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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, April 28, 1902, Image 12

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12
SYRIANS IN SMALL RIOT.
POLICE SURROUNDED BY A
FIGHTING MOB.
THE ASIATICS HAP BEEN CELEBRAT
ING BOn EASTER-TROUBLE
STARTED BY A BANKER.
There was a small riot in Washington-st. yes
terday afternoon. As a result four men are in
the hospital nursing stab wounds, one of them
a prisoner charged with felonious assault. The
Injured are George Kahsos. of No. 14 Washing
tnn-Ft.. stabbed in the back: James Harron. of
No. 6 Albany-Et_, stabbed in the right leg;
Thomas Connolly, fourteen, of No. 29 Washing
ton-st.. stabbed in the right side, and John
Hamad y. of No. 17 TVashington-Pt., who has a
scalp wound and a stab in the side. Hamady
Is the prisoner.
Ail day the Syrians -who inhabit Washington
rt. from Battery to Rector-Pt. were celebrating
their Easter and drinking the Syrian drink
"armr" Tony Saba, a Syrian hanker. Bortjr
fvc years old. of No. 73 Waehingion-st.. started
the trouble, the police allege, by pushing a sis
ter of Mary Sullivan, who was standing in the
doorway of No. 15 Washing^on-st. The street
■was crowded, and some people yelled at Saba.
He frtarted to run. and in his flight knocked over
a little boy. The child's parents raised a cry.
awid everybody apparently started in to hit
Bomebody else.
The palrol wagon of the Church-st. station
is kept at No. IS "vVashineton-st. The police
ran nut and tried to quell the disturbance. Then
Saba pave the yell which is the leathering call
for Syrians, find in a moment two thousand
yelling- and striking Syrians gathered around
the policemen.
When th« policemen cr llected the prisoners
and put them into the wagon the mob refused \<<
let it proceed. So they telephoned to the Church
pt. ptation for the reserves. Sergeant Nugent.
Roundsman C. Halene. Detectives McGovern.
Bchults and Creed, and fifteen patrolmen rushed
up VTashington-st. to rescue the patrol wagon.
By the vigorous use of their clubs they suc
ceeded In petting through the crowd to the
wagon, and surrounded it. Then the wagon and
mob started. When they reached No. 73 Wash
lngron-st. Mary Sullivan begnn to throw beer
and soda wat^r bottles into the crowd from her
g- c escape on the third floor.
This add-d to the excitement. For a time no
one knew whence this last onslaught came.
Finally the Syrians brgan to fight nmeng them
selves. Many were the cuts and bruises thf-y
rerf >ived. The crowd was so great th.it th*>
police could not get to any of them and they do
not know ho-sv many were in.iured.
At the station a large Syrian carving knife.
double edged, about fourteen inches in length.
•was found <-,n Kamfdv.
For a long time there has been a bitter feud
between two sects of the Syrians. This was
partly the cause of the riot.
FULTOX TO START TODAY.
HOLLAND SUBMARINE BOAT EXPECTS TO
TRAVEL TO HAMPTON ROADS
I'NDER WATER.
The. Holland submarine boat Fulton will leave
this port to-day, at 4 a. m.. convoyed by the sea
polng tug Storm King and the yacht Mindora. As
soon as Sandy Hook Is left the boat will be sub
merged for a ten mile run. Returning to the sur
face, the endurance run will then be made, and it
Is possible that Hampton Roads will be reached
Without a stop.
In the vessel there Trill be three naval officers.
In addition to the regular crew— Lieutenant P. P.
Nelson and Lieutenant Arthur Mac Arthur, of the
United States Navy, and Lieutenant Oscar Cohen.
of the Austrian Navy. The Holland boat will be
In charge of F. P. Cable.
WOX'T JUSCUfiS WATER CURE.
GOVERNOR TAFT SAYS HIS TESTIMONY ON
THIS SUBJECT IS NOW BEFORE
THE COMMITTEE.
William H. Taft. Civil Governor of .he Philip
pines, who arrived In this city on Saturday night.
when seen last evening at the Holland House by
a Tribune reporter refused to talk about the recent
revelations before Congress as to the water cure
and the. report of Colonel Gardener, of Tayabaa.
When asked if this fresh testimony would make
his recall before the investigating committee neces
sary. Governor Taft replied that his testimony cov
ering these points was already before the commit
tee, and that he had nothing to add in interview
or as a witness.
One of the NBMM for Go.crnr.r T«iffs presence
In town is the dinner to be given In his honor at
the Yale CM this evening by W. T. Gilbert and
the class of WM. Covers will he laid for sixty.
When asked af to his h«alth Governor Taft re
plied:
I am gaining in strength, but I have been left
somewhat weakened by the operation. You will
remember that I promised to be in the Philippines,
by May 1. That has of course become impossible,
and 1 have decided to make no definite, agreements
about my return. But probably I shall reach the
Islands by the middle of July or the first of Au
gust, ]ea\inc this country the middle of next
month. On Tuesday I shall run up to New-Haven,
and shall probably talk over the plan of Importing
some. Filipinos for a Yale education. The plan is
full of problems, for the men must first be equipped
In English In order to qualify lor a university
training. I shall leave New-Haven on Thursday,
returning to this city, and then continuing or. to
"Washington.
GEE AT GUN FOR FORT HAMILTON.
EXPECTED TO HURL. FHELL. TWENTT-ONE MII^ES
KRUPPS .SAT ONLY FIFTEEN.
Troy. N. V.. April 27.— The authorities at the
"Wa,tervliet Arsenal expect to complete work on
the 16-inch gun that is to be placed at Fort Hamil
ton. In New-York Harbor, by June 1. The gun.
*hlch ha* been in course of construction about four
years, will be first sent to Sandy Hook for proving.
JLaM week the War Department decided to mount
th« (run on a disappearing carriage. It Is expected
that- the pin will hurl a shell twenty-one miles.
Tils is disputed by the Krupps. who contend that
it will not throw the shot more than fifteen miles.
To load the pun will require one thousand pounds
of powder and a three thousand pound projectile.
The gun whin completed will weigh one hundred
and fifty tons.
MANY TELEPHONE LINES CFT.
ETRIKING LINEMEN TLAY HAVOC NEAR NYACK
AND POB3S FERRY.
Striking linemen and their sympathizing friends
played havoc with some cf the lines of the New-
York and New-Jersey Telephone Company yester
day. The villains of Nyack and Dobbs Ferry are
completely cut off from New- York, while in Yon
kers out of eleven trunk lines to New-York only
three were in working order. Nothing definite
could be learned as to where the cuts in the lines
were or to what extent they were damaged. Noth
ing was done yesterday toward repairing the lines.
SIRE BROTHERS TO LEAVE CASINO.
On May 1 the lease of the Casino, which has been
held for the last two years by the Sire Brothers,
proprietors of the New- York Theatre, expires, and
will not again be issued to Casino, which lease has
the laFt two years by the Sire Brothers.
)rs of the New-York Theatre, expires, and
again be issued to them a new lease has
been signed" to th- Shubert Brothers, who are at
present managers of the Herald Square Theatre
The policy of light opera will be continued how
ever, and the first production under the new man
acement will also be the first New-York produc
tion of "A Chinese Honeymoon."
DEATH OF ALEXANDER COOK.
Alexander Cook, who since 1690 had hem a writer
of commercial reports for "The Evening Post."
died suddenly on Saturday night while sitting in
th« parlor of his home. No. 148 Willow-st.. Brook
lyn. He wu born In this city elxty-four years ago.
A* a young: man he went v.to the grain business as
a commission merchant, and for many years wap'a
member of the firm of Bruce & Cook. Be had been
m. member of the Produce Exchange and of the
H*jr.:ltoii and Rembrandt clubs, of "Brooklyn. Ha
I— TTrr *. widow, one son and one daughter.
SURRENDER OF GUEVARRA.
LUCBAVS SUCCESSOR TAKES BY
GRANT'S EXPEDITION.
Manila. April 27.-General Frederick D. Grant
has ascended the Gendara R:ver. in the island
of Famar. and has brought the insurgent leader
Guevarra and hip entire command down to the
coast. General Grant 1 ? expedition went up the
river in the gunboats Besro and Florida, sev
eral eteam launches and native Hghterp.
Guevarra's command consists of Rafael Se
bastian, Abaki and thirty-eight other officers,
I*o men and 161 rif.es.
Three hundred insurgents, with 131 rifles, are
expected ,to arrive at Catbalogan. Samar. to
day, to surrender formally to the American au
thorities. . , - „,._,
Three thousand bolomen. twenty-eight of them
armed with rifles, surrendered yesterday at
Sulat, alsp in Pamar.
Guevarra succeeded General I.ucbar. to tne
command of the insurgent forces in Pamar when
the latter was captured last February. He an
nounced his intention to surrender last Marcn.
PRAISE FOR ARMY'S WORK.
Manila. 1 April 27.-At a farewell dinner here
to the officers of the fhh Infantry, the acting
Civil Governor. Luke E. Wright, spoke highly of
the military- forces. He said the army, under
circumstances of surprising difficulty, had paved
the way for the work of the civil authorities.
and that only a few cases of friction between
the two branches of povernment had occurred.
He said that General Chaffee. whose opinion
might at times have differed from those of the
civil authorities, had been a most loyal sup-
PO ReJiylnK to Civil Governor Wright. General
Chaffee said that the officers of the army toew
that their duty to the country demanded their
utmost efforts- to sustain the civil authorities
and to suppress the rebellion.
TROMTNENT LBADBB YIELDS.
Manila. AprU 27-Captain L. W. V. Kennon.
of the Otb Infantry, reports from the island
of Negros the surrender of the ladrone leader
Rufo. with ir.S officers and men of his com
mand, together with twelve guns. 140 bolos,
seven spears and a few revolvers and daggers.
Captain Kennon says this surrender means the
.•"TITig up of the whole of the southern coast
Of the island of Negros. After Pap:. Wo Rufo
-was the most important ladrone chief on the isl
and He promises to force Papa Isio and his
few remaining followers to surrender. Papa
Isio was appointed a colonel in the insurgc
army by General Malvar one year ago.
MANY DEATHS FBOII CHOLERA.
Manila. April 27. -The cholera situation in the
islands does not show any Improvement. Cases
are reported among the American soldiers in the
Camarines provinces of Southern Luzon and
elsewhere, but so far few Americans have been
attacked and the disease is mainly confined to
natives and Chinamen.
In Manila there have been rasos and 44H
deaths from cholera, while the provinces report
L9BB cases and 1.169 deaths.
J/.4r BE FOR A COLER BOOM.
RADICALS IN BROOKLYN ORGANIZE A NEW
DEMOCRATIC ASSOCIATION.
Steps were taken on Saturday night to organize a
mem Democratic club in Brooklyn. The leaders in
the movement are Coroner Michael J. Flaherty
and others of the radical element of the Brooklyn
Citizens Union, which last fall started out to force
the nomination of Bird B. Coler for Mayor by the
Citizens Union.
It is understood that one of the object of the
organization is to further the political ambitions of
Mr. Coler. It was Coroner Flaherty and his radical
friends who some months ago got up a dinner in
honor of Mr. Coler. This was generally considered
to be the launching of a boom for the former Con
troller as a candidate for Governor. Mr. Coler is
in a sense the idol of the single taxers and labor
people, represented by Coroner Flaherty. Alfred J.
Boulton. Peter Aitken and others.
At the meeting on Saturday night, which was
held in Court -St.. near State-st.. there were forty
two present. Including Mr. Flaherty. Mr. Aitken.
Mr. Boulton. Robert Baker and Richard Whales.
"Whalen is a Coffey Democrat, and it is expected
that a large number of members of the Brooklyn
Democracy who are not altogether satisfied with
the leadership of Michael J. CofTey will Join the
new club. Otto Kempner. who only a few days ago
said publicly that none of the present independent
Democratic organizations were so constituted that
they could become much of a power in Kings
County, may be persuaded to come into the new
movement.
The name of the new club will probably con
tain the word Jefferson, as Its organizers Intend
to emphasize strongly iheir ideas of Jeffersonlan
principles. Th*> advisability of renting a floor in a
building in Court-st.. near State-st. is being dis
cussed. The rental of these premises would be
about $l.(»"> 0 a year. It is proposed bo fit up the
quarters with the conveniences of a regular club.
a:: this will cost money. None of those who are
openly interested in the movement are wealthy, and
it Is "understood that ex-Controller Coler has pro
mised to give financial aid.
When Coroner Flaherty was seen last night he
was asked if the purpose of the n»w organization
was to boom Mr Coler for Governor.
"No." he replied. "Mr. Cnler's name was not
mentioned last night. We are all good blends of
Mr. Coler. but this club has not been organized to
boom him for any position. Our aim is to better
the Democratic party in this borough and to stand
up for the principles "enunciated in the Kansas City
platform, with perhaps the elimination of the sil
ver doctrine."
The coroner refused to discuss the plans of the
organization at any greater length. Another meet
ing of those interested in the movement will bo
held next Friday night at No. 193 Ralph-aye.
7.V MEMORY OF WENNERBERG.
SWEDES OF THIS CITY TO GIVE A CONCERT IN
HONOR OF THE STATESMAN AND COMPOSER.
The Swedish-Americans of New- York will hold a
memorial concert next Sunday for Gunnar Wenner
berg. the statesman, poet and composer. He was
born in the city of Linkoeping, October 2, 1817, and
died at the Castle of I>ekoe. August 23, 190 L He
served as a university tutor at Upsala from 1*46
to 1R49. as a college professor at Skara, 1R49 to IS<X>:
as a chief of the government's educational bureau
at Stockholm. 18W to 1870; as a governor of a
province at Vexloe, 1875 to 18S8. and as a member
of the Cabinet, with the portfolio of church ani
education, from 1870 *o 1875 and from 18S8 to 1891.
The executive committee arranging the concert
consists of Charles K. Johansen, chairman: Otto
Reidberg. secretary; John T. Smith, financial sec
retary, and F. Teden. treasurer. The hymns will
be sung by a mixed chorus of over four hundred
voices under the leadership of Arvid Ak^rllnd, mv-
Fical director. The choirs of the following- churches
will take part: Lutheran Gustavus Adolphus
Church. Harlem Lutheran Church. Lexington Ave
nue Methodist Church. First Swedish Baptist
Church. Bethesda Mission Church, of York;
Lutheran Bethlehem Church. St. Paul's Lutheran
Church. Bethanla Methodist Church, Pilgrim Mis
sion Church. First Swedish Baptist Church. Dean
Street Methodist Church, of Brooklyn, and the
Swedish Ladies' Chorus, of Brooklyn. The patriotic
songs by Wennerberg for male voices will he sung
by the " Christian Brotherhood Singing Society.
Lvran and Svea, of New-York, and the Glee Club
and Orpheus, of Brooklyn. 125 trained voices In all.'
The soloists engaged are lime. Hanson-Gray, of
Worcester. Mass.. soprano; Miss Martina John
ptone. the Swedish violinist; Professor Josef Hag
strom. of Greenville. S. C, barytone; Professor
John T. Erickson. organist, and lime. Calleberg.
accompanist.
The entire proceeds of the concert will be given
to the Swedish Hospital of Brooklyn, the Swedish
Lutheran Emigrant Home and Scandinavian Emi
grant Home, of New-York; the Kallman Orphan
Home, of Brooklyn, and the Swedish Gustavus
Adolphus Orphanage, of Jamestown.
BIG STRIKE OF WOMEN IMMINENT.
CHICAGO CAPTAINS AND ENGINEERS VOTE TO
SUPPORT MEN ALREADY OUT.
Chicago, April 27. — Captains and engineers of the
Chicago bag fleet of the Great Lakes Towing Com
pany hav>- decided to support the strike of the
company's firemen and engineers. At a meeting
to-day they declared themselves in full sympathy
with th» disgruntled workers. The decision means
that the licensed men will neither work with non
union firemen or deckhands, nor do the work of
the striking tugmen themselves. The meeting also
developed a strong sentiment in favor of calling a
session of the grand grievance cczr.mittee of the
association to make the support of the strike gen
eral, which would involve 1.&00 licensed tugmen.
NEW-YORK DAILY TKIBTmE. MONDAY, :\PRIL^g I _l9o2 L _
]& fIINT^fiNEpIBNITUBE
TWIN BEDS.
Some of our most attractive suites we now
make with twin beds, In all woods and designs
to carry out any style of decoration.
Satin-wood. White Mahogany, Olive-wood,
Sycamore, Bird's-eye Maple. Birch, all finishes
of Oak. Mahogany inlaid in French. Empire
Bra C ss °Beds. $I*so each. White Enamel brass
trimmed, $6.7s— and Enamelled woods which we
specially recommend for the ?easnore.
Always the latest comforts at factory prices,
if you „
*BUY OFTHE MAKER
Geo. C.Flint Co.
43,4.5 and 47 WEST £3 D ST.
NEAR BROADWAY.
FACTORY: 154 nd 156 WEST I9 T -"STR££T.
PANIC OVER VACCTXATICLV
TENEMENT HOUSE DWELLERS COR
RALLED ON ROOFS AND FIRE
ESCAPES BY POLITE.
Excitement was rife in The Bronx last even-
, ng scores of persons were panic stricken, and
for hours the excitement prevailed. The trouble
starter! when it was discovered that James But
ler a hostler, and his wife, Kate, who lived in
three rooms on the third floor of the four story
crowded tenement house at No. 2.017 Third-aye
were suffering from smallpox in an advanced
stage. , ,
Dr Daly, of Alexander-aye. and One-hundred
and-thirty-sixth-st.. when called to the Butler
home discovered that both had smallpox in the
worst' form. Mrs. Butler could not move from
her bed.
Dr. Daly left the house, ostensibly to get some
medicine. Once in the street he made a dash
for a telephone, and. calling up the Board of
Health, told the officials there that their ser
vices were desired immediately in the house.
When Dr. Spencer, chief inspector of the Board
of Health, arrived there with his entire corps
of vaccinator.", he discovered that But'.er had
fled. The hostler had become suspicious of Dr.
Daly's sudden departure. Dr. Spencer declares
he was aware that he had smallpox, but he
feared to be removed to North Brother Island.
When it became known in the neighborhood
that Butler was suffering from smallpox, and
that he whs at large, the excitement was in
tense. The news quickly spread that everybody
on the block would have to submit to vaccina
tion, and men, women and children fled from
houses and sought to elude the vacclnators.
Twenty policemen from the Morrisanla station
were called, however, and only three of the
tenement houses. Nos. 2.615, 2.017 and 2.C.19.
were quarantined. More than three hundred
occupants of the houses were vaccinated, the
majority of them much against their will. Many
of the men and women attempted to escape by
going down the fire escapes and climbing to the
roofs, but policemen were at hand at every
place of egress, and appeals and entreaties were
unheeded.
A policeman said he had seen a man go In
the basement of a hous.- at No. 584 East One
hundred-and-flfty-fourth-st. The house was
surrounded, and the physicians and several po
licemen (iart>-rl into the cellar and began a
search for Butler. They found film hiding In a
coalbln, and after much difficulty he was taken
to the street, bundled Into an ambulance aa !
S'-nt to North Brother Island. His wife was
also sent to that Institution.
nn\ii: news.
PROMINENT ARRIVALS AT THE HOTEIA
ASTOB Ex-Governor Alonxo B. Cornell, of
Ithaca FIFTH AVENUE rustic* Edgar L. Purs
man, i>f the New- York State Supreme Court HOL-
L.\Nl>— Justice D. Cady Henick, of the New-York
St nt»- Supreme court; Governor William H. Taft,
of the Philippines. IMPERIAL Dr Jamei N
Bushrod. of Philadelphia. NAVARRE Captains
C. R. Nelson, B. C. Gilbert -uAi M. O Blgelow,
V. S. A PLAZA W. 11. H. Newman, of Buffalo.
WALDORF Ex-Congressman Wallace T, Foot*,
jr.: Frederick Cook, ex-Secretary of the Stat-- ot
New-York; Colonel L, Victor Baughman, ■•' Fred
erick, Mil.
WHAT IS GOING ON TO-DAY.
Conpreratlonal ministers. United Charities Building, 11
a. m.
Sunrise Club dinner, Clarendon " ''■'. <V-jr> p. m.
Miss Ellen M. Stone's lecture, Broadway Tabernacle, 8:15
p. m.
Municipal Art Society. National Arts Club, No. 87 West
Thirty-fourth ?t.." 8:30 p. in.
Harlem Republican Club dinner, Harlem Casino, evening.
St. Michael*! Chapter. C. A. I. I*. No. 220 West Ninety
ninth-Bt.. 8 p. m.
Jacob A. Tula's lecture, People's Institute, Cooper Union,
8 p. m
City Btadatrates, West Bide Court. 8 p. m
New-York Academy of Sciences, No. 108 West Fifty
fifth M.. .s p. m.
MIKE PRESIDENTS CONFER.
NO PREDICTIONS AS TO THE RE.SUX.T OP" TO
MORROWS MEETrNO.
An informal conference was held yesterday at
the Ashland House between John Mitchell, presi
dent of the United Mine Workers, and the three
presidents of the anthracite districts regarding the
coming conference by the committee of seven to
morrow. None of them would express an opinion
on the situation.
"If the miners gain th« concessions they are
seeking." Mr. Mitchell remarked, "the situation
will be brighter."
I'resident W. H. Truesdale, of the Lackawanna
Railroad, who is a member of the committee of
nevf-n. f-ald that the miners ought to be satisfied
with present conditions. There was no reason, he
thought, why any concessions should he made to
them.
"The rank and file of the mm' rs are perfectly
satisfied with the wapres and conditions." he said.
"As to thr chances of a settlement I prefer not to
say anything."
When asked how Mr. Mitchell had stood at the
conference regarding the concessions demanded on
behalf of the miners h« said:
"That I cannot say anything about. Mitchell, I
believe, does not want a strike."
Chairman K. R. Thomas, of the board of di
rectors of the Krie Railroad Company, said h»»
caiiM mnkc DO predictions regarding th*> possible
result of thr* meeting to-morrow. It was like toss
ing up a coin on chance. No one could tell before
hand which side would come uppermost.
Ralph M. Easley. secretary of the civic Federa
tion, spent some time in his office yesterday, con
trary to his usual custom. He would make no
predictions as to the possible outcome of the com
ing conference by the committee of seven.
NEW CLAIMANTS FOR RICE ESTATE.
THREE DAUGHTERS OF A FIRST COUSIN OF MUR
DERED MAN TO FILE PAPERS SOON.
Trenton, N. J.. April 27 (Special).— Three sisters.
Mrs. Ella Smith, Mrs. C. Augustus La Rue and Mrs.
Harvey K. Kunyon. all of this city, are claimants
for a share of the estate of William M. Rice. The
women are daughters of George W. Rice, who was
a first cousin of the murdered man. They have
placed their cases In the hands of an attorney, and
they will he submitted within a few days.
ARRESTED AT FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL.
A man who registered at the Fifth Avenue Hotel
last Thursday as James L. Lynch, of Lynn. Mass.,
was arrested at the hotel yesterday. He was
locked up in the West Thirtleth-st. station, charged
with violation of the Hotel law.
MARINE INTELLIGENCE.
MINIATURE ALMANAC.
Sunrise S :021 Sunset 6:53|M00n rises pm ll:52|Moon"» as* IP
HIGH WATER.
A.M. — Sandy Hook lO:4s|Gov. Island ll:21(Hell Gate
P.M.— Sandy Hook |Gov. Island (Hell Gate 1:10
INCOMING STEAMERS.
TO-DAT.
Ves»el. From. Line.
,Aii/i./^. - ... fill— in i. -April r?_ . . , „_ L
We probably sell more livery than any
other maker in this country.
Why?
Details are right; livery's a technical
subject, and we served our apprentice
ship years ago. Now we're past masters
of livery good form.
Delivery is quick: whipcords for un
dress, body coats for dress livery: even
the hard-to-get boots and stockinette
breeches are ready for fitting.
Our Livery Guide for carriage ser
vants, and half tone pictures of proper
liveries we are always glad to mail.
Rogers, Peet & Company.
258 Broadway, cor. Warren.
and 7 and 9 Warren St. ■.«-_ «n „r , i,.r ,
542 Broadway, cor. 13th. Aye. "» « fll byb v mull.
and 140 to 14S 4th Aye. b y niali.
1260 Broadway, cor. 32d.
and 54 West 33d St.
'Amnsemenia.
BUFFALO BILL'S\
wild rtr\ west]
ROUGH l^y RIDERS/
MADISON SQUARE GARDEN^/
The bicgesVthinc IN towSn.
IJxoillKt, Novel, lutoro»tiu(\
NEVER I *\ FULL OF \
8O GOOD JLIFE AND I
AS NOW I _J VICOR i
300 S4C«»zi. »r» tbo Saddle /
PRiCf'-n. 3«0.. noa., 7«o. «i.oo. •— si.na. V
Boiu <« «Mlai, »0.00 and •IJ.OO.
BROADWAY TABERNACLE
TO-NIGHT AT 8:15
SHT ELLEN M. STONE
Mirsionary, fc ■■la tall ■•■■ W ■«•■■■■
Peats Jl and $1 80. at Dltson's, 667 Broadway, and at
the Tabernacle. ~* POND
MANAGEMENT J - B - PONP
BROADWAY Thea.. 41"t %£.*£"'*>%&
ROADWAY Wed. Mat. Prices 60c to *I.«>.
LAST WEEKS! I.ANT WEEKS!
VS^^r ! FRENCH OPERA GOMIQUE.
& 7th Ay. Prices -rf) IMIRHT and Tues NKnt.
2.00 to 50c lU-NlUni Also Wed. Mat.,
|,KS MOIMII KTAIUS I>l COUVEXT.
Wed NlKht. LES CIX)CHES i ■;•: - - .IINUVII.I.'-; (CMm««
of Normandy): Thura. and Krl. Nlghta and frat Mat
ORI'HEE AUK ENFEKS; Saturday Night, LA Pfc>Kl-
CUOL£. ,
EMPIRK TIIEATREJ Broadway and 40th Ft.
I'MIMIir i -X- 8:30. Mats. Wed. & Sat. 2:15.
THKATHR THE niPDK'i'l^ 1 /.,,,...,.,.
compa.\v. ok nEi.\« i:.vn>KST.
SEW SAVOY THK.ATKK. 3tth St. A Broadway.
Eve». 8:15. Matinees Wednesday and Saturday 2jWj
ROBERT LDESON oi^VCt"^.
K.MCKEhIIOCKEn Thentrr. B'way A 3Sth St.
ljktl 6 NiKhts at b:ls. 1-oat .Sat. Matinee. 2:15.
Francis Wilson lin 1 " THE TOREADOR
Next Monday— Ceo. W. I^-derer'a "The Wild Rose,"
IfAOISOBi S«i. THEATRE. 24th St. and B"way.
Kvcs hM Matlnr'-s Wednesday and Saturday 2:15.
WILLIAM COLLIER. ul'imomvt.
SSSJKS,.. CRITERION
"^J^.^V,^ 0 LESLIE CARTER
In bin New rinr. 111 BARRY.
Herald Si|. Theatre. Nil.". Mitt. Sat.. Slid
lulu ,ii Asi DOLLY^VARDEN
111 A I I kt*V T C way i 30th St. Ev K s.. S:2O.
ff ALLAUIV O Mats. Wad, & Sat., 2:15.
&?£& ' THE LAST APPEAL.
May 6th. New Musical Comedy, "The Show Girl."
II It I. KM E\enlnpK. «:15. Mat. Sat. only.
«>l*l : It V jum:i>ii jeffeksox.
HOUSE. I To-night. RIP VAN \VI\KI.K.
Mil DD A V lIILL THEA, I-ex. Ay«. & 42d St.
U n nH I m atim:i: evkiit DAT.
Doubl» Hill— 'Turn Him Out" & "The Bells."
%Km. AMELIA BINGHAM
Matinee* Last five weeks in the test
Wednesday I pl a >' since diplomacy.
Saturday. A MOUEK.\ M it \ i.i .n.
IRVING I'i.\( TBBATSE. I^\st WEEK.
Mond, & Tues.. .S«>\ M:\IH.VI- »t BONN In
••Kl\<i LEAR." Wed.. Thurs., FVi. & s.it Eve.. i
"DIE Illlilli: ROUE." With ODIXOM, HO>\,
SO.NXEXTHAL and DIRECTOR niVHil'.l).
Sat.. Farewell Mat.. M»VM: >TII \l, as "iIATHAH
l»i:il WEISE." Mond.. Farewell performance.
ir^f £S 8 «I°" ' THE HALL OF FAME.
5^ yNSISy N SIS s,T ORK ' THE HALL OF FAME.
ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 14th St. & Irving PI.
TO-NIGHT il.i 1 . C. WHITNEY'S Original Production.
QUO VADISi=S
[Ti.es. 25. f.O. 7;.. 1.00. Mats. Wed. Ac Sat.. 2. Eve..8:15
Flrby ► Gibraltar. April 8 „
Tripoli Hamburg. April 9 Braver
California Naples. April 1) Anchor
Cltta dl Torino Naples. April 9 L* Veloce
X Maria Theresla... Gibraltar. April 20 N G Lloyd
Manitou London. April 17 At-Trans
Attavlta Naples. April 11
Afton Gibraltar, April 13
•Seneca Havana. April 22 N V & Cuba
•M.iltke Hamburg. April 19 Hamb-Am
•Georglc Liverpool. April IS White Star
Panama I'aulllac April 14 „
•Caracas Porto Cabello. April 18 Red D
Proteus New-Orleans. April 22 Cromwell
Kan Marcos Brunswick. April 2."> Mallory
TUESDAY. APRIL. 29.
•Kronprlnz William. Bremen. April 22 N r, Lloyd
Frieplßiid Antwerp. Apr!! 19 Re.l star
•Orizaba Colon. April 22 Panama
Concho Galveston. April 23 Mai!ory
El Dorado New-Orleans. April 24 Morgan
WEDNESDAY. APRIL ?.o.
Majestic Liverpool, April 23 White Star
Perugia Naples. Aprl! 16.. Italian
Pontiac Gibraltar. April 16 Medltn A N V
Sardesrna Naples. April Ifl . Italian
Iroquots... Jacksonville, April 27 —Clyde
•Brines mail.
OUTGOING STEAMERS.
TO-DAY.
Vessel. For. Line. Malls close. Vessel sails
Jefferson. Norfolk, Old Dominion 3:00 prn
TUESDAY. APRIL 20.
Archimede. Italy, Italian 8:30 a m 11-00 a m
Finance. Colon. Panama B:3oam l:UOl>in
Pretoria. HamburK. Harnb-Am , lh ,,, m
El Slklo. New-Orleans. Morgan 300 nm
Apache. Charleston. Clyde 3 : oOr>m
Hamilton. Norfolk. Old Dominion 3 : <>onm
Silvia. Newfoundland. Red Cross 10:00 a m 12:00 m
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 30.
St Louis. Southampton. American 0:30 urn 10:00 am
Oceanic. Liverpool. White Star 7:30 am 11 iV> a m
Zeeland. Antwerp. Red Star 10:i*am 12-OOm
Laurentlan, Glasgow. Allan State .
Eabine. Galveston. Mallory 3:00 pm
Jamestown, Norfolk. Old Dominion . 3'oopm
Catania, Maccio. Sloman 8:00 a m 10:00 am
Horrox. Brazil. Lamport * Holt 11:30 am" 2:00 pm
SHIPPING NEWS.
PORT OF NEW-YORK— APRIL 27. 1902.
ARRIVED.
Steamar Georgian (Br). Parker, Liverpool April 16. with
mdhe. to Frederick Leyland & Co Limited. Arrived at the
Bar at 3:15 p m.
Steamer I mbrla <Br>. Dutton. Liverpool April 19 and
Queenstown 20. with mds.\ 100 cabin and 757 steerage
passengers to Vernon H Brown & Co. Arrived at the Bar
at 6:22 a m
Steamer St Louis. Fassow, Southampton and Cherbourg
AprU VX, wlth-miim. 222 cai>tQ usuir <ii> *teexa«tt pajaaar-
O'Neal's
Announce for To-day, Monday,
Sale of Trimmed Millinery
An Exceptionally Fine Assortment of
Toques, Walking Hats and Round Hats
In a large variety of designs, all handsomely jS\ S\r\
trimmed . . . I U.UU ?acn
(Millinery Showroom.)
We will also show on the Main Floor a large and varied Mod of Simply
Trimmed Hats appropriate for wear with shirtwaists at unusually attractive
Pf Latest and Best Shapes in Untrimmed Hats
AH the popular braids and colors.
Fine Flowers. Foliage, Ornaments, Crowns and Braids at Lowest Prices.
Women's Cloak and Suit Dept.
Special Values for To-Day.
40.00 Suits at 29.75
lust a special lot made from Imported Canvas Etamine over silk, also a
Granite Etamine. ruffled silk drop, unique design. They are all handsomely
trimmed with tailored Taffetas, have fancy vestees and are very EgM in weight.
59.00 Suits at 44.75.
These are made from Imported Woo! Berepe over silk. " Paquin ' Copy,
one of the very newest designs; Blacks. Royals, Tans. Creams, etc. Un
questionably the best value of the season.
Important Values in Jackets.
To-day, Monday, a special purchase of the New Slot Seam g^ —mm
Jackets, low-busted shapes, in Tans and Castors, lined with \§ 1
white Liberty Satin or Taffeta ••■■•• ,-™ • M **
Jf3f- Regular value 15.00
And the GREATEST BARGAIN OF THE SEASON in
Women's Cloth Eton Jackets.
They are Silk lined, new designs, finished with Moire mm
collars and long tie bows €l^% Each
s£^» Regular value 10.00 %^ • ****
Great Sale of Silks.
10,000 Yards Japanese Corded Wash Silks,
in a complete line of colors, also in a!! white, best quality imported,
39c Yard
Also 3,000 Yards Black Peau de Soie,
soft finish, wear guaranteed,
jf^^ Regular value 1.50,
Sixth Avenue, 20th to 21st Street.
Slmnscmcnta.
DDn(>TflO'C I "l»c Vaudeville, Ills: Comedy.
rnUL; o | 521 '->c.. Res. 73<-.: Box Seats *i.
OOn CT i Helens Mora. Hill ft Stlvlany. Halnes 4
LOU Ok. { Vldocq. Carroll Johnson. 25 Star Acts.
r-TLJ AW 5 'IVit \\ cifflii(|ti>ii," M:.->" Kelm. Mr
Ol AY. • Bond A Biff Stock. Best Vau<-v. Orch.
COTLI CT l •■«.lorlima." Bl* Stock & Vaude.. Daily
00 111 O I . } Souvenir Mats, lot I-»!l"5>
1 nf-TM CT i 'The Cherry Plckem." Sensational
• L.D In O I . Hcenes. 13!* Stock A Vaude.. Or h.
AIITDI^AKI «-D ST. AND BTH AYE.
AMERICAN Ev s. 8:15 2.v .. He.. 50c
Mat. Dally eic't Mon.. 23c. ! CAII.ME>.
a ff a ll*O B-wtf I BEST SHOW IN TOWS.
lCt I I H X «"J 30— C.reat Act»-30
IVLiI I II M 14th St. I PRICES >.-,<-. and SOe.
manbattan^^* Broadway A 33d St.
Mil HERBERT I MISS KKFIE I LAST
KFICKV SHASNOX. I T Times.
ill -HER LORI) A\O MASTER."
. . • Tuaa. May 6, MRS. FISKE a» TES3.
D_ • x/ iO' B'war & 30th Overture, 9.
ALY o m ■«■■■■ Wednesday & Sat.. 2.
T-,r QAM Tfi V
i,,\s: WEEK. aj II II I LI I
Mnstcal CooMdy. Wm urn "v.v^niwo
MONDAY. MAT 12 - KIN POPO
14tfc St. Theatre. j^^V -J JOS. HART.
Mat*. Wed. a sat |r>/^ !*%fi(f| «'arrib
May 12— l<M>th Tim*. l/^Dd|jn|/n! DE MAR
|-» A PTAD'C CONTINIOUS.
PASTOR o -°«- and SOc '
£iff A anclatr. W«rf & Curran. Touhry A Lacy. Others.
EDEN I WORLP IN WAX. New il-nuya.
EDEN cT* c■ar o o r ar h
MUS E E ! Orchestral Concerf & -■<-.-. 1 Solol»t».
(the Curt
QUEENS CO. JOCKEY CLUB
AQUEDUCT. L.. I .
Racing Every Week Day at 2:30 P. M.
Admlmtcn t« Orand Stand ■»<»: Ladles. ««*
pi l" VS. P M. and from Flatbush A%e. 11:04 A.
M-T 1. 1:25. 1:60 and 1:04 P. M
fllcetings.
QUVRTERLY MEETING of the American
Institute May Ist. at 8 o'clock P. M.. at 1» West
44th Street. WM. T. PEOPLES. Secy.
K»r» to the International Navigation Co. Arrival at the
Ha /r. a :™Vr°Brm,h Empire (Br. new. M»^.O«!»
Antwerp April 13. with mdse to Sanderson A S?on. Ar
"^a^Ry^am ■v. W ,e T? saris? AprU
i- and Boulogne 18 with mdw. 101 cabin ami 1.135
steerage, pasii-njen. to Holland-America Line. Arrived at
"^^MtaMtti «■■>. Falke. Stettin April 11 with
mdse to the Hamburg-American Une. Arrived at th«
B % r t^mer P X?nla (Pan). Knife. Copenhagen April 7 and
AalborßlO. w"th md,e to Funch. iS« & Co. Arrived at
%.?me"s 7 ab?n* P <Brt. Taylor. Cape Town March 21. in
haitMt to Norton & Son. Arrived at the Bar at 4 am.
Steamer Kaffir Prince (Brt. Smythe. Rio de Janeiro
Mar-h 11 Panto, April 3 and Barbados » with md« to
,he ICSeawr Co. Arrived at the Bar at 3:35 ■ m.
Steamer \lbls (Nor\ Chrlstoffersen. CliaflliajM April
18 and Matanzas 23. with 350 horses and 1» men of the
•M rivalry to the fntted States Quartermaster's De
partment; vessel to "W D MM Arrived at the Bar
"^'earner New-York. Marmlon. San Domingo April 14.
Macnrl* 18 Sanchez and Samana 1!>. Puerto Plata and
Monte Crlstl 20 and Turks Island, with md?e and 7 cabin
pa"senser» to William V Clyde & Co. Arrived at the Bar
at <!teamer n prins Wtllem 111 <Dutch>. Jutte. Paramaribo
AD 'ril 7 Demerara * Trtnldad 10. Carurano 11 Cumana
ard Ou'anta 12 U"» Guam 14. Puerto Cabello 15. Cm
17 Tarmel 10 Am Caves 10 and Port au Prince 21. with
mdse and 27 passenger* to Kunhardt & Co. Arrived at
the Bar at 11 am
steamer Sablne. Young. c.alveston April If), with mdse
and pafseniters to Charles H Mallory & Co.
Steamer El Rio. Parker. New-Orleans April 22. with
m ,W to John T Van Sickle.
Steamer George Farwell. Rrewjter. Fernandtna. Fla.
"steanvr San Marcos. Aviry. Brunswick, fia, April 25.
Pteanrr Sin Marcs. Avt-ry Brun«wl. k. «-,«. April 2.V
•with mdse and pas?enn"r» to Charles H MallOrjr & Co.
Steamer Jefferson. Dole. Newport News an.l Norfolk,
■with md«e and passengers to the Old Dominion S» Co.
Steamer Oulf Stream. Swain. Philadelphia, with mdae
to William P Clyde * Co.
Steamer tassell. Haley. Boston April 23. to the MM
Ca Sandy 0 H a nU SS N.\l.. Arrll 27. 9:30 p. nu-Wlnd w t- M
northwest, light breeze; cl'-nr.
SAILED.
Steamers Admiral Sampson, for Port Antonio. Aragon.
Georgetown. 8 C: Brilliant (Ger). Flushing: Buffalo (Br).
Hull; City of Philadelphia. Baltimore; Dona Maria (Port).
Azores, Madeira. I,:<N>n, etc; Evelyn. Tampa and Pen
sacola; Richmond Castle (Br). Singapore. Manila. Hong-
Kong, etc. via Norfolk.
THE MOVEMENTS OF STEAMERS.
FOREIGN PORT*.
Queenstown. April 27, 9:40 a m — Sailed, steamer Luc*nla
t.Br). McKay, from Liverpool for New-York.
Brtmto. A^rti JB— Arrived. ttMimr BtuvU (O«r). Ke«*-
1 .00 V-nl
Tribune Publications.
Trthnnr Almanac. 1902 — Best number ever put
forth by The Tribune. Carefully revised. enlarged, and
with a rich budjeet of special features. The Record of
Sports Includes a statement of "best performances known
In each »port. All the political, financial and other Im
portant statistics of the past year, with full election
tables, the party platform*, and a great variety of social
and other Interesting feature*. In paper covers. 25 cent*
a copy, postpaid. In cloth covers, 11.00.
Almanac for Preceding Years.— IS7» la
1900. 25 cents a copy each.
War At la*. This atlas of America. Cuba. Porto Rico.
the West Indies, the Philippines and Hawaii, with ocean
routes clearly shown and the length of each, and the
population of principal cities. Is as valuable cow that th«
war Li over as durtn* the great struggle. It ha» thirteen
large colored maps. Spanish names are pronounced. Only
a few copies on hard. 25 cents each, postpaid.
Tribune Index. — Tribune Is the only American
newspaper which prints at the end of each year an Index
of Its Dally <and one of the very few la the world a:
large). The document i» an alphabetical Index of tha
dates of the year. The numbers for lsiK> and 196* coat
SI a cooy each. Indexes for previous years as far fcaclt
as IST6 (except for ISTS. 1579. l.v>s». 1894. lsi»s, loUT and
1000. which are out of print) 50 cents each.
Knitting and Crochet. — Pattern* for garments,
tidies maps, chair covers, etc Six different pamphlets.
each sixty-four pages or more. Each 10 cents; the six for
60 cents.
Summer Leisure.— good collection of love stories.
One hundred pages. Just a* good for winter reading. 10
cents.
Dlnttley Tariff.— Rates Now la Fore*. Compared
with Those of the Previous Act. 10 cents.
Ships of the >mvy.— Pictures of American Navy
Vessels In the War with Spain. 10 cents.
Portraits of Our Late President.— On heavy
woodcut paper, with black border. 5 cena per copy.
Pri»e War Stories.— Over 4O Tales of Battles in tha
f\var Written for To. Tribune by Actual Partici
pants. Magazine size. S3 pp. 25 cents.
True War Stoi n.-A Second Collection of ThrKl
inj Narratives, fill of lacidaai and Pathos. Jiag^ln.
size. S* pp. 25 cent*.
Trusts.— A Defence of Them by 9. C. T. Dodd. and
an Attack by T. V. P>w lerly. Brochure. 5 cent*.
Village Improvement.— Essays written for Tha
Trtbun" by thTute Prof. B G. Northrop, tha Asostl. of
this Movement. Brochure. 5 cents.
Occupations o* Women—This highly toterwtfcil
SSTTrTstoS.. C?. 7 Ea« 16th Street. Naw-Tora.
Yacht K».-«- Extra.— Tte dtory of the InterTianonal
v f- tv" "ora c-st w last, with illustration* of aU
«iV "re« Racers and an account of the preparation* tor
th* races of k»
STIV aJSSSS- in the Most Important Un*. of Ita Da
velopment.
eight large pages. 10 cents.
... i.-v View of Greater Sfw-Torfc-A
D d nor v" wing New- York CIV, Us fort*.
colorsd "£*£'£' Vlth part of Staten lataod. painted
and the ,LJ, L J- lwe X. VI Tribune. Tnere Is a guide to the view.
cent* aach.
ihn rn-ted States for :.o cent, ea^h
Review. - 1 each a year.
t_ » few cop."B of the -Imperial Atl»*
of the w *\°,r£;» Wrought by recent Wars. The Rao*
talnins the •j^ngesWrou ? . m
McNally «= C< ;-. MH , contains- 160 (olio pages 11* »>y \*
to the year IWJ-- £?£, £ale colored map. of each State
inches m stz«. d o J a each Island acquired by War. of th»
and Territory and or c provlnce » o f Canada and ta»
and population ofth* al^^ b . tle and < ji 9taac »s cf
Another W. the * l « a / on 9 and eclipses. A third «*»—■•
planets, he tides. national debts of the coxing*
graphic 'V",*." Marginal notes explain the population of
of tha world. 55a The Atla* Is bound handsomely to
each City and E^e.iai attention la paid to our "New r>oe
heavy cloth. E^'/^^X^each succesaiv. terrtwrUl
M *Kem;««a-c« shonld he made or »o-e,
order or draft, to avoid los. In the mail*-
THE TRIBUNE, NEW-YORK.
tns New- York; 26th. .ailed, steamer Bremen «*£'
Ntertch Nrw-York via Cherbourg (and passed &*■**
proce»ded>- sailed, steamer Lahn (Ger). V,»tl\a. i"
Genoa and Naples for New-York.. „.„_.. <Ger).
Pardar.elle,. April 27-Passed. steamer G !° r «J* Ua U for
Hrambeer. New-York via NorfoU ana iia«»
FayafAprU^^-Passed. steamer Troian Mf^***
Ea«lewn New-York for Naples. Genoa <">^_V2mrt«
Bt Michaels. April 27— Arrived «««»«,JSS5r^
CUD. 3U«otal. o«M»'iß4»Mto tot A«w *n™»

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