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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, April 20, 1902, Image 1

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X ot - LXII -N o 20.244. NEW-YOBK. SUNDAY. ! APRIL 20, 1902.-2 PARTS, 28 PAGES. WITH ILLUSTRATED SUPPLEMENT. 16 PXGES. PRICE FIVE CENTS,
RflHDnre BOOSBVBLTi WITH TROOP A AS HIP ESCORT, ARRIVING AT
COLrMRIA COLLEGE.
NEWS OF WO CAPITALS.
LONDON.
ACTIVE PREPARATIONS FOR CORONA
TION CEREMONIAL.
COLOR SCHEME CAREFTLLY STJUDIED-IN
TEBEST IN BELGIAN AFFAIRS-THE
REVERSION FROM FREE TRADE.
«3opyrlf±t: 1902: By The Tribun* Association.)
[Special to The Tribune by French Cable.)
London. April 19.— Public interest in the coro
nation is now stimulated by the -well founded
hope that peace will be arranged early in June.
While the ceremonial and national fPte are not
dependent upon the conclusion of the war. the
• public rejoicing will be unclouded if peace reigns
within the empire. The coronation itself is al
ready planned In detail, and as carefully stage
managed as the costliest and most ingenious
theatrical spectacle. Ail the effects of color are
carefully studied. Th* gorgeous blaze of crim
son in the peeresses* robes will be enriched by
touches of violet in the gowns worn by the
princesses of the royal house and the rows
of gold lace in their mantles. These costumes
will include trains three yards in length, and
picturesque hoods lined with minever. The
n>aids of honor will also have a distinctive cos
tume of cloth of silver, in harmony with the
royal purple.
The order of the coronation has been settled.
but net formally approved. The coronation pro
: cession will follow the lines of the ceremonial of
-William IV. and the larger one on the following
day will closely correspond to the jubilee circuit.
London is already ir. the hands of carpenters,
who are erecting platfcnx*. balconies and stag
'_. «& «I1 kinds In xMf principal thoroughfares.
'There will be great gaps in Whitehall and the
Strand, where the new public buildings and
thoroughfares are in progress, but work »ill be
suspended in time for the construction of im-
TheYemand for the f-w large *»oue«s along the
route has run up price, to remarkable figures
in Carlton House Terrace and other favored lo
calities, but otherwise the coronation «*£»£
not materially higher than those of ordinary
yeirs.
The season has remained backward, even
£S the royal standard floating over Bucking
ham Palace. There has been a large part* t
Lansdowne House this week, and the « *il I
mother at
otherwise there gjjgg rnurt funct ions
dances for girls and bo>- «■ during May.
maii
■nllailT— for June have en >*"%: , cpg
OZ£Z : , rSln >«"r» need not £g
gsp *rsi£ gassfS
dtatalshed by the loci Prep.rat ons .very
vhere la prourew for celebrating the coron.
tior. by procM.IOM. services, pageants and
revelry.
The chief centre of foreign interest during the
week has been Belgium, where the experiment
of throwing the entire weight of organized la
bor into politics has menaced the welfare and
peace of all nations. More alarm has been
caased than the facts have justified. The strike
is formidable, but the socialists have supplied
utterly untrustworthy nirures of the strength
cf the battalions of labor engaged in the po
litical demonstration, and they have not con
templated keeping men out of employment longer
than a week or ten days. The ministers have
been equally partisan in exaggerating the dan
gers of lawlessness and the necessity for mili
tary precautions on a large scale- Everything is
done on both sides for political effect.
Accidents are liable to happen, as at Louvain,
where bloodshed ha* been caused either through
the bad temper of the strikers or the nervous
ness of raw .recruit* in the Clvl- Guard, but in
th- main the populace and soldiers maintain
•excellent | mil nil and regard the whole affair
as an Incident of the political campaign. Brus-
S»-If. Antwerp and other towns are quiet, and
there a] little excitement except in ihe columns
of the newspaper?. Th- socialists have a rea
sonable cause, even if they are adopting ques
tionable bmmh of advocating it through the
general suspension of lsbor.
The movement has nothing ir. common with
the student riots in Moscow, whi<-h have led up
to tb«; assassination of a powerful minister. That
crime illustrates the difference between the
Russia* and the Belgian grievances. It was an
•ct of despair by the educated clasps, which can
not penetrate the mazes of officialism and ap
peal to the Czar for reforms of the administra
tion. The' educated class in Belgium profits
heavily by plural voting, «nd is the natural ally
< onllnord on fourth i>nu.<-
J7O TO LOS ANGELES AND RLTI'RN
Via Pennfylvanla Railroad, April If to 26. account
Convention of Women's Clubs; *67 via Washington.
,' Consult ticket *«ent«.- AavL
POOR BRITISH FINANCE.
CRITICISM OF THE CHANCELLOR OF
THE EXCHEQUER,
MILLING AND PROVISIONS TRADES DIS
ORDERED-LORD ALVERSTONE'S
DAUGHTER WKDS.
(CV>p>-rl*ht; i<4o2: By Tti<» Trthun* As.-ncla.tlnn.)
[Special to The Tribun* by French Cable. 1
London. April 20. 1 a. m.— The Bank of Eng
land has handled the allotments for the new
loan most expedltiously and caused the least
possible inconvenience from a lock-up of money.
"While the portion of the loan reserved for Eng
lish investors has been covered twenty times
over, there Is a good deal of criticism of the
Chancellor of the Exchequer for not securing
more favorable terms. The financial history of
the war has not disclosed either originality or
breadth of view. The business of the Stock
Exchange has remained stagnant in spite of Im
proved prospects for peace. The Budget has not
affected any industry to a great extent, with
the possible exception of milling, which is mainly
centred at Liverpool. The millers are clamor
ing for a rebate on exports of grain, and com
plaining that the great business in the export of
flour to the Mediterranean and Brazilian ports
is threatened with ruin. The price of wheat
has risen In many districts, and the bakers of
Liverpool and a few other towns have added
a penny to the loaf.
The meat and provision trades have been
greatly diFr.rder«»d by the trust operations in
America, of which the daily press has be°n
publishing sensational accounts. The depend
ence of England upon American and Canadian
food supplies renders these operations of vital
importance h"re. and the butchers anci retail
dealers are Quick to take advantage of any
pretext for putting up prices.
The opinion of the. Continental press on the
peace negotiations is less favorable than that
formed by English Journals. The Boer agents
In Holland are asserting that, the conference has
been broken off and will not be resumed. Th«!r
pessimism may be a sign of Irritation over the
minor part which they are playing In bringing
the Avar to a close. While they have been
secretly consulted by the Boer leaders In the
field, their work passes without observation.
Lord Alverstone's daughter was married yes
terday to Alfred Shaw Me! lor, at St. Mary Ab
bot. Kensington, with eight bridesmaids and
two train bearers, a boy and girl picturesquely
dressed. At the reception at the Lord Chief
Justice's house four hundred presents were dis
played. I. N. F.
FIRST WHEAT SHIP TO PAY DUTY.
London. Aptil 10— The firot wheat ship to
come under the new taxation regulations, the
German ship Henriette, Captain Weinberg,
from San Francisco. December 15, which
reached Falmouth on March 81. arrived in the
Tyne yesterday. The American wheat on board
the vessel will have to pay a duty of £.'*..'!«m>.
BOCAS DEL TOBO TAKEN.
CAPTURED BY THE REBELS AFTER A
SHARP EIGHT.
Colon. Colombia, April lf>. — The expedition
under^General Gomez, the military Governor of
Colon, which left here yesterday on the govern
ment gunboat General Pinzon for Bocas del
Toro. was due nt Bocas at about 8 o'clock this
morning. The expedition comprised seven hun
dred men, with four guns, one of them a long
range three-pounder.
A German steamer from Bocas, which has
just arrived her<-. brines news that the Liberals
effected a landing in open boats and barges
near Bocas at 6 o'clock Thursday evening, when
fighting began. The Liberal troops outnum
bered the government force, which was forced
to surrender the town at 1 1 o'clock yesterday
morning. One hundred and fifty men on both
sides were killed, but the government loss was
insignificant as compared with that of the Lib
erals.
The T'nited States gunboat Machlas has land
ed one hundred marines at Bocas.
■It is believed here that the Plnzon Is bom
barding the town, and will quickly dislodge the
insurgents, who are under command of General
Buendla.
Further news is anxiously awaited here, and
little surprise will be expressed if the recapture
of Bocas is announced soon.
COLONIES DEMAND PREFERENCE.
AUSTRALIANS WANT THE BRITISH MAR
KET.
Sydney. New South Wales. April 10. -John
Ppo. Premier apd Colonial Secretary "f N* PW
Sojth Wales, speaking here to-night at a ban
ouet at which were present Richard John Sed
den. the New-Z>aland Premier; Edmund Bar
tnn ' tn£ . Prime Minister and Minister for Ex
ternal Affairs in the first Australian Federal
Cabinet: Sir William John Lyne, Minister for
Home Affairs in th° Australian Federal Gov
emmer>t. and other prominent colonial residents.
Kiid the time was not far distant when Great
Britain would realize that her interests would
£.' „'p serves bar giving preference to the trade
Ifthe British colonies, to which she is allied
b X]f . s ,>f blood and kin?hip.
Hiram Rlcker & Sons, proprietors of the cele
hr-.tS^ol.inrl Wat«r. guarantee it absolutely pure.
tnr Micply telephone Poland .Water Depot. 6000
CortlSSS * Park Mace. New York City.-Advt.
COLUMBIA COLLEGE STUDENTS SINGING COLLEGE SONGS ON
THE LIBRARY STEPS. WHILE PRESIDENT BOOSEVELT V.\
AT LUNCHEON.
AMERICANS TO CONTROL
BUT STEAMSHIP LINES' FLA GS
AND SUBSIDIES RETAINED.
ALL GREAT FINANCIAL INTERESTS
HERE TO BE TX UNDERWRITING
SYNDICATE CHARTER FROM
XEW-JERSEY.
The report cabled from London that a com
bination of six steamship lines— the White Star.
Pomlnjon. Leyiand. Atlantic Transport. Ameri
can and Red Star- had been effected, was con
firmed yesterday by George W. Perkins, of J. P.
Morgan A- Co.
"The proposed company." he said, "will be
essentially like the United Ptates Steel Corpora
tion, in that It will bring together under a cen
tral control several independent companies,
which will in no wise lose their identities. Th»
different shirs will sail under the same flags,
and will receive the same subsidies as at pres
ent. In case of war. Fngland might still call
on her subsidized ships for pervice. notwith
standing that they would be owned here.
"If a ship subsidy act should b-» aussul 'n
this country, it might make some difference to
us. In that case we might complete our or
ganization with American ships, which would
not be done if other governments were sub
sidizing vessels and the United States were
not.
"The control of the new company will be en
tirely American, and will be exercised from
America."
Mr. Morgan. Mr. FV-rkins continued, would act
aa the syndicate manager In effecting the steam
ship consolidation. ;is he acted in the formation
of th« t'nited States Steel Corporation. The
directors <>f the new company had not yet been
pelected. he added, nor had a name been de
cided upon for the corporation.
THE UNDERWRITING SYNDICATE.
It is understood on high authority that prac
tically all the great financial interests of th<
country, including the Standard Oil group, are
In the underwriting syndicate. It is believed,
however, that. a.s in the case of the United
States Steel Corporation, the underwriters will
be called upon to furnish only a comparatively
small sum In cash; the shares of the several
companies being expected to be exchanged di
rectly for securities of the now corporation. It
could not b<> definitely learned yesterday what
the capitalization of the projected company
would be, but it can be said on authority that.
there will be an issue of bonds as well as of
stock.
Hanking interests identified with the proposed
underwriting syndicate said that the new com
pany would have a New-Jersey charter. Th--
Rothschilds, they added, were to be among the
underwriters.
THE RUMORS CONFIRMED.
The steamship combination proves to be as ex
tensive as all the rumors concerning it have in
dicated. It is seen in the light of present knowl
edge that the tid bits that came through the
cable under the Atlantic were all more or less
accurate. Notwithstanding the many denials
from steamship agents here, and the efforts of
the prominent European steamship officials, who
came here in January and February, to convince
the newspaper men that they were not her.- for
the purpose of considering a plan to bring their
companies into a close union, it is no-.v disclosed
that there was something more important than
the signing of a rate agreement on foot.
DIFFICULT TO (JET DETAILS HERE.
The heads of none of the steamship companies
Interested In the deal have offices in New-York,
so it was difficult yesterday to obtain here any
of the shipping details of the project. Appar
ently the representatives of the two German
co:npanies. the North German Lloyd and the
Hamburg- American, were the only shipping
men here who had any official information, and
they said that their information was confiden
tial, and therefore they could say nothing about
It. One man who seemed t° be familiar with
the scheme said that the deal was closed six
weeks ago, and that the arrangement with the
two great German lines was simply a business
agreement to work harmoniously with the com
bination.
•pnf.i-pp nf .i-p was no financial interest in the com
bination so far as the German lines were con
cerned, he declared. He thought the combina
tion would be of great value to the steamship
companies in the way of equalizing rates. It
was in this direction that the greatest benefit
would accrue. He did not think the fact that
Mr. Morgan and Mr. Griscom were interested
in transcontinental railroad systems had a great
deal of hearing on the formation of the comhina
tion. The opinion among the steamship men
seemed to be that the project would be of great
benefit to shipping.
In speaking of the situation. John Lee, of the
White Star Line, said:
THINK COMBINATION A GOOD THING.
"Such a combination as is outlined in the cable
dispatches fr^m England this morning would
be a good thing for transatlantic shipping in-
Continued <>v second s«gi-.
FIGHT ITALIANS IX DARK.
DETECTIVES AND POLICT PLAYERS
STRUGGLE DESPERATELY WITH
PISTOL AND KNIFE.
Four county detectives had a desperate strug
ele with twoscore Italians last night when they
descended on the alleged clearing house for the
poiicy system in the Italian district, on the sec
ond floor. of a tenement house at No. 141 Moft
st. Stilettos, dirks, knives and revolvers were
brouprht into play. As soon as they broke into
the alleged policy shop the Italians turned out
the lights and hand to hand fights ensued In
the pitch darkness, while the majority of the
piayers escaped. xj
The raid was made on the instructions of Dis
trict Attorney Jerome, who assigned County
Detectives Reardon, Dillon. McLellan and Sec
ord to attempt the hazardous task, and without
apprising- the police of the Mulberry-st. station.
Captain Stephenson's command, that a raid was
to be made. The first intimation they h-"i of
the raid was when eight of the prisoners capt
ured in the raid were marched into the Mul
berry-st. station and arraigned.
If the police, it was said, had known at first
the place would certainly have been "tipped
off."
When the raiders mounted the stairs tn the
first landing they saw a lookout ov the =»coii'l
floor. The halls were dark, anil the lookout did
not recognize the detectives as intruders until
they had reached the second floor. When he
paw that they were strangers, however, he start
ed to yell, and made a move as if to draw a re
volver. But he was» too late, f<>r the detecthres
sprang at him before he could utter a cry.
dragged him to one end of the hall and over
powered him. They then forced open one of the
doors leading to the office, where policy slips,
they say, were being delivered tr» runners and
players, pushed the lookout in first and then
followed him.
Immediately the air was rent with yils from
thf surprised Italians, and somebody who was
evidently the manager gave orders in Italian.
There was a gr- -tt hubbub, and the men rushed
to the doors and tried to escape to the hallways.
The detectives stood near the <!<>'>rs. however,
and tried to beat th» men back, but while they
wen- atti-mptini? to stop th** rush the lights be
gan to go out, iea\-ing the thr»->> rooms which
composed the headquarters In Inky blackness.
As the place was growing darker th>- detec
tives saw a number of Italians drawing stilettos,
dirks and revolvers. Reardon Immediately called
to his companions to draw th--ir revolvers,
which they did, ami he then cried <>ut that any
man who attempted to escape would be shot.
This did not deter the Italians, however, for
they continued to fight and struggle with the
detectives, forcing them from the doorways and
rushing from the rooms. They feared to fire,
knowing that the police would bear th>- shots,
so they clutched their revolvers and were con
tent with thrusting them into the detectives'
The detectives were rapidly losing ground, and
when all but eignt of the men had escaped they
shut the -loors. The Italians who were hemmed
in groped their way through the rooms, trying
to find means of escape without engaging ;n
combat with the detectives, but the latter made
for them. Kach detective grabbed two <if the
Italians, and then the desperate struggle began.
The twelve men fought all over the rooms,
clutching at each other's throats and attempting
to wrest weapons from each other's hands. The
detectives finally got th~ better of the affray,
their onslaught proving effective. The cj K ht
Italians were overpowered and marched from
the rooms. They resumed the fight, however,
when they got on the stairs, and Detective
Dillon who weighs about 27<> pounds, was com
pelled to sit on on»- of the Italians and squeeze
the light out of him. When the Italians knew
that they were under arrest they started in to
dispose of their knives and revolvers. They
threw the weapons over the balustrades and
down the stairs
The detectives managed to confiscate policy
record books, slips, manifold paper and drawing
sheets, which were found in the rooms, and
taken to the station with the prisoners.
YALE MEN'S NARROW ESCAPE
THEY DROP FIVE FLOORS IN AN
ELEVATOR. THE CLUTCHES OF
WHICH FAILED TO WORK.
One of the elevators at the Yale Club, in West
Forty-fourth-st.. is at present out of commis
sion, and it is a matter of wonder that some
of the members are not seriously injured-.
About ten days ago several members of the
class of "95, Sheffield Scientific School, were
holding a dinner at the club. At 7 p. m. eight
of them started up in the elevator for the din
ing room, on the ninth floor.
When the floor was nearly reached the eleva
tor slipped control and started slowly down.
At the fifth floor the safety clutches suddenly
failed to work, and the car descended to the
basement at a tremendous rate, smashing doors
and windows as it fell. At the bottom the oc
cupants were piled in a heap, and both the
floor and roof of the car were smashed. Only
one of the occupants. Joseph Quimby, was in
jured The others were, badly shaken up. Sev
eral of the bones in Quimby's foot were broken.
An Investigation Is being made into the cause
of the failure of the safety clutches to work.
Every' mile between New-York and Buffalo and
Niagara Falls is not only beautiful, but of great
historic interest, and" can "be studied and enjoyed
as" you travel by the New- York Central.— Advt.
[Copyright: 1908: By The Trtbuiw A«iocl»UoB.l
THE PROCESSION' ON ITS WAY TO THE CEREMONIES OP INSTALLATION 01?
PRESIDENT BUTLER.
From rtsrht to left will be seen President Roosevelt, William C. Schermerhorn. German Ambassador
Yon Holleb<»n, R. Fulton Cutting, Dean Van Amringe, Mayor Low, President Butler, Bl3hop
Potter and the Rev. Dr. Vincent.
INSTALLATION OF DR. BUTLER.
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT AND OTHER PROMINENT METSt
AT THE COLUMBIA CEREMONIES'
STUDENTS CHEER TITE ACADEMIC PROCESSION.
The prestige of a great educational institu
tion was recognized on Morningside Heights
yesterday afternoon when Dr. Nicholas Murray
Butler was installed as the new president
of Columbia I'niversity. Decorous pageantry,
graceful oratory and the presence of a great
company of prominent people helped la mak» the
importance of Columbia as a seat of learning
more conspicuous. The President of the United
States, a persoiial friend of Dr. Butler, was an
honored guest at the installation. The Governor
of the State of New-York, the Mayor of the city
of New-York, other high public officials, presi
dents of many American universities and coi
leges and men of prominence among the clergy
walked in the procession and listened to th^ ad
dresses.
Enthusiasm over the ceremonies was increased
by perfect weather. The sunshine that flooded
the campus seemed to pervade the great assem
blage. Thousands of New-Yorkers who «>-r
uninvited, and were kept back from the ground?
of the university, formed crowds and wat°hei
the parade at a distance. Throughout the cere
monial there was manifested the warmest In
terest In the institution. Hundreds of under
sraduat*j.s were on the grounds as spectators.
They shouted the college cry until they w*«>
hoars?, exhibiting hilarity that could not be . t
pressed by the dignity, of the occasion.
The only blemish upon the day's proceedings
was the brutal and unauthorized conduct of sev
eral paid employes of the university, who
seemed to be determined to assert some brief
authority at the expen.-e of decency. The m-n
wear uniforms to distinguish them as caretakers
of the grounds and buildings. Several news
paper photographers, who were on the grounds
by permission of the university aothorities, were
attacked in ruffianly fashion by the employes in
uniform. They were pulled away from advan
tageons positions, and interfered v. ith in other
ways. Some ol the men in uniform went to the
extreme ol actual assault la trying to prevent
the photographers from taking pictures.
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT'S ARRIVAL.
The first demonstration of enthusiasm was at
1 p. m.. when President Roosevelt arrived at
Morningslde Heights, escorted by four troops
of Squadron A and a sqnad of mounted police.
When the troopers wheeled into line in front of
the library and the President's carriage stopped
at the foot of the great stairway, there were
volleys upon volleys of cheers. Ex-Mayor
Abram S. Hewitt, a trustee of Columbia, and a
member of the class of '42.* was in the carriage
with the President. As they climbed the stair
way together, Mr. Hewitt leaned on the Presi
dent's arm. The gW- club on the steps sang
the college song, and hundreds of other students
back of them gave the college yell. The Presi
dent lifted his hat several times, and kept on
his way with Mr. Hewitt. They went to a rear
door of the library on the way to luncheon.
For nearly an hour after the arrival of Presi
dent Roosevelt visitors at the university were
entertained at luncheons in various buildings.
Among those at the official luncheon given for
President Roosevelt by the trustees in the libra
ry were Governor Odell. Mayor Low. Secre
tary Cortelyon, Postmaster General Payne,
President Eliot of Harvard. President Hadley
of Yale, President Patton of Princeton. Presi
dent Harper of Chicago. Dr. Harris. United
States Commissioner of Education; Dean Van
Amrtnge and R. Fulton Cutting.
Previous to the luncheons there were several
official receptions in the library, and at one of
them a portrait of Professor W. R. Ware was
presented to the university by his former stu
dents in the Massachusetts Institute of Tech
nology. President Eliot of Harvard made a
presentation speech, and the p.rtralt was ac
cepted by Dr. Butler.
STUDENTS CHEER PROCESSION.
The procession which preceded President But
ler's installation formed in the library soon af
ter 2p. m.. but did not start until 2:'_T>. It took
nearly an hour to wind its slow way along the
west walk of the campus and down the stairway
to the gymnasium. A band played while the
procession moved, and at various points of
vantage groups of students, joined in giving the j
college yell and calling out the names of proml
nent persons in the ranks.
First came a division of representatives of
students of the university, all tn caps and
gowns. It was followed by three divisions of
lecturers, instructors, tutors and members of the i
faculties of the university.
In the fifth division, composed of officers of
the United States, of the State and of the city, [
clergy and alumni, were many prominent men.
Including:
ti-i if\ T DAVIES. f Rrrnrd^r GOFF.
f'-TPu T AUSTEN. R»v. Dr. WILUAM R.
ROBZRT C CORNMJ* HUNTIXGTON.
\UNP C STEDMAK. Colon*! T. A. BI.VGHAM.
rS^RLES R skinner. v. s. a.
.-inUin FRENCH E.'GEOROK B CORTELTOL".
.-HiTAVHK V. Bk N I secretary t« the President. '
Major HARRISON X Sir I'Ekct SANDERSON
hi up Ctmm r-,»n«-rai of Great
T.r I( HN S BIU-INGS. Britain.
MEL.VII. DEWET. OU SHOTCHUN. Secretary ;
\\IM IVM H MAXWELL j at the Chines* Lection.
„■'■',; JOSEPH H. Major General JOHN R
TWI.-HEI.L BROOKE. C. S. A.
JAPOB A CANTOR. ! Rear Admiral A. S. PAR-
J EDWARD SWAN- KER. V. S. N
9TROM Postmaster Oeneral HENRY '
CHARLES V. FORNES. \ r. PAYNE.
JuVtl"- EDWARD PAT- Governor OF>F.LL.
TERSON. '
Professor William T. Brewster and Eben E.
Olcott were i arshals of the sixth dlviston.
which' was composed of representatives of many
American universities and <-nn-->srp- among th'«tl
being President M. Carey Thomas of Bryn,
Mawr. Dean E. H. Griffin of Johns Hopkins.
Chancellor J. R. Day of Syracuse. President
Caroline Hazard cf Well^sley. Dean H S. Whita
of Cornell. President T. M. Drown of Lehigh.
President Mary E. Wooley of Mount Holyoke.
President James M. Taylor of Vassar. Chancel
lor MacCracken, New- York University; Colonel
Mills, superintendent of West Point United
States Military Academy: President Raymond
of Union. President W. H. P. Faunce of Brown,
President J. B. Angell. University of Michigan:
Dr. William T. Harris. United States Commis
sioner of Education; President William R. Har
per. University of Chicago; President Francia
L. Patton. Princeton University; President Ar
thur T. Hadley. Tale University, and President
Charles W. Eliot. Harvard University.
In the seventh division were members of
the University Council, trustees of Teachers
College and trustees of Barnard College. In
the last division were the trustees of Columbia
University, with Bishop Potter, the Rev. Dr.
Vincent, Mayor Low and Dr. Butler, who w»r«»
fallowed closely by Dean Van Amringe. R. Ful
on Cutr:n_r. William C. Schermerhoro. Dr. yon
-lolleben, ihe German Ambassador, and Presi
dent Roosevelt. Behind the President walked
three Secret Service detectives and a few profes
sors, closing the procession.
DR BUTLER RECEIVES THE KEY 3.
The large hall of the gymnasium. In which the
Installation ceremony took place, was filled t<>
overflowing. Seats SB] the platform* had been
placed for most of those who were in the pro
cession, while the st-ats in the body of tie hall
were mainly occupied by Invited persons. At
one side were about one hundred students of;
Columbia. In the opening prayer the Rev.
Dr. Marvin R. Vincent repeated rhe prayer
offered by Dr. Samuel Johnson, the first presi
dent, upon the laying of the cornerstone of.
King's College in 17."»6. A3 follows:
May God Almighty grant that this colW/v IBIM
happily fbuaded, may ever be enriched with His
blessing: that It may be increased and flourish and
be carrier! on to its entire perfection, to the glory
ol Hta nime ami the adornment of His true re
lision and good literature, and to the srr^at<»st ad
vantage of the public weal, to all posterities for
evermore.
William C Schermerhorn, chairman of tha
trustees, made ■ brief speech, extending a -wel
ci bm to President Roosevelt and other guests.
Then turning to Dr. Butler he presented to him
a charter of the corporation and a bunch of
keys, dec'aring that the trustees reposed full
confidence in him and in his ability "to protect
thf property an.) th- interests of the university,
and to maintain order and discipline witr
precincts."
In his r-ply Dr. Butler said:
To preserve, protect and foster this ancient eo|*
lege. established for the education and instruction,
of youth in the liberal arts and sciences, to main
tain, strengthen and upbuild this noble university,
to obey Its statutes, to labor unwearledly for Its
advantage and for the accomplishment of its higli
ideals, to promote its efficiency in every part, that
it may widen th«- boundaries and extend the appli
cations of human kn»w]iil;o and contribute In
creasingly to the honor and w*>lfar<» of the: city.
State and nation. I plfde'' my strength and what
ever abilities God has given me. By His help, I
will.
PRESIDENT LEADS APPLAUSE.
President Roosevelt rose and led a round of
applause when President Butler was esc " '.
to his chair. This chair, which has b«<en used
by the president >if Columbia Collet;
than half a century, was 'iriginally the library
chair of Benjamin Franklin, under whose wtQ
it passed to Dr. David Hosack. a protestor in
Columbia College r>r many years, and thriugti
whom it was presented to the college.
Dr. John H. Van Amringe. the d- • - ■" tr.-j
university, made an address on behalf ot the
faculties. He sketched the history of the uni
versity, paying high tributes to the late Presi
dent Barnard and ex-President Low, which
were applauded liberally. He closed his address
with the following:
You, sir. were a factor, and a potent one, in this
great work so quickly and so ahly done. You know
the result as a whole ami in alt Its details, In Us
substance and in tt.-i spirit.
The full story of the regeneration of Columbia
under Dr. Barnard, and its re-formation, under Dr.
Low, Is familiar to you; you ar>- cognizant of the
Important matters that were «etr>.i under their
distinguished and suggestive administrations, and
of the grave questions that Mill remain to be eOß
aldered. some of which press for <tn answer.
From h long and intimate acquaintance with you,
and from a knowledge of your thorough mastery
of the whole situation here. I. and those whom I
represent, hive every confld?nc*» that under your
direction Columbia will advance and prosper more
fully than ever before: and it la now my office n
delegate of the faculties. .. is it is personally my
high privilege and very great pleasure, fo promise
you on behalf of the entire teaching staff of the
university a most willing ami thorough co-opera
tion.
In an address in behalf of the alumni, R. Ful
ton Cutting said:
The university does not aim to mike the I nllHl—
aire but the millionaire Is busy making 'h» tunY
and Ihe v-r !: r f fhe man ol affairs praeas)
the laurel uron the brow of the man of learning.
HARDMAN PIANO FACTORIES ARE
AGAIN WORKING IN rtnx FORCE.
As -work which as! bosa suspended since th* flra
on March 20th has been fully resumed in all depart
ments.' iv;.»in*--« ia assss active, both it the fac
tories and at the warerooms. P?h -■- --• and 5r r»
Aye. where nn» examptes of the Hardmaa Pianos
can always be seen.— (AdvU

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