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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, April 13, 1902, Image 10

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SPORT S
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GOLF.
THE VAN rr.RTI.ANDT PARK LINKS
EHatfMSGBD OS OPEKiSG r»AV
MANY IMrROVKMKNTS
HADE.
It wopenln* day at the Van Oartiandt Tark
link* yesterday, and everything looked a- spicK and
span 'as a new laid lawn. The ground ha been
CTtatlv improved a* a result of the month en
forced closinK. and. thouph many improvements
are still to be made, those who played yeMerd aJ
peeraed well satisned with what had been «xwn
ptM^. Superintendent Moor, baa bad ■ force «l
forty vim at work for the last ten days, and h- in
tends to keep them at it until ■ ecTtaln. to done
•Th* weather has ;-..-. r leaitlM us or we would
have man* ■ better showinc." he explained. "The
ground ha» been Me wet to to nri.h rolllnp. but
an outcroppins: stones; have been removed, the
underbrush has been cleared up and two new
arreene have been laid. From what I have heard
to-day I think the powers are satisfied that we are
<Jolnp our best for them."
Superintendent Peters of the Park Board, who
-wa* present to see» that the crowds were properly
handled. Joined in expressing The same opinion.
The now p<>lf house had been thoroughly renovated
tor the occasion, and a pleasant surprise to the
visitors was the announcement that hereafter the
lockers for both men and women are to be free
Rooms have '.. . r. provided on the second tor of
the building, and lockers may be obtained upon ap
plication. Men were at work yesterday rela> ing
the paths leading to the house and mi ? k ' nfr t "^
furroundin* lawns r.ady for the flower beds that
are to be laid as soon as the weather permits.
On the links itself matt has "'!. done tolm
prove the polflr.R possibilities of the park. About
five hundred yards have been added to the course
at the old fourteenth hole, though the new pround
will not be ready for play for another month. On
the elphth and ninth noies new preens have been
laid, and on the first hole the fair a- Teen has been
widened hy filling in the former unsiphtly ditches
The entire eighteen holes were opened to the pub
lic yesterday, and more than two hundred T'la>e"
took advantage of the opportunity^of acquainting
themselves with the new work. No cadd j. es £ a £
been prodded by the superintendent, and ea.
SStatea™ of visitors was obliged l to F^t with
out boys to carry the club*, but this wt-.K Mr.
Moore promises to have an ample force on hand.
' OPENING PAT at RICHMOND COUNTY-
The Richmond County Ceutitry Club of Staten
Island opened its links for the first time yesterday
' and scores of players were out. The full nte ™
holes were in order for the cay's tournament, and
' £,ore than twenty complete cards were returned.
The cont-t was a medal play handicap for Classes
i A and B. Following are the scores:
CLASS A.
Gross. Handicap. Set.
K. P. nmnvms £i : £
•7. W. lowre y r\ - y ,
«- c. n rapton :::::::::«» i ™
t E. O. Schovler "• \ g •
. O. L. Williams *2 „ 101
L H.Thomas g» - ]<]
• C A. Willis •« - •»
J.P. rottrpii }\\ * "J
■ A. K. Paters en "♦ • "*
CLASS B.
. K. S. Walk-. Jr - »= « »i
F. L.. Huirl-F "-JJJ }*
W. H. SlaTt.ack JOJ = J 1
. W. P. Uiraed J" 1" \ ( '\
P. p. a. Buckim .--Ig I* ]"}
W. Her* Plmps-^n JM 1«
H. P. Playback 122 * »w»
ON THE DTKER MEADOW LINKS
An eighteen hole medal handicap was played yep
♦-rday at the Dyker Meadow Golf Club links. In
■which many of the members took part, although
or.lv thirteen cards were handed in. The winner
•was F. J. Philips, who also tied S. B. Beckwith
for the best rtoss score prize. The scores follow:
Qtwa. Handicap. Net.
„ T. J. Phillip- £• B £*
.P. B Berkwith *" 1' "5
E. \. Kulbfleifrh. 1r 102 1« ««
A. H. PM »f> 11 i X
' William .Tar\-1(« 1"7 17 flr.
• v- .1 r^dde, le» 1C »1
T-: 1 .1 rhnuncev «> » »*
. J. W. Mcßrlde ' 113 IP M
- /. 1, v rrte 101 « S" 1
I',. K. '••—, -• . 1<"« 14 P5
■ JT V. Waldnn 113 17 W
J. R. (SithrMltW 115 18 " 7
• John M. Power, 11* 14 100
U. OF PENX. TEAM DEFEATED.
;" • IBT TELEr.RAPH TO THE TKIFtTXE. 1
Philadelphia. April YL— The University of Penn
sylvania polfers were defeated by the Philadelphia
Cricket Club yesterday by the score of ■ to 7.
The playing: of Harold McFarland for the collegians
and A. H. Smith, a former Philadelphia champion,
lor the Cricket Club, was of a high order. Score:
CRICKET asm. I PENNSYLVANIA.
J. I. Lineair in T> F. "V\'!Uard o
C P. weaver OH B. McFarland 2
Howard Perr<n < T. D. Smith o
L.. H. Smith , S'H. K. Hill 0
A 11. Remlnrton «V P. N. Ctewruei — O
W. C. Houston . * A. C. Williams «
■ 3. HasFe 11J G. U-d-av. Jr 0
W. M. Lame 1 <■"*<•!] Calvtrt 0
Jacob Dlsston. 0 O H. Perry Pepper 2
W. T. Brown ." G»orpe Phlller. Jr .... 0
ilajor W. *:. G«odman... OH. D. Pratt 3
Total ■"•"' Total 7
FIRST DATS PLAT AT PINEHTJRST.
Plnehurpt, N. C^Ap ril — Th» second united
North and South' open golf tournament, which
opened yesterday on the Plnehurst links, began
•with great enthusiasm and many entries from all'
■parts of the country. In the qualification rounds
for handicap medal play some excellent scores
-were made. These rounds were of thirty-six holes,
and -were played In the morning and afternoon.
Of the first sixteen qualifying for the champion
ship for best cross score. Mr. Barnes. New-Haven
Golf Club, of New-York, was the winner. J. EC.
Rurnfcaugh, Swannanoa Country Club, of Ashevllle,.
N. C . 'won the cup for beat net score. The prizes
for the tournament consist of eight silver cups,
presented by Leonard Tufts, of Boston. The pool
tournament, which has been held here, closed last
night, the cup winner being George Cleveland, at
-York.
Following are the scores of the sixteen con
testing' oil the opening day for the handicap medal
play:
Gross. Met '• Gross. Net.
M Barnes 162 l.V> r. L. Shepoari .Mi 17«
C R. Corey ]*» NT. U B. Ward well IS6 IT»>
J. E. Ruirbaujrh 172 164 1 H. C. Brlders 187 1&>
K. I*. Malby 174 Mi <'. L. White IS7 IM>
E. A. ThomtH»OT! . 181 17* W. E. Fisher 19S IS<»
E. A. Manic* 1*« IT? 1 A. C Gurrett IM 180
J. C. B. Dane:.. INI 178 H. SUllnian lf»S lsr,
C E. HaJ«tosa IM 171 1 A. C. Ketcham . 1»» ISI
PRINCETON DEFEATS BALTUSROU
The Princeton golf team made its first appear
ance of the season yesterday against the Bahusrol
team. The match was play d on the latter'a links
«t Short Hills, and resulted in favor of the Prince
ton men by a Hore of 1* to 16. The summary:
PRINCETON. BALTUSROU.
F. O. Relnhart Sjßoy I>> Rmiamea .. .. O
V Pro, 24 <• J. A. Tyng 4
11. Wilson OIL. P. Bayard Jr I,
J. W. K&ker 3 Allan Ker.r.aday «
G. Brokaw 3 T. T. Reid 0
I* m Coaklln a c J. J. l* Ral»me« 4
I eta. jr OH. K. Voter.. 3
L. B. O*rret»on <> \v Vanderpool 0
H. P. ?mith „ S|R. W. Caadler ..." 0
M. Ol>-ph«nt | U, H Graham w
Total lv Total la
CONTESTS AT J.AKKWOOIX
Lakewo«vl. N. J.. April 12 (Special).— Eight pairs
of golfers took part in to-day's mixed game handi
cap at the Country Club, two cups having been
given to the winning pair by Mis« Maude I. Park
and Miss Edith M. Ambrose. A high wind pre
vented low scores, and the 9* card turned in by
Miss B. Andrews and Ml Moller. jr.. the only
scratch pair listed, represented sterling golf under
existing conditions. That card had an easy margin
;is winner, and the summaries follow:
Mis* B. Andrews and John Miller. Jr.:
Out 8 4 4 7 « 5 4 & 4—474 — 47
in 8 3 4 7 6 .'. 5 6 «, — 62^-4*
Groaa. H'olp. Net.
Mie« Sophie Downer and C H. Robttlns. .107 3 104
Sirs. St. John Smith and A. McKim 11.1 V 104
Miss Uu Downer and >„ \i.. C. I»ino...]].'i s 107
Mrs. John Uttl* and B. F. Ituttcm 126 1- ion
MkM M&rion Tracy and Chan. A. I.'.ni!«-y.ll::{ 14 lon
Mlh* H 1.. McPherßOn and W. K. Marcus. 111 «- IK.
>!.«• Maude I. Hark and T. W. Peamall . . 128 lii 110
The gale discouraged the handicap field at the
golf club and there were more withdrawals than
j score cards bulletined. A. J. McClure, of Albany
Country Club, was the net winner, and John M I
l»r. jr.. came In for gross and second net honors.
Cards:
<Jro»s. H'fip. Net.
'A.. J. McClure. Albany Country »7 JO >-7
John Mol!»r Jr.. Ap&wamls :>." 4 sn
Jasper Lynch, Uakewood Golf «4 4 i»i
J. J. O'l»-o<-.j,u«-. Jr.. Fos Hills »$ *- HO
H. L. Phillips. Fox UllJa ft« >- t«p
•% «V fc*lternc*i. North J «rsey 103 12 I' 1 .
BASEBALL.
HARVARD DEFEATS VIRGINIA IN AN EX
CITING GAME.
[BT TF.LEGSAPH TO THE TRIF.CNE-]
Washington. April 12.-Society turned out In large
numbers to see Harvard beat Virginia University
to-day by the score of 11 to 8. President Roosevelt
had expected to attend i .he game, but he was
unable to do bo Miss Alice Roosevelt. Miss Ruth
Root and Mr* Cowk-s. the President's sister, were
present and took ■ lively interest in the contest
from the start. Harvard earned a victory by su
perior all around playing. For four innings only
thirteen Virginia batsmen faced Stillman. and tal
lied only one run BtUlman weakened in the next
Inning and two bases on balls with four sin&'f«
KOred two runs, two Virginians being caught out
on ,he bVsoI Vl ; irk*on succeeded Stillman in tne
Mxt' innirg and was extremely wild. Three bases
on ba sVn^n home run scored four more runs lor
Vireinii Virginia"* last run resulted from a wo
ta?pr and two wild pitches. Harvard earned
moVt of her runs by clean hitting. In which StlU
™n <• ark-on Kernan and Coolidge figured. Har
vard" was particularly strong with men on bases.
«£ o " Vir^nia's base runners being thrown cut
between lw«. Kernan caught In fine style for
Harvard Score: R H E
_, 11"»41OO2 x—llx — 11 12 2
vfrS- .■-•-..• •.•-•.•••■ l n 0 O 2 4 1 5 O_B .5 J
gSSSi « lmi<lre--'AI." Orth. Tin,-> of game-Two
boon «n<i thinv minutes.
YALE. 14: WESLBYAN. 2.
[BT TELEGRAPH To THE TRIBUNE.]
New-Haven. Conn.. April 12.- Yale won from
Wcsleynn University in an Interesting game at
Yale Field this afternoon, showing some ragged
work in fielding, but batting more heavily than
any Vale team in recent years Garvan. A ale s
c?-ick Pitcher was In the box. and held the vis tors
down To three scattered hits, fielding his position
well \ L At first base two new men were tn.Mi-
Hazenwinkie and UtUefleld-bOth of whom batted
and Slaved well. The Yale base running was a
feature For Wesleyan. Chapman, who went Into
the box in 'he fifth inning, pitched much better
££ than Hume, allowing three hits to Hume s
five. The score by Innings: n & &
Yal* ...."> I .", 0(t 2 0 0 — 14 7 4
. . M -.\::v:::.v::l> 0 ■■ ■■ » - • • °- 2 3 M
DRSINUS !<: NEW-YORK UNIVERSITY, 8.
Ohio Field was the scene of a closely contested
game yesterday between Urslnus an.l New-York
University. The local team secured four runs in
the first inning, but were tied in the third by
Creinus The lead then alternated until it stood
B to Sat the beginning of the ninth inning. With
two men out and the bases empty Urslnus scored
the winning run on a single and a double ;N; N e , w "
York played a fast, snappy field game, but failed
to solve "Townsend for the necessary hits. Ihe
honors of the game fell to Farringer for a good
stop and to Connelly for clean, active fielding. The
COTe: R. H. E.
rr ,; nus 004 102 1O I— i» 13 3
N-"w-York University. 4 ••iso« • OS 11 6
DE LA BALLS. 14: COLUMBIA FRESH
MEN. a
The De La Salle Institute baseball team defeated
the Columbia University freshmen at Columbia
Oval. Williamsbridge. yesterday, by a score of 14
to « The De La Salle boys played a clean, fast
game, and took a decided lead in the beginning of
the game by a combination of good batting ana base
running and by the errors of the collegians. The
score by Innings was as follows:
De Ia Pall* 3 5 10 2 12 0 O— 14 $>' 3
Oolumtia Univ.. '06.0 01100022— « . S
Batteries — Kirk and Cestfllo: Connell and Cooper.
PHILADELPHIA (A. L,». 21: PRINCETON. 4.
Philadelphia, April 12 (Special).— The Philadelphia
American League team had little trouble in defeat
ing the Princeton nine here to-day. The game was
practically lost in the first two innings. Princeton
made a poor showing in the field. The score fol
lows: R. H. E.
Phlladrinhla II !!512S!~ J ?m I
Princeton • 1 • I <> • 2 • •— 4 11 S
Batteries Plank. Bernhard, Steelman ami Powers;
Stevens and Green.
LEHIGH, 9; COLUMBIA, 6.
[BY TEI.KC.RAPF TO THE TRIBrNT-]
Bethlehem. Perm.. April After Lehlgh had
batted Grant out of the box In the sixth inning,
Tyler fared no better, and Columbia was easily
beaten. Taylor, who pitched the last three Innings
for L^high. struck out six men, and allowed only
one hit. Score: rh&
Columbia 1 • 1 2 0 2 0 " o—6 10 2
Lehlch I 0 0 8 0 4 0 2 x— B 10 4
Batteries Grant. Tyler and Goodman; Sellers. Fara
bauEh. Taylor and LJli'V.
PENNINGTON SEMINARY WINS A GAME.
Pennington. N. J.. April 12 (Special).— The Pen
nlngton Seminary baseball team won Its first game
of the season here to-day from Stewart's nine, from
Trenton, by a score of*l4 to 4. O'Hanlan's three
base hit was the feature- The score:
R. H. E.
Pennln«rton Seminary.. 2 2 0 0 0 0 5 f> x— l 4 9 6
Trenton 0 « 3 1 0 0 0 0 o—4 4 8
Batteries — O'Hanlan and Hart; Keller and Bodlne.
MANHATTAN, 10: TRINITY COLLEGE. 1.
The game at Jasper Field yesterday afternoon
was one-sided, and Manhattan College easily de
feated Trinity College by the score of 10 to 1. The
local collegians batted strongly and made eighteen
hits off of Goodrich, who twirled for the visitors.
Their stick work was effective. Murphy, who
pitched for Manhattan, puzzled the Trinity boys
with his delivery. The score:
R. H. E.
Trinity *» 0 (• << "> " © 1 —14 5
Manhattan 2 •*■ « 2 0 0 1 0 x— lo 18 2
Batteries -Ooodrtck and tiP.i-ierßon; Murphy. KJlroy and
Puff.
LAFAYETTE. 17: RUTGERS. 3.
IBT TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBUNE. 1
Easton. Perm., April 12.— Lafayette opened the
baseball season on the home grounds to-day by de
feating Rutgers 17 to .':. There was a heavy wind
blowing, makirg good fielding impossible. La
fayette's stick work «vas far superior to that of
Rutgers. Score:
R. H. E.
Lafayette 3 9 0 1 0 0 211 x— IT 10 4
Rutiter? 1 • 0 0 O 0 • O 2—32 — 3 7 12
Balterleß— Johnson and Irwln: Smith. Danßrermond aiid
Hltchner.
NEW-YORK. IS: C. C. N. V., 5.
A one sided game was played In the bleak breezes
at the Polo Grounds yesterday between the New-
York professionals and the team from the College
of the City of New-York. The professionals won
as they pleased. Mathewson pitched in his first
game for the professionals, and in the five innings
he managed to strike out seven batsmen. The
boys, however, scored two runs. Dupee and Thiel
man pitched each two innings. The score:
R. H. E.
New-York 1 3 O 0 4 1 7 1 I— is 10 «i
C. C S. V O 0 1 1 0 3 • 0 0 — 4 12
Batteries — Mathewson. Dupe?. Thielman and Teager;
Sullivan and Kebler.
PRINCETON FRESHMEN WIN A GAME.
Princeton. N. J.. April 12 (Special).— freshman
baseball nine opened the season here to-day by de
feating the Central High School team, of Philadel
phia, by the score of 12 to 3. The Quaker City boys
played a fast game, but failed to find Dunscombe's
curves for more than five hits. Brown and YVyckoff
«lid the heaviest hitting for the freshmen, and
Stevens put up the best work for the visitors. The
score:
R. H. E.
Freshmen 0 0 <• 0 2 7 0 3 x— l 2!i 3
Central High School. 1 0 <> 0 O 0 A 0 2— 3 5 3
— Dunncombe and Young; Grave*. CaJdwell and
Stevens. c
A GAME AT GARDEN CITY.
The baseball nine of the Cathedral School of St.
Paul>. at Garden City, lined up this afternoon at
Garden City with the team of Brown's Business
College, of Brooklyn, and was defeated after a
close and exciting game by a score of 1 to 0. The
work of the batteries and especially that of the
pitchers was good.
HAMILTON T<» JOIN NEW YORK TEAM.
"Hilly " Hamilton, the fieetfooted outfielder, who
has piayed in PoetOll sir.cc i«Ki. has signed with
the N-w-Y<i,-k team.
GAMES ON OTHER FIELDS.
At Providence — Providence, 4: Brown Uni
versity, 2.
At \\ orcrsier— Tufts, 2: Holy Cross. 1.
At Amherst-Amherst, 7; Williston. «■
A: West Point— West Point, 2; Union. 1.
At Philadelphia— Pennsylvania. 15; Carlisle Ind
; lans, 0.
At Philadelphia— Philadelphia (National League),
11: Villa Nova. 1. • -U ,
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. SUNDAY. APRIL 13. 1902.
LACROSSE.
ORANGE DEFEATS COLLEGE OF CITY OF
NEW- YORK— INJURED.
The lacrosse same at the Orange Oval yesterday
afternoon between the Orange Athletic Club and
the College of the City of New-York was a spirited
one, Orange winning by the scor»- of 7 to 1. The
game was Interrupted early by a mishap to or
bach. of the collegians, who fell and injured his
shoulder. He was out of the game terr-rori-rily.
but after Dr. Grleschen, of the Orange uub, lad
attended to him. he revived and pluekily continued
Five minutes alter play be^an Miller scored a
coal and shortly afterward Stewart scored the
first and only goal for the visitors. The play
throughout the first half was loose, but lively play
and spirit.-d team work characterized the second
half the play of Miller, Simpson. Gioschen and
Mclntyre being especially good. Five goals were
scored by Orange so rapidly that the collegians
were badly rattled and fumbled the ball. Opportu
nities for goal were missed by Norman and Solow.
Gieschen mad,- three of the live proa Is. and the
others were scored by Miller and Mclntyre. Ihe
lineup:
Orange. Position. College City. N.^\
Cremiii .7 .".".".'.".'.".r0ver 'point Fauerbacb
Ilo™d"r .....Cover p.Mnt "»™
J/X . . .First defence Sailer
si^JMt •'-•--. . -Second defVe. Hamilton (OSteWt)
VaaderbUt (Newman). . ..Third defence .■■.: t^
Comreehall ...Centre.... A. M»-wn.t
•=;inii)«.'n ".".' Third attack D Bolo«
KSSSSv...: bjco~s ">r k XT"K T" : "n
Mclntyre Outside home „' . lrri ,
Miller ...'.'.. :::.:: : S^:::::.v. M. 23S
Goal umpire. C. Stewart. Oakes; referee. H. Solow:
timekeeper. Mohor.
CRESCENT A C. CLUB BEATS STEVENS.
The Crescent Athletic Club defeated the Stevens
Institute In an exciting game of lacrosse on its
grounds at Hay Ridce yesterday. The first half
ended 4 to 1 In favor of the Crescents. In the
lecond half each team made two more points, mak
inp the score 6 to 3.
HORSES A\~n CARRIAGES.
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT? NEW VEHICLES
NOTES FOR HORSEMEN.
Two luxurious carriages have recently been re
ceived at the "White House for the use of the
President and his faintly. They came from .the
Studebaker establishment. Broadway and I'rince-
Rt New-York, and were selected by President
Roosevelt. The more imposing of the two vehicles
is the ceremonial carriage, a feather front landau
It is trimmed in dull blue K<>atskin, with] dickey
seat and head lining covered with Wue^othV%Boot
and body panels and the Rear a lighter shade, of
finfe, sTrip"d with black. The Interior fltttngs in
clude speaking tube, combination cardcase and
tablet, mirrors, etc.
J B. Brewster & Co.. In old Gerard Build
ing Broadway and Forty-ninth-st.. yielding to the
prevailing demand for pneumatic road wagon*.
have pot up a wagon of this character on the
lines of their "Thoroughbred wagon," so popular
ve-.r«< aro It has the Brcwster earmarks and
finish h The company has received so many orders
lor these wagons that it is hard to keep them
In stock but a sample or two can now be seen
in their warerooms. All horsemen should examine
them.
Basket vehicles, victorias nnd pony trnp» ar»
bein* displayed in variety at the wareroomn of
Jame- w. Renwick. In Forty-slxth-st., Just west
of Broadway. Mr. Renwi-k says that in ap!t«j of
th* had weather he his sold n number of .hose
vehicles In the past we. k.
Tho principal attraction of W. H Gray's Woos
ter-st showrooms In these spring days is the cut
under runabout and the stylish depot wa K on.
ATHLETICS AT CORNELL.
CONFIDENCE EXPRESSED IN TRACK AND
BASEBALL TEAMS -A SUCCESS
FUL TRIP SOUTH.
The track athletes at Cornell will begin this week
active training for the annual relay carnival to be
held by the University of Pennsylvania on April K.
Instead of entering the relay championships, Cor
nell will send men to compete in the special track
and field contests. The men most likely to be
taken to Philadelphia are Rogers. '04. and Porter.
•05 ehot putters: Kctchum. "04. who won the high
hurdles against Princeton last May; Knapp. 03,
who has cleared nearly six feet in the high jump,
and Frederick. 03. the pole vaulter.
The damage done to the track at Percy Field by
the winter Hoods is now being repaired, and tho
track will be used for the lirst time next week. A
new cinder bedding has been laid In both the
quarter-mile circle and the straightaway, and the
entire track has been resurfaced.
Cornell's track schedule for this spring will in
clude an open handicap meet at Ithaca .i dual
meet with Pennsylvania, and the annual intercol
legiate meet. The Princeton meet, which has here
tofore been an annual competition, is to he dropped
this year, because no satisfactory place to hold it
can be found. Both the Pan-American Stadium at
Buffalo and the Young Men's Christian Association
field at Albany were considered but 'for neither
could suitable arrangements be mad.- A challenge
for a dual meet has been sent to the University of
Chicago, and Hooker, the manager. is now corre
sponding with that university.
Tlugh Jennings, coach of the baseball team, said
recently in an interview: "The baseball team has
new" had a more satisfactory trip South. The
teams we play.-d were stronger this year than last.
too Our piu-hers were in splendid form, the bat
tng was excellent, and the whole aggregation
nLsfedtOKether remarkably well. The hits were
bunch-d as they should be. The defeat of the
Cornell team by Clemson was a fluke, for the
CorZn t«E? defeated North Carolina by the score
of k to 1 and that university defeated s Clemson by
a good margin?" Jennings said that he wished to
retract all the bad things he said about th- team
at the recent junior "smoker." He has much con
fidence that the team will prove to be exceptionally
strong.' ' .
CONTESTS AT COLUMBIA GRAMMAR
SCHOOL.
The annual gymnastic competition of Columbia
Grammar School was held in the school gymnasium
on Friday afternoon. The competition consisted of
exercists on the horizontal bar. swinging rings and
parallel bars, with rope climbing. Robert Piel, of
the first form, proved himself to be the best all
around gymnast, and won the gold medal, with
Walter Belnecke second Silver medals were offered
to the best gymnast in each form, and were
awardtd as follows: Fourth form. Walter Bem
ecke: third form, John Andrcsen. and second form,
Arthur Piel. The judges were Robert Stolla.nl
A. A. Manrara. of the New- York Athletic club,
and A. B. De Young, of the Knickerbocker Athletic
Club. While the judges were making their deci
sion. Messrs. Mitchell and Keating gave an ex
hibition of boxing, and Professor Whowcll. director
of the gymnasium, with some of his pupils, per
formed several dimcult exercises for the entertain
ment of the spectators.
HAMILTON TO RKTIRX TO LEAGUE.
Clinton. N. V.. April 12.— Hamilton College to-day
vot«»d to accept the invitation to rejoin the Fnter
eollegiate Athletic Association of New-York State,
from which it withdrew two years ago because of
a quarrel with Union. There is DO provision in the
acceptance of the invitation which would bar Union
from again Joining, and the sentiment here is In
£a.vor of resuming athletic relations with L'nion.
T. '.*.'.,>. *. .',>; i ii
THE SBENANDOAR LAUNCHED
GIBSON FAHXESTOCK'S YACHT SENT
INTO THE WATER AT SHOOT
ERS ISLAND.
The schooner yacht Shenaudoah. ™&'*-™£™*
tion at Shooters island by the Townsend-Downej
Shipbuilding Company for Gibson |^«gfg«;
launched yesterday rrom the ways on the right of
the shed from which the German E^gJt^J
was sent Into the water a little more than a .month
ago Those who attended the launching of the
llf§il|§i
the ceremony. ' „. .r , t b i.
The launching party was taken to Shooter. I*l
and on the tug A. A. Sumner. which arr v.- d th r
shortly before 11 o'clock, the hour JJ^JJJS
ceremony. All was in readiness »^£«H » »
with flags gayly flying.
'York about l o'clock. _■ z Ftaar< . were Gibson
Among those on laancWng »m M ar«ue-
Fahnestock. Mrs. I' 8 " 11 '- ™ "j H Cuthbert. R
rite, D. O. Brown. %^-J^\l'^nU. Dr. Vande
wateToenorai and^^rson^^^^
ov^aU.^ S on th,
water line. 27. feet beam. •'»«£% t whlto enamel
SXffiS J??h gol^and S?2So« work is to be
of mahogany.
KAVAHOB MAY BE MADE A SCHOONER.
ills I
A ,C«~a>: th<- I^V^/ h % X Fn"™mVon Commodore Wat
u-or and probably.the g£ a fj_^£ oe> haa re-engaged
„,, .1... • „<* owner ot tne -^ .^t nresent there la
ll Si iv r 'tn,^ge n o "-can.'and will soon be
more can p-*'^' l^'
ready tn start. .
A NEW SCHEME FOB RACING YACHTS.
The council of the Yacht Racing Union of the
Creat IXTw»H meet at Detroit to-morrow to con
fer the report of the special committee In regard
to the construction or racing yacht. This com
'„;„ met last week at Hamilton. Canada, and
settled on a new scheme which is believed to In
sure the building of a better class of boat,. One
a "m in this plan is to avoid the calculation* and
£rts n> nS?y m^et and See on such even terms a»
contribute to the best racing.
THE OISEAT) A SPEEDY CRAFT.
The speedy Herreshoff racer that Is to be sent
from the yards of Frank Word. City Island, to
Kiel measures 24 feet I<^ Inches on the waterllne.
and may certainly be regarded as a rapresentaUv«
American racer. She has sometimes ha i a mis
hap, which created for the day a blank in her
ra<-insr record, but for three seasons she has been
a practically unbeaten boat, being excellent in light
airs and also fairly fresh breezes. Things were not
ho easy for her in last summers racing, as sh.> was
pretty well caught in the later designing, but still
there will be few who will expect her to be de
feated by anything that Germany or England >ai\
produce In her class. She has sometimes lone
better than th*> Herreshoff 70-footers when nailing,
of course In a different elnss. in same conditions
and waters.
Her record, as gfren by 'Manning's Tacbt Reg
ister," shows. In ISSft. the year of her debut, four
teen races. In which she took nine first prizes, three
seconds and two blanks Her second year, speak
ing from recollection, was about equally and
she was always handled at th.> top notch by h.-r
owner, the celebrated amateur. .). Rog.-rs Max
well, president of the Central Railroad of New-
Jersey, or by one of his sons. In. purchasing the
01c,. ; ,"u for sum.' good sport at the imperial re
«ait:is in Germany. Isaac Stern, of the New- York
Yacht Club, makes no mistake, and when be ac
companies her in his huge steam yacht, the Vir
ginia, the little .raft will compete under stylish
attendance.
Captain Leander Jeffrey, the Bkipper of the Vir
ginia, will sail the small flyer He is a yachtsman
.rf the older school. He was formerly the ski;>!>.-i
of the schooner Columbia, which in IS7I success
fully defended the Mv Cup, and is still kept in
commission by her present owner. Commodore Jo
seph De F Junkin, of Philadelphia. The name of
the Oiseau has given much trouble to people who
are not French scholars, and in city Island she is
called the "Wah-zoo." but whenever a new boat
has attempted to raise her out .if her gloi i. s she
generally makes good her nickname. "Oh-I-see
you."
l>]\K;iiT school GAMES.
CONTEST? HBLD \T TWELFTH RKOIMENT AR
MORY MANY SPECTATORS PRESENT.
The.Dwight School games were held yesterday ai
the 12th Regiment Armory. The entry list wa> ;
large, and furnished several exciting contests. The
armory was filled with the relatives and iriends of
the competitors. The summaries.
Sixty-yar.l dasb — Won by A. Cellar. Horac« Mann
School; M. Bamejr, XaviW "Pr.p." second; H. C Fe!d
man. I'wiKht. third. Time. <»:i>«; 4 .-..
Eight luin.irni-an.i-elKluy-yunl run— Won by H. B*eor a
St. Haul's; J. T. EtIIBCWOOd, Uwiu'lit. second; C. U. Mac
dunal'l, Uiir'iard. third. Tim.'.
Three-hundrpd-yaril run — Won l>> A. r?fllar. Horace
Mann; M. Rulney Xuvier "Pwp," second; F. C. Herr.
BoyB 1 High, third. Time. 0 3'H-
Twelve-pound shot — Won oy J. A. Munn. Kast Orange,
B0 ft. 9 In.: A. K. tftaee. St. PaaTa, 39 ft. 2'a !n.. si-c
ond; 1^ D. Kl.ms Dwight. tB ft. "•• in., third.
Hl?h Jump— Won by M. B. T.K.ker. Newark Academy,
5 ft. 3*4 in.; C. M. Rish..p. AdeU'lil Academy. 5 !l. -J In.
second; S. U Miller. Trinity, 5 ft. 1 \ In., third.
Four-hund.-vd-and-forty-yard novice — W..n by D. Wood.
Trinity: A C. Bcktow. Newark High, second; W. Fran
cisco. Dwißht. third. Time. l:<>l*fc.
one mile run — Won by H. Secor. St. Paul's; J. T.
Pilgrim. New-York Military Academy, second; R. S.
Patterson. Pwifcht. third. Time. 4:£2.
TIME AMI MOXEY.
It inny post you n llltl«* time and money,
bat < It in I* lit nave you many dollam. for
nhat yon need may be found In the little
advertisement* in narrow column s.
Worses anb Carnages.
J li THE STAMP OF EXCELLENCE" d*&
i HARNESS J&
El SI lift Leather Traveling Goods. ** \ jl^
|| &™ I I Workshops in England and America. I ■ 1 IB
jli The best both countries can produce. I |
isSslO Mark Cross Co., || llu
1 1 1 ft, 253 BROADWAY, N. Y. I U
ft RJB *iP (Opposite City Hall.) * |
/ 2?+o^Z"* boston: MMaMeli / >« -CAtA
<»0/^QO»* SO Summer St. 97 Sew Bond St.. W. **C/i^DO~
Send for our Illustrated Catalogues witn Price Ust ana Duy direct.
AMERICAN RUBBER WORKS CO..
New York Office. No. 277 BROADWAY.
CYCLING.
W. R. PITMAN RIDES rENTI'RY ON
PIFTT-THIRD BIRTHDAY— NOTES
AND roMMF.N'TS.
Few men celebrate their fifty-third birthday as
W. K. i'itman di.l yesf-n'.ny. Mr. Pitman arose
early, saw that his bicycle, a chainl-^s coaster
br.ike, was in Koo.l order, and then proceeded to
ri.le a century, as he has done on his birthday for
mnny years. Not satisfied with this exercise. Mr.
Pitman reports that he rode down to the shore and
took a swim in the. chilling waters of Great South
Hay. Mr. Pitman left hi* home, in Sixty-ninth-st..
at 9 a. m. yesterday, ar.d crossed over to Long
Island by way of the Thirty-fourth-st. Ferry. Then
he went out through the Hoffman Boulevard, to
Jamaica, to the Merrick Road, and on to Wast
Islip. With tho wind at his back he made the
WHX R. PTTMAN 1 .
Who ro.le a century on his fifty-third Wrthday.
trip of forty-five miles in three hours. Comlns:
back he had the v.md in his teeth, and it took six
hours for him to ride back to Bedford Rest, the
distance being forty-one miles. He attended a
dinner given by wheelmen in Brooklyn last night,
and finished up the century on his ride back to his
home in this city at a late hour. .., . .
Mr Pitman's cycling days began in 15,.. and he
ha- been an enthusiastic devotee of the sport ever
since He won the firsi bicycle race held in this
country at Brockton, Mass., winning three heats In
So.'. 347 and 3:. r ->. He Is one of th« founders of the
League of American Wheelmen, being one of th*»
twenty-two charter members living. Mr. Pitman Is
also a veteran of the Civil War. and he looks as
hale and hearty as he did twenty years ago.
Whether or not a woman rider mny with pro
priety take part in a coasting contest was a sub
ject which greatly exercised the last meeting of
the Metropole Cycling Club. The question was
raised by the application of m wheelwoman for an
entry blank for the club's coasting contest in
Boulevard Lafayette on May 10. Mr. Ibbeken.
chairman of the committee, of No. IS West One
hundred-and-twenty-fourth-st.. to whom the appli
cation was made, asked for instructions regarding
such entries, and personally expressed himself as
favoring them. Opposition promptly manifested
its.-if. and for half an hour the discussion was
spirited. The opposition based its objections on the
ground that women competitors would give rise to
false impressions, and renew .some of the resent
ment provoked by the female scorchers on century
runs 'The other side maintained that to open th»
contest to women would be to promote a delightful
sport free from exertion, unpleasant spectacles or
results and which, with the coaster brakes now In
use. could be Indulged in safely and de.orotisly.
This side also raised the point that there could be
nothing more unladylike about a coasting con
test than there Is about a horse show, "riding 10
hounds" or ■ golf or a tennis match. In each of
which women take part without offending good
taste or public opinion.
After a long wrangle the question was left for
woman hertelf to decide She Wai barred from,
competing with the men. but if a sufficient number
of wneelwomen manifest a desire to participate
Mr Ibbeken and his committee were authorized to
add -i special contest for them, for which special
prizes will be offered. At the same meeting seven
new members were elected, bringing the member
ship close to the one hundred mark. A committee
was also appointed which will report the feasibility
of conducting the opening race meet at Manhattan
Beach on ■ lance scale.
A rider who kept a r*cord of the. weather for six
months last year, from n cyclist's point of view.
found some interesting results The bast* of com
parison was .livid, d Into three conditions- coo.l
days, average .lays and days on which rain fell
continuously The day on wUen no rain fell was
ranked ai "^oo.l." md by "average" Is meant days
on which there were showers, but rot heavy enousrh
1,1 k.ep wnei linen fron-. ridinji. it happened that
there were afaowera OH tive Wednesdays in May
last year, yet not one of the show, rs made tho
roads impassable for McycleSL April was the worst
month of the year, having fourteen bad days, and
June was the best. With tw.iity-six good i.ys and
four average -lays Considering only good .la>s.
Friday was the worst, with only thirteen k<><>,l
days, but Its average for tne six months was
brought up somewhat by its number <>;' average
days— seven. With ten bad .lays and only three
average days, Monday was . a.-ily at the fool of the
list, tn good day-; Sunday was BOCOBd, while Mon
day. Wednesday and Saturday brooghi up the rear.
In average days. Wedn< -day. Friday and Saturday
were equal. ;i-< were Sunday and Thursday. Mas
day Jin.l Tii.sday were at the fo.it in this class.
Combining good end average .lavs. Thursday was
the best with 85 i>er cent; while under the same
rule Monday was last, with t'^l per cent.
With unproved weather conditions, the proba
bility increases that the interest In bicycling as a
pleasure will this year approach oldllme propor
tions. The crowds of two or three weeks ago. with
the weather still rather cool, promise Kreater
crowds in the future. After a year of rest then
will be a return to old pleasures by riders who be
came tired of the pastime. Those who rested last
season will be the enthusiasts of this seaso.i. The
work of road Improvement has been kept up. and
New-York has a greater variety of good roads
ci< aa at hand than ever before. There Is no sub
urban village without good roads. It is already
evident that touring will b- indulged !n to a large
extent Iris year. It Is In touring that the bicycle
is most useful to the city man. The national
bicycle organization* of Franc and Kngland have
made touring popular for many years: and the
proposed trip of New-York .xiemhers of the Leaput-
Of American Wheelmen to Atlantic City, at the
time of the leagut's rational gathering, is ■tffoadj
arousing interest among wheelmen here who bave
made extended trips.
Enthusiasm for the bicycle isi found this y -ar in
places wJure it is likely tr> do the most good. Any
one who visits John F. Clark., secretary-treasurer
of the New-York division, will not leave> him with
out hearing some of his good humor, caused, by the
fjorsea and Carriages.
*"pHF best Pneumatic
Tire in the world
for .Auto or Girracre,
NEVER PLNCTLRES,
lasts longer, rides bet
ter, and has no equal
for comfort or artistic
appearance.
We make higher rrade
tires of all description. Solid
or Pneumatic, for Auto-Car
ria^e or Bicycle, and sell
cheaper than any Company
in this country — AND we
GUARANTEE our good*.
LATEST HHIU.IIU
BASKET
[LJl^ . --
SUPERBLY FINISHED IN !:::A!'Tlf L COI/)R3.
RUNABOUTS,
ANY STYLE YOU DESIRE.
RENWICI
227. and 225 West 4«th »t.
just west of Broadway
J. M. QUINBY & CO.
Carriage Builders
COUPE ROCKAWATS.
PANEL.BCOT VICTORIAS.
STATION WAGONS. UN AH SIZE 3.
PONY CARRIAGES
Seasonable Carriages, second hand,
In good repair, prices reasonable.
Newark, N. J.
Opposite Lackawarna Station.
80 minutes from New York. Earclay or
Christopher Street Ferry-
VAN TASSELL & KEARNEY,
130 and 132 East 1 3th St.,
123, 125, 127, 129 East 12th St.
CARRIAGE REPOSITORY.
Finest display In New York of Carriages of v.. aifhsst
grade and meat fashionable designs.
BROUGHAMS, OMNIBUSES, VICTORIAS,
STATION WAGONS, WAGONETTES, TRAPS
CARRIAGES.
I. \KCEST STOCK IX I Hi; COC^TRY
of ur> to late, carriages, comprising all tie latest covti
dM Full i:r.e of horse good* at extrerueur law price*
Rubber urtn* a •P«^ 6T _ pp..H _ .. Mount veraoa
T"""NTIRK OUTFIT. — Sound, stylish black horse. I rears
Hi" old. ::>■• hand* high: perfectly gentle and su.tioie
for lady's driving; also rubber tlwd Spider Phaetcn:»g
holstered In blue cloth; almost new. WALDORB* aTOa-
AGE. Van Buren-»t and Broad-way. Brooklyn.
FOR SALK.— One Ertension Front a- ■■< '■■■ 3T'.u«ham.
one Victoria and one mail Phaeton. All !n •xcellmt
condition. Also a bay gelding-, six years, sixteen hands.
perfectly sound kind and fearless and taorousraly trained
fo"car?latr» and saddle use. Can b« wen a'- Hft.n«tt9
stable. 10 Baal la St.
I MM SALE. — Children's Shetland Por.v: e>ven har.ds:
' six years: sound and kind: towaer with ponr cart;
harness, saddle and bridle. Apply stable. 2?£ ■■•' ■«"■"-"•
F° X SAL PAIR BAT CARRIAGE HORSES, . ■ ..
iqxteen hands full: » un . and kind. Will be «>« 9l^r.
v-an be #een stable. 252 West 40th Street or wU b» shown
on request. Apply stable. 232 West *•"■- ■;•--■
Dirnclca.
STANDARD OF THE WORLD.
Tshe COLUMBIA
BICYCLE.
WE HAVE MI. .MODELS Vi STOCK.
>»-w York. Branch.
AMERICAN CYCLE MFG. CO,
12 \hi;i > ST.
boom in wheeling affairs this - M ™; vi T *s,,u^
of the official headquarter* In the \ar.d^Uu BJWi
Ing U charged with bicycle fever, and Mr Cla*K
believe? that t.be big sales of sldep^th tags mean
that riders are going wnere the rldinij is bes-
Wheelmen who did not Indulge in the pa3"S£
last year will find many delightful surprises
year Improvements in roads have gone v -hPt
rapidly." nd the abstainers of 1»1 will^ -■ >w .hji.
old enthusiasm when they see the < ?**BK*±l*g
year there were not many riders who *WJ*;J?I
evele paths of Long Island: now they will ftad new
pleasure in old places mada possible by road un
provement.
The rider who uses a coaster-brake. WEI probaMr
find the most use for It in New-Jerser trips. The
road from Elizabeth to miHHMliam presents
about as great an assortment of grades rasHlli»r as Hll i»
average rider will cara to encounter. The roaa ;i*
all macadam, but th {Trades are ■ severe. TSer.
is one walk of one mile and a half vp • J. ""JJ
vond German Valley. This is part of the sho.^sc
'route from Elisabeth to Delaware Water Oa» a..a
the distance 13 not more than seventy mLes.
Wheelmen in Brooklyn who go to the I.on* Island
roads by way of St. Mark's-ave.. Albany-aye. ana
Eastern Parkway may be tempted by the ne .
arphalt In St. Mark's-ave. beyond Albany^-
There Is no outlet to Eastern Parkway oeye»
Albany-aye.
According to reports that are current, the Ber
ing of the Associated Cycling Clubs to-morraw
night may be attended by an unwonted occurrence.
One Of the delegates, who holds a titled offlc*
has been expelled by his club for non-payment o
dues, and as under the rules of affiliation s^
member cannot remain In the Awocmied lU^
the otti.iil in question is placed in an J-"?^"? 3^
position, particularly as the club • hich ne offenoea
has instructed Its other deles^tea to insist on w»
rnforccment of the rule.
as AIRSniP xrn[\<;.
A delay in an important freight shipment ••
necessitate the postponement of the launching-
Frederic Thompson's airship Luna II at co:w
Island from Saturday Apr:l 12. ti> toaturdaj, a»*
19, according to Mr. Thompson.
tiKTTIS'r READY FOR TEXXIS »*** \
The Kings County Tennis Club, one of the old
est tennis clubs In Brooklyn, at St. Mark 1 * and
Kingston ayes.. is putting its grounds In eoad.t£.
for the opening games on the 15th inst. The follow
Ing officers have been elected to serve lor"
II Hill year: President. Dr. William >- Prase •
vice-president. Joseph T. McMahon: ««*S;
Chauncey L. Mitchell: secretary. H. Uv>
Chapman, and Dr. Frederick C. Koyce. I " «°^. an ,
Talbot. Henry Mollenhauer Hen n K. g£g aR d
Frank B. Hague. Frederick W H« l >4? th*
Frederick G. Anderson, additional members oi »—
board of directors. „ nr;>^ent
An enlargement and Improvements to tteP^
clubhouse are under way. and are «pe»-tea two
ready for the opening Jay. The club **» »* 0 * n ee.i
tournaments this year-an open event. an f S^t,
for June 2. ami the club handicap tournameni.
date to be announced later. • t j,a
Miss Bessie Moore, woman champion o.^
United States and a member of the club. will -* ren
her title.
TIME AM» MO3EV.
it may com >«»a m little time «i»d l **"' T
bat It mlKhl »nve you many doll M ' (^
what you need may be *ou«a In *»* M*lM * 1
mltrrli>rm<-nu in the a*rr«»w « " l "^-\« 1

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