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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 25, 1902, Image 4

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MITCHELL IN WASHINGTON
"WAYNE MACVEAGH SENDS FOR HIM
AND MINE WORKERS' ATTORNEYS.
INDEPENDENT OPERATOR? COME TO THIS
CITY— THET NOW TAKE A MORE
CONCILIATORY TONE
[BT uiaain TO THE Tltnit-NE.]
Ecranton. Peon., Nov. 24.— President Mitchell
•was called to Washington this afternoon in
furtherance of the plan for a settlement of The
strike He was accompanied by Messrs. Darrow
and Lloyd, of th*» mine workers' attorneys. At 3
p. m. Wayne MacVeagh. who is in Washington.
Told Mr. Darrow by long distance telephone that
he would like to *■<■*■ Mr. Mitchell and his two
leading attorneys. At first Mr. Mitchell hesi
tated about going. Mr. MacVeagh said no more
than that he «ii not in condition to undertake
the long journey to this city. and asked that in
stead they go to see him. As he has been fore
most in the efforts to effect an amicable adjust
ment Mr. Mitchell finally decided to go. The
party left on an afternoon train, and will reach
"Washington at midnight. To-morrow morning
the conference with Mr MacVeagh will be held.
Mr. Darrow Mid that he did not know what it
■would be about specifically, but he understood
that Mr. MacVeagh had something to communi
cate from The presidents of the coal roads. Mr.
MacVeach has. with David Willcox. of the Dela
ware and Hudson, been active since last Wednes
day in working for a settlement. He and Mr.
WiUcox submitted to the mine workers the
eke. -ton of an agreement which is being devel
oped, so that when the commission reconvenes
en December I all that will remain for it to
do wffl be to reach a general finding on the
condition? md to prepare a plan for the settle
ment of future disputes, unless, indeed, it is act
satisfied with the agreement, in "which case it
will probably order the hearings resumed. For
the commission has made it clear that it will
not allow the settlement to be taken out of its
hands. It was created to pass on the dispute,
and will Insist on doing its work. The sub
commissior. held BO formal meeting to-day, and.
BOW that th* independent operators. President
Mitchell and his attorneys and the attorneys
for the coal companies are out of town, and
negotiation* are proceeding elsewhere, they do
not expect to have anything further to do until
— possibly not until next Monday.
A number of the independent operators left
here to-day for New-York, and to-morrow their
committee of nine will hold a conference with
the officials of the bis coal carrying companies.
Following this conference it is expected that
th«r< will be a meeting of the big operators, at
which there will be a general discussion on the
proposed settlement. If a satisfactory conclu
sion is reached, meetings with the representa
tives of the rain||v ork^rs will be arranged at
once, and : "- f ' ■Twja*' end of the week the strike
Issues may be ir&olly settled.
Mr. Darrow sard to-day: "'I have no doubt
that by the time the commissioners meet the
questions at issue will be adjusted and a plan
■will v.p r<=ady to be submitted for their ap
proval."
Each side is hopeful of success. The one
stumbling block is the independent operators,
but this afternoon their tone was somewhat
moderated, and they expected to return from
New-York with all the difficulties adjusted. If
they are assured of a decrease in the freight
rates, that will even half cover the advance to
the miner*, it is understood that they will agree
to the plan of the big operators and cause no
further trouble.
Mr Darrow, in discussing to-day the proposed
settlement, said that the increase granted would
be a horizontal one. "We would prefer an
equalization of wages," he said, "hut it seems
Impossible to get it. The prices paid by the
companies are to different that I am afraid there
never would be an amicable agreement upon an
equalization either by operators or men. We
have named a certain figure, and the operators
have proposed a basis of settlement. There we
are now. Each side Ss holding conferences and
discussing the plan, but there has not yet been
a joint conference. When that will come I do
not Know. It will largely depend on the result
of the meetings to-morrow in New-York and
Washington."
An equalization of ages would, it is believed.
b*> opposed by the mine workers, because the
men who uze getting low wages would have all
the better of it. while those having high "wages,
«f» man" have, would get little, or. perhaps, no
increase. The yearly wages of the miners range
from 5400 to $I*3oo.
The mine workers do not understand the pres
ent negotiations, and do not feel at liberty to
speak, but they are watching them closely.
They want, and believe they should have, recog
nition of th* union, but there is no hope of their
gelling it That question appears to have
dropped entirely from the lost of demands.
A move is afoot to have a bill introduced In
Congress for perpetuating the strike commis
sion, and to extend its scope to all serious strikes
of whatever nature In the country. Certain
Representatives from the coal regions are being
seen about it.
COMMISSION LOOKS FOR AGREEMENT.
CARROLL D. WRIGHT IN CONFERENCE
WITH THE PRESIDENT.
"Washington, Nov. 24.— Carroll D. "Wright, re
corder of the Anthracite Coal Strike Commis
sion, had a conference with the President to
day. He outlined to Mr. Roosevelt the work of
th» commission, indicating that, whatever
rr.lght be the result of the conferences between
the representatives of the operators and the
minemi the commission probably would pro
ceed, at l apt for a time, with its work, and en
deavor to reach a definite conclusion which
might be used in the future as a basis for the
adjustment of similar controversies.
Members of the commission are of the opinion
that the operators and miners will reach an
agreement on all points of difference. It will be
the repose to arrange, if possible, that the
agreement shall have some permanent form.
WODD EI'RNERS TO FIGHT OPERATORS.
The Wood Burners' Association has been formed,
vith headquarters at No. IM Montgomery-st.. Jer
fey City, to fight tlw coal operators. The twenty
■Ve refmWs are pledged bo bum no coal. Samuel
Jaycox is th» presiding officer, with the title of
Boss Burner. The members hope that the asso
ciation will extend to all parts of the country, and
dim* the demand for coal.
FRENCH COAL STRIKE ENDED.
rtnon< Ferrand. France. Nov. 24 — The
Mrike of the coal miners in this region has quite
terminated. The men have resumed work at
ell th« pits, and the troops who were guarding
th* properties have been withdrawn.
\ATAI PRISON UNIFORM ADOPTED.
Washlr.jton. Nov. 24.— The Navy Department has
decided upon a distinctive prison garb for marines
•"1 enlisted men in the navy. It will be a plain
dark gray blouse and trousers, with a round
hiIBSSMfI soft hat of the same hue. Heretofore
en!ift-:<J men serving terms in naval prisons have
worn their old inUotBM This was regarded as
Hard on the other men la the service, and on the
recommendation of Judge Advocate General Lemiy
the prison uniforms were adopted
THE WISCONSIN LEAVES PAyAMA.
Washington, Nov. _a cable dispatch to the
Kavy Department to-day from Panama reports the
departure of Rear Admiral Casey in his flagship
the Wisconsin, for San Francisco. The cruiser
Boston' left Mare Island Saturday for Santa Bar
fc""".! 011 £&? **? t0 the isthmus to relieve the bat
tleship Th«- Wisconsin ha 8 been at Panama since
ember 29. having been ordered there when
th^r r ? n8: L across . he Isthmus was threatened by
the Colombian revolutionists. v*u *
I nion Square. North. 2<> L. ]7lh Street.
We Have Imported a Number of Choice
FHESGH KAHBLE WANTELS,
FfiEHCH Ind ITALIAN
ANDIRONS. FISE SCREENS, etc.
Our Own Foundries and Shops.
THE INDEPENDENTS ARRIVE.
THEY WILL TRY TO CONFER WITH THE
COAL PRESIDENTS TO-DAY.
A. committee of independent operators which
left Scranton yesterday afternoon to try to con
fer with the coal presidents to-day as to how
the independent operators would fare in the
proposed settlement between the operators and
the anthracite miners arrived in this -city last
evening. Among the members of the commit
tee who came were Dr. J. M. Rice, of Pittston.
Perm.; J. L. Cake, of the Clear Spring Coal
Company and the Raub Coal Company of
Pittstown; H. B. Reynolds, of the Wyoming
Coal and Land Company. Scran ton; C. D. Simp
son, of the West End Coal Company, of Scran
ton. and C. W. Wissner. They held a confer
ence late last night in the Hotel Imperial, but
refused to say what conclusions they had
reached or what time they would s»ee the coal
presidents to-day.
President Fowler of the New-York. Ontario
and Western Railroad was seen yesterday re
garding a report that the coal presidents had
had an informal conference early in the day
about the position of the independent operators.
He said he knew of no such conference and
also knew of no arrangements for a conference
with a committee of independent operators.
It was learned that the independent operators
are anxious to know how they will stand in the
proposed plan of raising the freight rates. The
independent operators depend on the railroad
companies to carry their coal, and if they have
to pay an increase of wages and at the same
time hnve to compete with the railroad com
panies in selling coal their profit will be dimin
ished, unless some special arrangement is made.
President Baer of the Philadelphia and Read
ing Railroad is expected to be in this city at 11
a. m. to-day, when he will inform the other
coal presidents that the usual Tuesday after
noon meeting of the Temple Coal and Iron Com
pany will be held at the office of the Central
Railroad of New-Jersey. Th« coal presidents
are directors of this company, and after the
meeting the coal situation will be discussed.
The committee of independent operators, it was
said last night, would try to see the coal presi
dents before the meeting of the Temple Coal
and Iron Company.
John Markle. one of the Inrtenpendent coal
operators, went to the offices of several presi
dents of coal roads yesterday, and there was a
report that he was trying to arrange for the
conference of the presidents with the independ
ent operators. He would not talk about it.
Some of the operators said that anthracite
coal wa« arriving in the city at the rate of
£0,000 ton? daily, and that since the strike
ended early 1,000.000 tons had been shipped
here. Dealers are charging $7 and $7 50 a ton.
retail, yesterday, and not everybody who want
ed coal could get it at that price.
"A TRIUMPH FOR ARBITRATION."
PROFESSOR GUNTON SO CHARACTERIZES
THE COAL STRIKE— S. A. BRIGGS DE
FENDS RIGHT TO WORK.
Th* thirty-eighth dinner of the New- York Ur.iver
palist Club was held last night at the St. Denis Ho
tel. Professor George Giinton was the speaker of
the evening. At the close of his speech some of
those present took exception to some of his points.
He spoke on 'Capital, Labor and Serf." saying in
part:
President Roosevelt feels compelled to recommend
in his next message that legislation be taken
against trust?. I do not think be does this because
he thinks they should be legislated against, but
because it Is the opinion of some people who, he
thinks, know more about this matter than ho does,
and because the great mass of people are prejudiced
to the same view.
In the late coal strike President Bapr ,wed a
remarkable lack of sense. Whtn lie h<-i himself up
witn the claim of being a partner with Goi Al
mighty and that God left matters to him it v/as
not sense. This one statement has done tr.r.re to
stimulate the belief that capital cannot safe!y con
trol the great productive forces than a cent or
socialistic propaganda, with Bryan and free silver
thrown in could do.
You all know how Mr. Mitchell went hack to th
miners, and how they struck. The result has been
bad blood, mutual acrimony and material for su
ciolistic propaganda. hi* owner said "Nothing to
arbitrate," and now everything is being arbitrated
Had the operators as much sense as Schwab
showed In the st el strike, there would iv-v<;r have
been any coal Ike, That strike has b< «n a tri
umph for arbitration.
Tne speaker said that, as a rule, In difficulties
between capital and labor, capita] was often the
more to blame because of the greater opportunities
of the operators to learn and understand the gen
eral drift of industrial tendencies.
At the close of Professor Gunton's lecture B A.
Brings jumped to his feet and said:
I am surprised to think that such an intelligent
audience should listen to a man of supposedly co
great an Intelligence as Professor Gunton with
out taking exception to his remarks. I'hf real ques
tion of the late coal strike was whether a man hal
the right to work when he pltasc-d or not whether
his wife should remain unmolested and' whether
his cildren could go to school or he ro to work
without being dynamited The second question was
whether worthless men should have the same pay
as faithful worklngmen Whether a man shall
have a richt to hire the men he wish*"i or not that
was the third question.
Why should we be dictated to by Mr. Mltcell who
never did an honest day's work in his life, and who
receives $10,000 a year from the men.
Only three weeks ago I wanted a ditch dug in my
yard. A walking delegate called the men oft, and
no ditch was dug. There Is a case of walking <1«>1»»
gate for you!
Professor Gunton denied mary nf Mr. Briggs's
assertions.
ADVOCATES MORE ORGAXIZATIOy
H. K. CASSON' ADVISES LABOR UNIONS TO BT.T
STOCKS.
Herbert N. Casson delivered a lecture on "How
Strikes May Be Prevented" at Berkeley Lyceum,
No. 23 West Forty-fourth-st. last evening, under
the auspices of the men's department of the League
for Political Education.
Mr. Casson expressed the opinion that labor
should organize in every trade and profession, and
praised the trusts as an enemy to competition. He
said a complete organization of labor and capital,
one to produce the articles and the other to market
them, was the way to secure peace and harmony
among ail classes. He flayed the Socialist parties
as working on ideas that would be useless in a
congested community like New- Tor City. He re
ferred to J. P. Morgan and John D. Rockefeller as
capable organizers, but "expensive toys," because
consolidation was comparatively new He urged
that labor unions should govern the capitalists, the
former being the larger body. To do this he ad
vised the unions to buy stocks with th© mom .
raised for the purposes of a strike.
"I would advise the organization of every pro
fession as well as business enterprise," said Mr.
Catson. "and that a delerate from each body mer-t
in a federated union. Then we should haVe the
first representative congress in the country which
would govern work."

DOCTORS ACT ON CORONER QUESTION.
APPOINT COMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE MOVE.
MENT FOR ABOLISHMENT OF THE OFFICE.
At the meeting of the County Medical Society
last evening, at the Academy of Medicine, a mo
tion was passed directing the appointment of a
committee to inquire into the movement for the
reorganization or'h.bolition of the coroner's office,
to report in December. Dr. Van Fleet, the retir-
Ing president, who made the motion, sold he had
no opinion to offer on the subject himself, but a
prominent layman had asked him to introduce the
resolution, and he thought that an investigation
could do no harm. The committee appointed 13
composed of Drs. William M Polk, John W. Bran
nan and Frank Van Fleet.
Dr. Van Fieet made an address, In which he
urged that all physicians should be organized into
one body. The District Attorney's office, he said,
announced a raid with a blare of trumpets, just
because an idiot or two loses some Inherited money
on the turn of a card, but when some swindlers,
under the guise of religion, spread deadly contagion
through a community, the officers of the law ap
pear to be powerless. He hoped to see ail schools
of real medicine united, and as an Immediate step
In that direction he hoped to see the two regular
organ zat.ons— the State Society and the State
|psi£2* a thCir county branches— brought to
cn W , ee £ ldent '„, I)r ; Charles N. Dowd, called
flon?i rL *l « medlc ,a l organi 2 ation of the Ns-
Ameriran w- He recalled figures of the Spanish-
>~EW-YOKK DAILY TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25. 190!!.
JOSEPH 51. Wilson
Philadelphia. Nov. 24.— Joseph M. Wilson, a. well
known archil and glneer, died suddenly to-day
in bis office from heart disease. He was sixty
four years old. Mr. Wilson was born in Phoenix
vilie. Perm., and was graduated from the Rensse
laer Polytechnic Institute; Troy, N. Y. In 1860 he
was appointed assistant engineer of the Pennsyl
vania Plnilroad. and was connected with that road
until I^6.
In 1888 Mr Wilson made a special «=* animation of
in England and France
designing the Drexel Institute, in this city,
board nf three experts en
gineers Int committee of Con-
i •■ ictlon of the Wash
. ■ i iward
Rapid Transit Commls
■ ■ t on the t< :-ibility of a
rapid ti i teni In that city.
Mr •■■ n member of the Institute of Civil
■ ' .mi. American Society of Civil
■•can Philosophical Society, Fel
low of the American Ac ■ i ;at on tor the Advance
: ■ ■ • • rtcan Insti-
JOIIX P. DOLE
Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island. Nov 24 —John
P Dole, postmaster of this village, died at his
from a complication of dis-
Mr V't'.e was born in Boston on January IT,
His parly life was spent at Boston and Phila
ne to Cold Spring Harbor in 1860,
and had resided here slnc<>. Mr. Dole was married
in Phil - In 1857 to Jane Thomas, whose
native place was Mi If or d, Del
Mrs Dole and three crildren survive him Mr
Dole w.is tin recognized Republican leader in hi*
aistrlci Of Huntington town and Suffolk County.
He if prrsmtPd his town as assessor for two terms,
and ■>• ounty overseer of the poor for,two
term*. H« was appointed postmaster by President
:i Kinley.
MICHAEL SANFOKD
Haokensack, N -T . Nov. 24 (Special).— Michael
Sanford, for several years associated with Elihu
iw firm, died at his homo, in Clinton Place.
• yesterday. from acute stomach
He v. as born In Montclair seventy year*
ago, was educated at I'ennington, and for many
years wn? cashier of the First National Bank in
( Ity H« was ■•• '.rother-in-law of Georg*
w Conklln, cashier >>f tho First National Bank.
< iiy. an.l an uncle ot Frank B. Flympton.
■ of' the Hackensack Trust Company. H<a
i •« idow.
PETER SPEER.
Montclair. N. J.. Nov. 24 (Special).— Peter Speer.
eighty years old. one of the charter members of
Mont lair Lodge No. 144, F. and A. M.. died yester
day at his home, in Sussex-aye.. after an Illness of
several months. Mr. Sneer was one of the oldest
members of the First Presbyterian Church, where
a. Masonic funeral will be hew on Wednesday.
JAMES L. STARBUCK.
.Tames L Starbuck. who was the manager of the
Brooklyn branch of the brokerage house of the
llaipht & Freese Company, died on Saturday at his
home. No, 532 Flatbnsh-ave.. Brooklyn, as the re
fult of an operation for the removal of a corn
three weeks ago. He was born In Union City. Ind.
fifty-four years ago, where the funeral will be held
to-morrow. Mr. Starbuck leaves a widow, two sons
and a daughter.
THE REV. ELIAS SAADI.
Th<s Rev. Ellas Baadl, pastor of the Syrian Pres
byterian Church. Washington-st. near Rector-st..
Manhattan^ died suddenly on Sunday afternoon,
near his home. No. ■•■ Hlcks-»t.. Brooklyn. He
had started out to hold the regular service, but.
growing s'.iddonly ill, was Obliged to turn back
toward his homo. At State ar.d Hicks sts. he fell
Into the arms of a policeman, and died before the
arrival of an ambulance surgeon.
Mr. Saadl was born In Tripoli sixty-two years
ago. He was convr-rted and was educated In the
Chrittlan missions in his native land. After three
years of work there he cam»» to New-York, and
established the church of which I -j was pastor.
He had assisted in preparing; a Biollca.l concord
ance !n Arabic, and had translated many Christian
works Into his native tongue.
Ml;. ANNA FAIHCHILD.
■Mrs. Ar.r.a Falrehlld. wife of ax-Congressman
Ben L. FairchlM. of Pelham. died yesterday morn-
Ins In the ■,• neral Memorial Ho?pUM In this city.
Mrs. Falrehlld was before her marriage Mr*. Anna
Crumble of New-York. She leaves a pon. nine
years old. Mrs Falrchiid WM a member of tb«i
First Presbyterian Church of Mount Wrnon.
WALTER N. MILLS.
Chlcapo. Nov. 24— Walter N. Mill«. father of Lu
ther Laflin Mills, ar.d a plor.eor wholesale drygoods
merchant of Chicago, cied yesterday at (hi home
.' his da\;ehtfr. Mr?. Caroline J. Faker, In this
city. Mr. Mills was born In Canton. Conn . in I*2l.
and came to Chicago In IMB,
DR. EDWIN GRANVILLE.
Karfas City. Mo., Nov. 24.— Dr. Edwin Oranville
<iiert here to-day from lcoxotor "•:*!-.- He «»:v^.l
with the Tlst New-York State Militia, reaching the
rank of lieutenant. He was born in New- York in
3543 and was the sr.n of Edwin i.ranville. for many
y^urs prof"«=f-"r of trckooray In N**w-York Dnl
versity.
JOHN F. RICH
John F. Rkh who for three yean .id been the
cashier of tha Third National Eank. at Grove and
Bay st? , Jersey City, di^d on Sunday at the home
of his parents. No. 132 Fa'.rview-ave., Jersey City.
H<> tv&s forty-two years old nn<i .'i bachelor. Mr.
Rich was the president of the Palma. Club and vice
pre*l<lent of the Schubert Glee Club of J«r:-ey City.
His death resulted from a stroke of apoplexy sus
tain«?<l while at work In thu bar.k on November i".
BEyiORS' STRIKE NARROWLY AVERTED
THO?E AT THE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE OBJET
TO WEEKLY ORATIONS.
Declaring that they are overworked and will
write no mor« weekly orations, the nlor class of
the Polytechnic JnstiT'it*. In Brooklyn, Is up in
arms ayair.Lt the (acuity. Yesterday, when the
regular oration was due, w.is the day set for going
on a strike and showing that they would no longer
abide by the "'obnoxious" rules. President Henry
Sanger Snow, of the faculty, hf-ard of the proposed
strike, however, and had a conference with the
preside] of the fiemor class At the close of the
meeting the latt«_-r went to his classmates and told
them that President Snow had consented to con
sider their grievance. They therefore decided to
hand in their oration ns usual yesterday and await
developments.
It i.- a tirr.o honored custom that la his senior
year each student fhall hand in an oration each
week Failure to observe this custom has been
held a suKlcient cause for suspension until the stu
dent should h;ive m.id* up his neglected work. The
cla?s this year voted the • ration a burden, and was
willing to defy the faculty if It refused to consider
a proposition to lighten the burden.
GOODERSON REFUTES NORFOLK CHIEF.
DECLARES HI NEVER PAID CHOKER "WOULD
HAVE TO GO; THAT HE MIGHT BE BOSS-
John J. Delaney. who was the attorney for Fire •
Chief Croker in the latter' 6 trial before Commis
sioner Sturgis. yesterday received the affidavit of
Martin J. Ryan. Chief of the Fire Department of
Norfolk, Va., in which he says that he was told I
by Battalion Chief Gooderson as early as Febru
ary 10 last that II was settled that Croker would
have to go, and, that he, Gooderson, might yet be j
boss. The affidavit was a. surprise to Mr. Delany. j
"It came to us out of the sky." he said, "and it
saainn too Important a matter to be withheld from
the public, Gooderson was one of the men used
against Chief Croker, and the fact that as early
as February 10 Gooderson said what Ryan swears
he did say is of great importance. If is seen to be
Important when it is remembered that as late an j
August there were no charges and none threat- I
ened."
The affidavit is as follows.
On or about February 10, 1502, Battalion Chief i
F. W. Goodereon said to me whll« in hls'offlce in
Twentleth-st : "It is about settled; Croker will !
have to go. and I may be boss yet." ,
The affidavit was made before A. J. DaJtoa. a. '
Justice of the peace in Norfolk, whose authority to
take affidavits is attested to by James V Trehv
clerk of the Corporation Court of Norfolk." '
1-tattaiion Chief • ;.">derFon. at his office in the
quarters of Hook and Ladder No 12 at No 243
West Twentielh-st.. was lririignant about the state- I
!:.• Dt, uri'l said :
'•It' is false in every way. I did rot see Chief
Ryan from August of last year to July of this year 1
and I never Raid anything like that to him. I never •
said suen a thing to anybody. It is not true." j
AN electric target.
From The Philadelphia Press.
The new electric target of Captain Charles !
Chevallier. of the French Army. is made up of '
a series of metal segments. When a proiertile
strikes a segment an electric circuit is com
pleted by one or more spring-supported rods at I
the back, and the exact spot struck is signalled
upon an annunciator. «."«mcu
OBITUARY
The Most Sumptuous Number of any
Magazine ever published
A FEW OF THE CONTRIBUTORS
Swinb\irne
Mark Twain
W. D. Howells
Robert W. Chambers
Edith Wh«vrton
MeLrgaLret Del^nd
BootK Tarkington
Mary E. Wilkins
Amelie Reives
Mrs. Humphry We^rd
etc., etc., etc., etc.
19 Full-Page Pictures in Color
by
Edwin A, Abbey, R. A.
Howard Pyle
Elizabeth Shipperv Greerv
E, M. Ashe
Andre CastaLigne
H. C. Christy
etc., etc., etc., etc.
9 Short OC Separate
, Stories ||Z J Contributions
At w IP J• • Ed<warJ Bok, Editor of The Ladies' Home Journal, 'writes:
de I>VIXe JLdltiOn "*J h Jbout as close to a model Christmas magazine
as I can imagine possible to conceive and carry oat
GEXERAL MILES'S OBZERYATIOyS.
IMPRESSIONS GAINED ON :iIS TOUR OF THE
PHILIPPINES.
Manila. Nov. 24— Lieutenant General Miles
will leave here for China, Japan and Russia at
the end of the week. Discussing- the Philippines
with the correspondent of The Associated Press
to-day General Miles said:
I have- seen thirteen thousand of our troops
and will Inspect more of them before leaving
I found them to be In fair condition. This is a
hard country for campaigning. I Inspected the
principal natural defences of the islands and
some of the harbors which th« government may
fortify. I found the people generally impov
erished from the effects of the war and pesti
lence which followed it. and I fear some may
suffer from famine. The dearth of farm ani
mals leaves the people no means of recovery.
The Army and Navy dub will entertain Gen
eral Miles to-morrow.
WILL TAKE LUMBER TO MANILA.
San Francisco. Nov. :4.-The freight transport Dlx
has sailed for Puget Sound, where she will take on
a cargo of 3.000,000 feet of lumber for Manila This
t^^th'eU'lrnm^nf m f**t T*(-?nMv ««*«ete<l
for by the government. "
KEG ROES. GOING TO LIBERIA.
A'SENT OF LIBERIA*.' COLONIZATION* SOCTETT
ARRANGING FOR 6AILINa OF THREE
HUNDRED FROM SAVANNAH.
Savannah. Oa.. Nov. 21-D. J. Flummer, agent
of the Llberian Colonisation Society, of Birming
ham, is here arranging for the sailing from this
port on January 20 of three hundred negro colon
ists for Liberia. The steamship Donnakl, of New-
York. he says, has been chartered. Flummer was
formerly conected with the International Migration
Society that sent two shiploads of negroes from
this port to Liberia. p
Flummer went to Liberia with the steamship
Lorada. and he says that fully 86 per cent or the
negroes carried on that steamer and on the steam
ship Horsarc are satisfied with their new home
and surroundings.
A SILENT ZOyE.
From The Hartford Courant.
That a powerful alarm like a tog siren can
be sounded without being heard is shown by the
Investigations of E. P. Edwards on the English
coast. At a distance of a mile from the siren
the sound began to die away, and between two
and three miles it was entirely Inaudible while
beyond three miles it was again plainly heard
This mysterious "silent zone" constantly
changed in extent and position.
INTOXICATION FROM BEAKS.
From The Indianapolis News
Among the peasants of Southern Italy. Sicily
and Sardinia, a curious malady has been noticed
by physicians, which is caused by eating beans
One of the most remarkable effects of the mal
ady is a species of Intoxication resembling that
produced by alcoholic drink In some cases
persons predisposed to the malady are seized
with the symptoms of intoxication if they pass
a field where the bean plant is In flower, the
odor alone sufficing to affect them
»
HOPE FOR HIM.
From Pearson's Weekly.
A young probationer was preaching his trial
sermon in the church in one of the inland vil
lages of Scotland. After finishing the "dis
course" he leaned over the pulpit and engaged
in silent prayer— act which surprised the
congregation, which was unaccustomed to such
procedure. Suddenly the young preacher felt
some one slapping him on the shoulder, and, on
turning round, he beheld a grave and sympa
thetic elder, who remarked: "Hoot, man. dinna
tak* it Bae muckle to hert; ya'll maybe dae bet
ter next time."
40KMOKM-OKHOK) J-O+O+O+O+O+O* 040K>K>K>K>K>*0«>40+0*OK>K>K>K>*<
! Mercantile Library
; ASTOR. PLACE AND EIGHTH ST.. near Broidwiy.
I Contains Over 230.000 Volumes.
XEIT BOOKS PURCHASED AS SOON 1 AS PUBLISHED. ANT> LARGELY
| DUPLICATED TO MEET DEMANDS.
I Books «J« r*!M^r«d by Co*th at R«l<!«ace« or Places of Business 'a THmm fork.
' MEMnEKSHIP. «3 PER TEAR. """
' Me.-nbenhJp aad delivery IB I lc*. id P«r year.
• Books may bo drawn as frequently as
I desired and at the pleasure of the member-
I 800 PERIODICALS A\D MAGAZINES OX FIXE XX THE READING ROOM.
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WOMAX EDITOR OY TRIAL.
MRS ELIZA W. HEATH SUED BY MAMAP
, ONECK TEACHER FOR «*<W LIBEL
DAMAGES.
Trial of the criminal libel suit which has set
Mamaroneck agog was begun before Judge Matt
la the Westchester County Court, at Whlt« Plains,
yesterday. Mrs. Eliza West Heath. Editor of "The
Mamaroneck Democrat." a social reform paper.
and president of the Mamaroneck Vigilance Com
mittee, was charged with having circulated re
ports derogatory to Miss Anna L. Lynch, a school
teacher; with having written to her telling her to
resign to escape legal proceedings, and with hav
ing written to the School Board demanding Miss
Lynches discharge. Two factions have been formed
In MamaroneeJc. on© upholding Mrs. Heath; the
other saying that her action was caused by anger
at receiving a letter telling her that her children,
not having attended school, were violating th©
Truant law.
Mrs. Susan M. Hurtbert testified that she had
seen Miss Lynch, while driving with her sister and
Dr. Adolph Hoerr. a married man. sit on th* doc
tor's lap and "laugh boisterously."
George D. Andrews. Miss Lynch's counsel, said
that the buggy was only wide enough for two. Mrs.
Hurlbert also said that she had seen Dr. Hoerr at
Miss Lynch's home "at 11 o'clock at night—some
times even later."
Richard O'Gorraan. ex-presldent of ths Mamaro
neck School Board, told of Mrs. Heath's letter.
and added that the board considered the charges
unwarranted.
Mrs. Heath said that she wrote the letter be
cause of statements she nad heard about Miss
Lynch
v Dr v Hoerr and Miss Lynch both denied that there
had been any improper conduct on their drive. Dr.
Hoerr said he was the Lynches family physician
and he and his wife visited them frequently. Miss
Lynch said she had never sat on Dr. Hoerr's laD.
Sho is suing for $20,000 damages.
PAyiOillUE.
From Answers.
Certain gestures are absolutely Identified with
certain feelings To shake one's fist is to threaten;
to hold up one's finger is to warn. To Indicate
thought we place the tips of the angers on the
rorenead; to show concentrated attention we apply
the whole hand. To rub the hands is everywhere
a sign of joy, and to clap them a sign of enthusi
asm. It would be easy to multiply examples. At
urination, negation, repulsion are all indicated by
motions that every one understands.
It is the samu. la quite as great a decree, with
nationalities, In spite of the original diversity of
the races that make them up. The mimetic char
acter results at once from race, from history and
from climate. - .. -*
The gesture of the Englishman Is fierce and
harsh; he speaks briefly, brusquely; he Is cold,
positive, forceful. His salutation is cold and ac
centuated, but his handshake Is loyal. The gesture
of Germany is heavy, good humored and always
ungraceful. Many of the Slav people are unwill
ing to look one In the face, and they have a false
gesture.
The Spaniard and the Portuguese, although
dwelling In a southern land, gesticulate little; their
language is rhythmic, slow, solemn; they are grave
their salutation is a little theatrical.
The Italian Is lively, mobile. Intelligent. gar: his
language is harmonious, sonorous, warm and lu
minous, like his country's sky. The salutation of
SPECIFIC FOR DIABETES
Taw in«i<lK«a wasttac 1i— ■■■ it ■•-imilM^
C-J±rS\r X Ft ttr»oirtl>en». tBJt»DU» re.:«T» «»»
/ "N»/~r» VJyA unqceochibl* Uurtt. r«pJvU» «•""*
I fV>v r Vr- 1««* "» ius»r. acd pr«v»tts Do**"
V w yn EWYOR K. ao<!L«ttin«Dnig#B»
17%
17% 17%
Seventeen Ter Cent—
It rounds easy— but
jtut stop a moment
and consider t&hat it
means to increase
your business more
than one-sixth in one
year.
The
Tribune s
INCREASED
17%
During the Tast year.
17% 17%
17% _
the Italian Is quick and full of feeling, his ges™ l
colored and exaggerated.
Helen-How shall I word the advertisement.
Herbert? . , „*«•. *«itl»
Herbert— Well, say: "Lady help B |ing-- s
treatment, high salary, no cooking-no *»=> rV|r.
no ironing— to do but eat and go out *>■• - .
noons.**— a Life,

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