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New-York tribune. [volume] (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, May 24, 1902, Image 1

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V OL LXII..N 0 - 20.27&
THE PIIII.IPIMM-: POLICY.
pro CONTRASTING VIEWS OF
FT PRESENTED.
THE DEMOCRATIC ATTITUDE STATED
BY SENATOR DUBOIS AND THE RE
PUBLICAN BY SENATOR
BEVEUIDGE.
lux ii :i.)...HAi-u to nil: Tiuurxi:. i
Washington. May 23. a notable feature of
to-day's debate In the Senate on the Lodge Phil
ippine hill was the speech by Fred T. Du
iv.iF. of Idaho, the virtual Wader in the minor
ity's fight to binder the installation among the
Filipinos of a more generous and practicable
■j-ffN m of civil government. Though serving his
first year In the Senate as a convert to Demo
cratic theories, Mr. Dubois has quickly risen to
authority and Influence, and his determination
to •met all legislation granting to the Fili
pinos a larger measure of self-government has
befn the moving Impulse in dragging the minor
ity Into that attitude of wholesale denunciation
of American rule In the archipelago to which
th* older party leaden have given so grudging
and reluctant an assent. The Idaho Senator,
whose policy has spurred the rawer recruits on
the Democratic s=ide to much extravagant and
ill Judged abuse .if American military methods
in the Philippines, might have been expected to
follow the sensational lead at which his more
hysterical supporters so eagerly grasped. On
the contrary, his speech to-day surprised both
hj? admirers and detractors by resolutely es
chewing all vituperative pyrotechnics, and hold
ire itself to a legitimate and serious discussion
of the political and commercial prob^ma raised
by this country's effort to pacify infi administer
its new pof sessions beyond the Pacific. In this
respect It offered a striking contrast not only to
the defamatory vaporing* of excitable anti-im
perialists like Mr. Wellington and Mr. Carmack.
but also to the philosophy of Mr. Hoar. Senator
Hale, who rarely says a thing In debate without
both point and substance, remarked at one stage
Of Mr. Dubois's speech that it was by far the
most sensible and valuable criticism of the
Lodge bill yet offered by the Democratic side,
and expressed regret that more Senators were
not on hand to benefit by it.
Mr. Dubois's voice suffered from the strain of
a three hours* speech, and he had to ask for
help In the reading of certain passages. But in
the main his matter. If not his manner, fully
Justified Mr. Hales spontaneous and timely
compliment.
An earnest and forcible reply to Mr. Dubois
was made by Mr. Beveridge. of Indiana, who
contended that the deve'opment of China's re
sources would be of a. antage in trade and
commerce to the United States, as the Industrial
development of other nations had been.
ARGUMENTS OF MR. DUBOIS.
Mr. Dubois spoke in part as follows:
There are two propositions before the Senate and
we are called upon to decide for the people of the
United Spates which one we will Indorse by our
vote? One is presented by the majority of the
Committee on the Philippines representing the
views of the Republicans; the other by the minority
of that committee reflecting the views of the
]t Is quite eertirtn. howevrrr that-the-i»««r-««*~
"wd in the majority bill Is satisfactory to the
Rrnub cars as the policy marked out in the rni
norMy bill r tk MtUfactory to the Democrats In the
S< The main question is as to the policy which we
sna^adSit uTd«Sfag with the
Kill Mi prVrem! Question, then, which the two
bTlWately present The difference Is so clear and
well §eflned that no one here or «'^* h X"uon ft
-. ,i,.u',T For the very first time the question is
SaftSmSffia^ggS
Jr. cmnip language between the policy or tne ite
pubKE anTDeinocrats befure entering into an
Republicans intend to hold the Philippines
rSwt to the United States in all things. without
I vine any hope much l*ss a promise, of ultimate
f, dependence P So far as "S^^^EfS'aited
S^ &fe2BS
jtSZnt. and for the indefinite future waterways
be parcelled out to our own people under
luch restrictions only as we ourselves shall irn-
The FiUDinos are to have no voice In the
ire to be taken Into consideration now or in the
future.
INDEPENDENCE FOR FILIPINOS.
The policy of the Democrats to to^^^jlSJJj
pinos an independent government
pradicable moment. This is clearly set fort h an 1
'ZmUIK-™* V suitable to their conditions we
propose to keep and protect their country and their
possessions for their own use. «h*rn
The contrast between the two pollclei to sharp
and w*ll defined. There can be no .such thltii; as
mistaking the difference between the two Proposi
tions before you. The majority Intend to hold tne
iMands for all time as a colony. The v m J."?T!. t n V t as
tend to give them an Independent v i r, "™ ." t _,' 9
foon as possible. The majority Intend tmm.-dl.itei>,
ana in the future, to exploit the Islands for the
advantage and gain of our own P*°PJ«;- . T nr\™«
nority intend to hold the islands for the Filipinos
and turn th<-m over to them when they have <s
tiblish.rd a government of their own. I.■hallen
d^avor to demonstrate that I have correctly *****
the. difference as to the policy between the two
parties, as *=hown in the two bills before us. al
ttiouph I am not certain that any one objects to
th»- accuracy of my comparison. ,
1 take the bill of the majority. Its title U "A
bill t^mporarilv to provide for the administration
ef the affairs of civil government in the *'hmppine
UUnds. and for other purposes' There certainly
is nothing ir. th.it title to hold out any hope of in
«*r*r»nt government for the Filipinos, and no
wher* in th* bill do you find any. language convey
ing any mor< hope. Who is to provide for the ad-
RiiniMfation of the affairs of civil government In
the Philippine Islands? It is plainly set f**** I.™1 .™
HI the succeeding sections of the hill that the
United States : - to administer the affairs of civil
lexemment of the Philippine Islands. utterly re
rardles-s of the wishes, suggestions or protests or
the inhabitants of the Islands. There is no "}" m<*
tior. anywhere in the bill that at any time In the
futur* or and<r any circumstances will the Lnite-i
Eutes ce-ise to administer the affairs of civil gov-
Msmfnt in th* Philippine Island*. It must no as
mm, <i then, and cannot be controverted, dodged.
or evaded that the ITnlted States Intends to make
« perpetual colony of these Islands. No Republican
Senator has denied this in this debate. and w some
have exultingly proclaimed it. The title of the bin
•» "temporarily to provide for the administration
of affairs of civil government in the. Philippine isi
»n<Jy. and for other purposes." Let us see what
*oro« of th« other purposes are. I will not taKe
up any more time In reading or commenting upon
»!>•» bill, but will address myself to the commercial
*fp»ct of this whole business as It affects the
t'nitfd States.
THE COMMERCIAL QUESTION.
If It wag perfectly manifest that we would he
trolly Injured commercially by continuing the
Policy marked out by the majority, if we were al.
•olutely sure that retaining the Philippine Islands
would entail great and constantly Increasing loss
to our own people, we could find some way to let
«*. If it could be demonstrated that Oriental trade,
••* a myth, and the exploiting of the Philippine
Wands would Injure our own people more and more
•• we exploit.-d them, then quickly It would become
*»r "man!f«"nt destiny" to allow them to have and
manage th*-ir own country In their own way.
I am so certain that great danger to the white
"»borer of the United States and the world will at
t*nd th* attempt to awaken the Chinese to lndus
tria! activity arid competition, ami that the devel
opment of the Philippine Islands by our capital will
*ork great hardship and inflict serious damage to
our own Industries and laborers, that I shall have
the temerity to attempt to prove It.
In the first place, we cannot compote with Japan
•or the Oriental trade. Japan la about the size of
Montana in square miles, and has more than half &s
« ontlnnrd on third pace.
POLAND SPRING HOUSE. POLAND SPRING.
Maine, opens June Ist. Booking office. Poland Wa
ter Depot. 3 Park Place. New York.— Advt.
SPRINGFIELD. MASS..
'k» 1 !i Celebrat * J I 1" golden Jubilee next week History
: Mthe city, programme of celebration, with inter-
fictuxce, la U)-nwrrow b Tribune.-'Advt.
NEW PLAN FOR WOODRUFF
TO RUN FOR SENATOR AND TAKE THE
LEADERSHIP ON THE FLOOR AT
ALBANY
I-leutenunt Govern Woodruff's probable elec
■ ion as Senator fron. ihe Vlth District of Kings,
to be followed by making him leader of the ma
jority in the Senate, was a story that inter
ested Brooklyn politicians last night. A mem
ber of the Kinps county Republican Executive
Committee, who asked that his name be left
out. outlined the situation as follows:
"Lieutenant Governor Woodruff will retire
from the place he now hold>, and will l»> suc
ceeded hy Senator Francis W. Biggins, of Olean.
Mr. Woodruff is tired of being Lieutenant Gov
ernor, bat is disinclined to retire from public
life, because he is a comparatively young man.
and the possible rapid changes in State politics
in the nexf five years may afford him an op
portunity to become s more prominent figure
than ever. As soon ;>s lie returns from Germany
md Knsrland. in July, he will < ill the leaders
together and inform them of his wi=h to be
come ■ Senator from the Vlth District, now
represented by Randolph C. Fuller. He believes
that with Senator Plait's help he can convince
Mr. Fuller that something else is better than a
Senatorshlp for him. and then. If p'-ms carry,
Mr. Fuller will r>\ a Slate <.r federal appoint
ment. Mr Woo, huff .iiso counts on Senator
Plan's Influence in prevailing upon Senator BUls
worth. th.- present Republican leader of the
Senate, to retire in his favor."
"What .i.--s Mr. Woodruff want With B State
SenatOTKhip?" was asked
"Because the leadership of the Senate, if he
secured it. would give him a chance for him
to displaj his ability as a leader on the Boor.
He would have a chance to lead in debate, and
WCUId come Tiuch more prominentlj before the
people than h<* does as Lieutenant Governor.
Moreover, he has said a, number of times that
he was going to retire from the Lieutenant Gov
ernorship, and he wants to keep his word. His
exrerien-e his shown him that the leadership
of the Senate is more desirable than being pre
siding officer.
"More important to Mr. Woodruff than any
thing (Mse, however, would be the opportunity
to demonstrate to the public that he can carry
his S. nate district by a larger Republican vote
than it ever has given to any one else. He
would manage his own campaign, and the re
sults would open the eyes of Mr. Woodruffs
critics, many of whom think that he has lost
much of his popularity. Mr. Woodruff was bit
terly criticised for sidiiiß with Sheriff Guden In
the earlier sta^-s of that controversy, and this
aroused the enmity of the Independent Repub
licans of KitiK^. Mi. Woodruff b>-lie\es that this
criticism has largely died out, and he is willing
to make a test by running for Senator Mr.
Woodruff Is president of the board of trustees
of Adelphl College. It was due to his energy
to a large extent that the tentative Rift of
$125,000 offered by John I>. Rockefeller was se
cured to the colleße as an endowment. Mr.
Woodruff and a few others succeeded in raisins
$125,<KK) for Adelphi, thus making Mr. Rocke
! feller's gift secure.
"It is believed that Senator Fuller would re
■ tire from the race for renominntlon merely or.
. the suggestion that the organization wanted
I the nomination to go to Mr. Woodruff. He is a
i thoroughgoing organization man, and Mr. Wood
ruff undoubtedly could beat him at the primaries
In a contest for the nomination. Just what
.would be done to make things agreeable to
Senator Ellsworth remains to be seen. There
4a poasUHlity of a change fn the Btnte Hail
road, CoHimlßuiyn. A secretary is to be ap
pointed, and It is poHfMble that Colonel Ashley
'A', cole win not succeed himself. Senator Klls
■worth might accept a position on the commls
nlon."
Senator Fuller could not be found last night.
Nothing has been said to hint as yet In an of
ficial way about Mr. Woodruff's reported plan.
/. T. BURDEN ARRESTED.
CHARGED WITH SPEEDING HIS AUTO
MOBILE IN CENTRAL PARK WEST.
I. Townsend Kurden. of No. Ti Bast Twenty
sixth-st., was arrested last ni^ht after a chase
:iy a bicycle poHceman. He was charged with
speeding his automobile In Central Park West.
Mr. Burden was taken to the West Bixtjr-elghth
st. Station a prisoner. He had no sooner en
tered the door than Justice Francis N. Scott
appeared and furnished bail for him.
Bicycle Policeman Nernay, who is attached to
Th«* West Blxty-elghth-st. station, was riding
along Central J'ark West about 7 p. m. when h^
noticed an automobile coming down that thor
oughfare at a fast rate. As the automobile ap
proached him he called to the driver to slow tip.
Mr. Kurden was handling the lever The pollce
man says he kept on at a hlnh rate of speed.
tfcrnay Immediately gave chase, calling out for
those in the automobile to slow up. A young
man who said his name was ECiernan was with
Mr. Hurden.
At Beventy-third-st. the policeman rode up
beside the vehicle. Nernay told Mr. Hurdf-n that
he was under arrest, and the latter submitted
■juietly and drove to the West Btxty-elghtb-st.
station.
Justice Scott save as security his home, No.
42 I'ark-ave. After signing the bond he ai'<i
Mr. Burden left the station. The ball was $500.
Mr. Hurden was Instructed to go to the West
Side court this morning. He will be arraigrn-d
on a. charge of violating the law, in speeding an
automobile at more than twelve miles an hour.
MRS. PARSONS IN COLLISION.
THK LAWYER'S WIFE HAS A NARROW
ESCAPE IN THE PARK.
Mrs. John E. Parions. of No .'«» East Thlrtv-
Kixth-st., had a narrow escape from serious
injury while driving in her victoria In Central
Park yesterday afternoon. The accident hap
pened in the East Drive, near Sixty-third-st
A cab coming south ran into the victoria and
was overturned. Mrs. Parsons'* carriage, as
well a» the cab, was smashed. No one was in
jured.
The cab was driven by William Mooney. of
No. 906 West Sixty-ninth-st. It contained two
well dressed women. Mrs. Par.sons's victorii
was driven by Thomas Reilly, of No. !t East
Twenty-fourth-st.
As the cab struck the victoria the women in
the cab attempted to get out. but it was too
late. Cab. passengers, driver and horse, all
went down, but fortunately the horse fell so
far away from where the passengers landed that
they v ejv not injured by the frantic efforts of
the animal to extricate himself from the harness
and regain his ft
One of Mrs ParSOns's horses was slightly
cut. During the excitement there was a block
of carriages in the drive
The women who were in the cab would not
give their names to the police, though they
exchanged card* with Mrs. Parsons.
THE SHENANDOAH SPECIAL.
A new train on Norfolk and Western, carrying
through sleeping car PhUa. to Welch, W. Va., via
Perm. R. R.. Harrtsburg and Hagerstown. con
necting at Roanoke for W nston-Salem and Char
lotte. N. C. and at HlueHeld for Clinch Valley Di
vision. Leave N. J. <|auy commencing Sunday.
May 25. « p. m.. Phila «.-■ p. m. . Harrisburg 11:10
p. m. Inquire of any Perm R. R Agent or Norfolk
And Western. 39S Broad N. -A.I 1
HOLIDAY TRIP TO BERNARDBVIL.LE.
Five-day excursion u< k. ■'!• ■■ .. r Decoration U*y,
|1.05. Lackawanna ticket offices.— Advt.
NEW- YORK. SATURDAY. MAY 24, 1902. -SIXTEEN PAGES -^^ZTA^uo*.
T. D. M' ll' >!*S.
BIG FRAUDS DETECTED.
THE POSTOFFICE DEPARTMENT BEGINS
WAR A(JAIXST "HOME CORPORA
TION" AND "BOND INVEST
MENT" CONOEKXS.
ll'Y 1 i:j.i:<;ii m-ii TO mi: TBIBrXE.I
Washington', .May 2.'}.— The fraud order divi
sion of the Postofflce Department, which has
just closed the mails to more than twenty cor
porations doing an endless chain business, has
begun war against' the "home corporation* and
"bond Investment" schemes which are substan
tially rooted throughout the country, particular
ly in .the West. An official estimate was sent
to the Postmaster General, which showed that
these questionable companies had contracted lla-
Ulities of ?."i0.(>00.000. Examination has proved
that the available assets would not be one
tenth of this amount. The earnings of the fac
tory workers and the day laborers feed the bank
accounts of tL-.-x.- • •unjtiiiK aulnUUe* --I.' -.t.-r*
containing pitiful pleas from these poor p*«pLt
have been received at the Postbfflce Department
Raying that they have paid money on contracts
for homes which the contractors have failed to
keep within a reasonable time. This a the cry
against the "horn corporation companies,"
while the subscribers to the "bond Investment
companies'' say their weekly payments In moat
cases bring no returns.
Though tii-s.- s< li.-iii.-s are a new class of
fraud t.i the postofflce Inspectors, having de
veloped within sixty days, thirty fraud orders
have already been Issued. With this progress
toward ridding the country of such frauds the
Assistant Attorney General for the Postoffice
Department Bays thai he has refused to make
appointments with other companies, which have
sprung up like mushroom*, until the fraud order
division will be bun) from June 1 to August
hearing the statements of their representatives,
who have asked permission to show cause why
they should not be debarred from the mails, it
is thought' possible that further developments ,
will show that the .*.">o,(h.n»,<km> estimate of these
frauds Is underrated by at leaSt $-':* x * >,« * *>.
The Information already secured was reported
by one officer, whose Inspection tour included
less than four weeks' work In a small part of
the country. This Inspector reports that there
are some thirty Arms In Kansas City, between
thirty and forty In Chicago, nearly twenty in
Louisville, eight In I)es Moincs, and from seven
to twenty in various places throughout the
West, from Lexington, Ky.. to Denver, Col. He
said that they had exhausted the vocabulary of
corporation literature.
Among the thirty firms against which fraud
orders have been issued in the last six weeks
are the .Mutual Fidelity Company, Wilmington,
DeL; the Daily Redemption Bond Company,
Louisville, Ky.; American Investment Company,
Lexington, Ky.; Century Investment Company,
Lexington, K>.; Equitable Investment Com
pany. Lexington, Ky.; P*ayette Investment Com
pany, Lexington, Ky.; Globe Investment Com
pany, Lexington, Kj ; Home Investment Com
pany, Lexington, Ky : Industrial Mutual Deposit
Company, Jefferson Guaranty and Surety Com
pany. Lexington; Heal Estate and Insurance
Company, Tontiiv nti«l Minneapolis Sa/tngs As
sociation, Minneapolis.
POSTMASTER GENERAL UPHELD.
A SECOND i I. ASS MAM. CASE DECIDED
AGAINST A PUBLICATION.
Washington, May 'j:;.- justice Barnard, of the
District Supreme Court, In a decision in the
mandamus case of i he Chicago Business College
against the Postmaster General, to-day sus
tained the policy of the Postofßce Department
in its exclusion of certain classes of publica
tions from Hie second clan quail rates. The
court refused* to issue the writ of mandamus,
and dismissed the petition of the coil..^e, which
sought to compel tin- admission <>f its publica
tion. "Business Education," to the second class
rate. The court suggested In Its decision that
it did not think .units should differ in Judgment
with officers of the government as to the mean
lag of a law that such officers are charged With
executing, ..s that would constitute a .substitu
tion of the Judicial mind for the executive. The
decision Is i garded by postal officials as of
great Importance.
IMPROVED SERVICE TO ROANOKE V \ VIA
PENNA. X It '
Beginning May 18, the Penna. Railroad train leav
ing N V . West i'::.l Bt Station, 6:55 p. m daily
will carry through rullman buffet slrtpinir car be
tween Philadelphia and Welch. W. Va.. via Harris
burg, Hagerstown and Roanoke, and Norfolk &
Went.™ R. It.: returning leave Welch 1-40 n m
Consult Ticket Am-nts.-Advt.
IN THE SPACE OF" KIFTV-KIVE FEET
you can buy your passage and sleeping car tickets
send a telegram or cable message, check your baa
sage.5 age. and step on to your train, at the New York
Cental's Grand Central SUtion.-Advt. - iOr *
LEADERS IN THE GREAT COAL MINE STRIKE.
JOHN FAHKY.
'\}\i- woman In the centre Is Miss Clara Morris, President Mitchell** secretnrv.
MANY USE SOFT COAL
DEM A ND CA USES SCA RCITY IN
BITUMINOUS SUPPLY.
SLIGHT ADVANCE IN PRICE-TURNED
PRINCIPALLY IN HIGH BUILDINGS
OPERATORS DECLARE THEIR
STAND UNALTERABLE.
Neither the order of Mitchell to the pump
men and engineers to quit work on June 1! at
the anthracite mines unless they receive the
eight hour working day nor the efforts of th»»
Civic Federation to bring about peace will alter
the stand taken by the coal operators, accord
ing to representatives of the coal carrying roads
who were seen yesterday. They said that no
«'«ipfr renews over the situation would be held
.luring the day, and that, so far as the opera
tors were concerned,' no conferences were heeded.
Soft coal "was used very largely in thin city
yesterday on account of the scarcity of anthra
. lte. The Sound Steamers began to burn It gen
erally, the •"colley," as the soot deposit is called,
falling, however, on the river instead of being
blown Into the City. Soft coal mixed with
anthracite was burned in the furnaces of the
North American Trust Building, No*. 139 and
137 Broadway. The smoke was very palpable,
but, as the building is a very tall one. it was
dissipated in the upper air. Superintendent
Traver of the building said that the smaller
sizes of anthracite burned better when mixed
With soft coal. He believes that a nuisance
could be avoided If soft coal were stoked prop
erly.
In the engine room of Ihe Broad Exchange
Building appliances have » n pul In to con
sume the smoke caused hy soft coal, and aofl
coal is now b -ing consumed there without creat
ing smoke. At Lord's i*ourt Building, which ad
loins it. :i representative of the house man
agement s.iid that soft coal had b.-en ordered
and voiild he burned when the present supply
of hard coal, which would la«t only .1 shod
time, has exhausted.
in .nber tall downtown bulKUngs soft coal was
freely consumed, especially In the Wall street
district. The stand if taken by their superin
tendents that their use of it is not, BO far. a
nuisance, as in tail building*, when only one
or two are concerned, the smoke does not reach
the street, and the city ordinance aims, not at
the burning of soft coal, but at the nuisance
from its consumption.
The demand for soft coal caused a scarcity
of thai article in the afternoon.- only the
cheaper grade* were in the market. The whole
sale price quoted was *■'! ">o a ton, the schedule
price being £- •>•"', and no retail price has been
arranged.
In the morning a number of small dealers
along the New-Jersey coaat Of the Hudson ar.d
in Btaten Island, who had been holding stocks
of anthracite, put It on the market at whattvei
price it would bring. The quantity set free was
too small, however, to affect the general supply
The retail dealers generally stood by th»-jr
promises not to raise the retail price .higher than
J 1 > .'!."> a ton until some new concerted action la
taken by the dealers One or two Manhattan
Arms broke away from the agreement and .sold
a few tons at $N and $8 ,\O. hut this was an ex
ception. One of the best known dealers said:
"No good can he done by raising the price of
anthracite any higher. We don't want to sell
it. and there is practically none for sale.
and there i.s no use In starting a panic w Ir-n
it can be avoided. At this time of the year the
present scarcity of anthracite is not a serious
problem."
Various unverified reports arose yesterday
evening about alleged attempts of outsiders to
bring about more conferences between the
miners and the operators. William Moore, of
Manning, Maxwell A Moore, was asked if a re
port that he had been a?kf>d to bring about such
a conference was true, but declined to say any
thing on the subject-or confirm or deny the re
port.
There was a slight advance yesterday in the
price of bituminous coal hy the cargo. That
product, the wholesalers pay. is becoming scarcer
every day. and unless a larger supply is received
here in a few days the price is expected to take
another and much larger Jump.
II.VNNA'S YIKWS ON THK STRIKE.
HE DOSS NOT BKLIKVK HlTl'MlNol S COAL
MINKRS WILL STOP WORK.
Washington, May 28. Senator Hanna returned
to Washington to-day from a visit to Philadel
phia, where he went to attend a social affair,
and not to arrange matters connected with the
ccal miners' strike. Senator Hanna says he does
not believe the organisations of the United
I untlnurd <i» «e.-€iiid im*,-.
; . . /.THE .PROPHETS CHAMBER."
Reprinted from -the- Four-Track News" for May. will
Interest every farmer')* wife In New York and New
England. S«nt free on receipt of 4 cents by G.II,
fcaoiela. Grand Central Station. Nsw W*r*.—
J. IIARTLEIN.
ENGLAND'S FISCAL POLICY.
COLONEL DENISON WORKING FOB DIF
FERENTIAL TARIFFS.
.1 r MORGAN GIVES A COSTLY BPAWMH
TAPESTRI TO THE KINO— I.ITKKARY.
(CopvrlKht; IMS: B) Tl Tribune Association.)
(Special to TV- New-Tors Tribune by French '"able.)
London), May '24. 1 a. m.— Colonel Denlson, of
Toronto, addressed a meeting of the Liverpool
Chamber of Commerce yesterday on the subject
of England's trade relations with her colonies.
His plea for the adoption of a system of prefer
ential tariffs was listened to with sympathy and
even enthusiasm. He warned the meeting that
the Atlantic -hipping combination would charge
higher prices for bringing corn from the United
States to England so as to be able to send Amer
ican manufactured poods In at lower rates. The
next war was to be a war of trau'e JL _a.r)<j__uj3legs
England changed her fiscal policy sht- could not
hope to survive.
Premier Seddon. speaking at Pretoria on Tues
day, also advocated a change in «>reat Britain's
fiscal policy.
Mr. Brodrtck last night said thai th- forth
coming Colonial Office conference would take
into consideration the question of closer union
between the various part* of the empire, but he
avoided any reference to commercial relations.
Mr. Chamberlain is the only Cabinet Minister
strong enough to tackle, that subject just yet.
A curious detail of tin- coronation preparation
has i n revealed .it the South Kensington Mu
seum. .1. Plerponl Morgan Is said to have pre
sented to the Kir.t; :i large tapestry, for which
he paid $.*tfMW. This tapentrj "ill he used for
decorative effect In the Abbey at th" coronation
service. If this Information be accurate, it Is a
Spanish tapestry about twelve feet square, with
crimsons and blues of exceptional beauty and
richness and s great deal of gold thread is
woven with the colors. The tapestry is now in
the museum, although no one Is allowed to see
it. but I learn from go .1 authority that the King
has decided to use it at the coronation.
Lord Rosebery made an appeal for Liberal fa
union at the National Liberal Ctah last ntsjM.
"For good or for evil.* 1 be said, amid loud ap
plause, "the Liberal part] is bound to free
trade."
Among the latesi arrival.-: here from Canada
are Mr. RabUn. Premier of Manitoba; J. Stew
art Tupper, Qeocge Burn, president of the Rank
of Ottawa, and the Rev. Or Wilkie. Oavid C.
Townsend, the American diamond expert, is
also hare for the coronation, with Mrs Town
send.
Maurice Hewlett has returned to Inadon from
Italy, where he has been rtiUlnsj about Tuscany
from town to town with Joseph Pennell behind
him mi a bicycle They have bets to OBSiaUgfl
in ■ literary and artistic undertaking for Mae
millan. Mr. Pennell is Starting tor Spain, where
he will make a series of drawings, for Ulustra
tJea» i n. k.
THK AGRICULTURAL I KPARTMEXTS KSTI-
M A IKS OF .VRKAiiK. PMMN7G
TION AM' V.M.IK
Washington, May 9 The stathrrletaß of the De
partment of Agriculture l>«i> completed his esti
matea of tin acreage, productloa sad farm value .>f
the c trawl crops of the I'nite.l States m ]:*'>l. th«
grand totals being a- follows:
Acre*. BMIMHS Value.
Corn 01.34».!tt8 1..V£.\.V.>.v.»l t551.303.7ai
Wheat 19.895,314 74*. t»v> .M 4>;7 |."l«
Oats >:.»!. »Tii 73i:.»>in,7-. > I 2M.ti.ls. 777
Karl~\ ■!'."..:»» I«W.WR!.I»-t M>.7€B,tSl
Rye l.!><» 7.'!»>.".. '!»>.". 3V.3-t4.KH> I". '.■«•! 7
Buckwheat 811. i.\ ii"..:>4i 8,323.318'
In the preparation of this report all proper weight
has been given to the recently published census re
port on the crops of 1359. ■
1 KG£y 77 A A-VMIU AOMEEMEU T.
Beenes Ayres, Argentine Repasts?, May
pit.hts recerred here from Baattaga ds I'hili, say
that an agISSSMHII on th.- suhjset of Argentlne-
ChiUan disarmament has been arrived at.
I'h-IMH BEMtI LBJkVB* Ih'HLiMt.
Dublin, Miy at The squadios <>f Qsrmaa war
ships commaiiili <i by Prince Henry of Prussia
sailed from Kinsstowri. seven miles from here, for
Kiel to-day.
BAMOMET, ROCKLAND BREAKWATER. ME.
Opens June 25th, first season. Booking office Po
land Water Depot. 3 Park Place. New York.
RICKKR HOTEL CO.. A. C. JUDD. Mgr.
-AdTt.
OUR SIMMER CAPITAL.
President Roosevelt will spend a greater part of
the summer at Oyster Bay. and the work of the
administration will be conducted there, Photos of
some of th« homes of New-Yorkers who will be, the
President* neighbors. In • to-morrow* Tribune.—
-Ad.**-. -■ !-■«■■
T. DUFFY.
CEREAL CROP* or 1901.
PRICE THREE CENTS.
PEACE OUTLOOK GOOD.
BRITISH SPEt TLA TORS BE
LIEVE IT IS CEBTMX.
BOERS STILL TO CONSIDER THE REPLY
TO THEIK LATEST I>IV WIS.
(Copyright; IJH*"-: By Th« Tribune Association.)
(Special to The {few-York Tribune by French Cab*».»
London. May 24. 1 a. m.-On the Stock Ex
change peace is regarded as certain. From an
early hour yesterday morning the "Kaffir" mar
ket was hard at work pushing up prices in every
direction, trotting out derelicts, and introducing
novelties until the roar of the members made
the "Kaffir" dome ring again and again. Ex
cited little crowds cursed round the doors of
the building all day. and everybody appeared
to imagine that the long looked for boom had
at last come. Peace, however, has not yet been
arranged, and there will be a hitter awakening
if the negotiations should fall through after all.
It is understood that the Cabinet yesterday con
sidered certain proposals made by the Boer
leaders which Lcrd Kitchener and Lord Milner
didn't wee their way either to accept or decline.
Nothing has been allowed to become public offi
cially as to what took place, but it is known
that a dispatch was cabled last evening to Lord
Milner, and it is presumed that this was the
reply to the Boer proposals. The communication
will doubtless be made the subject of further
debate by the Boer delegates, and it is there
fore quite possible that some days will elapse
before the government can see its way to make
a definite announcement regarding the situation.
Mr. Brodrick. speaking at a volunteer on
cers' dinner last night, said he hoped that the
negotiations would end in the surrender of the
Boers, but the Government was determined not
to purchase temporary immunity from trouble
by sacrificing anything which would tend to
permanent security ,nd peace in South Africa.
All of this morning's newspapers take a very
hopeful view of the peace outlook. Even the
cautious "Standard" says the main I!r.es of
settlement appear to have been practically
agreed upon.
m 1. N. F.
GREAT OPTIMISM IX LONDON.
BELIEF GENERAL THAT PEACE IS ASSURED
—THE CABINET MEETING.
IMy The Associated Brew.)
London. May 23.— The Associated Press has)
every reason to believe that peace in South
Africa is practically secured. How soon It will
be announced depends, apparently, more upon
the convenience- of the Boer leaders than upon
the inclination of the British Government. The;
private and official advices received to-night in
London from South Africa all point to the same
conclusion. The delay is technical, and to end
the long war seems to be the desire of both
British and Boer leaders. The latter, however.
are unable to convince all their followers of the
wisdom of acquiescing In the terms of peace.
Information as to what occurred at to-day's
meeting of the Cabinet is closely guarded, but
it is not likely that the Cabinet transactions
were of vital Import. The surmise of one .well
Informed person places the sum total of the de
liberations of the Cabinet ministers at a de-
easlßSl regarding points of the peace agreement
of entirely minor importance. Another surmise
I* that the Cabinet has merely sent a rather
mock ultimatum to South Africa, which can be
used by the Boer leaders in explanation to their
forces. Both these surmises probably contain
an element of truth, but neither can In any way
affect the widespread belief in the best in
formed quarters that the end of the war has
come. In fact, those persons who are best ac
quainted with the actual details of the present
negotiations only qualify this optimistic ex
uression of opinion by guarded reservations con
cerning the extent of the personal control of the
Boer leaders over their commands. Were the
Boers a thoroughly disciplined force, dependent
upon the action of their general officers, peace
would probably be proclaimed to-nisrht; but
Botha. IV Wet and the other generals seem
themselves unable positively to guarantee the
degree to which their example will be followed.
The delegates at vereeniging, according to in
formation in possession of the War Office, axe
fairly evenly divided. Consequently, extreme
precautions are # exercised both in London and
Pretoria to prevent any premature action or
report which might adversely influence the
burghers.
The most pessimistic forecast heard to-night
only admits that a few isolated bands of irrecon
cilable* may be left in the field.
A member of the House nt Commons who Is In
close touch with the government said to a repre
sentative of The Associated Press to-night that
he believed everything was settled, and that
the British terms would be found unexpectedly
liberal.
The British public is still quite Ignorant of
the course of events in South Africa, and there
are no demonstrations to-night on the London
streets, although on all sides the question asked
Is. "Is It peace?-' On the other hand, the Stock
Exchange throughout the day was a seething
mass of brokers, who eagerly bought South
African shares, while long after the closing of
the exchange nearly a thousand brokers crowd
ed Throgmorton-st. and did a frantic euro
business on the strength of the peace outlook.
It was reported that the bases of peace war*
signed in Pretoria yesterday.
The appearance- of Mr. Brodrick. the Secretary
Of State for War. at the Volunteer Service din
ner to-night, was watched eagerly in the hope of
gaining an inkling of the government's private
frame of mind. But Mr Brodrick'3 listeners
had to be contented with one brief and adroitly
turned reference to the present situation. Re
sponding to the toast. "The Imperial Forces."
the War Secretary said:
I would go beyond my duty should I enter into
details of the communications which are now
passing, and which prelude, as we all hope th* '
Surrender of the Boers.
Mr. Brodrick then proceeded to reiterate the
oft declared intention of the government not to
be. drawn into any compromise which would
jeopardize future peace in South Africa.
Greater public interest was manifested In to
day's meeting of the Cabinet than has been the
case in any meeting since the earlier stages of
the war. The ministers reached Downing-s*.
(where the Foreign Office. Colonial Office and .
other government offices are situated) from all
parts of the country, and were greeted by hun
dreds of people anxious for some sign of th«
probable trend of affairs.
The Cabinet meeting adjourned at 3:10 p. m.,
when The Associated Press ascertained that th •
The New-York Central announces a number of
first class excursions to St. Paul. Colorado. Utah.
California. Oregon and Yellowstone Park, at very
low rates. Itineraries now ready. Call at ticket
offices or address M. C. Roach. I.So Broadway.
New-York.-AdvC
ARBITRATION.
■ The annual Arbitration Conference meets at tails
Mohonk on May * 2) and 30. Representative
Americans from all over the Union -will be present.
The purpose, history and future of the conference. •
with UluatraUoa* in t<J-morr<)w_a Xri&ua^.-Aiiii^-

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