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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, April 04, 1902, Image 2

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other. Then came a more Ferious catastrophe.
The Tarletcn Hotel caught fire. This was a
building of Importance, under the same propri
etorship as the Windsor. I.lke moiit other hotels
here, however. It was of inllnmroable construe-
... in spite of :ill efforts it was nan a
total loss. By this time the lire had such head
way that no efforts «C the Fire Department
oouid at •; it. and the only hope was* in the wind
or In the coming of help from Philadelphia:
Happily the wind was from the shore, not
from the sea. Had it been a sea breeze the fire
would have swept back across the whole cit>.
Being from the land, the fire was blown toward
the - •„ where there was -."thing to be con
sumed. However, the flames persisted n
spreading laterally along the beach, especially
to the nortr.wa.rd. The palatial Windsor Hotel,
perhaps the most famous of all in Atlantic CltJ,
was soon involved, though it was only partly
burned. This hot*-l will be remembered pleas
antly by many New-Yorkers who visited At
lantic City many years ago, when a "boom" was
started her* 1 to interest New-York people in the
place and many representative New-Yorkers
wen- invited hither as the guests of the city
and am royally entertained at the Windsor.
The hotel had been enlarged and improved since
that time, and was one of the most attractive
on the whole Atlantic Coast. Another particu
larly tine hotel was the Luray, a comparatively
new house of great size and luxurious equip
ment. The Stratford, the Berkeley and the
Stlckney were among other hotels which fell a
prey to the flames. These were all along the
board walk. Of course, the board walk itself
suffered. It was rebuilt a few years ago, upon
a substantial steel framework, but the flooring
was still of wooden planks, which quickly
caught fire.
The net result is a gap of a quarter of a mile
In the very centre of the ocean front of the city.
It is. however, only along the ocean front. The
residence and substantial business portion of
the city is quite intact. The great mass of
stores, the banks, railroad stations, churches
and private houses lie back from the beach.
aid the wind blew the flames away from them.
Th loss to a few hotel proprietors and shop
tecpers is heavy. Bui the city as a whole is not
at all crippled as, for example, Paterson was.
As the fire occurred in the middle of the day,
when everybody was awake and a large pro
portion of "the hotel guests were out of doors,
there was comparatively little peril to life, ex
cepting to the police and firemen. Many guests
lost clothing and other personal property, but
none of them were made destitute, as would
doubtless have been the case with a midnight
Instead of a midday fire.
FIREPROOF WBES REBUILT.
GOVERNOR MURPHY SIGNS NEW CHARTER
WHILE FLAMES ARE RAGING.
Trenton. N. J.. April .*> (Special).— At
lantic City was being swept by fire to-day. Gov
ernor Murphy was giving the resort a new char
ter. By the terms of the charter it will be im
possible to reconstruct the demolished portion
of the city on the old lines. All buildings will
have to be fireproof.
Mayor Stoy. City Controller Heston, Senator
Edward S. Lee. Frederick Helmsiey. proprietor
of the Hotel Brighton: City Engineer Hackney,
City Solicitor Godfrey and Secretary of the Sen
ate "Walter E. Edge, all of Atlantic City, were
before the Governor, urging favorable considera
tion of the charter, when they received word of
the fire. They hastened their arguments, and
Governor Murphy told them that he would give
their measure favorable consideration at once.
As soon as he signed the bill a special train
was chartered and the party was taken to At
lantic City at top speed. The special left Tren
ton shortly before - o'clock, and was made up
of an engine, a baggage car and a single coach.
WBBCK Vil' SAVE IXJCMED MAM.
MOHAWK AM' MAU'NH TRAIN L>ITi."HBI>— NO
FATALITIES REPORTED.
Utiea., X. V.. April 3 — northbound train on
the Mohawk and Malone division of the New-
York Central Railroad jumped the track at
Wood's Lake early this morning, and five
coaches were ditched Physicians were sum
moned from Fulton Chain, but It is said that
there are no fatalities. The train is reported
badly wrecked, and a number of people are said
to be hurt.
78,000
in Service in
Manhattan
and the Bronx
Manhattan Rates :
Business
from $5 a month.
Residence
from $4 a month.
One-Year Contract*.
Monthly Payments.
New York Telephone Co.
15 Der St. 11l West 88th St.
• 216 West 125 th -.
Comfort in the
Dining Room.
where the impoitant point of service
ability is e^th^red inta a thought to
ward the artistic — is given a wide
range in our showing of Mahogany
Furniture lor this important room.
Sideboards, Glass Cah:nets. T.nbies
and Chairs that bear a 'Hall Mark'
for fine detail and pure design.
GRAND RAPIDS
FURNITURE COMPANY,
nricorporateci;,
34th Street, West. Nos. 155-157
" Minute Irom Ri a:-, ]■*■?. \
DAIRY INTERESTS WIN.
THE ATE PASSES THE OLEOMAR
GARINE BILL BY A VOTE
OF 39 TO Si:
Washington. April 3.— the close of a lively
debate this -afternoon the Senate passed the
Oleomargarine bill by a vote of 39 to 31. The
debate was largely In the nature of a reinforce
ment of arguments previously advanced. Mr.
Spooner. of Wisconsin, made the principal
speech, maintaining that Congress had ample
authority to enact the proposed legislation, be
cause it was In the Interest of the people. Mr.
Vest, of Missouri, held that Congress was In
vading the powers of the States. Mr. Scott, of
West Virginia, moved to recommit the bill to
committee, holding that it was unsatisfactory
to many Senators and ought to be perfected.
The motion was defeated, 35 to 37.
A perfect flood of telegrams poured into the
PHOTOGRAPH OF THE FIRE AT ATLANTIC CITY YESTERDAY.
Hotels Traymore and Windsor in fnrepround.
Senate this afternoon^ from all parts of the
country, urging Senators cither to support or
oppose the bill.
The vote in detail was as follows:
AYES—
Allison. Fry*. McCumber.
BurnneTn. Galllnper. McMillan. »•
Bumms. Gamble. Mason.
Burton. Hal<>. Millarf.
CSsa*. Hanna. Mitchell.
Cockr»H. Hansbrousn. Nelson.
Cullom . Harris. PsilW
Deboe. Haw Icy. IVrkinf
Dietrich. K>an. Platt (Conn.).
IMlllneTham. Kearns. Pritchard.
Fairbanks. Klttredpe. Procter.
Foraker. Lodge. Quarts.
Foster (Wash.). UcComas. Spooner.
NOES— 3I.
>ldrich I>ubols. Rawllns.
Banna- ' Foster (La.). .Scott.
Hitl«-y. Gibeon. Simmons.
Bate. Heltfeld. Stewart.
Berry- Mcßnery. Tallaferro.
BlacUbum. Mcl^aurin <Mi*S->. Teller.
Oarmack. . Mcl^aurin (S. C). V^.-t
Clark (Mont.). Mallory. Wellington. '
«-lark (Wyo.). Martin. Wctmore.
Oulb^rson. Patterson.
Dryi-ri. Pettus.
On motion of Mr. IVnrose. chairman of the
f <■ on Immlpration. the Benat« made
Uw Chinese Exclusion bill the unfinished busi
ness.
The Oleomargarine bill as passed to-day dif
fers in some respects from that passed by the
House of Representatives. It provides that
oleomargarine and kindred products shall be
TIIi: BURNED DIBTBICT, ATLANTIC CITY.
subject to all the laws and regulations of any
State or Territory or the District of Columbia
into which they are transported, whether in
original packages or otherwise; that any person
who sells oleomargarine and furnishes it for the
use. of others, except to his own family, who
shall mix with it any artificial coloring that
causes it to look like butter, shall be held to be
a manufacturer, and shall be subject to the tax
provided by existing law; that upon oleo
margarine so colored as to resemble butter, a
tax of in cents a pound shall be levied, but on
oleomargarine not colored the tax shall be one
fourth of a rent a pound; that on adulterated
butter a tax, of 10 cents a pound shall be levied,
and on all process or renovated butter the tax
shall be one-fourth of a cent a pound. The
manufacturers of process] or renovated or adul
terated butter shall pay an annual tax of $000.
the wholesale dealers shall pay a tax of $480,
and the retail dealers a tax of $48 a year. The
Mil provides regulations for the collection of
the tax. and prescribes minutely how the vari
ous products are to be prepared for market.
WAMtt PROCEEDINGS DISMISSED.
j SALVADOII *»TlrTfj|B LACK OF JURISDICTION ON
j TUB TART Or ARBITRATORS
Washington, April -The Salvador arbitration
opened here to-dny with a surprise in the *-hape cf
a motion b;' Messrs. Cotton and White and Dr.
Rodriguez, of counsel for the government of Sal
vador, to dismiss the proceedings for want of Juris
diction on the part of the arbitrators. The motion
will be argued to-morrow. . Tbe case Is that of
the Salvador Commercial Company, of San Fran
cisco, which si-tic* about $500,000 damages from the
government of Salvador tar Uum at Its ?ro£«rty.
SEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. APRIL 4. 1902.
PROGRESS. IX CHINA.
AN EDICT AGAINST THE OLD CUSTOM
OF BINDING WOMEN'S FEET.
Washington, April 3.— The State Department
made public to-day copies of two Chinese edicts,
which were sent by Minister Conger at Peking
under date of February H. These edicts. Mr.
Conger says, Indicate the loosening of the bonds
of old custom and the present trend toward a
new order of things. The first edict removed
the prohibition of intermarriage between Man
chus and Chinese, and is of political significance,
Mr. Conger says, as indicating a desire to em
phasize less strongly the distinction between
rulers and ruled. 1 It also bids Chinese officials
and gentry to persuade Chinese women to do
away with the old custom of foot binding and
let their extremities grow as nature Intended.
The practice, says the edict, is "an Injury to
the good order of creation."
The other edict is in line with the policy de
clared In a number of recent edicts, and con
templates'the sending abroad of competent Chi-
namen to study Western methods in order to
extend the international relations of the empire.
TO HELMUT LIBERTY'S TORCH.
SECRETARY ROOT WILL MAINTAIN THE
LIGHT IF HE HAS THE LEGAL
POWER TO DO SO.
Washington, April .'?. — Secretary Root Bald
this afternoon that he had decided to maintain
a light in the Statue of Liberty, on Bedlow'a
Island. New- York Harbor, If he had the legal
power to do so. General Hrooke, commanding
the Department of the East, at New-York, will
have a consultation on the subject with Secre
tary Root to-morrow. There is an Impression at
the War Department that there is the same au
thority for lighting the statue, which is on a
military reservation, that there is for liKhtln??
any other army post. It is expected that a do
cision will be reached to-morrow.
To IMPROVE REVEXUB CUTTER SERVICE
SENATE BILL. PASSED »V THB HOUSB AFTER A
HOT FIGHT.
Washington, April 3.— The Senate bill to promote
the efficiency of the revenue cutter service passed
the House td-«lay by a vote of 13.". to 49. The oppo
nents of the bill fought it to th.- Ims? ditch. At
the very end they attempted to filibuster, but w. re
swept iiside by the overwhelming majority In
favor of the int.. sure.
"the bill gives the commissioned officers of the
Revenue Cutter Service relative rank as follows:
Captains, with majors in the army and lieutenant
commanders !:: >h- navy; first lieutenants, with
captains In the army and lieutenants In the navy;
'ac -ond lieutenants, with hrst lieutenants in the
army and lieutenants (Junior grade) In the navy,
aid third lieutenants, with second lieutenants In
The army and ensigns In the navy. It plves the
nffli-1-rn of the service longevity pay equivalent to
the corresponding rank In the army, and provides
for their retirement with three-fourths pay for
disability or on reaching the atT* limit of sixty
four years.
iro.l/lY OVER NIAGARA FA U.S.
SENSATIONAL SUICIDE ALMOST PREVENTED
BY A LIVERPOOL MANS DARING.
Niagara Falls, April 3.— Delia Tansey, of Buffalo,
went over the American Falls at 6 o'clock this
< venlnp. It ajaa the most sensational cataract sui
cide In years. The woman jumped over the railing
of Goat Island bridge about ten feet from f>ht>rc.
William Connors, of Liverpool, Eur., who was on
the bridge at the time, -an down the shore and
waded Into the river. A rake was passed to him,
which he succeeded in fastening in her -clothes.
Miss Tansey begged plteously to be, saved. He
tried' to draw the woman toward the shore, but her
clothing tore, and «<>•.*• wp.s carried over the brink
of the fall*. Two hundred people saw the woman
40 to her deatb.
PALMA WANTS MORE HELP
APPEALS FOR STILL LARGER REDUC
TION OF CUBAN TOBACCO AND
SUGAR DUTIES.
General Tomas Estrada Palma. President
elect of Cuba, was the guest of honor at the
meeting of the Chamber of Commerce yester
day In the rooms In Nassau-st., at which Mor
ris K. Jesup presided. Sefior Gonzales de Cas
s?ala. of the Cuban Congress, and Alfred Mosely.
the English Commissioner delegated to studj^
the labor problems in this country, were also
present.
In introducing General Palma President Jesup
said that the Chamber of Commerce had taken
a derided stand in favor of reciprocity with
Cuba. They all knew that President Palma was
well fitted for the high office which he had been
railed to fill. The Cubans were our children
now. and Congress In considering reciprocity
with Cuba should be asked to deal generously
and magnanimously on that subject.
President Falmu In his reply said in part:
With my conviction that th.' best and surest way
to attach one country to another consists in build-
In* up and atrengtbening the trade relations
throu^n reciprocal exchange of product! and the
development or other interests in the same line, I,
who entertain for Cuba, my native country, the
greatest love, and feel ut the. came time deep grati
tude to the. United States, where for etgntecn
years I have met with the most kind, generous and
cordial hospitality, rob anxious to see both countries
closely connected and firmly united by a reciprocal
commercial 'treaty, drawn on the moat favorable
term . a treaty to the end that. Cuba become the
l«rK»-f-! market In America for the product* of the.
United States, and that this country raise the bar
now placed aK-'ilnht th« Cuban product*, especially
s:u:itr and tobacco, which are toe principal staple*
of the Island • '>•>• Constitute the only basts we
have to start on in unfolding other Industrie*.
On the Chamber of Commerce of New-York and
«ach one of it- estimable member* depends In great
measure the attainment of that advantageous re-
Milt, us the enormous amount of business which this
chamber represents certainly needs a vast, an
immense Bald, aiul Cuba, lying within hand's reach,
afford* one of the best ground* for prorHubl.- trade.
I therefore a'vall myself of this opportunity to
enlist your help, your earnest support, In order to
obtain from the Congress of the. united States— the
House and the Senate a substantial reduction of
the duties "ii MiK.ir and tobacco, a reduction larger
than that recommended by the Committee on Ways
ana Means In the House, which will In no way
afford any relief to the present distress of the
Cuban producers.
Alfred Mosely, In comparing the commercial
condition^ here and in England, said:
As a. student or commerce and finance 1 have
been (Truck by the Immense strides this country is
making agriculturally, commercially and from an
Idealistic point of view, and In a previous tour that
I made through the United States some thrte years
ago, 1 came to the conclusion that If Great Britain
was going to hold hi place In the commercial thea
tre of the world we must modify our views and
drop our extreme conservatism. Of course I am
i'<-i .<■•!!> aware thai nature has endowed this coun
try with --lit- that must place her In the front rank
hut you have not been Slow In bringing science to
bear upon the development of her resources with the
i suit that to-day you are more Intelligently tackling
the great problems of commerce than any other na
tion In the world. Although endowed with the nat
ural gifts of great mineral resources, agricultural
soil, Climate, timber, natural gas, oil, navigable
riven and lakes, and ■ variety of other advantages
too numerous to mention, still all these would be
nothing unless Intelligently handled, and this brings
me to the crux of the whole situation. To what do I
attribute the present great energy and vital force
2L, '£*.!"' tt>< ? State*? Personally, i am inclined to
think that education Is at the bottom of the whole
question, and it is with this view that I am about
to invite a number of our educationalists to visit
the United States for the purpose of Investigating
your system from the bottom to the top "« aurl *
I venture to think that your system of production
is far in advance of our own. an. l that capital and
labor in this country have learned to understand
one another better than we do In England 1 tl "!
1. n-Vli'v «'V, l these <lelt> Kates will be '''>!,• to per
sonally witness your methods and confer with their
fellow workmen °" th , aide of the Atlantic ,rus
ink,- that they may Kean mu.-h ii*..m,i <.„ I ,
and that they may^lffi,* .„£ "• „ am'm* tlf'.
workmen on tbell return to Or.-at UrltaiM
<lin NEEDS GREATER RELIEF.
REPRESENTATIVE MVI.ku.aNS RKPORT
AGAINST Till: PATNK RKCI
PROCITI mi. i..
Washington, April 3.— The tirat of the minority
reports on the Cuban Reciprocity t.iii w^ih m.<i to
daj by Representative McClellan, of New-York, a
member of the Ways and Means Committee, who
argues that th.- bill gives Cuba much less in the
way of relief than site i« justly entitled to. He
cites the Teller resolution and the I'iatt amend
ment as establishing our niwnnranoea to Cuba and
the worl.l. Mr. M.ilellan th.-n suyn:
it has imposed upon us an obligation of our own
assumption— the obligation to preserve Cuban Inde
pendence, and government adequate for the i>r<>t--
tloii of life, property and Individual liberty We
ar. bound in honor as a nation to set- to it that
economic conditions in Cuba are such that an ■•ade
quate government " can be maintained The ri.ne.i
States is about to fullll part of its' pledn con
tallied in the Teller resolution. The pacification of
Cuba having been accomplished, the government
and control of the Island la to be left to its people
subject however, to the I'latt amen.imvnt \u
cause ot that amendmeni we must make it possible
for the people of Cuba to govern their island sue-
Mr. McClellan then reviews the sugar situation
in Cuba and this country. He sums up his position
as follows:
I-irst. the hill does not afford sufficient relief to
Cuba, hut it minimizes Hie |oa* of the present crop
of sugar; second, it is possible, but not certain that
a 20 per cent reduction of the Cuban tariff will
result In giving us a monopoly of the Cuban mar
ket, third, the bill is an enunciation of the Demo
cratic doctrine of reciprocity, It is a breach In the
wall of protection, and lowers in part the prepos
terous Uinnlev rates. *
If I am afforded the opportunity when the bill
comes before the Committee of the Whole. 1 shall
try to amend it by increaHing the rate of reduction
s<< as to make certain not only the control of the
Cuban market by us, hut also the pyeajpetlU of
Cuba. I Hhall also try to amend by striking' out
the time limit. FallitiK to amend, for the reasons
here stated., I shall vote for the bill.
A FAREWELL FOR GENERAL PALM A.
The local Cuban colony will give a dinner to
President-elect Palms on April 12 at the Union
Square Hotel. This affair will be In the nature of
a farewell demonstration, as General Palma has
definitely fixed April 17 ,•!<• the date for his de
parture for Cuba.
It has been the aim of the committee in charge
to bring together Cubans representing all the polit
ical elements of Cuba, and their efforts have been
successful. About one hundred invitation* have
been accepted. .The members of the committee are'
Perez del Castillo. chairman; R. C. Palomino sec
retary, and P. E. Desver'.tae, t?easur«r«
44 Last Important Art Sale of the Season."
On Free View Day and Evening,
American Art Galleries
MADISON S^ARE SOUTH. NEW YOUC.
The Blakeslee Collection
OF
Valuable Paintings
BY THE MASTERS OF THE
Early English, Dutch, Flemish, and Various
Modern Schools,
Including Desirable Representative Examples of
Van Dyck — Wilkic — Reynolds— Racburn — Lely— Lawrence— Kneilcr—
Hoppner-Gainsborough- Cotes-Constable- Watts-Beechey-Dobson-
Harlow— Hudson- Wilson— Bronzino -Clouet - Janssens— Kauffman—
Miercvelt-Mignard— Pourbus-Morcclse— Mytens-Vesticr— Canaletto-
Rousseau — Harpignies— Corot— Dupre— Courbet— Guardi— Hals— Jacquc
— Knaus— Schreyer— Bouguereau— Thauiow— Roybet— Ribot— Romania
Vibert— Clays-Hcnner— Mettling-Monticelli-And Other Distinguished
Painters
Among which are many fine
Portraits of Fair Women
The Collection to be Sold at Unrestricted Public Sale
By Order of T. J. Blakeslee,
On THURSDAY and FRIDAY Evenings Next,
April 10th and t Ith,
AT MENDELSSOHN HALL,
Fortieth Street, East of Broadway.
Illustrated Catalogues containing 23 hill page Photogravures
mailed on receipt of fifty cents.
The sale will be conducted by Thomas E. Kirby of
THE AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION, MANAGERS,
6 East 23d Street, Madison Square South. New York.
TO REJECT CAPTAIN CROZIER.
NOMINATION OF CHIEF OF ORDNANCE
ADVERSELY REPORTED TO
THE SENATE.
\Va?hlngton. April 3.-The Senate Committee on
Military Affairs to-day authorized favorable re
ports on the nominations of Colonel George I-
Glllesple to be chief of engineers, and Colonel
George- B. Davis to be Jud c advocate general, and
an unfavorable report on the nomination of Cap
tain William CroeJet to be chief of the Bureau »>f
Ordnance, all with the rank of brigadier general.
The reason why an exception wan made in Cap
tain Crozier'3 caw Is found in the fact that he is
charged with being interested In certain ordnance
patents. There was also a technical objection to
Captain Crozicrs. confirmation, th* Senator!, who
myomA him contending that the l»« lmpliedl> if
not explicitly prohibits the appointment to the
Slace of chief of the Ordnance Bureau tf an
officer holding rank below that of lieutenant colo
nW There wa* a sharp division in the commit te^
Sod some of the m.mbcrs were strongly In favor
"w^n^ir^Sen^te met . executive mmkm Sen
mm-Hiwlm mad.- U adverse report on i aptaln
Cr ,'«Jr : H n^mSatlon. Thi. carries with It like
action on the nomination of Lieutenant J E
fionVr t" succeed Captain Crosier as a captain of
Ordnance.
ADULTBRATWX OF WOODS.
DR. WILEY TO PRESENT SOME SI'RrRIS
INO FACTS-NO FRICTION WITH EU
ROPE EXPECTED.
|IIT TEI.K .HATH TO *U IBIMIJIaV]
Washington. April S.-W. H. Wiley. chief of the
chemistry division of the Department of Agricult
ure is preparinK a pamphlet, by direction of Secre
tary Wilson, which will contain ;i complete history
of the adulterate.! food question for the last three
years. In which time the l.iw excluding from Matted
States ports all foods deleterious to health has
been enforced. It will be ready for presentation at
the Cabinet meeting next Tuesday, when In all
likelihood nettle ■! Roos«velt will authorize its
publication. The material to be printed in this
pamphlet has been . .Maine,! by careful research,
and the facts which will be presented about food
stuffs In dally i.-c will be surprising to the public.
The adulteration of fruits and other canned gix)ds
side* meats will he exhaustively discussed.
It is believed here that no friction can b« created
between this country and the European powers over
I c adulterated food question, as the regulations
controMn X importation will be rix.-.i on a strict
re-iprocitv bub! Only that class of foreign goods
wll l.» debarred from thl* country, it is pointed
out, on which foreign countries have already placed
a ban.
POWELL CLAYTOX 8888 1//.' BAY.
Till: SECRETARY SAID TO M SATISFIED
THAT CHARGES AGAINST THE AM
BASSADOR ARE ttASKI-ESS.
Washington. April 3. -Powell Clayton. United
States Ambassador to Mexico, had a talk with
Secretary Hay to-day about the charges preferred
against him lii connection with the cases of Mealy
and Or. Scott Mr. Clayton afterward paid his ic
spects to the President. U.-fore his departure from
the City of Mexico the ambassador received copies
of the charges preferred by the attorneys for
Mealy and Scott. Consequently he arrived in
Washington fully prepared, and he submitted to
Secretary Hay documentary evidence In contradlc
iion of the charge*. It I. believed that Mr. Clay
ton"» presentation of the case was such is- to
satisfy Secretary Hay that the ambassador had
not been culpable in any of the matters complained
of It will be for the President, however. to render
a final decision. Mr. Clayton declines to make *ny
statement concerning the affair.
DMADIOCM Ofl WAM TAJ BMPBSI tUMA,
ITUM.
Washington. April 3 —The conferreea of the two
houses of Congreaa on the War Revenue Repeal
bill held another conference to-day, but again
failed to reach an agreement. The only item ■■
which there Is disagreement is the Senate amend
ment continuing the tax on "bucket shops." This
the representatives of the House refuse to accept,
while the Senators decline to recede from their
position. ■
OVER $6,000,000 FOR FORTIFICATIOSS.
Washington. April 3.— The Home Committee on
Appropriations to-day reported the Fortifications
Appropriation bill. It carries $t5.5«2.4.".0. which is
$501,K6 leas than the list act. With the appro
priations In this bill |63,365,?'-> of the *W.»2.222 in
cluded In the Endlcott board's scheme of seacoast
defences will hay been appropriated. The more
important tt«m» In. the hill are for gun and mortar
batteries. t3.0M.000: for armament and fortifications.
$3.ail.T»: for the Board of Ordnance and rortinca
lons'. 1100,000.
THE MANHATTAN STORABE
and WAREHOUSE COMPANY
i:- l*9tnil*tlbl« Flr» an<i Barplar Proof. f
Warehouses j I>xlDKtcn Ay.. 41-it -nd 43d 9tJ
and Offices. I Seventh Ay.. 52d in' M St».
Sup#rlT a4vant>«e»s anil ur.ex.-il».l security for *toriff
Of Furniture. M*rrn,-i and Valuables.
B\fE DKPOdIT FV'Xr^ W lEX TEAR \ AfLT<
pni silver TKtrsou
Furniture. Ornaments. Ac. carefully packed.
Van ««rvlc« by ikilled workmen. }
Illustrated descriptive r«mphle: sent on application. ■
Infraction of BulMlnirs lnvH«l. m l^. _„_., *
ADRIAN ISELJN. Jft.. LAWRENCE WELLS.
d<?-'y * Treas. Pr« St.
Tribune Publications,
Trlbnne Alniituac. I!*>a.— B»st number «ver put!
forth by The Tribune. Carefully ••!*>.» _-n.ar«»l an*
with a rich buJjet of special features. The Record oS
Sports Includes a statement of "beet performance* knrwn
in each ap^rt All th« political, financial and other lia
portant statistic* of the past year, with full elwtlooj
tables th* party platforms, and a ajreat variety of social
arv! other Interesting features. In paper al.er».a I . er». 25 cent*
a copy, postpaid. In cloth cover*. $1 M
Almanac for Preeedlnff Years.— For IST* «i
l'n.»j 33 cents .1 copy each.
Trlltaae lades. — The Tribune la th* only Americans
newspaper which prints at the end at each year aa Index
of it» Hatty (an.i on* of the van few In the world aC
!aric>">. Th* Jofum>nt is an alphabetical index of Htm
datra of the year. Tn» numbers for Ij<W» and WOO e«SB
11 a ropy each. lnd-xr» (or previous years as far bacat
as Mi (except for l.S7\ 1-T'.<. 1st!). IS4M. l-'Jo. 1437 aa*
l'«»>, which arj cut of print) 30 c«nts each.
War *tl««.— Thi» atlas of America. Cuba, • rto Rico.
the Weal Indies, the rhllljpines ana Hawaii, with oceaa
routes clearly »h,.wn an.l the length of each, and th»
population of prti.-ipal cities. la as valuable now that ta«
war la ov«r ad during the great Strugs!*. It ha* thirtaea
larpe colored map*- Spanish names are pron^inc*! OaljJ
a few copies on hard. -•'• cents each, postpaid.
Kntttinu and Crochet. — Patterns .'>r rarmeaUa
tidies, maps, chair coders, etc. Six different pamphlets,
• each sixty-four par^s or more. Each 10 centj. lh« aix 1:3
i 00 cents
i Summer Leliorr. — A rood collection of lava itorie*.
; On* hundred pases. Just as good for winter reading. US
I esajsa
] l)li>«lr> Tariff.— Kates Now In Force. Compare!
j with Tnos* of th* Previous Act. 10 cents.
I Ships of th* Jlair>.- Pictures of American Naxyi
Vessels In the War with Spain. 1" cents.
Portraits of Oar Late Pre»ldeiil.-Oa heavy*
j woodcut paper, with black border. 5 ens per copy.
Prlir War S»torlr« — Over M> Tales of Baitlestn the*
Civil War. \Vrltt«n for Th« Tribune, by Actual rariici—
pants. MeSJSSBM alaa. S3 p. -*• cents.
I Trot War Storl*«.-A Second CMBMttSB of ThrHt-.
f Inn Narratives, ft 11 of Incident and Patho*. i*a»azlne>
• »lie. ha pp. 25 cents.
I Trustß.-A Defence cf Them by I C. T. Dcdd. a -.4
' an Attack by T. V. Powderly. Brochure. 3 cents.
VIIIaKF Im»roTenie«l.-EJi»ys written for Th«
• Tribune by the late I'rof. B U. Northrop, the A. '»■••* at
this Movement Mrochure. 5 cents.
«.,...,,,. 1 1. Mi- of W omen.— This highly Interestlns
document Is now out of print. For copies, bound la clotn.
apply to r. A. Stokes Co.. I Baal lt>tn street. Saw-sssm,
Vo.lit Race Extra.— The *ory of the International
: Yacht Haces from ttrst to last, with Illustrations of all
the Great Racers and an account of the preparation* tor
[ Iks races of 11MI. ~ r . l f
I Story of the ll»th IVnturjr. A Review of thj
J World 1 • rn.*i*i<» in the Ijiat Une Hundred *«» r ?-, Wr "^
I ten by j-peclaiists in the Most Important Urns of Its "• - l
1 ■ i aaaaM.
Art •■<! Archlteotnre at the AVorlrt** *"« lr *
'—A .-rIM. -a! review by The Tribunes art critic. tlft/-»
, eight bmbb aaawi i" cents.
• ' Btrdaeye View of Greater v "°" r^
; colored map. or view. showing New-York City. its ortSL
and the !«'»-r Bay, with part of Stat»n Island, paint*!]
Muaaal] lto« The Tribune. There Is a guide to the view.*
; showing important points. In a roll, postpaid. for lISJ
1 cents each.
i Uln<lers.-A binder suitable for The Tribune WeekM
' Review or Tribune Farmer will be sent to any address U|
! lac United States for &0 cents each-
We have also a few copies of th« "Imperial AtlaSl
: of the World."— Latest work from tr.« ITess con-J
: talnlnc th"t"anges Wrouxh: by recent Wars. The R»***
McNalV* Co. "imperial- A. a. of the World . re«-3
;, th« year 1900. contains I— M; • pages 114 by )♦
Inches in .lie. and UrK-.- seal* colored MBS sfjaea >«»«•
and Term .ry and of each Island acquired by Uar of *•
United States, with the provinces oi Canada and l •«
• .-ountrl-s on other continents, and large street maps oq
i twenty prlnclpul American cities.
■ l X pa«e is devoted to graphic 'r.uatrattons of th. ar^J
- and population of th. different countries of the rl i,
I "n-ih« -to the solar s> item- the sl»e and d *"^'» <*"
< flm.-ts. the tides, seasons and eclipses. A third *' v *» *'
! rr'ai>hlc Illustration or the national debts of the coun.rlej*
! of the world. Mur lnal notes explain the population ot,
: each .-in and State. The Alias la bound handsomely W
heavy cloth. Espeotal attention ,-.■■■■ ■'.- N»* , l^*2
I !v««..ns." and on«» map .stows rah »accesslve territorial^
: expansion of the United >•..-- ' ' \._\l ,v_,
\ll the old Atlases have b»en rendered obsolete *» »"2
j War. and chans«» of recent years. The "Imperial las
\ "^tcV^o^the'-Impertal" Atlas per copy . $1.80 <".-»*_
I -X-ho Tribune will send one cepr. free ot express c^rgaajl
i•> any person who -111 »end to this, office t!ir»e ;' ir *"r" r M
1 •lens ■' the Trt Weekly at $1.90 each a year, or four »üb-4
; ».-nptlons to th« Weakly, at }. *ach a year. \
i Htmittttaew ahould »c mud. by ■•"*'"
' or der or draft, to avoid lnaa In the mail'-
I THE TRIBUNE, NEW-YORK
ElflHT HOUR HILL FAVORABLY REPORTED.
Washington. April 3.— The House Committee <**
Labor to-day ordered a favorable report on tas»
Eight Hour bill, so-.-alled. providing that In cve *"*"
contract for work for the government It shall D«
specified that the work Is to be done on an eight
hour basis This bill has be«n strongly «UPP«£2
by labor ©rganlxa.tion« and opposed by tn *_**t!T
armor, shipbuilding, ordnance and <* 1 »« r . con £t2r3
having contracts with the gov«mm*nt. Tin -» l:
able report «m ordered without division. <**■•£: m,
man Gardner will make tiM r«P«r» j
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