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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, April 28, 1902, Image 8

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6
HAMPSHIRE.
THE FIRST VOLUME OF A SUPERB SE
RIES OF ENGLISH COUNTY HISTORIES.
___ vi~TORIAV HISTORY OF THE COUN
TH TIES OF ENGLAND. HAMPSHIRE AND
" THE ISLE OF WIGHT. Volume I. Edited
by H Arthur Doubleday. Octavo, pp. xx.
687. E. P. Dutton & Co.
This magnificent volume Is the first fruit of
«in undertaking of monumental scope, giving
assurance that It will be carried out In a man
ner fully Justifying the high expectations
aroused by Its announcements. The projected
eeries of county histories of England will In
clude 160 volumes, of which from two to eight
will be devoted to each county. These are to
form a national survey of the condition of the
country at the present day. tracing the domes
tic history of the counties back to the earliest
times. They begin at the beginning, with an
examination of the geology, climate, paleon
tology and natural history of each county,
treated with the utmost thoroughness and de
tail by specialists, and then, proceeding to the
earliest history, follow It down to the present
time. The volume now before us. the first of
four that are to deal with Hampshire, is an
admirable example of the skill and scholarship
with which the work Is carried out. and justi
fies the highest hopes for the undertaking as
a whole. It Is a magnificent specimen of
luxurious bookmaklng. beautiful in typograph
ical execution, and lavishly provided with Il
lustrations.
For many reasons there Is an especial In
terest attaching to Hampshire, particularly In
Its natural history and in the remains of early
civilization found there; in the first regard be
cause It contains the New Forest, and In the
second because of the traces of Roman occu
pation that abound there. The Selborne of
Gilbert White Is in Hampshire a town whose
name, as Mr. Trevnr-Battye says in his Intro
duction. Is better known to th? English speak
ing world, through the labors of the scholarly
g^ntleman. than that of any village or town
■which owes its fame to a single reputation, ex
cept Stratford-on-Avon. Special students will
find much to Interest them in the monographs
on the geology. palaeontology, botany, marine
ecology, entomology and other divisions of the
zoology of the county. A wider appeal will
perhaps be made by the chapter on birds. The
■woodlands of the northern part of the county,
the great chalk plain in the centre and the
■ninety thousand acres of the New Forest pro-
Tide suitable ground for almost every bird that
can be expected to be seen in any English
county, and some of the rarer ones have made
their homes in the New Forest longer than
anywhere else in England.
Prehistoric man was well represented in
Hampshire. There are the traces of neolithic
homesteads in the circular hollows found abun
dantly on the chalk downs and gravelly heaths.
The first aliens who came were the Goidels, the
van of the great Aryan migration, who crossed
the Channel armed with the implements of the
"bronze civilization. Their descendants are the
Gaels of Scotland and the tall, fair Irish and
Manx. Later, In the Iron Age. came the Bryth
ons. who have left their name on the island.
With the Roman occupation, in A. D. 43. we
enter upon the historic period, and have in
Hampshire a remarkably fertile field for the
study of the Roman remains. The essay on
this subject is one of the most elaborate as it
Is one of the most interest in the volume.
The Romanization of Britain Is well displayed
in Hampshire. Says the writer. Mr. Haverfield:
Almost every feature in Romano-British life
•was Roman. The commonest good pottery, the
so-called Samian or Terra Siglllata. was copied
directly from an Italian original, and shows no
trace of Celtic influences; it was, indeed, princi
pally imported from Gaul. The mosaic pave
ments and painted stucccs which adorned the
houses, the hypocausts which warmed them and
the bathrooms which Increased their luxury were
equally borrowed from Italy. Nor were these
features confined to the mansions of the wealthy.
Samlan bowls and coarsely colored plaster and
makeshift hypocausts occur even in the cottages
of outlying baxfilets. The material civilization of
Roman Britain comprised few elements of
splendor or magnificence, but it was definitely
and decisively Roman.
The highest form of town life was rare, and
there were, so far as is now known, only five of
the privileged municipalities. There was some
degree of municipal life in the smaller towns;
there were two such in Hampshire, on the pres
ent Bites of Silchester and Winchester. On the
former site — at present given over to the plant
ing of corn— pome of the most extensive discov
eries have been made. Round it, in circuit of a
mile and a half, are ruins of the ancient city
wall: cr the town itself excavations reveal no
more than low foundations, hardly rising above
the level cf the streets and floors. But by them
the layout of the Ftrr-'tp has been determined,
and the forum, with its basilica and shops, has
been traced. The houses attest comfort and
elegance, but not wealth or splendor. A num
ber of mosaics have been found, and many
scattered objects, which, with the inscriptions
found upon them, are elaborately described and
pictured. A special chapter is devoted to the
results of the systematic excavations made
since MM. The remains of villas found scat
tered through Hampshire go to show that a
definite agricultural life of the villa type ex
lEted outside the towns.
Of Saxon remains there ie much l-?s to tell
th.a relates to the earliest period. Not till the
introduction of Christianity, in the seventh
century. dr»es Anglo-Sax. -n history rest on liter
ary records, and other means of determining
the character of the early Teutonic settle
ments in Hampshire are meatrre. On the other
hand, and coming down to later times, there is
no other county in England so closely connected
with "Domesday Book" as Hampshire: at Win
chester it was compiled and kept, and there the
last original returns were preserved. Mr. Horace
Bound sives a learned and minute discussion of
the famous document, and of its implications
a* to land tenure and to other historical and
economic questions. r,nd follows it with a trans
lation of the part relating to the lands in Hamp
shire.
ARMY AXD VITT ORDERS. x
TTashlngron, April Zl.— The following army and
navy orders have been Issued:
ARMY.
Ueutenant Odonel CHARLES L. HEIZMAX^Deputy
Surgeon General, upon his arrival at San Franc.:? co
will proceed to Chicago and report to the commanding
irensral,' Department of the Lakes, for duty as chief
surgeon at that department, to »•!!■■■ Lieutenant
Colonel TIMOTHY E. WILCOOu Deputy Burgeon Gen
eral, -si-ho »•;:; proceed to Vancouver Barracks and re
port to the commanding fenera!. Department of the
Columbia for duty as chief surgeon of the depart
ment, to 'relieve Major RUDOLPH G. EBERT. sur
r*- ■
Seoond lieutenant ROBERT L. WEEKS ISth Infantry
la relieved from temporary duty at Fort Porter, ana
will proceed to San Francisco pending th« arrival of
his regiment In the United States.
F -(■• Lieutenant CHARLES O. ZOLLARS. artillery corps,
' 1* fttr'.wfj to the Wth Company, coast artillery, and
will report at Fort Logan for temporary duty, and
tbenc* Join his company at Tort Flakier. Washington.
Car-a:r. CARL R. DARNALL. assistant surgeon, mil;
proceed to Plattabu 1 Barra'*«. New-York, for duty.
First Lieutenant GUT E. MANNING, artillery corps. la
•f*:im«! i . the 4th Company, coast artillery, and will
report it Fort Thomas 'or temporary duty, and thence
Join hla comsany at Jackson Barrack*.
Captain HARRY E. FMITH. artillery corps, will report
to th« retirtr* board at the Wax Department for ex
amlnaUon
Capvaln PETER C. HARRIB, »th Infantry, la relieved
from duty «-t Buffalo and will proo*«<l to Ma(Sl*on
Barntcka. Now-Yoi-lt, for duty.
Captain HARRY FRKEI.ANIi. 3d Infantry, now In San
Francisco, will proceed to Hot Spring*. Ark., and
Navy 'j<:,«;Tfc. Hoapital.
FMt Lieutenant GEORGE L. HICKS. Jr.. axtnie.ry corpa.
la a»al(rn«d to the B&th Company, coaet artillery, and
will Join that company at Fort Wadrwortb, New-
Tcrk.
NAVY
TltT**"- -* H. C. K.L'EA'7,IJ. detached Naval Academy, to
the Eteaex* M.'' 10.
JJa-vml Ca4*ts R. R. ADAMS. J. W. ■WOODRUFF. F. 8.
"WHITEN. R. WALLACE. Jr.. It. WAINWKIGHT
Jr.. H. <». 6. WALLACE. J. •• TOWSSEXD. F. W.
fiTEHUNG. W. W. SMITH. •• M. SIMMEKS. C. J.
" ROWCLIFF. J. REEI». Jr. W. D. PUIJESTON W.
L. FRYOR. L. B. I'OIiTEHnEUj. K. O. 8. PARK
ER. A. A n.'n.! -.'- T. T. OSBURN. F. \V.
OBBURN. J. P. 4JURDOCK. W. J. MOSES. C J.
MF.TKRS. F. C. MARTIN. E. J a e rq^| t ki%
LA WON E 8 LANI>. H. S. KLTCE. F. t. KIM
XER c' *. KEKKI.'K. R. BBKDERgOX. F. P.
HALL R. M w ORJSWoLd. J 0 > '~'j T :
TENDEN. R. P. CRA?T, M. B. CURMM'-^ v. T .
CONN. Jr.. J. A. CAMPBELL. Jr.. w - BR ?^ Al fnU
I. H BLACKBURN. C. BEAN and H. A. BALU
RIDGE. detached Naval Academy. Annapolis, to home
and wait orders.
S&VTNG NATION'S FORESTS
PLANS FOB PROTECTION OF TREES.
FISH AND GAME EMBODIED EN
ICEASURE BEFORE CONGRESS.
[Wt TELEORAPH TO THE TRIBUNE. 1
Washington. Aprl! Z7.-OM of the most Important
rr.eesures for the common welfare now before i_on
grefs Is that favorably reported from the House
Committee on Public La-ids, transferring certain
rational forest reserves from the Interior Depart
mer.t to the Department of Agriculture, where they
esa be properly -ared for. and to establish game
and fish protection in those reserves. The Presl
d.n- in his last message, called attention to the
propriety of making some havens of refuge for the
survlvinc wild birds, game and fish within B*es«
preserves. He said:
Certain of the forest reserves should also be
mace preserves for the wild forest creatures An
of the reserves should be better protected from
fre Many of them need special P«J^on^
cause of the great injury done byUve stock, above
on he «;h»-en "Hie Increase in deer. e.K ana oinei
"^.niil, in ';h»l>li:™,,o n » P»rk ,h. ; w.«ta. >..»>;
h* CKpeettd «-bT. Other mourns!!. for.Ms r. prop
breeding bird? including grouse and quail, and
wmmmm
: ,' fauns «nd flora, safe havens of refuge
Jo our rapidly diminishing wUd animals of the
laWer kind*, and free camping Kround? ; for the
«w Iticrwing numbers of men n ' women wh>
have learned to find rest, health and recreation In
fhe splendid forests and flower clad m^<m. of
tmr mountains The forest reserves should be set
a-ar^for the use and benefit of our people ns a
whole and not sacrificed to the shortsighted greed
o' a few The forests are natural r«=er\olrp. K>
resfrainlng th! streams lr. «^J«J^
in drouth they make possible the use of waters
otherwise wasted. Th prevent the soU from
washing and -o protect the storage reservoirs i from
filing up with lilt. Forest conservation Is there
fore M essentla condition of water conservation.
THE QI'ESfION OF STATE RESERVES.
The committee In Its report urges that the In
terior Department, which has control of the public
domain, with the view to its disposition and sale
under the Land laws, has no organization for the
preservation of its timber or other products, while
the bureaus of the Department of Agriculture are
already equipped for those purposes. It is pro
posed "therefore, that the Interior Department shall
continue Jurisdiction over land destined for settle
ment or sale and reserves still in formative condi
tion, with undetermined boundaries, but others to
be selected by the President are to be administered
by the Department of Agriculture.
A valuable feature of the Mil relates to the re
serves already established by the States, and nota
bly those of New-York State. On this point the
committee says in its report:
Under our dual system of government the ques
tion of game preservation within the limits of the
State iniftht involve some friction and trouble if
there were not some mutuality in the establishment
of sue!', reserves. A question as to the power of
the national government to create such reserves
within the limits of the State is one involving some
constitutional difficulties, an.: before this Dill was
prepared the subject was submitted to the Attorney
General, who gave a careful opinion upon the sub
fee) which we will set out in this report. "1 our
committee are of the opinion that by only establish
ing game and fish preserves in the forest reserves
within the- limits of a State, upon the request of
the Governor of the State, full harmonious action
could thus be obtained and the public opinion of
the State would coincide with the purposes of the
general government In creating and sustaining such
preserves. There are wide differences as to climate,
altitude and general character In the various re
serves, It is therefore not practicable, where such
reserves are set apart for refuge for game, birds
and fish, to provide any hard and fast regulations.
Th.re.'ore the hill provides for the promulgation
of rules and regulations by the department having
such reserves In charge, which regulations may be
changed from time to time, as the necessities of the
case or actual experience may suggest. The viola
tion of these regulations Is made a misdemeanor,
and the custodians of the reserves are charged
with the duty of enforcing such regulations.
YELLOWSTONE PARK EXPERIMENT.
In th» Yellowstone National Park the first at
tempt at national game preservation has now been
in progress for many rears. Unfortunately, the
altitude, heavy scows and some other causes have
prevented the experiment there from being a suc
cess as to the buffalo. The herd of sev< ra hun
dred which was originally protected In the national
park has gradually disappeared, until only about
twenty-two at this time remain. Th*. elk have pros
pered greatly in that region, and have Furnished a
supply tor restocking the Forests In the surround
ing country by overflow from the reserve. Of course
they are killed off rapidly when they get outldde
of the national park. We think that the Governors
of the various States in which these forest reserves
are situated will undoubtedly aval! themselves and
thfir States of the privileges contained in this bill.
By thus making the establishment of any qamc
and fish preserves dependent upon the concurrent
action of the State and federal authorities all local
friction will be avoided, and the public sentiment
will move along the same line with hitter results
than could >■• accomplished without such mutuality
of action.
Instead of regarding the creation of such ■ re
serve as an imposition it would be sought as a
benefit and accepted by the masses of the people in
each State in a friendly and supporting spirit.
Public sentiment 13 rat .•;>• becoming enlightened
upon these questions, and the enforcement of the
law would have that most powerful of all aid— the
moral backing of the people of the vicinity.
The creation of manj of the forest reserves was
met at the beginning with active hostility and re
sentment. Experience has demonstrated the neces
sity and utility of these reserves The conservation
of the streams and the beneficial effects upon the
climate of the locality are matters which have
attracted the favorable attention of the people gen
erally. Your committee propose, by an amendment
to the hill, to have the State authorities consulted
In the future creation or enlargement of forest re
serves in the States. Th« committee are Inclined
to the opinion that, while, the amendment may
cause the national government some Inconvenience
in the creation or extension of such reserves, this
will be more than compensated by the greater
harmony in forestry questions.
A PRACTICAL. BUSINESS PROPOSITION.
Th« expansion of the system la no longer met
with local bickering and hostility. The public
have found that It is not the intention of the
friends of forestry to withdraw such lands from
the use. but to withdraw and preserve them for
the use. of the people. To preserve them from de
struction for the public use is a highly beneficial
purpose. It Is not a mere sentimental question.
The poet may from the heart sing "Woodman,
spare that tree," but no mere matter of poetic
sentiment is Involved in the question of national
forestry. It is a plain, practical business proposi
tion. Th« friends of forestry are utilitarian in their
Ideas and purposes. When a tree becomes ripe and
is required for any beneficial use, it should be
marketed in a proper and careful manner and Its
place supplied by a younger growth for the uses
of the coming generations.
Ir France great sums of money are being ex
pended In the reforestation of the mountains which
have been recklessly denuded, and the gravelly
soil has been washing down, to the utter destruc
tion of the valleys below. Terraces are being
built and trees replanted in the hope of saving
further destruction. In Northern New-York the
State has acquired the Adirondack^ in order to
preserve the headwaters of the Hudson, and has
expended nearly 54.0C0.000 for that purpose.
The total destruction of the forests means a
change of climate, the drying up of. the springs and
the conversion of the deep, perpetual streams into
dry and gravelly torrents. It means recurring
floods and drouths In endless and ruinous succes
sion. We must give up a portion of the land to
foreetation In order to preserve the usefulness of
the remainder These, questions have thrust them
selves upon the unwilling attention of the people
by the dire results of the general destruction of
our national forests. The necessity of the preserva
tion of considerable areas of our woods is now
generally recognized. The propriety of th« continu
ance of this policy is no longer seriously disputed.
The general destruction of game, birds and fish
has also attracted public attention, and met with
general condemnation. Now that these forest re
serves have come, and corn** to stay, it would be
good policy to provide In them places of refuge for
some of the small remainder of our once abundant
animal life. These reserves would have breeding
grounds, from which the surrounding country
would be restocked, and thus an additional bene
ficial use would be added to our general system of
forestry.
THE PETROLEUM MARKET.
The Keener sand pool near Jerusalem, Monroe
County. In Southeastern Ohio, was the centre of
Interest during the last week. It was here that
the Unity Oil Company drilled its test well on the
Harper farm and found that It had a good pro
ducer. it Is expected, when It Is shot, that it will
be good for fifty to one hundred barrels a day. So
Important Is the well that it detracted the Interest
somewhat from the West Virginia fields. Develop
ments of the latter during the week were without
particular Interest. In the Smlthfleld district the
South Perm Oil Company found a good producer
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. 3IOXPAT. APRILJ&Jj^.
on the Martin farm, which extended the productive
limit westerly about eight hundred feet, and gives
this section a promising outlook. In the Little
Germany district the old weils are holding up their
production in a very satisfactory manner, and
considerable production is looked for to the north
east and southwest of Littleton, in the Gordon
sand
A surprise awaited the South Perm Oil Company
on the completion of the test well on the Ward
farm, west of the Wolf-Summit field in Harrison
County, as it proved to he a fifty-barrel producer,
when only a small .veil was looked for at best.
Salem is the centre of the development in this
county, and much of the work is well 1.-: ond the
defined limits. West of Blacksville, in Greene
County the South Perm Oil Company struck ■
irusher 'on the Eddy farm, where its test well De
|an to Bow at the rate of fifty barrels an hour.
Th« is the largest producer found In the county
for %.Veral months. A number of dusters was
the only reward for the work done in i hester Hill
district Morgan County. Southeastern Ohio, De
velopments in other sections of the country were
of no special interest. unchanged at _ We in
Refined petroleum closed unchanged at „40c in
barrels and 4.85 cln bulk at New-York; Philadel
nhSnrices are on a basis of I points lower. Foreign
So^tionlw^re unchanged, as follows: London
16 U^l6d per Imp. • «>: Antwerp. »^»ea
pPr ioO kil.s. and Bremen. 6.35 marks per 50 kilos.
Spring Resorts.
NEW-JERSEY.
HADDO^ HALL
ATLANTIC CITY. N. J.
Every modern appointment and comfort. Hot and cold
sea water baths. Golf links.
Write for Illustrated iit.-ran.r*.^ i.iPPINCOTT.
hotel riDßNnriSy
Atlantic City. N. J.
Beautifully Fltual-d. directly faclnc the '***?■ ts«e
coldja and fresh water. --:^bT
K«3nr[£[L,
Strictly en the Ocesn front.
Rooms en nits with bath attached. Sun Parlor, ele
vator to lev*, of street. F . P . CO OK ft SON.
ATLANTIC CITY. S. J.
[fSEW KKDTTIEIL DBOD QDGD IUIF-
Personal New York representative for rooms and rates at
HOTEL IMPERIAL. 3:30 to 8. Telephone f».060 Cortlandt.
HOT"L NEW ENGLAND.
South Kentucky Ay*. and the Beach.
ATLANTIC .MTV. N .1. .
New hlch class hotel. Capacltj i l' m «" /" ;
"•vat. - ' ln « , r ,,L h t,.,Xy
Ka^K.»J.y : Booklet. ' BRYAN aY WILLIAMS.^
mo THOSE DESIRIXO AN '" , 1 7 r ;,v H auick
X. LIKE HOUSE, absolutely clean, good table, quick
ffrvlce. we call attention to the
HOTEL MAJESTIC.
Virginia Aye.. third house from Beach.
ATLANTIC CITY. N. .1
Capacity 2, r laic- sun parlor; elevator from f'reet
-.vur«eam heat baths. Specially low Spring rate. J2
to J2.60 daily. $8 to $14 weekly. 'MLtooklet mailed.
HOTEL IROQUOI3.
South Carolina aye. and neach.
Atlantlr •■.. N. J.
Caracltv 4<»> rooms «insrlo nr.d ■• suite with bath;
elevator- ran ; oarirrs; special Bring rates $10 to $1..->0
weakly. ?2.&0 and up da> ; booklet. p BHAW.
ATLANTIC CITY'S NEWEST AND SIOfT MAGNIFI-
A CENT tLw ißoroH |IOU9E ,
Stone. Iron and *ha-> .-or..»tru^tlon.
Private baths with every room or suite. ' apaclty •'«>
Enure block on Ocean > ! "^ « l AK I wHrra & SONS.
HOTEL TRAYM<
ATLANTIC Cl~, f, N .'.
Open all y*ar Hot and cold sen w.iUr >Ht»,. '' ' *»•«■
Gol7prlvlle 8 . TRAYMORB HOTEL COMPANY.
° D HOWARD WHITE Jr.. Manager.
D. E. WHITE. President.
i.om; I*I. AM).
ILa/r^Liu lLU lCsllxl hi 0 v inJIUJ II ELL
GARDEN CITY. LONG 1 ISLAND.
ONLY 16 MILES FROM NBW YORK.
ROQDM ODLFfEKOo
NEW- QUIET— LUXURIOUS.
STEAM HEAT AM' OPEN FIRES.
IOSEI H J. .-■'■ ' . : '■''
inmincr flceorlo.
M'U-Vmih,
TfflE ODatLOBVCDKIn
MILLBROOK. DUTCHEBS CO.. N. Y.
UNDER NEW PROPRIETORSHIP.
NEW MANAGEMENT.
With every modern appliance for health, comfort and
. ; v .
CUISINE AND SERVICE UNSURPASSED.
OPEN MAY 21ST TO NOV. 9.
HENRY F. GILLIG & CO.. Proprietor*
New i'nr'K ■ ; -.irli-n,.
ptFTH AVENUE HOTEL.
■iOiyUBGBQDI X DKIRSa
MILLHUOOK. DUTCHES 3 COUNTY. N. Y.
■ »FEN ALL THE YEAR.
Small, qul-t. bomellke bouse. Fifty acres cf land.
Charming drives: good li»er> First class golf link;..
Our own garden! Excellent table. Resident physician.
LONG DISTANCE PHONE.
MRS A. P. CARPENTER Manager
m JEBSBT.
AND EIC.HT COTTAOKS. BERNARDHVUJJE, N. I
Opens May IT. :'.."■ miles from New-York. <>n 1.. U A
W. R R.. vta Barclay ..1 Chrtstophei si. Ferry. Altitude.
bOO ft«t. UEOROB W. TUTTLB. Mt;r
COXM3CTICUT.
EtD®[|M©(!l)§ GM
EJDGEWOOD PARK.
SSISEEDSWOISIiII (OX THE *??*?>•. (Sugg,
OPEN FROM Ji;..'R TO NOVEMBER
A beautifully located hotel, with every modern facility
for the luxurious comfort ..f guf-sts.
Forty minutes from New York, with trains running
hourly from '■::.:.! Central Station.
Leading attrHrtlr.nß of the report ... Yachting. Golf,
Riding and I irivlnjc
FRANK F. BHtTTE, Manager.
.M A i \ i:.
YORK CLIFFS. ME.
Fine yachting, Bshins;, Rood roads, »olf course clr.se
to the hoteL For circular appl] to
HARVKY & WOOD. Hotel \u Uevue. Boston.
3 Park Place, New- York, Mondays. II to 1.
MASSACHUSETTS.
BERKSHIRE HILLS.
PITTSFIELD. MASS.
Will open Jun« 2d. Altitude. 1. 100 IVpi. Hotel equipped
with all modern Improvements Musi", Golf Boating
etc.. etc. Booklets at FRED H. si ■il I Kl.irs Metro-^
folitan HJ.'.K .. Madison Su. A. W. PLUMB. 'prr.pr.'
Gummcr Besorte (BniOr
DOCTORS SAY
that during the heated term In Greater New York you
must take wife and the children and
GO TO THE MOUNTAINS
of Sullivan. Ulster, and Delaware Counties, N. V., on
the main line and branches of the New York Ontario
and Western Railway, a. region of ;.!^..|ir.- HKa'ITH AT
MODERATE COST, 2.000 feet above the ««•.->, with Pure
Air. Pure Water. l'ur>- Milk and only ti.rvc hours' i !<le on
the cars. Send " cents for postage to the Uiideralnied
or call and get free at otli'M below th<- Bi'perbly Illus
trated Ri,ok. "SUMMER HOMES, ' of 200 phr*s. It
Rives list of Hotels. Farm and Hoarding Houses, with
their location, rates of board, fnci!lti«-s, ttttractiona At
On May 2ath and 80th Excursion tickets at reduced
ratt» will be sold at (2S Broadway. l.:;:.i Broadway, and
Ferry Offices, giving an opportunity •.• personally select-
Ing a Summer home, and also enjoying a day's Ashing
In this d-llchtful r««lon. Tick) good returning up io
Monday. June 2d.
IN NEW YORK: -1 Par* I*lac». 11.1. 141, IC.I, 425. 1.354
1.370 Uroadway.. 287 4th Ay.. 24. . Columbus Ay., 153 East
12SU St.. 273 West 125 th St.. 182 .'ith Ay.; ticket offices,
Franklin and West 42d St. Ferries.
IN BROOKLYN: 4 Court St.. BGO Pulton St., 08 Broad
way. Eajrle Office.
Passenger rates, 2 cents a mile
J. C. ANDERSON.
General Passencer A^ent. .'.'l Heaver St . N V
Jnstnutton
For Young Ladies — City.
T7-INDERGARTEN Tralnlna-- cia«M now rormlnir. (Free
IV Srholaraiiipa). 7.. A CUTTKN. Supt., tf Irving Dace.
near E. 17th Ht. (Formerly Mi-t. Temple) Evening i'la.s*es.
MISS MURPHY.
BOAUDINV. AND DAY FCHOOU Foreign tnivol.
160 and 117 V.'t-»t Wth St.
MRS. DORR'! POARMNG AND DAY SCHOOL FOR
GIRLa AND CHILL.RBN . - Hume School. ?.(i3 W lCKith
Bt.: Day School. 303 W. 10M St. H..urs (ran 0 to 1:13.
m
.A DVEKTI^EME.VTb and subscriptions for The Tribune
received at the Uptown Office.
MO. 1.142 BROADWAY.
3nstrnrtion.
For Both Sexes— City.
ADULTS' FRENCH INSTRUCTION -P^kless method,
adopted In France. Special summer course \er> cneap.
beeinn.iiK now. Preparation and information for .rips to
Pans. DEVROYETS Select French School, 152 E. *Btn-»t.
THE BERLITZ SCHOOL Of LANGUAGES- 1 , m
Madison Sa.. New York. 73 Court St.. Brooklyn
Pupils speak the foreign language from beßlnning.
KOCH MEDALS AT I ARIS EXPOSITION. ,
Be« native teachers only. tee moderate.
\HniAT to do with my hoy. Phrenolojrv will a:d you.
\\ FOWLER & WELLS CO.. 27 Eaet 21st St.
For Boys and Young Men— Country.
THE -WEANTINAUG SCHOOL FOR BOYS.
New-.Mllford. Utcbneld Co.. Conn.
Preparation for business and College. Rev. F. •' B.
Draper. H«ad Master. New Buildings Modern equip
ment. Refers by permission to Mrs. v\ m. D. Black.
Patroness of Ingleslde.
MAPLKWOOD. Concordvllle. pa.— Successful school
31 one nt the he«: to in!u« enerpy. to wake up boys
xo duties of life; prepared for husiness or college J-bJ.
under 13 years, ?244. Location beautiful, elevated. nealtn> .
no tobacco. J. SHORTLIDGE (Ya)ej. A. M.. Prln.
Europe
T>ARIS. NO. 20 RUE DBS BCOLES FRANCE, new the
1 Borbonne an.l Luxembourß Gardens. Mademolael c
JEANNE BLANC and her parents offer a comfortable
Home to a limited number of yotmg Ladies, who wish to
perfect themselves in the French Lanpiiase and see some
thing of Paris. Highest reference* furnished. Address
a? above. Paris. France. '
5ci)OO) 3.qenncci
* MKRICAN AND FOREIGN TEACHERS' AOHNCI
A supples Professors, Teachers. Tutors. Governesses,
•tc to Colleges. School! and Families. Apply to
Mr? M J. YrrxG-FITI.TON. 1:3 I'm, n Square
(tfar. tiers.
.» !VI l-nTT STONE lYilp anil CnlumMa). Sl* West
A- Mth St Tmc.HlW nt iuu.-Ts ir f.if-.r-« • •- ' '■•■- •
Citations
T^EWCOMB, JOSEPHINE LOUISE.— The
"■ People of the State of New York, by the C.race of
God Free and Independent. To Greenwood Cemetery Alice
Bowman. \Villinm Robertson. Administrators ol : the
Tulane Educational Fund, in New-Orleans, Louisiana
Joseph A. Hinrks. individually and as a person claiming
to be ancillary executor of the Lajt Will and Testament
of Josephine I. Newcomb. deceased: Brandt V. B. Pw
Individually and as a person .Uimln* to be ancillary
executor of the Last Will and Testament of Josephine L.
Newcomb, deceased, and all persons Interested „'■; ' the
estate of Josephine L. Newcomb. late of the Borou*h of
Manhattan. City of New York, deceased, »* t , -'■ I" ;.-■
legatees next nf kin or otherwise, send creating. You
and each of you are hereby cited an.! required P^onalb
to he and appear before oar Surrogate of the «_« _ ount > r,f
New. York, nt the Surrogates' Court of said County. held
kt the county Court House. In the County of Ne« Jork
on the sixth (rtth) day of June. 1002, at na ''-'*?" ' "
o'clo.-k In the forenoon of that day. th^n and there to
Show Va use why the order dated April 16. 1901. direct n*
the of ancillary letters testamentary ur-nthe
estate of Josephine L. Newcomb. decease.!, to JOsepn A.
HlnckH and Brand! V. B. Dlxon should not^be absolutely
vacated! and the said ancillary letters revoked *«&££*
the allied will of Josephine Ix>ulse Newcomb. deceased
dated STl»h toy of May. 189 ft. should "otbe decr^d
Illegal and void as a testamentary paper and '
citer! ao are undej the ape of twenty-one years are re
quired to appear by your K uardlan. If you have ™ -or If
you have none :o npp«-ar nnd apply for one to be ap
„•»Tnv'i or in the event of your neglect or failure to do so
Martian will be appointed by the Surrogate to^reprewn
an.l a-t for J'OU In the proceeding. In t<-s.lmon> wnereoi
«,tav« caused the seal of the Surrogates' Court of '■'
said' County of New York to be hereunto affixed.
WlmesV " Hon! Frank T. Fitzgerald a Surrogate of our
said County, at the County of New York, the
I4th day of April. In the year of our I*.'.'. one
thousand nine hundred and two.
.1. FAIRFAX McLAT GHLIN.
p.. ?.] Clerk of the Surrogates' Court.
(Son\ nt Surrogates* Court.)
ROLLINS * U ROLLINS. Attorneys for petitioners. 32 Nas
sau Street, Borough of .Manhattan. New York City.
rjnilE PEOPLE OP THE STATE OF NEW
JTSt-
Amelia S. Williams. William Taylor "»!»""»• -^vVn*
■ :" HI
: ilerbert V U A R
. .... „ K.^n
Son^-WilluS? 7*7 * KrkTns. and Th-odorj Peridn*
- .
"k'.t tVe Surrogate- Cjurx Ot »U CmgM on the
County Court House. In the County oi Ne«-\ork on the
t«ment of mil.l dcc-a^d. and such of you as are hereby
Ot'-d «s nr» under the aX" of twenty-one years, are* re
nt i red t» appear by your guar.llan. If you have one. or r
you have. n-ne. to appear and aoply for one to I' appointed.
or in thr event <-T your neglect or rallun? to do »o. a guard
1-in will b» «pp<-.inted by the Surrogate to represent and act
&M B .n&SrtSrs?.'£ have atused the sea. of the
Surronte'i Court of the said County of New-York
I Sea! ] to l>* hereunto limited. Witness. Hon. Prank T.
KttzcernM. a Surromt* of our »aM County, ... th»
County of New York, the l*th day of April, In the year
nf our Ix>rd on" thousand ntn«" hundred and two.
r,r our ix>ra on J FAIRFAX GHLIN.
tTerk of the Furroirate's Court.
Gnrrogateo' iX aticcg
Tv PURSUANCE of an order of Hon. Frank
T Fttxsjaraafl a SurrOKaU of the Aunty of New-
York notice is hereby given t.. all persona having claims
acairisi Daniel Murray. hne of the Cbunty of New. York.
deot-ased to uresnnt the. same with vouchers thereof t.> th«
Mit-!cnberß. at their place of tmnsa.-tlnK- islnesa, at the
oJSco vt Andrew Wilson, No. i.'.4 Nassau ,vr*«-t. in th«
City of New York. Borough of Manhattan, on or before
the 3v':*»i day of October next.
Dated New York, the I*;:- day of Apr!!, ir«-2
JOSEPH K. MURRAY. MICHAEL, F. MURRAY. Ei
ecutori.
ANDREW WILSON, Attorney for Executors, 184 N«ss;iu
St., Borough of Manhattan. .New York City. N. Y.
TN PURSUANCE Of nn order of Hon. Abner C.
Thi.nias. a Buwagats of the County nt New York. BOCIas
Is hereby Klven to all i^rsons ha\l:.« claim* rgniTMri Anna
Meyer, late of th>- County of New York, deceased, ; i irr
■ent tlie same with VOUchSTS there.. f t<i the Miit.!iorlti»r. at
Mb place «'f tr«nsiirtlim tiiiflness. at the office ..f Wrdl ■
nand Hhark. at Nos. M nn.l 8] rine street. Borough ol
Manhattan, In the City of New York. on or befuro the
20tl daj . f June. 1903
Dated New York thi; fith day of December. 1901.
EDWARD MKYKH. Rx^.iJtnr.
FERDINAND SHACK. Attorney for Executor. '.» an.l 61
Pine Htreet. Hi'irnugh of Mnnhnttnn. City of New Y. rk.
|N PURSUANCE of an order of Hon. Aimer
C. Thomas, .i Surrogate of the County of New Tork.
Notice Is hereby g'v»-n to ail persons having claims ns-aln^;
CiVLTt im B. Maloy, late of Summit. County of Union. New
jersey, deceased, to present the same with vouchors
thereof to the ("übscrlber, at her place of transacting
»>usliit-HM ,- the .:•>.. of Francis P. Oarvan, No 3" Frank
lin Street, In the City of New York, on or befora the Ist
day of A . •'• I m-xt.
Dated Ne-v York, the 2.'« th day of January. 1802.
EMMA. B. UALOY, Administratrix.
FRANCIS P. GARVAN. Attorney for Adlmlnlstratrlx.
32 Franklin Street. Manhattan. New York City.
TX PURSUANCE OF AX ORDER of Hon.
Abner C Ttiomni". a Kurroirat* of the County of New-
York, notice in hereby (tlven to all persons having claims
„,.i.-.si Mary Kelly, late ..f the Count) of New York, de
ceased, to present the same with vouchers thereof to the.
gubi Tiber, at his place of transacting business, at th»
office of his attorney, (I. Thornton Warren, No. 31 Xas
naii Street, Borous;ll of Manhattan, In the City of New
York, i in or before the 28th day of AuKust next.
Dated. New York, the 17th day of March. 1902.
THOMAS KELLY. Administrator.
G. THORNTON WARREN, Attorney for Administrator.
No 'M Nassau Street. Boroush of Manhattan. New
York City.
IN PURSUANCE of an order of Honorable
Abner C. Thomas, a Surrogate of the County of
New York, notice Is hereby given to all persons havlns
claims against Mary Ann McOulnness. late t,f the County
of New York, deceac-d, 10 present the same with
vouchers thfr»..f, t.. the Bubsi-ril.cr. at her place of tran»
acting business at the office of Ronald K. Brown, Num
ber 820 Broadway, in the City of New York. County or
New York, and 11- .rough Of Manhattan, on or before the
fifteenth day of June n^xt.
Dated New York. /ember 27th. inoi
MARY FRANCES McGOINNESa Executrix.
RONALD K. BROWN, Attorney for Executrix. Num
ber 320 Broadway, Koi .ugh of Manhattan, New York.
■JiriLiN, S-USAN.- in pursuance of an order
"*" or Hon. Abner C Thomas , a Surrogate of the Count]
or New York, notice Is hereby given to all persons having
claims aKaln«t Susan Miln. lat*» of. the County of N.-\v
York, deceased, to present the same with vouchers thereof
to the subscribers, at their plact rz transacting business,
at th« office of Howard Beck. No. i>7 Wall Street Mlorouch
of Manhattan. in the City of N«"W York, on or before the
22d day of July nest
Dated New York, 'he lot day of January. 1902.
WILLIAM M. LESLIE.
THOMAS U PEITNER,
NATHAN A. UOSSMAN',
E<xecuiorm
HOWARD RRi'K, Attorney for Executors, «7 Wall Street,
Borough of Manhattan. New Y.ik city.
JN PURSUANCE of an order of Hon. Ateer
C Thomas, a Currojrate of the County of New York,
notice, la.hfreby Riven to nil persons having claims agalna;
Elizabeth Roaenbaum, late of th»- County of New Tors,
deceased, to pin-ent the same with vouchers thereof to
tim subscriber*, at their place of transacting business,
the office of Morris S. Wine. No. 40 Exctaac* PUce,
Borough of Manhattan, in The City of Now York, on or
before the 2nd day of June next.
Dated New York, the 16th day of November. 1001.
HENRY C ROSE.VHAUM.
SOLOMON K. UCHTENSTBIN,
Executor*.
MORRIS S. WISE. Atty. for Executor*. 40 Exchang*
Place. Borough of Manhattan. X Y. City.
JX PURSUANCE of an order or Hon. Frank
T. Fitzgerald, » Surrogate of the County of New York,
notice Is hereby (riven to all persons having claims against
James Mills Smith, late of the County of New York, de
ceased, to present the same with vouchers thereof to th«
subscriber, nt her place of transacting business, the office
of Thomas J. Ourran, No -•>> Nassau Street, Borough of
Manhattan, In the city of New York, on or before the
sixth .lav of September next.
Dated New York. th« twentieth day of February. 1002.
MART ANN SMITH, Administratrix.
THOMAS J. CTJRRAN, Attorney for Administratrix, 30
N»»-iu Street. Borough of Manhattan. N. T.
snrrogaies* Konces.
Tv PURSUANCE of an order of Hon. Frank
Y 6 crk nS dec H eaied U t?" JS^thl*^
ofU? iSFriSki&FIZ her pta?e of transactln, business^
at 'he office of Pirsson & Bcall. her attorneys. No. 15»
Broakway. Borough of Manhattan In The City of New
Yo°k? on or before the first day of May next. Dated New
York, the 2bth dayff o^^^,^
TN pursuance of an order of Hon. Abner C.
■*- Thomas, a Surrogate of the County of New York.
notice is hereby given to all persons havin claims against
Emma O. MUmine. late of the County of New York de
ceased to present the same with vouchers thereof to the
Subscriber, at his place of transacting business Room 401
Produce. Exchange Bulldinß. at corner of Whitehall and
IJeaver Streets! in the City ■ I New York, on or before the
i;;^i' New York. 3 r c d Xt day of February. 1902.
uatea .se CHARLES E. MILMINE. Administrator.
HARRIMAN ft FESSKNDEN. Attorn- for Administra
tor. 277 Broadway. New Yrrk^^^^^_^^^^_^^_^_^
©cean Sicamcrs.
RUCDDaiTffl'ffiEOßliiSlAMia [LILODVDb]
FAST EXPRESS SERVICE.
"LYMOUTH— CHEKBOI-'RG — BREMEN.
From Pier ■<-. North River, Ganfevoort St.
Kronprirz. ..May «. 5 A.M. I Kronprins.... July 20. noon
Kaiser May 20 10 A. M. Kaiser An* 12. 10 a. M
KronprYnz....lune 3. 2P. M.I Kalsertn. . -Au? 19. A. M.
Kaiser June 17. 10 A. M. I Kronprinz. .Auk 2«. 10 A.M.
Kalserin June 24. If) A. M. ; Kaiser Sept. 8. 1« A. M.
Kronprinz July 1. noon; Kalserin. . .Sept. I«. 10 A.M.
Kaiser July 15. 10 a M. Kronprinz. .Sept. 23. »a. M.
Kalserin July 22, 10 A M. i Kaiser Oct. 7. 10 A.M.
TWIN-SCREW PASSENGER SBR V ICR
Cherbourg — Southampton alternately, and Bremen.
From Bremen Piers. Hoboken. N. J.
Or. Kurfst.May 1. 10 A M.lFrd. ier Gr.Jun. 2«. 10 A. M.
Hhein May 8, IO A. M. | Kfi»n. lAilse..July 3. 10 A. M.
Bremen. ..May 15. 10 A.M. Gr. Kurft..July 10. 10 A M.
Fr der Gr.-May 22. 10 A. M. Barbar'sa. .July 17. 10 A M.
Neckar. May -'.'. 10 A.M. Bremen July 24. noon
Gr. Kurft. .June 5. 10 A. M. JFrd. ler Gr. -July SI. 1 P. M.
Barbo.r-za.Jone 12. 10 A M. | Koen. Luise..AuK. 7. IP. M.
Bremen.. June 19. lOA. M Gr. Kurft. .Auk. 14. 1 P. M
MEDITERRANEAN SERVICE.
' ; I BRALTA R— NAPLES— GENOA.
From Pier 24. Ft. of Amity St.. Brooklyn.
•Kaiserln .. May 3. noon! Hoh«-nzollern.. July 5. •A. M.
I.ihn ... May 10. 10 A. M.jLahn July 1». 9 A.M.
Trove May '7, 1 P. M.jTrave An?. 2. 3P. M
Aller May 24 10 A. M. ; Aller Aug. 9. 10 A.M.
Hohenz"n..May 31. 11 A. M. ; Lahn Auk- 23. 10 A M.
Lahr, Tune 14. nooniTrave Sept. «. A. M.
Ttbtc June 21. !• A. M. AIl«-r Sept. IS, 2 P. M.
Aller June 2s. t© A. M..l^ihn Sept 27. 1 P. M.
•From Bremen Piers Hoboken. N. J.
OELRICHS ,v CO NO. a BROADWAY. N. Y.
Louis H. Meyer, ■*'< SOUtll Third 9t.. Phila.
BSAfiidl r IERKM UK
TWIN-SCREW EXPRESS SERVICE.
PLYMOUTH— CHERBOURG— HAMBURG.
F. Bismarck.. May 1. 10 AM A. Victoria. . .May 22. 10 AM
Columbia May 8. 10 AM' F Bismarck. .May 29. 10 AM
And every Thursday hereafter.
These Steamers carry no rar^
TWIN-SCREW PASSENGER SERVICE.
PLYMOUTH— CHERBOURG— HAMBURG.
Pretoria Apr. 2!). 10 am Klautsrhou. -May 15. 11 AM
Moltke Hay « 8 AMfWaMeissei..May 20. 3:30 PM
Patricia ... May 13. 10 AM Pennsylvanla.May 27.S:3OAM
And every Tuesday hereafter.
MEDITERRANEAN SERVICE.
NEW-YORK— NAPLES— GENOA.
Phoenicia May 6. 2 PM; Phoenicia June IS. 2 PM
Palatla. June 3. 2 PM
HAMBURG-AMERICAN LINE.
Offices, 35 Md 37 Broadway. Piers. Hoboken. N. J.
HAWAIIAN* AND PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.
PACIFIC MAIL S. S. CO. .
OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO.
TOTO KISEN KAISHA.
Between San Francisco. Honolulu. Yokohama. Cob*.
Nagasaki. Shanghai. Hong Kong.
Steamers leave San Francisco at 1 P. M.
DORIC May 1 COPT 1..* May 27
NIPPON MART/.... May » AMERICA MARU...Jun» 4
• PERU May' 17 1 PEKING.... • June 12
For freight, passenger and general Information apply to
f.4!> Broadway, or 1 Battery Place. Washington Building,
and 2*7 Broadway.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
Intended Steamship Sailings frnm Vancouver.
JA!?A(?3, CHIBBA] MLIME liLM^lii
EMPRESS OF CHINA May 5
It. M. S. S. TARTAR May lf>
EMPRESS OF INDIA May 2*
BMP. OF JAPAN... June lfiJR. M. P. ATHENIAN. June 23
IMWAIfIM ISI^DS'^iUISTLMLH
MIOWERA. May 30. AORANOI, June 27.
F r rates apply 353 Broadway and 1 Broadway.
(01L2D HBCDEaDSiIDffIKO iLOi^Li
DAILY SEKVICBL
For Oil Point Comfort. Norfolk. PortsmoutTj. Pinner's
Point ar.d Newport News. V»., connecting for Petersburg.
Richmond. Virginia Beach. Washington. D. C.. and «ntir»
fcouth and West.
Freight and r%«*»n«rer it-earners sail from Tier 38,
N. U. foot of Beach St.. every week day at P M
H. B. WALKER. Traffic Mar.s««r.
Steamships or the RED "D" LJNB will sail for San
Juan direct, as follows:
B 8 CARACAS Saturday. May 3. noon
S 3. PHILADELPHIA Saturday. May 17, noon
For freight or passage applr to
80171.T0N, BUSS * DALI-ETT.
aanaral M«nait<?rs. 13.1 Front St.
/l\ mi r*n raj n nrrni? olasgow. via
/MLvJU^UU'w'UU U=iUuMlli. LONDONDERRY.
From Pier North Rlv^r. foot of West 2»th Si.
Fiirnessia May 3, noon Astcrla May 17, noon
Ethiopia May 10. neon, AnchorU Mar 24. noon
Twin-Screw S. S. Columbia (new) May 31. June 23
FIrM paloon. $.'■" and upwards.
Second tsUn, IS2.M »r..l up; third class. J2B »nd up.
in:.VT (-:;:>' >N ItROTHOIS. 17 and 19 Broadway.
AMERICAN LINE.
"■'*■ NEW-YORK— SOUTHAMPTON— LONDON.
St. I^iuls-.Apr. 3.>. 10 a. m. |?t. Paul May 14. 10 s. m.
Philadelphia. May 7. '." a. m. |Bl I>iul.* May 21. 10 a. m.
RED STAR LINE.
TORK-*ANTWTRP-PARIB
Zeeland .. . Apr. 30. noonlSocthwark May 14. noon
Frlffland V. ■••■ 7. noon [ Valerian.-! M«y 21. noon
INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION' COMPANY.
Piers 14 and 15. N. R. Office. 73 Broadway. N. T.
i _ CUNARD LINK.
**"• to unnPOOli VIA QOIMIuM
Cmbrla .May 3. IP. M.' Campania). ... May 24. 3P. M.
L.ti.anls ...May '•<•■ 4 P. M. Cmbrla May 31. noon
Saionla May IT. 1 M.iLucanla June 7. 3P. M.
VKRNON H. BROWS & CO.. Gen. Agents.
21> BROADWAY. NEW YORK.
HOLLAND-AMERICA LINE.
NEW YORK— ROTTERDAM VIA BOULOGNE S. M.
New Twin-Screw Steamers cf 13.000 tons Register
v:v :.-:; r ™ KVNDAM M<lv 3. 10 A.M.
£camer rW ROTTERDAM m.,., 10 . X 0 A. M.
Slam^* NOORDA.M May 17. 10 A. M.
Apply to Holland-America Line, SJ> Bway. N. T.
A — WHITE STAB LINK
* NEW- YORK— QUEENJITOV.'N— UVERPOOL.
Oceanic . . Apr. 3>>. 11 a. m. I Germanic May 14. nocn
Mh1,.,:,,. May 7. Teutonic .. . May 21 noon
Celtic May », 7 a. m. ■ Cymric. ..May 2.1. rt:3i> a. m.
I'Wt 4S North River. Office. & Broadway, New York.
T>ED "1»" LINE.
For La Guayra. Puerto Cabello Curacoa and Mara
calbo via Curacoa Calling «>•-> at san Juan. P. R.
Prom Roberta Tier, ltrooklyn.
S S. CARACAS Saturday. May 3. noon
S. S. PHILADELPHIA Saturday. May IT. noon
These vessels have superior accommodations for pa*
3r"*'la BOULTON. RUSH A DALLETT.
General Managers. 1.15 Front-st.
ALLAN LINE— Roynl Mall Steamers.
-*■*- New Tain Screw Steamships.
BAVARIAN. IONIAN »nd TUNISIAN— 10.000 tens each.
MONTREAL TO LIVERPOOL
ST. WRENCH ROCTE.
Parisian May B(Fr»tortaß May 17
Tunisian Nl: 1" Numl.iUn May >t
Thre« (lays In Smooth Water. Shortest Ocean Passas*.
Saloon $70 and upwards. Second Cabin. $.17 .V). upwards.
H. & A. ALLAN. General Agents. Montreal.
AUSTIN BAU>WIM & CO.. R3 Broadway. N V
ITALIAN ROYAL MAIL S. S. CO.
■^ NAVIGAZIOXE GENERALE ITALIANA.
WEEKLY SAILINGS TO
NAPLES-GENOA— ALEXANDRIA.
Archlmede Apr. 2»l Ugurla May Tt
Bardegna i; lv '■ Lombanlla June lt>
Slcllla May 2->;rmbria... ... ..June 17
New Steamers. Dining-room on Promenade Peck
For rates and other Information apply to
111H7.11. FELTMANN & CO.. 11 Broadway N. Y.
jVrALLORY STEAMSHIP i.INKS.
■*■ From. New York Wednesdays. Fridays and Saturdays.
FOR TEXAS. fIBOROM AND FLORIDA.
STRAIGHT and ROUND TRIP Tickets Issued to *ll
points In Texas. Colorado. Arizona. California. Mexlou.
cite. Georgia. FlorHa. &c. Delightful Excursions.
Wrltp for our <!«' HU "Pocket Guide" (mailed free).
C. 11. MALI.ORY a CO.. Gen. Agts. Pier 20. EX R.. R, Y.
(M.AIIK'S EXCURSIONS TO EUROPE.
A select pnrty will leave June 14 by North German
Lloyd, vi.i Naples. .%» days; firyt class. $i.-ki Vacation
Excursions, June •:. July 4. S. t 2 . Celtic- June 2S. new
•win screw S. S. Columbia.
FRANK C. CLARK. 11l Broadway. N. Y.
QOOK'S EUROPEAN TOURS.
Personally conducted Tours to all parts of th» world.
Programme and full particulars' from
THOS. COOK & SON. -><\l A 11*5 Efwaty. N. Y.
PAST ITALIAN LINE. "La Veloce."
Sailing «"ery Tuesday to Naples. Genoa.
BOLOONESI. HARTF.ELD a <■<-> v > Wai! St.
RilllTCiilO9
WEST SHORE RAILROAD.
Trains leave Franklin St. Station. N«w York, an follows,
mi. l 1.1 ruin, later foot Was) VIA St.. N. It.
•7 10 A. M — For kntcnn. points to Albany.
tll:2o A. M.— (l) Hudson Rlv. & Moh. Express-.
•l:oo P. M. Chicago Espress.
••-":2"i P. M. font Urn. for Detroit, Chicago. A- St. Louis.
t3:45 P. M. — <2> For Hudson Klver Points & Albany.
•8:13 p. M.— For Roeh., Buffalo. rietv'.l A ChleaKo.
t7:4.'i P. M.— For Koch.. Buffalo. Detroit a St. ill).
•9:15 P. M.— For yra.. H.Mti.. Ni'ig. Falls. pet. * ('hi.
■Daily, tl'ally, except Sunday Leave* Brooklyn Annex,
No. 1 at MO:« A M.; No 2at 13:08 P. M. Leaves Jersey
City P. I: It. Sta.. No. 1 at 111:20 A. It.: No. 1 at t3:3T»
P. M. Time tables at principal hotels and offices. Baggage
checked from hotel or residence by Weatcott's Ex.
A. H. SMITH. <■. F. LAMBERT.
Gfcn'l Superintendent. G*«nl I'asg'r Agent.
f Btxiltoaos.
PENNSYLVANIA
I HAILROAD.
■ STATIONS foot of West Twenty-third Street and Des
crosses and Cortlandt Streets.
*C7Tlie> leavinc time from DenbroMes and
< or t Inn. l l Streets If* five mlantei later than
' that »ti».-n belovr for Twenty-third Street
Station, etcenl where other-wine noted.
7..V» A. .11. FAST MAlL.— Limited to two Buffet Parlor
Cars New York to Pittsburs. Sleeping Car Pittshursr to
Chicago. No coaches to Pittsburg.
5. .*>.% A. M. FAST LINE. — Pittsbunt and Cleveland.
!*..-,.-> A. M. PENNSYLVANIA LIMITED.— Pullman Com
partment Sleeping-. Dining. Smoking, and Observation
i Cars. For Chicago. Cleveland. Toledo. Cincinnati. Ind
i ianapolis. Louisville. St. Louis.
I 1..15 P. -11. CHICAGO & ST. LOL'Ia EXPRESS.— For
; Toledo. Louisville <vta Cincinnati). Indianapolis. Chi
cago. st Louis. Dlnina Car.
i SJMI P. M. ST. LOUIS EXPRESS— For Ptttsbu.-s. Ind-
I ianapolis. Louisville. St Louis. Dining Car
! »%..%.% P. M. WESTERN EXPRESS. For '.TUcago For
Toledo, except Saturday. Dining Car.
, 7.5."V P. M. PACIFIC EXPRESS.— For Pittsburg and
Chicatfo. For Knoxville. daily, via Shenan.ioah Valley
Route. Connects for Cleveland, except Saturday.
, S.^."» P. 11. CLEVEUXD AM' CINCINNATI EXPRESS.
— For Pittshurg. Cleveland and Cincinnati.
\\ \MII\i.TO\ \M> THE SOUTH.
7 S. . * 2J> f».-"> (Dining Car>, 10.10 «Desbrosses ana Cort
landt Streets. 10.29) (Dining Car). 10.35 (Dining Car>
a m.. 12.55 'I'ininß <*ar>. -M" (Desbrosses and Cort
landt Streets, 2.2"). ■■:•■"' '" ngressional Lim.," all
Parlor and Dining Cars). 3.25 1 Dining Car). 4.25 (Din-
Ing Car) *-38 (Dining Car). '■• -• p. m.. 12.10 night.
Sunday $.25. i> -■" (Dining Oar). 10.55 (Dining Car) a.
I m 12.58 (Dining Car) 13.25 'Congressional Urn.," all
Parlor and Dtning Cars). 3.25 (Dining Car). 4.25 (Din-
Ing Car) 4.55 (Dining Car). 9.25 p. m.. 12.10 nlarht.
SOUTHERN RAlLWAY.— Express, 3.25. 4.25 p. m.. 13.10
ATLAXTIC r COASrf UNT Ft:- MM a. m. and 92$
! SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY.— "FIorida and Metro
politan Limited." 12..'5 p. m. daily. Express. 12.10 nl ?
NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY.— For Memphis
ar.d New-Orleans. 125 p. m. dairy.
CHESAPEAKE AND OHIO RAILWAY.— 7-» a. m. wwk
f r.Lj' POINT mMFORT and NORFOLK.— 7.3S a. m.
week-days and 8 SB p. m. daily.
ATLANTIC CITY.- ''■"■*> a. m. and 2." p. m. we»n-<laya>
Sunday 755 a m. Thmuirh Vestlbuled Trams. Buf
fet Parlor Cars and Standard Coaches on week-days.
Parlor Smoking Car. Parlor Cars. Dining a.- and Stand
ard Coaches on Sundays.
CAPE MAY — 12.30 p. m. w»ek-days.
F. points on New-York an.l Long Branch Railroad (from
West Twenty-third Street Station). 6.53 .a. m., 12.*)
3.25. 4 .-.:. and 11.25 p. m. Sundays. »-o a. m.. *.36
r m (from Desbrosses ■- : Cortlandt Streets). 9.00 a.
m.. ' 12..V). 3.4 ft. 510 and 11.3f> p. m. Sundays. tt4s a.
m.515 P . FOR PH.LU.HI.PHIA.
! 6.10 rrisliinsun and Cortlandt streets. 8.20). 7.23. 7JB.
8258 53 9-159 -1 5 (D'nin* far). i».!55 Penna. Limited). 10.10
(De-brosses and Cortlandl Streets 1ft.21» •: ■'..-.ir.g Car)
10.55 (Dining- Car). 11.55 a m.. 12.55 (Dlnin« car). ilO
iDesbrosses and Cortlandt Streets 2.20). 2.55 3.25 fDln
tag Car) 3.55. ■-'. 4.25 (Dining Car). 4.55 CDtelnsj Car).
j ', V. Dining Car). 7.55. 23 .8 », 9.25 p. m.. 12.10 night
: Sundays 6.l<> 7.55 Ino coaches>. 8.25. 8.05 ».-5 (Olajnf
Car) :•■*.-. (Unilted). '.' .V. 10.55 (Dining Car) a m 13.65
i (Dlninc Car). 1-38 (Dlnin* Car). 3.25 (Dinln? Car). 3.38.
I 4-. iDlning Car) 4.55 tDtntnn Car). 5.55 1 Dining Car».
I Tldket » "■• - .'*. '.».2S p. m.. 12 In niii.it. 281 Broadway;
i Ticket offices SOS «M. 1»« »3M. HI sad 281 Broadway;
' IS* 'Fifth Avenue (below 23.1 St.); 1 Astor House; West
Tw.nty-third Street Station, and stations foot .of Oss-
a"d "ortlandt Streets: 4 Court Street. MO Putt*
Street 9S Broadway and Pennsylvania Annex Station.
Brooklyn- Station Jersey City. The New York Transfer
Comedy' will call for and check baggage from hotels
In" residence through to destination. Telephone "»H
"ghte?nth Street for Pennsylvania Railroad Cab Ber
r *"*',||| SJSMSJI J. R. "WOOD.
J - X Ht SSS.^anag>r General PassT Agaat
NEW JERSEY CENTRAL
! I «>„„- St and South Ferry (time from South Ferry flV *
IS eariter than below, except aa noted).
rlliTO v nF.THIKHK.M. ALLESTOWm A?ED
za&gi i2O!i 20 ! *&&£££? oaly> p - *
« II.KESBAkRE AXU.SCK.VJITOX-itOO. »1» A.
5,00 P. M. Sondays. A 11
4ss^ WasttHr ?i ,T^ m. f
Sundays. O.CO A. M.. '4 -«'> F- M.
New Jersey Centra! — Philadelphia & Reading
m !■,.... >i.ki.phia : .->k»-»« .a'^JST'sS
?» 4 SO 4 4O 5.0.1 ■ (T.SO. to Reading only) P. M-. 12.15
WHSM
Pottsv:!> only:. Ml P. M.. XLM mJt
ROYAL BLUE line
p M.. 'lilS red'-.
Ss^s^-rSt^SSaS
$£•£'%££*. WUttiaisbur, S«-™c Tracer
ISunda, only JFarlor cars only.
W ; %JF%£&. Cen-iPa».A 8 en t .
NEW YORK CENTRAL
"nuns arrtv* and depart frcm Grand C.ntral Station.
SSSSgS-2Ss££££fi§i
:::;:iS:::::::^s^S^...:-- ;: :!-i
lilii^^il p-I^p -I^
'< t5 3 "p.S:::::.Aiblny and Troy Flyer »*Hg££
m ■ .
-£*»£ m ..St Louis Llmltfcl -•• -*X •>• „
•rt..;-. m Montreal Kwrr-s .- »i" i
:^S: m.. Adirondack. & Montreal Expr»...
4^^: S::::::::. ..pacific Kxpr-r,. 3g££
•11.3<>r. m Northern New \ot* Ex?.- J'^ ra .
H'wii „■
9.0* A. M. and 3.35 P. M. Dally. «*pt Sundays to PUts
field and North Adam.. Sundays only, at £» A. M
Pullman Cars on a.. through trains
Trains Illuminated with Pints Light
Ticket offices at 113. •-•■:. 415 " d 121n broadway. =»
TTbJoii So W., 273 rolnmbus v- • 13 J , "LP'wi a
f-uiton ?t.. and I<V. Brotvlway FT. D Bro *';_..
FervU-e. Pa<r«a*e checked from hotel or restd«ne« ay
Westcott Express Company. __ „ r^vrFLS
V H «MITH GKORGE K. I> A > li. i^>.
* General Superintendent. General Passenger A?ent._
NEW YORK CENTRAL ROUTE
BETWEEN
NEW YORK & BOSTON
Via Springfield and the
IIOSTOV AND ALII.VNY R\HRo*n. .
(New Y^rk Central A Hudson River P.. R.. Lessee.)
Trains leave Grand Ontnil Station. Fourth Aveaa» and
42d Street. New York, as follows: .„.(*.
Ne^YcTrk. £§&£. JS
tft.Vka. m. 12. W noon. 3.U> p. "-
Tickets at New York Central ticket nff!ces. 4TS nna i-i»
Broadway, and at Gr^nd Central Station.
BALTIMORE & OHIO RAILROAD
Leave NEW YORK CITY. South Ferry. Liberty St.
BSSK c!:ve::v;;::::^^:rt gg«
••Plttsburs Limited" >&»pLm. .-^P, m - ?™S!
Cincinnati. Pt. Louis «12. }i» nt. !*-jg f m niner
Cincinnati. s»t. Louis -J..^ a. m. 'mrtia. m. Cbtf
Cincinnati. Pt. L-uls •« -5S P- m. •. •>> P. m. Eu.^l
Norfolk tI".V» p. m. +l'H>p. m. W"r
' r ° lIOYAI. lII.IETU.UNS
Washington. Balto tT .» a. m. ♦*«»•-» s^;"
Washington ftktto •» ■» *- "- 'V'""*" nS'r
Washinßton. I!alt.> Ml.^l a.m. •11.30 a.m. P.-^-
Washinston. linlto il.^p. m. O»J« g ner.
-Royal lUmltcdT' -.TXV p. m. -S.*> p. m. MW-
Washington, Rilto -4..V. p. m. -s.t»p. m. Dla*r
Washington. Balto *rt..V' P- m. «I.W P- m " K .? I<n^1 < n^
Washington. Balto . . 'VI nx 'li »t- Sleeper*
•Daily tDaily except Sunday. «Sunday only.
Offices 113 SI «l. I.:'" Brosjdwsiy. 25 Union Sa^
W 3»1 Grand Street. N. V.: :M3 Fulton t>tre,t. Fir.-xvltiy^
Whttehail Terminal and Liberty Street. Baggage cnecusn
fr.-m hotel or real* to destination. '■ _ -> .
LEHICH VALLEY.
Foot of West 23-1 A ; Cortlandt and Peabrossta Streettß- ;, A
♦Dally I Except Sunday. - ■■■■■'.*y cb*age*: c ,ia a l-»
e7«. 5T.35. t«.io. »l>.». -^ =
L»N.T..ALT.Vy.,B
Easton Local J'S »J »j .^; w *„
• inacpt^toresi:: :::::::::::: -»»*3^ : 255
BLACK DIAMOND EXPRESS •• J52.55553
Wtlkes-Bam and si mut..Q lUpress. ... «» r » t4- «
K»a"l Toronto Vestibule E»pfw»"" *$* *! *^| ■$ *.t
THE BrjPPALO TRAIN -„X T »i _ »•»' "
Ticket* and Pullman accommodntloiM -« 11J -*'-; i *i,? >oMnlros
.S.VI Broadway, Bl sth .Me.. 23 ITnlon t^nxn West, *J*£?'-2SiiSS
We . S. V . «3 Fulton St.. 4 Court 91 . ** HroaawsyssslFT
Ht Brooklyn. N. Y. Transfer Co. will call for aaacLeekba«B»« l ii
Lackawanna Railroad.
Leave New York, foot Barclay .-!•■:•."> s£ *
t*-t«> A. M.— For PttiKhamton and Syracuse
• I<mm> A. M. — For Buffalo. Chicago and St. Louis.
•I to P. M. — For Buffalo ami Chicago. _ _ _
1 1 (»> P. Si. — For Pcranton and Plymouth — Buff**.
'<;:<> P M. - For Buffalo an.l Chicago. o » la.
•< I.'. P M.— i-'-r I'tlon. I'sni-S'i. Ithaca and Bu ?.'^_.
••» Nl A. M —For Buffalo .in.i Chicago— Throu*S s i~£
"T.ckVtV'iM +•.-.• Broadway. C«r. Howard St: 1.J»8«2£ -
way. Cor. -.sih St.: 11.-. Broadway. N. T.: 33& r»tt°» ..^<- !
Brooklyn- -.-'.■: .
• 'Dally. t Except Sunday. ; tt '-..-. %i
...... . : . :.:■* ■■■:,!

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