tbb departm^ni to «toms thetr dutj
n^rlc^H and blactaSll *U1 beeol down O««^
Thr patrolmen in the Police Department ot thu
cflv -have bfeti sohooWd for y.ars n«t to h :iv- con
fidence hi th-ir su;..Ti.-rs. It will i.c a long tim. . if
vor befor. the men will hay . :.iTI conftdenca
pßoiißh m <-om- !•• lleadJioarters tj**ly wirh their
complaint?.
thought SOMSTIIINCJ WAS TO HAPrKN*.
!>id yon haT» any Wea Ihstt the men were
going to d>> whai they did in th>- Twentieth Pre
cinct?" the Commissioner was asked.
"1 had heard some things before that thins
; happened that made it very little of a surprint*
me/ !»« .... "1 kn.-u rni.t Eomethlng of a*Ja
k'nd was coming. ■■ v.;,* rig'nt in line wi'h
seme things that happened a weeh before. l
don't care ■■■ go int>> parti" nl.irs."
■What steps win y.«t< ' ■■'-■■ lo prwfeel these
men who do iheir duty in spite ot "'•'- to ■ '
slow"*" , ..
■•I will see to it that they ;tre protect"..
"Are yon going to call the men of the Twen
tieth Precinct down her. t«. explain."
That would be a funny thing to do. call them
down to explain why they hive done their
'■To explain why they didn't do it before."
"That would be a very goi-d way •■■■ prey-nt
any more from following their example, don t
"'■ylni':' have some of their, down to talk
over matters'""
■1 haven't had any of them down yet. ,
One of the Mayors advisers, in commenting
lust night on the situation said:
I do not apaali for the Mayor. The so-ca:;e>t
,-. • ,l't :- i mattei thai I. ".TT
. , . -h,n ttaM
■•
yea
he repeatedly said that he was opposed to the thea
exL'tmg condition*. PrrsonaUy. ! regard the so
■»lJe.l revolt as ;<:> indi.«i:i.in that the old system
«? h -ukm.iil 1" begtenms to di»lnre<rratr Open
«looSSToW"sSieay me.,n. customarily, that th*
;,r..p'ietors are paying Ma ■■■.:! to certain police
• sal >©nlieei m -In here this rr.>rn'.ns. •• * "']
that two policemen were stationed in front m
Mm •,!,..• nearly ill day Sunday, while other -a.oon*
v ..,.-',. „nnv • • : A mere flurry does not prc-v*
that the „ ii ■« actnally are in revolt «S»n»t tt *
old ?v?tern. We will have to wait nml see if they
will stand the pressure whfi th«>ir testimony \»
-'.■...:
The Mayor was asked -•••.■:■.:! times to com
ment on the latest developments In the policy
i situation, but declined. Before l^'irg the cit>
Hal at B:ir. p. m. he sen; for the letter nleanA
! looked at a ropy of his letter to Dr. Parkhurst
, in January.
| Ai.i>r.HMK.\ ask FoirrnHKK PLATOONS.
A >TOISY DKBATE ON THE RESOLUTION.
WHICH FINALLY PASSES.
Th* city fathers nad a bad temrered wranirl*
yecterday over th. proposition to request Com
ml-sioner Partrahja "• veintroduce the three pla
i toon sv^tem n> the Police IVpartinent •Jimmy
I Bridges was harder to v.ppress than usual, aad ,
! hi-, fearful and wonderful oratory gushed forth
like molten brass from a superheateu oupcla.
After a aata debate th» boara adopted the reso
lution, offered two weeks a=o by Alderman Culktn. .
requesting Commissioner Partridge to re^roduc*
the three platoon system. Aldermen Kennedy,

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