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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, April 26, 1902, Image 1

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V OL LXII- N° 20.150.
MERGER DETAILS LACKING
SUGGESTION THAT MORGAN W.\S
CAUGHT KAPPIXG IS BGOCTED.
SAID THAT SCHEME HAS BEEN DRAWN DP
WITHOUT REGARD TO POSSIBLE SHIT
SUBSIDY BY UNITED STATES.
(OoryrlS'ht; BMC: By The Tribune As-ociatlon.)
ISpeclal to The Tribune by French Cable. ]
London. April 2»>. 1 i. Several questions
■vrere asked In Parliament last evening in refer
ence to details of the Atlantic steamship combi
nation. Gerald Balfevr, who replied on behalf of
the Board of Trade, "n-1 Hugh O. Arnold Forster.
who answered for the Admiralty, did not. how
ever, set m to know much more abciut the matter
th.ir. does ih<> outside public, and the members
had to be i orient with the assurance that the
combination was receiving the careful attention
of both departments The suggestion that J. P.
Morgan has been caught napping in respect to
the claims of the Admiralty on the mail steam
ers of the White Star Lin.-, is not confirmed on
investigation. The attitude of the organizers
at the combination is understood to be that
while the matter has in no sense been over
looked it has been practically unnecessary to
consider it. for the reason that each company
will reTain its present nationality and there is
no guest as to Bag obligations. The allega
tion that it is merely intended to kerp the Whit«
Star Line vessels under the red ensign for the
next few years, while a bill authorizing their
transfer to American register is passed through
Congresr. is s=cout«?'l on the ground that there
would be no advantage in such transfer. It Is
stated that the whole home has been drawn up
absolutely without regard to any possible navi
gation subsidies that may be paid in the near
future by the United States Government. The
announcement that the organizers of the combi
nation will issue « statement explaining the de
tails of their project and justifying their action
;s probably true only in the sense that circulars
niil in due course of time be issued to the
shareholders of the lines concerned, giving to
mem particulars of the propositions to be sub
mitted for their consideration.
•The Daily Telegraph" confirms the state
irent in this column that each company in the
shipping combine will retain its nationality,
and states positively that in event of war in
which England, America or Germany should be
imclved the agreement would automatically
ccme t'i an end.
■perra! is given to the statement that J. Pier
■ liorajan is the moving spirit in the pro
: : Ane belswaeu Scotch colller> - owners.
Not only pig iron but also hematite is now
being exported from this country to the United
States. While the Steamer Klngswood is at pres
ent loading a large cargo of pig iron in tees fqr
Philadelphia, it is reported that the steamer Man
co:te has just been fixed to load 2.300 tons of
benatfae iron in tees for the same direction.
This is said to be the first cargo of its kind to
b» shipped to the United States from the north
of England.
Persistent overrrowding of suburban trains on
the Great Eastern Railway has at last W to a
bad 6mash at Hackney. Morgan's tube scheme,
■which iB now awaiting Parliamentary sanction,
may solve the traffic problem in this populous
district of Northeast London.
AFTER SCOTCH COAL COMPANIES?
J. P. MORGAN SAID TO BK.IN MOVEMENT
TO COMBINE THESE INTERESTS.
Edinburgh. April 25.— "The Evening News,"
of this city, says that negotiations, in •which
J. Pierpont Morgan is interest, are on foot to
combine the Scottish coal companies with a cap
ital of 0,600,000- It is also said that General
Lord Belhaven and Stonton. a Scottish rep
resentative peer, is to be the head of this con
cern.
FOR LIXDEXTHAL'S FLAX.
RAILROAD OOmmnOM PAYS $lf>.oOO.rOo
SCHE>rE WILL AFFORD FER
MANEXT RELIEF.
The State Railroad Commission, yesterday
Issued a statement favoring Commissioner Lin
denthal'E $15,000,000 plan for bridge relief
through Ashley W. Cole, chairman of the com
rr.iPPion. It said :
The Board at Railroad Commissioners has
been engaged during the last few days in ex
amining into the condition affecting the City
Hall station of the Manhattan Railway, with
a view to relieving the confusion which exists
there in the "rush" hours. The commission al
ready had a survey and report made by Its own
engineering Inspectors, and on Thursday had
put? inausMiJ, asu. mi-* eouajejuoD papuaixa us
General Manager Skitt and Chief Engineer
Pcgram, of the Manhattan Railway Company,
and Bridge Commissioner Lindenthal. The
Board has also had several conferences with
Messrs Herman Ridder and Herman Uhl, rep
resenting the "Staatg-Zeitung" Building and the
Ottendorfer estate. It Is understood that Com
missioner Lindenthal has practically completed
and drafted plans which provide for the re
lief of the congestion of traffic at the Brooklyn
Bridge terminal ir Manhattan and at the City
Hall station at the same time. These plans
were produced at the conference, and were
carefully considered. They provide for the
taking of the entire block of ground on which
the "Staats-Zcitung" Building stands, bounded
by Park Row, yon Row. Centre-st. and
Chambers**!., also the triangular block bounded
by the east side of Park Row. North "V\ illiam
ft. and the bridge terminal. M^ m „
There can be no temporary relief afforded It
is said, because the owners of the "Staats /-•'■
tung" property will not consent to any further
encroachment, either for the bridge terminal
or for the City Hall station, on their easements.
of access, light and air. Hut they are ready to
sell their building or to rent it for one hundred
years, if desired, to the railway company or the
city, or any one else who desires to use it for
public accommodation. There has been pending
for years, and remains still untried, a sun in
which they seek to recover damages for the ex
httfac encroachments on their easements. De
feidos. which they obtained, sixteen years ago. a
perpetual injunction against any further en
croachment. This injunction stands to-day, and
win continue to stand, as a barrier against any
Immediate temporary relief, and th.-i.- £pp«xa
no good reason why the plaintiffs should vill
:rgly impair the value of their property. The>
say: "We will sell ii. and the city and the rail
ways, either or both, may then use the prop
erty as they deem best." £ --"' ».^i,«j
The railroad commissioners have been checked
by thai f ltuation in their efforts to relieve the
crush, and it is doubtful whether relief can be
had other than by the carrying out of some
Plans which will take into consideration both
the bridge and the Manhattan railway terminal,
and which will reaott in solving the problem so
that it will stand solved for some years to
come. The plan prepared by Commissioner
:. ntbal will shortly be laid before the Mayor
and th* Rapid Transit Commission for public
consideration, together with a financial scheme
Under which th. plan may be carried into ef
fect by the city and the railways jointly. It
will cost from IIO.OWMMW to $IWX».Ofo to carry
out the plan, but the relief will be complete and
permanent. -
GUDEITS MEW TO GET THEM PAT.
Albany. Apil ■ .-Ex-Sheriff Charles
Guflen of DBS* County has MBS to the State Civil
Service Commission the payroll of the Sheriff »
office for the Brut ten days of March. Accompany
ing the payroll was a letter in which Mr. Gu.l«-n
staled ■•.. • in forwarding th*> payroll 7r7 r . !lfi ''""
tlon h- did not in any way waive his right to pa>
his office force for every day sf the month, hut
desired at this n.m" to have the men employ** in
his office paid for that portion of the month in
Vhich there wa« no dispute as to his being in
legal holder of the office. 'This was a matter ar
ranged a mouth ago. and therefore the Civil ser
*rioe Commission certified the payroll and returned
M. to Mr. Guden. >.
WANT TROOPS TO STAY.
FILIPINOS PAY HIGH TRIBUTES TO THE
CHARACTER OF THE AMER
ICAN SOLDI EX.
[BT mJMBAFH TO THh THIBU.M-: . .
Washington. April 'S,.— The attitude of the
Filipinos toward the American soldier Is clearly
set forth In a large number of petitions for the
retention of troops in various districts of the
islands transmitted by the War Department to
day to Senator Lodge, chairman of the Commit
tee on Philippine Affairs of the Senate. Th'
hich estimation In which the rank and file of
the army is held by the people in whose behalf
appeals are being made by political opponents
of the administration and would-be scuttlers out
of the easternmost possessions of the I'nited
States constitutes a significant refutation of the
JOHN BIMSON.
Captain of the Paterson police, who hns been In charge of the force during the strike
on account of th« temporary illness of the chief.
stories recently circulated of brutality permeat
ing the military forces. More than fifty of the
petitions, most of which were received at head
quarters in Manila last year before civil govern
ment~v*is fully extended, are transmitted just
as General Chaffee forwarded them, and others
now on their way across the Pacific will be
added for the information of Congress as they
reach "Washington. All of them are devoted to
securing the retention of garrisons of regulars
at points in various parts of the archipelago, or
of officers who had been performing administra
tive duty. In most of them the petitioners de
clare that by the presence of American troops
in their respective localities humane treatment,
protection and the maintenance of peace and
good order are assured to them. In many cases
the petitions refer to individual American of
ficers the natives have learned to admire and re
epect and to whom they look for protection and
Justice. In several instances, also, the petition
ers ask that American troops be not replaced
by native scouts.
GENERAL SMITH ON TRIAL.
HIS COUNSEL ADMITS THAT WALLER
WAS ORDERED TO "KILL AND
BURN" IN SAMAR
Manila. April 2.l.— The trial by court martial
of General Jacob H. Smith, on the charge of
conduct prejudicial to good order and discipline,
began to-day. General Lloyd Wheaton pre
sided. Colonel Charles A. Woodruff, counsel for
the defence, said he desired to simplify the pro
ceedings. He was willing to admit that General
Smith gave instructions to Major Waller to kill
and burn and make Satnar a howling wilder
ness that he wanted everybody killed capable
of bearing arms, and that be did specify all over
ten years of age. as the Samar boys of that age
were equally as dangerous as their elders.
Captain David D. Porter and Lieutenant John
H A Day. of the marine corps, were the only
witnesses examined. Their testimony developed
nothing new.
Major Waller will be the only other witness
Cor the prosecution. He was unable to be pres
ent to-day on account of Illness, but Is expected
"Vr^ £re^SS^T«ve^«llicer. of the *h
Infantry. .
DAT/OS SUING FOR PEACE.
GENERAL CHAFFEE BENDS A YOU \.
RLE REPORT ON THE SITUA
TION IN MINDANAO.
Washington. April & Adjutant General Corbin
to-day mad- public the following extracts from .
cable dispatch Just received from General * Chaffee
respecting th€ situation in Mindanao, dated Ma
nila. April 24:
H..f,,r.- Baldwin COUM be cjnmunlcated with he
h,> Mken fort at Puias. aftrT slight resistance.
& Teasualttei V-rv aoori after ndfehborlng town
S? SSSonened Itt floors. hoisted whit.- Bag
ami delivered r"d Vik. D*«° Lampok and «ttm
t th stn.nK following, asked permiASion to call
and nfakV- t.-i<-.' Datto Amani Pack, of Oanasl,
who Tent threatening message in reply to my Ist
?er isoi..- of these who have submitted Camp is
.« '. mil*-; from Panasi. whose Sultan has asked
Ba°d£in to V.I.- there. Have directed him not to
move He Is ten miles from datto.
it is m I'uri-os.- to have Interview with General
„'./' Will go on in.- Hancock, which leaves here
tn.VVv for -M:ilal-aiiu with battalion 10th Infantry.
It is our purpose to show considerable rorce. troops
Vl-ke Moros, converse with dattos. then re
tire troops by different trails to Malabang and
ParanK thereafter to send expeditions occasion
n« in lake We supposed Ganasi thirty-live
"'JL from Malabang-aclually short twenty-one
35-*»o flßhting. not necessary overcome oppo
™t on to advance to present location troops: „o
,';.' with Baldwin, two troops cavalry dismounted
elve miles In rear. Every effort will be made
Prevent general war. Davis says situation this
time very favorable.
WALLER AND DAY ACQUITTED.
Manila. April 2T».— Major Waller and Lieuten
ant Day. of the marine corps, who were tried
by court martial here on the charge of execut
ing natives of the island of Samar without trial,
have been acquitted.
BURYING PLAGUE VICTIMS AT NIGHT.
Manila- April -25.— The cholera record up to
da\e is as follows: Manila. 505 cases and 393
deaths; in the provinces. 1.317 cases and 907
d6 The S Board of Health is finding cases of na
tives trying to bury the dead at night In order
to prevent the detention o* tie living.
NEW- YORK. SATURDAY. APRIL 26. 1902. -SIXTEEN PAGES-
D AXIS II WEST IX DIES AXD TOTE.
SANTA CRUZ STRONGLY FOR SALE-MA
JORITY WOULD BE SMALLER
IX ST. THOMAS.
(Coprri«tlt; IMS: By The Tribune Association.)
IBT lAII.F. To THK TP.IHINE. 1
St. Thomas. D. W. L, April 25— Santa Cruz
has a decided majority in favor of annexation.
The majority in St. Thomas would be smaller,
the officials forming here a large portion of the
present electorate.
funeral regret Is felt over the action of the
Landsthing circumscribing the plebiscite, as the
inhabitants ate strongly annexationfcts. The
councilmen in St. Thomas are uncertain. Those
in Santa Cruz favor the sale.
The unregistered voters request an oppor
tunity to vote as a matter of justice. Thousands
indorsed the telegram the four hundred dis
patched to Copenhagen on Monday.
AT ATJGBB ft SIMONS' WORKS.
Officers Mo— ly. Hurd and Struck.
BIG LAND DEAL FOR COLUMBIA.
TEN CAPITALISTS NEGOTIATE FOR OPTION OX TWO BLOCKS
SOUTH OF LIBRARY— SI9SO,OOO OFFERED.
NEW-YORK HOSPITAL OWNER— NEEDED FOR FIELD.
Friends of Columbia University will he de
liphted to know that there ar^ neßotiatlons
pending to secure for the Institution an option
on the two city blocks immediately south of
th'? library. Th" property belongs to the So
ciety Of the New-York Hospital, and extends
from Orie-hiindn-d-find-fourteenth-st. to One
hundred-nnd-sixtfrnth-st., between Amsterdam
ave. and Broadway. There are about nine acres
in the two blocks, which would be a splendid
addition to the university site.
The Tribune has information that ten promi
nent capitalists of the city have consented to
aid in s^eurinK the desired option on the prop
erty and holding it for ei(?hteen months, in the
expectation that by the end of that time the
university ."ill have the financial ability to ac
quire the property. If the property in bought
by the university It will be used in part as an
athletic Held and In part as sites for the erec
tion of buildings that will be needed in the
future. The sum offered for the property is
$1,950,000, almost as much as Columbia I'nl
versity paid f< r its present site of double the
si;'.'- about t-n years ago.
Negotiations for the purchase of the present
gxpunds of thp university an Mornlngstde
Heights were completed in ISM. The property
then acquired consisted of the four city blocks
lying between One-hundred-and -sixteenth and
One-hundred-and-twentleth sts., Amsterdam
ave. and Broadway. Three streets running
through th" property were closed. There are
eighteen screa In Uie site, which cost $2,000,000.
Then- is yet a mortgage of .SI,(KH>.(MMI on the
property. Buildings that cost about $5,000,000
have been erected on the grounds. The chl ff
ones were sifts to the university. The library
was given by Seth Low. when he was presUent
of the university. Schermerhorn Hall was the
gilt of w. C. Schermerhorn. Havemeyer linll
was the sift of H O. Havemeyer and members
of his family. Fnyerweather Hall was bul>t
with the bequest of Daniel B. Fayerweathfr.
KEAI.TY COMPANY WOULD TAKE IT.
One of the ten financiers who have-decided to
aid Columbia University in securing an option
on the property south of the library said last
evening that he and his associates dll not wish
to have their names made public in connection
with the negotiation? at present. "Our aid was
solicited on behalf of the university," he said,
"as it is urgently desired that the institution
should have control of the property. Since the
university bafl b*>en moved to MorninKside
Heights the property south of the library las
been used as an athletic field, and it would be
h greal pity to haw it sold to speculators and
<ut up into building lots. We decided to make
an offer of $1 980.009 to the Society of the New-
York Hospital for the property and allow the
university to hold an option on the property at
thPt price for eight-en months. If the univer
sity decides not to acquire the property there Is
■ realty company that stands ready to buy the
blocks. The realty company would not acquire
the property for educational or charitable pur
poses."
Cornelius K. Bliss, who is president of the
board of governors of the Society of the New-
York Hospital, said last evening that he could
give no Information about the negotiations for
an option m the property owned by the society
on Morninsside Heights. The property was of
fered te r sale about three months ago, he .«aid,
and there had been negotiations fo r buying It.
but he was not familiar them. "Nothing
positive can be-settled," he said, "until the meet
ON GUARD AT PATERSON AT VVIEDMANNS WORKS.
Sergeant Draper and Officers Gibson. Graham and Waller, reading from the left.
ing of the board of governors nn the second
Tuesday in May."
"Would you not sell to the university cheaper
than to speculators""
"The Society of the New-York Hospital is a
charitable Institution that spends large sums
every year in charity, but its governors would
not be justified In giving nway any of Its prop
erty to another Institution, however deserving
that Institution m'ght be.~
KKPORT OF A RECENT OFFER.
Mr. Bliss was not willing to say how much
he thought the property of the society south ..f
the library should sell for. There was a report
that ihe society recently hail an offer <>f $2,500.
<>oo for that property am! the block west .if
Broadway, between One-hundred-an<l -sixteenth
and One-hundred-and-ninotoenth Bts.. which the
society also owns, bui Mr. Bliss could not con
firm that rumor.
Bheppard Gairidy. the former president of the
society, said last evening that he bad beard of
negotiations for the purchase of the property
south of the library, but he did not know the
details. He thought the two city blocks were
valued at about $2,000,000. the property having
increased greatly in value since the university
was placed near It.
John B. Pine, secretary of the board Of trus
tees of Columbia University, said that there
was no doubt of the necessity for future In
crease of the university grounds. "The uni
versity bought all the property it could afford
to buy for a site ten years ago," he continued,
"but it needs the property south of the library
for an athletic field and for more dormitories In
the luture. The university should have the
property for architectural reasons as well. it
should be enabled some time to crown Morning
side Heights with additional beautiful struct
ures. It would be a pity to have the effect
spoiled by the erection of rows of apartment
houses on the property south of the library.
OFFERED FOR LESS THAN $2,000,000. .
Maximilian Morgenthau. president of the Hud
son Realty Company, at his home. No. 248 West
One-hundred-and-thlrd-st.. told a Tribune re
porter that his brother Henry, president of the
Central Realty Company, had gone to Hot
Springs, Va.. for a rest, and he did not know
of a sale of the Mornlngside Heights prop
erty being undertaken in his brother's ab
sence. Mr. Morgenthau added that the New-
York Hospital property had been offered
to himself by a broker for less than .<_'.
(HM).(MM» in January, and he had conferred
with his brother about it. They had considered
the price too high, decided not to go into it. and
had not since given any thought to the subject.
Mr. 'Morgenthau thought the Central Realty
Company would not undertake the deal in his
brother's absence, as he was the real estate
man in the company.
At the installation of Dr. Nicholas Murray
Butler as president of Columbia University a
week ago there was exhibited the liveliest in
teiest in the Institution's affajrs. and many of
the prominent men who were present at the
ceremonies expressed the hope that the univer
sity would be able to get more room and have
an nthlMlc field of its own. At that time, it
is said, there was formed a plan to seek aid In
securing an option on the two city blocks south
of the library. The property is unencumbered
by buildings, and has been held by the Society
of the New-York Hospital for years. The so
ciety has been willing to sell the property at
any time, it is said, but It was not until three
months ago that it was offered for sale. Since
it became known that the society was trying
to sell the property, friends of Columbia Uni
versity have been anxious lest the property
should pass into the hands of real estate spec
ulators and be cut up into building lots.
QUEEN WILHELMINA
is in a critical condition. Her Illness has occa
sioned much speculation as to her successor should
she die childless. Emperor William of Germany
might become King of Holland. See The Sunday
Tribune to-morrow.— Advt.
AT KERX BROS.' WORKS.
Officers Bogertmin and Smith.
STRIKERS CHANGE FRONT.
THE MEN WHO CREATED RIOTS NOW
CALL ON EACH OTHER TO PRE
SERVE THE PEACE.
Paterson. April 25 (Special).- -A reaction has
taken place In the ranks of the striking dyers
helpers. The men who created the riots of Tues
day and Wednesday are now calling on each
other to obey the law and preserve the peace as
the only means of winning their strike. At the
meeting this morning the newspaper men. who
were all ejected from former meetings, were
invited to be present and were asked to report
the proceedings. James McGrath." OH chairman
of the meeting, said that the owners of the
dye shops had shown no di-posiiio:i M meet
the men half way. and he believed that if a
compromise had been offered by the owners
there would have been no trouble In coming to
an agreement. The owners say that it is rather
fete to talk in this way. They had no time to
make any offers before the helpers began via-
U All" the large dye houses are still closed, and
no effort has been made to open them. This
morning fifteen thousand pounds of silk was
shipped from one of the dye houses to a shop
in Pennsylvania to he dyed. The dye houses
outside of this city will be asked to do all the
dyeing they .an until the trouble here is set
tled ~ To-day it looked as though th* striker*
wefii sorry for the stand they had taken and
as though the strike could be settled easily an
terms advantageous to th- owners. There was
no violence of any kind to-day. Small squads
of police are still detailed to guard the dye
houses, but none of the strikers appeared at any
of them to-day. . .. _.
V number of dye shop owners were in attend
ance on the grand jury this afternoon, together
with a large number of policemen who took
nart In the protection of the shops in the storm:,-
Seen** of Tuerday and Wednesday. The grand
jury is Investigating the riots as it was instruct
ed by Judge Dixon. rind it is expected that a
large number of Indictments will be found
against the strikers.
B ffl /M V X F ULURE I V GEVE v\.
EIGHT MILLIONS LOST IN SPECULATION
OFFICERS ARRESTED.
London. April -2i;.— From Geneva the . cor
respondent of "The Daily Mail" sends a dis
patch in which he says a sensation has been
caused there by the failure of one of the oldest
banks in the country, the Paslst Credit «;■•
sellschaft. M. Grob and M. Ho^nin.ler. re
spectively the malinger and the cashier of th,
bank. ha\e been arrested. It is reported that
SS.iMM).IHio of the bank's funds has been lost
by wild speculation at Paris, and that thou
sands of* people have been ruined.
(//>' t\ AND BPASIBB Fl 108.
PAI.MA WOL'LD LIKE TO SEE THEM EN
' TWINED AT HIS INAUGURATION.
Havana. April 25.— Replying to an inquiry as
to whether the Cuban and Spanish flags would
be entwined during the coming festivities at
tending the inauguration of the Cuban Repub
lic. President-elect Palma had sent a telegram
from Bayamo. in Santiago Province, to 'La.
Union Espanola." ■ representative Spanish,
newspaper here, in which he says as would like
to see the Spanish and Cuban Hags together at
that time, but. not knowing the local feeling, he
preferred not to express a definite opinion in
the matter. v,. -v'U '--_ w '■* •■
Vrran:'ements are being made m Havana for
an elaborate reception to th- President-elect
upon hi.- arrival here.
t GREAT CAXAI TRADE.
REMARKABLE RUSH OK BUSINESS REPORT
ED ON STATE WATERWAYS.
Albany. April -•" (Special).— Superintendent
Boyd of the Department of Public "Works
learned to-day that business upon the canals
had begun with a rush. The Erie Canal was
opened yesterday, and the reports indicate that
th<*re was a total shipment of wheat, oats and
corn amounting nearly to two hundred thousand
ton" There were cleared from. Buffalo 85.000
tons of wheat. 74.000 tons of corn and 39,339
tons -of oats.' Thus far 'no- breaks or leaks in
the State canals have been reported.
PRICE THREE CENT&
CUBAN SUGAR INQUIRY,
THE TELLER RESOLUTION AMENDED
AM> rAVORABI.Y KKFOKTED.
A RECIPROCITY MEASURE THAT WILL, EH>
LIST FULL REPUBLICAN STRENGTH
IN CONGRESS TO BE FRAMED. J
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBCXE.I
"Washington. April 25.— Having called the blnff
of the Democratic obstructionists to Cuban reci
procity legislation by reporting favorably th«
Teller resolution for an investigation of the al
legation that the American Sugar Refining Com
pany, popularly known as the Sugar Trust, owns
the bulk of this year's sugar crop in Cuba, the
next move of the Republican majority of the
Senate Committee on Relations with Cuba will
be to frame a proposition for reciprocity which
will enlist virtually the full party strength in
both branches of Congress. The committee did
not waste any time to-day in useless discussion
of the wisdom or expediency of presenting th»
Teller resolution to the Senate for consideration.
By a unanimous vote, the only absentees being
Mr. Aldrich. of Rhode Island, and Mr. Spooner.
of Wisconsin, who would have voted for ths
resolution had they been present. Senator Platt.
of Connecticut, chairman of the committee, was
Instructed to report the resolution favorably,
with only one slight modification. As reported,
the Teller resolution is as follows:
Whereas, It has been currently reported that
nearly the entire crop of Cuban sugar has been
purchased and is now held by what is generally
known as the "Sugar Trust." which is th" prin
cipal consumer of raw sugar in the United
States, and that any concessions given to the
raisers of cane sugar in the Island of Cuba, or
any measure intended for their relief, by admit
ting their sugar at redured rates of duty Into
the United Mates will only benefit the said
Sugar Trust, and that the Cubans will receive
no real benefit from such concessl ins; and
Whereas. It i? alleged that a large number of
citizens of the United States have acquired large
holdings of cane producing lands in Cuba, and
are now especially urging the reduction of duty
on sugar under the claim that such reduction
will benefit the people el Cuba; therfor* 3 , be it
Resolved. That the Committee on Relations
with Cuba be and is hereby directed to make
an investigation as to the truth of such charges
and to report to the Senate.
The part of the resolution stricken out was:
And to report in addition thereto what is th»
normal cost of making sugar in the Island of
Cuba, and also if any concessions shall be made
In the way of a reduction of the duty on sugar
coming from Cuba into the United States what
concessions should be made by the government
of Cuba, about to be established, on articles
produced in the United States and exported into
the said island of Cuba, in order to make a re
ciprocal and equitable arrangement as to ex
ports to Cuba and imports therefrom to tha
United States*.
NOT TO DELAY LEGISLATION*.
The reason for striking out this part of the
resolution Is so obvious on Its face that it scarce
ly needs elucidation. It will be observed that
the part stricken out by the committee would
have subordinated the vastly more important
work of providing at this session of Congress
for a reciprocal trade arrangement with Cuba to
th- comparatively insignificant task of deter*
mining the truth of a rumor that the sugar In
the warehouses of the island and awaiting a
market has been purchased in whole or in part
by a >r"oup of individuals in this country. A*
amended by the committee to-day, the object .of
the Teller resolution tan be attained without
delaying the legislation necessary to enable the
President to negotiate a, reciprocity treaty with,
Cuba when the insular government soon to be
installed is ready to deal with the government
of the United States on an equal and indepen
dent basis. Senator Platt. of Connecticut, and]
the other supporters of the administration's Cu
ban policy think that the investigations of Sen
ator T. Hers charges can be made in two or
three weeks, and perhaps in a much shorter
time, and even while the Inquest Is In progress
the '■'>rnn:i-t . ■■ can be framing a reciprocity bill
as a substitute; for lac crazy patchwork of th*
House. The Investigation will be conducted by
a sub-committee, composed of Mr. Platt. of Con
necticut; Mr. Burnham. of New- Hampshire, an.i
Mr. Teller, of Colorado. It is believed that the
War Department now has i- its possession all
the Information that will be required, and if
this proves to be Ike case of course the work
will be comparatively easy and short. But is
make sure that the task shall be expedited th •
committee added to the resolution as adopted
the usual clause giving authority to summon
persons and call for papers and ».mptoy a stenog-.
rapher to make a full report of the proceedings.
It is regarded „s not impossible that, pending
the Investigation, the committee will report a
reciprocity bill in order that the Senate may
dispose Si the question it» the shortest possible*
rime
TRUST CONTROLS LITTLE CUBAX SUGAR.
Th* War Department has accurate Informa
tion on the subject of the ownership and status
•>f this year's sugar crop in Cuba. On April 2
Governor General Wont!, in reply to Instructions
from Secretary Root, ttlegrapheJ as follows
from Havana:
Telegrams sent la lf>l sugar central, to which
I 2(» answers bare been received to date; also
telegrams sent to thirty-six Cuban banking
firms, to which thirty-four replies have been
received. Figure?, according to replies received,
as follows:
Output for th.- year :o Mi: 2."> 334239
Amount actually in hand« of planters ZIT 9St
SaU ami delivered to i.«l;in>! firms llH'.d.i
Contracted for in the Mam! .<:•..! not yet delivered. 43578
t*:ril«.- : as security tor loan« in the Inland . but
not sold 233 223
Held at the option o the American Re
fining Company ijm
Held at option of otrer American purchasers:...!. r'Jso
Exported to the United States BMSJ
All sugar above mentioned, except that at the
option of the American Sugar Refining Com
pany anil other American purchasers. is in the
hands of Cuban planters and Cuban and Spanish
commission houses doing business in the island
si Cuba. nvi is not at th« option of any one.-
Where held a? security for loans advanced to
planters, the planters will get the advantage of
any r&Ue in price under conditions of deposit,
as is the custom in the island. This statement
shows conclusively the absolute- falsity of the
declarations that the Sugar Trusts have control
of a considerable portion of the Cuban sugar
crop. Other statements will be furnished as
soon a-> possible.
General Wood gent it supplementary report on
Apiil 7. as follows:
Kcferent-r our telegram to-day, telegrams
sent to 11)4 sugar centrals, as previously reported
in my telegram -a inst Ten additional replies
received since, which report as follows: -
I. -.« ton*.
Output for the >ear 21.739
Amount in hands of tilant^rs 13. 2«!)
Sold and d ■: •■ -• -1 11.3U
Contracted for with Island rirm». but not delivered. ;t.oi'.»
ried&tii a-" security for loans in island, but not sold 1 Mil
All sugar above mentioned is in hands of
planters and Cuban and Spanish commission
houses doing business In the island, with th-»
exception of 2,3*58 long tons exported to United
State* None at option • f American Sugar Re
fining Company nor other American purchaser*.
Where held as security for loans, planters will
get advantage of rise in price, as stated in tele
gram of -A inst. Two remaining banking firms
replied: "Do not make loans on sugar." Above
THE BROADWAY TABERNACLE.
This famous oUI landmark, ■• Broadway arid
Thtrty-fourth-3t., will soon be removed to rrnka
way for a business* structure. We present photo* r^
Of its pastor -and several influential membtn m •
The Tribune to-morrow.— Advt. |3gp»

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