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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, April 06, 1902, Image 5

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BEDELL RESENTS IT.
SAY? CRITICISM OF TERMINAL BILL
Should be aimei* at those
who fathered it.
Assemblyman Bedell of Orange County, who
Introduced the so-called Central Terminal bill,
which, in the opinion of many, gives too much
power to the State Board of Railroad Commis
sioner? and to the New-York Central Railroad.
when seen yesterday by a Tribune reporter
■ aid:
I _ « somewhat of ■ lost to understand this
-vjtM-ak against a hill «hi I introduced in per
fectrood ■:,„ at the dire i requtst of Mayor Cow
Ird rorprrati^n Counsel Rlvtts. l have at Home
?.,:.„ from th- Mayor and the Corporation I oun
* r« i«*Mi.« tn * Introduction of the measure, and
E-.^vhltraan, representing of Uk department ot
thp <uv urged the passage- of the MlL*ri his ought
» mtve to any reasonable man that tf there has
wn -nvthinc" worthy "i criticism In connection
ESS t he 'h / it is .., ,. «!>l.- to the officials of this
str who urged the bill. ! do not propose to sub
■)l.- criticism In this matter If much
™" ~ °i" said about the bill. l shall publish the
£r£-=pon<ienoe In order to show just who fathered
the bi'l.
Corporation Counsel Rives, who Ore» the final
amendments to the Bedell bill, said yesterday:
If this bill related only to the Grand Central
ciJtlin ! flo not believe such opposition to it
««Mh»« developed. We are debarred, however,
ESS^ffi^asfitiOn of this kind Into ; special
lc, fher.-f»re. it had to be made general, and it
to* drawn to apply to all railroads bavtngr termi
ng fn oiti"« of the tirst eSa*S. It is possible that
H^iUaenfi provisions were made too broad and
h '""" .-rlous consequences if applied to some
»** . 'crf-wn when ih* bill was drawn. I wish
'hat '"he '. ?hieAi«ns now m^de to the bill had been
fS£wM when the hill was before the legislature
instead <f alter its passage.
The Bedell bill is being attacked now largely
because none of the bodies to which plans for
terminal improvements are to be submitted have
■m power to modify them. The bill is Mi
amendment to the general railroad law. and pro
vides that the New- York Central Railroad «n«y
present to the city authorities, the Mayor and
Board of Estimate, ■ plan which shall show any
than*** or additions In its terminal or , any
changes of location of any ran of its railroad
SiTherfty authorities ha\e no jurisdiction, as
th» railroad can "go over their heads" to the
Fiat" Railroad Commission, and the commission
tan decide ihat the proposed changes are a pub
lic necessity. Their decision may be reviewed
to correct Irregular proceedings, but cannot be
" Tbe president of the Merchants' Association.
Tn*> president of th*» Merchants' Association.
D L' Roy Dresser In accordance with the reso
lution adopted unanimously at the recent meet
jnV of the board of directors, appointed v* llliam
Edmnnd Curtis, one of the director:-: S. C. Mead
assistant secretary. ?nd William R. Corwine of
-he office a committee for the purpose of consld-
Hrinr the Bedell bill. To th.- committee was
riven power to oppose the bill, if in its judgment
it ought to he opposed. The committee held a
conference yesterday with John G. Carlisle.
counsel of •■.. Merchants' Association. After a
'till discussion of the bin and Its terms, It was
fiecided to oppose it. In this decision Mr. Car
lisle concurred. The committee will be repre
sented at the hearing before the Governor at
Albany on next Wednesday. The argument on
tehal'"of the Merchants' Association, in opposi
... to the bill, Is being prepared by Mr. Car
lisle. ■
WKED TO fSEXD DELEGATES.
CTATE DEPARTMENT liEQCESTS MEXICO AND
BO IH AMDHICAN OOCVTRIES TO BB REr-
REsENTED AT TVnERCri>^.«IS
-CONcJRES?.
Clark Belt secretary of the American Congress
„ Tubercuiosis. which is to be beld at the Hotel
Maj«>«tic on May M. IS and IS. has received ■ letter
from tn» State Department, saying that the Am
t>E«sador t« Mexico and the ministers to Central
end South American States have been instructed to
express to the governments of thsse countries
that It would please the United States if they wen
represented in" the congress. Mr. Bell has als'»
r^rved a letter from the Earl of Minto. accept
'ne the rfonorarv vice-presidency or the congress
ta the Dominion of Canada, The letter adds that
nl H B Small, the honorary secretary of the
-Inadian association, will douotless soon announce.
The srrointmc-nt of delegate? from f«nada. The
lons^i" win be held in joint session with the
Meato-L^eal Society.
fBCEPTIoy BY SMITH COLLEGE ALiMXJ:.
The New- York Association of Smith College
Alumnae pave a reception for President Seelye last
tixbt at the home of Mrs. William Crittenden
\daifls. No. 323 West ty-fourth-st. Miss
Uora Glil. d-an of Barnard College, was also a
rarer and Mrs. T. F. Burgess. Mrs. Joseph G.
Dean. Mrs. F. T. Hill. Mrs. Daniel Talmage and
Mr- W X Derby received with Mis Adams.
* Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. Ed
rouv.d Clarence Stedman. Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius
N. ntm, Mr and Mrs. Edward C. Bodman. Mr.
a:,-' Mr- H H. Benedict. Professor biddings. Pro
;, F *or and Mrs. Kirchway, Dr. Nicholas Murray
Butler. ■;."-. A. Plimpton. Mr. and Mrs. '■'-
iani E. Dodse. Dr. ami Mrs. F. P. Klnnicutt. Mr.
end Mrs. Hamilton W. MabK. Professor and Mrs.
H. F. Osborn. Professor Harry Thurston Peck. Mr.
SSSJKKg SSM
rt.Ml^ «i ■'••■ Mr. and Mrs Ralph Seelye
Mr. and Mrs. Abram S. Hewitt. Miss J;;-;:;; :
Gildersl<=eve. Miss Florence Colgate Mls^ Jean
• ■• .■. ■ ,:: Renssela^r. '-■"■
B^ Silas B Brrwnell. Miss BrwwnelL Chancellor
Ejfl Mr? Ma '•■.■k--i. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Van
lie- Mr. "uiou i" Shepard. Mr. and Mrs. John
1?\- %:■" ■ Mr. and Mrs. William H. rar-n-.
>r Mr and Mrs. Louir Steams, Mr. and M«.
fcrwir R. James. Dr. and Miss Knap». Mr .and
burst. Dr „nd Mrs. Lvman . Mr ld Mr ■
t> Willis James. Dr and Mrs. Amor>. I-" ■•
in,\ I- C a"" Btoddard. Mr. and Mis. Arthur
M-» Wi ; am R-ynoMs Brown. Mr and Mr*
nd MrF Felix Adler.
TO COMPLETE RAILROAD WITH IX A YEAR.
John Glasgow; who M to superintend the con
struction of the terminal ports of the Tehuantepec
Railroad for the S. Pearson Company. Limited, M
London arrived here yesterday on the steamer
boctiiia. on his way to Mexico. In *pea" n *: ol
the prozness ■'. the work cm the railroad, which is
feter.d *V a .nscontinental line arro^M* *'
Mr. Clascow taid that the two port*. ' ■■«»< '■"•■;;,;
on the Gutt ot Mexico, and rialma Cn«. on t .
Pacific Fide would iv completed within ******
The railroad was built by the Mexican °?v? v
cent and leased to the Pearson company for ntt>
years.
$I£:BERE TO PAINT UIXIATLRE*.
' Jtr* T. Splcer-Slmpßon. a painter of miniatures.
arrives here yesttrday on the steamer Lucania to
paint the portrails of several well known women
or this city. In speaking of American painter? in
Paris. ?he said that they were becoming more b«c
tessfu! every year : n getting their work into me
Mrs. Slmpson ha« painted miniature* of the
Baronet BuMett-routts. the Prince and Princess
Men-cfcfFki of Ruhlj «nd Dr. Moncurc ConW.
the historian, . She will remain in this country but
Six weeks.
BILLIARD \\r» POOL HABIT.
If yon rare to .i<-«inire «lie h«l»«t. there In
« place advertised In ihr "Little Ada. of **»•-
People" where fin liniiht. Look it up.
$« pitman & €0*
arc showing this season's
Paris Model Dresses, and are prepared to
execute orders for Reproductions.
Designs of the most approved styles with
the newest materials wilt be furnished.
Dressmaking and Tailoring Third Floor.
Departments.
OPPOSE MORGAN LIBRARY BILL. COMMENDS POLICE REVOLT
DELEGATION PROTKSTS AOAINST CONDUCT
OK P.R'.QKLYN PUBLIC LIBRARY
HY A CORPORATION.
Th«- Mayor's office was crowded yesterday with a
delegation from Brooklyn, which opposed the bill
receatiy pa— rd by the legislature known as the
Morgan Library bill. Henry Saneer Snow and
Professor Franklin \\\ Hooper represented those in
favor of the measure. The bill seeks to convert the
Brooklyn Public Library, publicly governed ani
p\ib:i'!y supported. Into a corporation privately gov
erned In perpetuity, though maintaine-l hy the
taxation of the people.
Assemblyman Morgan, who introduced the meas
tire In the legislature, said he appeared to set right
the opposition, and that if there had been a strong
opposition from ih» people they could have de
feated the bill. Mr. Snow declared the bill would
bring to the Free Library five or six hundred
thousand additional volumes, and some valuable
collections. For the self-perpetuity feature prece
dent was to be found in many large, institutions,
conspicuous among them being the New-York Pub
lic Library and the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and
Sciences. Th.- Mayor. Controller and President of
the Borough will be ex offi.-io members of the
Board of Directors, and all the appropriations for
the maintenance of the library will come from the
Board of Estimate.
Thoc.e h,. spoke In opposition Included ex-Mayor
Charles A Scnleren. Frederick Hinricha. the Rev.
Dr. 8. Parks Caiman and Dr. Catlin. They as
serted thai if the hill became a law it would estab
lish a precedent without a parallel In the political
history of the country. Mr. Schieren Bald:
•It has been urged that the directors of the
Brooklyn Public Library. although originally un
acquainted with the bill, have since approved i' :
but it is notorious that fully a third of that body
have. In the most earnest manner, protested against
it and. that all of us officers, who are also the
trustees of Mr Carnegie, have stated that the pro
visions of the bill are contrary to their sentiments
as citizens and as individuals. The nature of the
bill la such that if the bill were to become a law it
would assume the form and enjoy the prerogatives
of a contract and thus be put beyond the pale of
legislative review, to the crave injury of the
community.
PRE FE R \ B l. l' Tt < TB E L A W.
REGULATING THE INVESTMENT OF FUNDS
HELD IN TRUST— THE LATE FREDERICK
D. TAPPEN'S INSTRUCTIONS TO
HIS EXECUTORS.
A unique tribute to the fidelity, ability and con
servatism with which the immense trust funds of
the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New-York
have been invested and administered during the
fifty-nine years of its existence is contained In the
last clause of the will recently Wed of the late
Frederick D. Tappen. president of the Gallatln
National Bank ol New-York trom 1868 to the time
of his death. February :'V 1902. Mr. Tanpen ha-;
been a leading figure in the banking world tor half
a century, and had an International reputation tor
his knowledge of the values of securities, and tor
his conservatism In investing the many hundreds of
millions of dollars that came under his direction.
He was twice president of the New-York Clearing
House Association, and many times chairman of Its
Clearing House committee. In every panic that has
occurred since the memorable Black Friday of 1853
be had been conspicuous in all the trying tim. s
that have shaken the financial community. At a.
meeting <.f the New-York Clearing House Associa
tion, held In memory of Mr Tappen, on March ".
the Hon. .1. Edward Simmons, president of the
Fourth National Bank said: "In times of financial
peril he was always regarded as a wipe and con
servative counsellor, and on each occasion when
loan certificates were Issued 1871 1884. 1890 and 1893
-he as chairman of the loan committee, piloted
many a totterinc institution through troubled
waters. Who of us can ever forget the great finan
cial battle of 1893 and the glorious victory achieved
by the associated bank* of New-York under the
brilliant generalship of Mr. Tappen?"
He was chairman of the Clearing House loan com
mitt.* In 1673. when ?:T..:*:..<ir«i of certificates were
Issued In 1884. when J24.915.fi00 were Issued, and in
IS!'?, when 541.490.000 were issued.
In the last clause of his will, after making be
quests to his family, he provides for certain trusts
and instructs his executors and trustees to invest
hie estate only In such securities as are •included
in the list of investments made by the Mutual 1.1,*
Insurance Company of New-York, not limiting my
.-aid executors and trustees or their successors
or successor to such Investments only as trustees
are by law authorized to make.
MARCOS 1 GUEST AT DISXER.
IRISH NIGHT CELEBRATED I'-V BRITI9B SCHOOLS
AND UNIVERSITIES CLUB.
X dinner was given by the British Schools and
Universities Club at the New-York Athletic Club
last night, the third in ■ series of four which the
Club is giving. The first dinner was known a-" the
English dinner. the second as the Scotch, and last
right's the Irish. The ■■:>.<■ yet to come will be the
Colonial dinner.
The large dining room of the club had been
rrettilv decorated At one end of the room a large
Electric sign was surrounded by th. , green flag wit l.
the old harp and two L'nion Jacks. Ihe letters
of the sign spelled in green lamps the words "A
Thousand Welcomes" In Gaelic When the guests
entered the dining room the light.- were lowered and
then of a sudden turned on to exhibit the sign, while
the orchestra rendered 'God Save- Ireland
Marconi was a guest. Only Informal speeches
were made About one hundred and nfty persons
sat down to the dinner, which was printed on the
itcnus in Gaelic.
AXOTHER VICTORY FOR li'EYOY.
Dennis McEvoy. the Greater New-York Democ
racy leader in the Vlth District, who snubbed "Tim"
Sullivan, in Albany on Wednesday, has beaten out
Senator "Tim" Sullivan In a race to find ■ berth
for ,-i efficient political worker. As a result, the
friends of McEvoy are happy. John Feeny is a
w-ell known Democratic spellbinder In the lib
Di- rict" and both Sullivan and McEvoy had-. use
for him Sullivan went to Perry Belaiont for a Job
for HVenv and stood ■ Rood ehan«-,; of getting It
when McEvnv heard of it. Mr. McEvoy Is pro-
T.riet..-'of hotel where District Attorney Jerome
Sad hi* campaign headquarter,, last fall When
he caw he was likely to lose Feeny. he Invoked the.
aS cjstance of Mr. Jerome, who appointed teeny a
cWniy detective. Feeny will orate for the McEvoy
people hereafter.
ATTACHMEXT ACAIXST ST. JOBS BOYLE.
justice Qreenbaom. of the Supreme Court, yes
terday granted an attachment for $-i.i!7 40 against
St John Boyle, of Louisville. Ky., in favor of
James W Kenning, the amount due on a Judgment
0^
tuchy, On March 1.
SEXP PROTEST TO FINANCE COMMITTEE.
William •' Reddy. of Alexander Hamilton Post.
C n R writing to The Tribune, deplores the lack
of patriotism of members of the Senate Finance
Committee in not reporting the bill providing for
the purchase by the State of The Grange, built
ninety-eight years ago on Harlem Heights by Alex
ander Hamilton. At a meeting of the post held
,, M Thursday the members expressed In writing
unsuccessfully petitioned the legislature to purchase
Grange and estahllfh there a memorial museum
Tintu^ri' character to the Washington Museum at
Newburg.
Till: PRIS'T CLOTH MARKET.
mv TKi.n<;r.A:ti to the thibuse.]
Fall River Mass.. April 5 (Special) -Brokers re
port a week of moderate business in the local print
cloth market. The sales reached about a hundred
thousand Pieces, but would have gone higher had
the mill men desired to sell extensively at the pr*
vailinK Prices The market is hampered somewhat
if- he fact that there are troubles In several or
bidding will improve, the market
NEW-YOISK DAILY TRIBUNE. STXDAT. APRIL 6. 1902.
Tin: BBCEXT ACTION OP PATROLMEN
CTPHELD I<V MKTHODISTS.
MUCH ROUTINE BUSINESS DISPOSED OF AT
CONFERENCE— DEACONS ADMITTED
AFTER A WARM DEBATE.
In the latter part of the morning session of the
New- York Methodist Conference in Grace Church
yesterday James M. King presented resolutions
commending the recent "revolt" of the rank and
file of the police against "a system of personal
slavery." He lnd had personal interviews with
several patrolmen, he s?aid. and urged the mem
bers of the conference to shake hands with any
patrolmen they met and encouraße them. The res
olutions, which wore unanimously adopted, called
upon the Mayor to enforce the Excise law. The
full text of the resolutions is as follows:
The New- York Conference of the Methodist Epls
conal Church composed of three hundred clergy
men, largely performing ministerial duties, in the
municipal limits of the boroughs of Mannattan and
The Bronx of the city of New-York, and repre
tenting a constituent of scores of thousands of
reputable citizens, desires to commend the heroic
attitude of the rank and file of the municipal police
of this city in their rebellion against the vicious
system of personal slavery which demands the pro
tection of vice and crime.
Thi« conference is gratified beyond measure with
th« courageous action of these honest guardians
of the law. and exhorts the Mayor to continue to
encourage their action, and in the llsht of the fact
to revise the express tudßment concerning the
practicability of the enforcement of the excise laws
ou both weekday and Sunday.
The reform .Mayor is also exhorted to recognize
the fact that in "the enforcement of all the laws,
which he declares to be his purpose, he must in
consistency first risidly enforce the one law which
is violated, produces criminals and strikes a deathly
blow at the life Of social purity and civic righteous
ness. JAMES M. KING,
JAMES R. DAY,
JOHN J. REED.
LOUIS ALBERT BANKS.
WARM DEBATE ON DEAOONSHIP.
The session was marked by the resumption jf the
debate on leniency In admitting deacons. The case
was won by those who set a higher value on the
efficiency of preachers in parochial work than on
their standing in scholarship. After a spirited de
bate on the motion to pass I". A. Russell, a licensed
preacher of the Newburg District, whose showing
was reported below standard yesterday by the ex
amining board, th' vote of the conference upon di
vision was found to 'be: Yeas. 07: noes, 50. The ap
plicant was declared fit for deacon's orders.
In the wake- of this success the faction that
was making a precedent for admitting to dea
conshlp valuable men who failed of full require
ments hnd two more candidates— John Dennis and
W. A. Rodney, of the Sew burg District passed
with little delay. When a third name was reached
the opposition gathered strength and made a sec
ond vigorous fight, th.- Rev. Dr. J. It. Day. chan
cellor of Syracuse University, voicing an earnest
protest. When the vote was taken the radical fac
tion of the conference showed its former strength.
The opposition, though it made a gain of 50 per
cent, securing twenty-six votes not cast In the
previous case was overridden, and W. Tunnicliffe,
from the Poughkeepsle District, was declared ready
for ordination as deacon by a vote of 9ti to „.
This fourth ballot put the conference definitely
on record as favoring a liberal Interpretation of the
discipline as to admission to orders.
SUPERANNUATED PREACHERS APPROVED.
The session was then occupied with the recogni
tion of local elders and superannuated preachers.
Among the latter. Dr. David Buck, over ninety
year? of nee. held the attention of the conference
for some minutes, and In the course of his re
marks recited a portion <->f a long poem The con
ference expressed it« respect and goodwill by voting
that he sit upon the platform for the remainder
of the session.
Two local elders. James N. < 'ox and W. 11. van
Hoesen, were admitted. Adolptous Schllermacher.
supernumerary, upon his reporting regained health,
was made effective. he following men wen <•!
mitu i to the conference on tri*!: George A Shahan.
Charles Ltttlebrandt, H. Y. Murklnnd. W. Finch.
M. P. Williams. C S. I '-mine and James A. Hearn.
Seven other names not passed by the committee
were, upon motion of the presiding elders, referred
to the cabinet ine< ting for action In th.- afternoon.
The Rev. Dr. V. 1". McDowell addressed the con
ference on the Educational Society, and Samuel W.
Mown.- on the Drew Ladies" Seminary. Th« de
votional services at «:3t> a. m. which preceded the
business session, were conducted by th« Rev. It
W. H. Mlckle. Before adjournment, which was
taken at i p. m.. an extra session was ordered by
rote of the conference for 3 p. m.
PROGRAMME FOR TO-i>AY
The conference will celebrate the Love Feast at
9:15 a. m. to-day In Grace Church. At 10:30 a. m.
will take place the ordination of deacons by the
Bishop, who i? to preach at 11 o'clock At 3:30 p. m.
at St. Andrew's Church ■ missionary sermon will
Ik; preached by the Rev. J. L Eiartsock, and elders
will be ordained by Bishop Fowler. In the evening
at <; o'clock there will be anniversary meetings
at various churches an follows: Missionary anni
versary at Grace. Church, with addresses by Mis
sionary Secretary H. K. Carroll and th.- Rev. Dr.
Willis" }' Odell: anniversary of Fr.-edman's Aid
and Southern Education Society, at St. Paul's
Church with addresses by the Rev. Dr. Wilbur P.
Thlrkleld and the Uev. \V. W. Wilcox: anniver
sary of the Sunday School Union and Tract So
liety at Union Church, with addresses by the Rev.
I >r. T H. N«»ly. the Rev. J. Inman and the Rev. J.
Rowe: anniversary of the Epworth League at the
Metropolitan Temple, with addresses by the Rev.
Dr Joseph F. Kerry, the Rev. F. H. Denting and
t!..- Rev. H. Houston, -md the temperance anni
versary at Calvary Church, with addresses by the
R. •. Dr James R. Day and the Rev. F. B. Crls
pell.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
t: • Rev. Dr J. R. Day presided at the afternoon
session. Bishop Fowler being occupied with a
cabinet meeting. Tne devotional exercises preced
ing the meeting were conducted by the Rev. Dr. S.
J. McCutcbeon. The discussion of various reports
from schools and committees was the main business
of the session
Ex-State Senator < \ P. McClellan was invited to
the platform to speak on the suhje,-; of "Confer
ence Claimants." The Rev. Or .1. '•• Spenser and
the Rev Or J. M. King also addressed the ses
sion The Rev. Or. A K. Sanford was invited to
deliver a semi-centennial sermon at the next ses
si.!,, of the conference. The Rev. Dr. P. «■ Chase
was re-elected railroad secretary. Ihe session a<i
journed at 5 p. m.
0*0.43 UUBIC GREETS POLICE.
BLACK ROBED FIGURES CONFRONT THEM
IN WHAT THEY THOUGHT WERE
IN lOLROOMS.
Detectives Maher. Black and Underbill, of the
West Thirtieth-st. station, took a "turn" around
their pi -.in. t earb last night looking for pool
rootns. They entered two places, but found no
evidence that the law was being violated, and
mad- no arrests. From nil appearance in both
pi,.es which were visited fraternal society
meeting* were in progress, though the detectives
expressed scepticism as to their genuineness.
The iirst was on the second floor of the build
ing on the southwest corner of Twenty-foorth-«t
and Sixth-aye.
At the northeast corner of Twenty-flfth-st.
and Sixth-aye. they entered a room over a
ealoon known as the "Chimney Corner.
What the detectives found, according to their
own statement?, surprised them. Instead of a
poolroom, with its telephone or telegraph instru
ment blackboard, racing charts and like equip
ment ' they found themselves in what appeared
to be a noiia fide lodge room. Black robed fig
ures stood at the officers' i.ostE. When Under
bill made his sensational appearance, and then
admitted his comrades, the one hundred men In
the room made a clamorous protest. The de
tectives told the lodge men that the place was
suspected of being a poolroom, but their re
marks were greeted with scorn. They were
told that they were intruders on a secret meet
ing and to "get out."
They "got out" and returned to the West
Thirti*eth-st. station empty handed, and unable
to say that they had found a poolroom in their
travels. But suspicion still rankled in their
minds and they talked of push buttons and
"buzzers" sometimes ■ hundred feet or more
from a room where bets were being laid on the
races, and which gave ample warning for a
transformation to take place.
CROWDS AT THE CIRCUS.
Th- average attendance at the performances
given at the circus in Madison Square Garden last
week was unusually large. At the matinee yester
day the throng extended entirely around the build-
Ing, and fully half of the people were unable to
gain admission.
The performances have been Improved since the
opening and a number of new features have been
Tntrodured chief of which Is a bareback riding act
blo'car I,ow.no>: famous as r. bareback rider.
He u^es two horses, on- running hehind the other.
M, on £ Mill a favorite with the people who
rhVer him loudly as h« loops the loop on his bl
cvola.
SAYS FRIEND WAS MURDERED \
I
CHARGES MADE IN CASE OF MAN*
STRUCK BY ENGINE ON SIXTH
AVE. ELEVATED ROAD.
Nathan B. Chadsey, with whom John Suffield,
who was found dying on the elevated tracks of
the Sixth-aye. line near. Bleecker-st. on Wednes
day, had an office, believes that the unfortunate
man was murdered. In support of his theory
Mr. Chadsey tells of a talk he had with Suffield
in St. Vincent's Hospital on Thursday.
"I -.vent to the hospital as soon as I heard of
this affair," said Mr. Chadsey yesterday. "Mr.
Suffield was lyine on his cot. apparently dying.
Gangrene, I think, had already set in. I walked
over to the cot and said, 'John, do you know
me?" He slowly opened his eyes and with diffi
culty replied, 'Certainly I do, dear boy.'
"This to me was proof that the unfortunate
man had his senses about him for he always, in
addressing me. called me 'dear boy.'
'I then said to him. 'John, how were you
hurt
"He replied, 'I was struck on the forehead.
"1 then asked him. 'By whom?"
"He replied. 'By a conductor.' I then asked
him if he had been murdered or robbed, and he
answered. 'I had a disturbance on a car with
the conductor.'
"Mr. Suffield," Mr. Chadsey continued, "was
what might be called a stoic. He was a man
ho could not be depressed or too highly elated.
He took things as they came. There was a time.
I believe, when he drank rather heavily, but
recently he had not drank anything at all. At
one time he was connected with the District
Attorney's office In Chicgo. He was also em
ployed as a detective by the Pinkerton agency
and in that capacity ran dc-vn and sent to prison
a number of well known criminals. In doing
this he incurred their bitter enmity.
"Mr. Suftield was staying at one of the Mills
hotels. Now. everybody knows that the part
of the city where this hotel is situated is filled
with crooks and criminals. I believe that some
of the men whom Mr. Suffield sent to jail saw
him there and recognized him.
"I believe that he was taken to a hotel,
drugged, beaten half to death, and then placed
on the tracks of the elevated road. Or he "™>
have been thrown from the rear end of the
U: -The station agent at Bleecker-st.,oiv rather,
the ticket chopper, says that Mr. buffleld did
not pass through the station and get on a train.
It Is possible that he was carried through the
station by three or four men without the ticket
chopper or the agent seeing him. .
Coroner Scholer said yesterday that he had
pot been Informed by the hospital authorities
of Suffleld's condition until it was too late to
take an ante-mort. in statement. "£» dd ha
he had been visited on Friday oy Philip Phillips
and Chadsey. with whom the dead man had
deskroom. They had said that s.iffi.Md had told
them at the hospital that he had been thrown
from the car- Then Suffield had lapsed into
unconsciousness before further particulars could
be gained. He had made an investigation of
Suffleld's death, and believed that the man hau
fallen from th. platform of the station to the
tracks in front of the engine. An examination
of the body showed no bruises or abrasions
other than could have been caused by the en
pine, and there was nothing to suggest foul
r Coroner Scholer added that Frederick G. Suf
field the dead man's son. was of the same
opinion Dr. Weston. the coroner's physician
who held the autopsy. Is inclined to the opinion
held by the coroner.
A warrant has been Issued for "John Doe.
Coroner Scholer says, but the policeman to
whom it was given was warned to be exceed
ingly careful in serving it.
FOR A JEWISH REFORMATORY
DR M. H HARRIS SAYS IT IS SIGNIFI
CANT OF STATUS OF MODERN JEWS.
Xl, o R eT , n r M. H Harris. In his >«-rmon jre«
terday to the congregation of lh«! Temple Israel, of
Harlem. Plfth-ave. an.! One-hundred-and-twenty
flfth-Ht.. called- attention to the application recently
made for ■ charter for ■ Jevlsn Juvenile asylum
and refonnatorj In this city. He said it was in
tended to mak- thH Institution similar to thos»
maintained !■>• thp Protestants and Roman Cath
olic*. He said In par)
This charter i- t >f the status of th*
modern J. «< and t.. obtain II we have I n Hgnl
itic for twenty years against • ur pride and preju
dice Ostriohlike, »••■ tried to hid ir beads to
existing condition* considering our malefactors as
a negltgibl quantity. We were unwilling to make
the confession and hence we k- i-t from rounding
Institutions for growing needs Bui at last we
have awakened to a full sense of our responsibility.
anr! it (s high time we d!« Iso There are to-day
in the House ol Refuge 32 lewish children out ol
900 Inmates Ir th. Juvenile Asylum. 223 oal ..f B».
and i" the Five Points Mission. 33 Th< ■ num
bers, appalling In their proportions, arc steadll)
Increasing. , .
These data are rvt prosent^d tn n*vnk<*n apprenen
si<.t; or to demonsti ite that -■ pirll of the 01.l
Jewish !<t."-k In dying out. Only in the sense ot
povert) ..i!. the most of th*- Jewish Inmate* of
these Institutions be considered criminals, Eren
facing the fact that there Is .■ criminal class sn
our midst donM lei us think that it is a sign of
rradual degeneracy Persecution, crtiel
lati-n. popular antipathy and povertj have made
life to some Jewsial best bul .i makeshift. When
the laws discriminate against . class, and when
they are outrageously administered, it stirs up the
feelings against all laws, and the persecuted strive
to evade them Then there are the Ignorant Im
migrants They cannot Wot oui the habits ol i
lifetime at oner, and it Is true that when they ar
rive here they do not meet with Ideal civic condi
tions. Overworked parents are unable to loo*
properly after their childre i. who live most or the
time In the streets and the remainder In rookeries
It Is In such places that the youngsters are oorn
Into sta and error. ,
The proposed Institutions need not be eonsiaeren
as prisons but homes for the homeless They will
tend to rescue those on the verge o< crime and
oiher^ who have crossed the Rubicon and have
become the agents of the toughn of society. our
children in Gentile Institutions are brought up as
Christians and learn In a hypicrttiwil way the new
creed There thej mine'- with others ol th« de
graded .lass Jewish children who have cone th'
wroiip way need to be train d In r. wish ways.
These new Institutions will reveal to 'is the snaay
*i,ie of our community, and we cannot evade fhe
re^iion^lhility We will try te nurture the fallen.
and point out to th. m the way of ripht. and some
will he saved, and become the savers nf .i rtgnteous
Israrl
TOWS OF PATTERBOX O> FIRE
PUTNAM COUNT? SETTLEMENT REPORTED
TO BE IN DANGER OF DESTRUCTION.
Inv TFi.K.;ii.\fii r.. thi TRIBVXg.I
White Plains, N. V.. April 5. The town of
Patters™, on the Harlem Railroad, is reported
at 10:30 o'clock to-night her.- to be on tire. Th
main business portion <>f tho town is said to be
burtiinp A special train was male up at
Brewsters, and the flrei ten and their apparatus
WPr o tak^n to Patters..!. The Pawling tire de
partment was also summoned. The Patterson
railroad station took fire, and the special train
from Brewaters was stopped several hundred
yards below. Only a partial list of the places
burned was received here. Among the losses
are Akin & Molin.-s grain elevator. J. U Irish
& Son's grocery store, buildings and sheds: J.
H Thompson's store, house and barns, and IVn
dletor i^wnsend-S sash and blind factory in
which a hundred hands were employed, it is
said that several private residences were burned
to the ground.
QIBL KILLED BY TROLLEY CAR.
STREET IS POORLY LIGHTED. AND MOTORMAN
DIP NOT SHE HER NTH. TOO LATE.
Rosie Schneider, five years old. of No. 237 Van
Brunt-St Brooklyn, was run down and killed last
night In front of her home by car No. 38 of the.
Van Brunt -st and Erie Basin trolley line. She
was playing in the street, which is poorly lighted
at this POlnt, and the motorman dtdnOtMC hrr
Tu. the motorman. was arrested on a charge or
homicide.
TO RECOGSIZE OSTEOPATHS IX IOWA.
Dcs Molnes, lowa. April The (louse has passed
the Senate bill in recognition of the Osteopathic
School of Physicians authorizing the State Board
of Medical Examiners to issue certificates to gradu
ates of osteopathlc colleges and to others who pass
Examination, and authorizing the choice by the Gov
ernor of an osteopathic physician to become a
member of the State Board ..f Health and the
State Board of Medical Examiner*.
l.slfman&€a<
Trimmed Millinery
For SPRING and SUMMER WEAR.
The newest styles are represented in the collection
of Hats and Bonnets now being displayed, which
include the most novel and effective shapes at
present used in Paris.
Dress Waists and Blouses.
Imported Models of Chantilly and Irish Lace,
Pompadour Net, Chiffon, Crepe de Chine
and Louisine Silk.
DRESS and SHIRT WAISTS of Plain and EmbnAieted
Pongee, also of White and Colored Handkerchief Lino©
1 hand-made and embroidered.)
For Monday, April 7th:
Pcau de Cygnc Silk Waists, *5J5 t 7.50
Spring and Summer Silks*
A choice collection is shown, of Imported Novelties
for Dinner and Carriage wear, Fancy Silks
adapted for Evening Waists, Silks for Out
side Garments, Sheer Dress Silks, etc.
Among which arc Plain and Embroidered ' Imported
Shantung Pongee, Satin Foulards, Peau de Gant Imprime,
Armure Radiante. Glace Illusion, Moire Velours, Ctepe
Armure, Fancy Lxnon effects. Figured Grenadines, etc
For Monday, April 7th:
6,000 Yards Shantung Pongee, £-«
per yard. 3OG»
$ 9.75 per Piece of J9 to 20 yards.
ejgMe«mb Street, nineteenth Street, Sixth floenne. flew Yor*.
LA GRECQLE CORSET
AN UNDEVELOPED FIGURE
.Means an unnatural rirjure. whether too stout or too
thin.
Hygienic support of the spine at waist line is the
first step toward the development of the figure.
La drerque Corsets support hygienieally from th»
>pine. allowing perfect freedom where nature demands
it, either to develop curves or reduce prominent lines.
The waist line falls low in front and sets in very
closely. .
They give the chic, stylish figure, and aid each
individual to wear her costume with that distictive
air of Personality < ailed Style.
VAN OR.DEN,
164 Fifth Aye.. Bet. 21st (Q. 22d St.. New York.
The New l.><ng Bi> Model.
CHOKER SENDS His BLEBBIXG.
A CABLE DISPATCH ARRIVES FROM THK
BOSS AT THK BIRTH OK A NKW
TAMMANY CL.I7BL
A new Tammany « luh was born last nlgrht.
and the first to offer congratulations to the
parents was Richard Crokcr. From his lonely
tower at Wantage th<» ooss perceived th" new
star on the horizon, and though it dimmed the
radiance of one of his chosen followers. Mr
Croker telegraphed his congratulations to the
man that the new association desires to make
leaner o. the XXth Assembly District, the HIM
Of all his earlier triumphs.
The new club is to bear the euphonious title j
of the Thomas Murphy Progressive Club. It is j
composed of some three hundred stalwart Tarn- ;
many braves, who have decided that the time is |
ripe to name a new leader to succeed James P.
Keating. At the Tecumseh Club. No. 793 East
Thirty -third-st., the followers of Thomas Mur
phy gathered, and. joining his name and that
Of Progress, laid the first stone of a new or
ganization founded upon the bedrock principles
of the old, but possessing also the qualities
which would appeal to the new and transformed
Tammany designed by Mr. Nixon.
To be sure. Thomas Murphy is not as young ,
as some of the Absalom* who have recently en- j
tirely choked the entrance to Tammany Hall.
He ran on the sett-sams ticket on which Richar.l
CrokSl was elected to the important position of
Alderman. Indeed, now that some three thousand
miles of sea separate Mr. Murphy's friends and j
he former chieftain, it is boldly announced that ,
Mr Murphy's popularity was the deciding force
1, the election. Be that as it may. Mr. Murphy
h r "v (S » ,1-ninK BOU ""out harmony in th-
SU S 'f«Unwine temporary officers were chosen
The following nex« ...-tln : Stephen O'Brien. |
tO a . Ct U 3 William J. Fea?herstone. vice-chair
mw AlSirt i ii,, r secretary. George Fuller
,".■•■:,?,;. "Terry" TindVle. Martin Noonan. John
M. L- and Thorn is W. Donohue were selected as
fcWnttteVtO inform Mr. Murphy of their in
tenS: The next meeting .ill take place on
April '.». _
BARGAIN • B»TOH.
,„„ win •!««• " Bd each Sund "y a new
harsaln hatched out •«»•« «»o-e "Uttl.
Ada. ©« the Pe»P»« ~
I Fifth Avenue /l Auct'n Rooms
♦ FIFTH UK. >S|~JRr SORJIAS.
♦ Sear 2Sth St. >jf Ane«l«>»e«r.
♦NOW ON EXHIBITION.
♦ A MOST IMPORTANT COLiJXrnO?! OT
1 Oil Paintings,
♦ By Dl.«ittns«iJ»!»ed Foreign ««d Amer
♦ - loan Art «M».
X Removed from a Privar- pwolllnc °" Gr*m«rey
X Tark. including Brilliant Examples by tS» foUow-
X ins:
X Asti T^uc—
X tmtOmm I?'"* 11^.
X Berne-Fellecour Moran. Thus.
♦ Pnotosd I|*J*
♦ P^arri Robl* 1
♦ i'..man» R»mln«toa
♦ n v isari s.-h»n-k
«• romni Srha-in
♦ l-elarocha S»«nortBl
A Po B»ul *■ ■*> . .
X Kabres Tamburta!
i oSSniZm V^n^msutteß
jfnT"- v r rbe«Wwven
X Jai-oue
♦ L*»ur Worms
•> ALSO
i A PORTRAIT OF CKORRE WASH-
X By THOMAS ?Ul-LT. in 17!>i>. »-i "- was a
A pupil of Monsieur M B*lznni».
X It was received by the ancestors of the «wner
X from Mr. Jam's Harbour. Minister of the United
X States to t^ondon. about IS3O
X To Be Ml
♦ THIRS. A>D KBI. EVESISGS
# . AT » O'CLOCK.
World Famous Mariani Tonic
Especially useful in Nervous
Troubles. Malaria. Consump
tion. Overwork. Indigestion,
La Grippe, General Debility.
All Druggists. Refuse Substitutes.
European MapsfBRENJANOsi
tfui Guide Btr^l^'o* ***■*■
*

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