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PSYCHOLOGY.
Two Uteful Contributions to Its Lit
erature.
OUTLINES OF PSYCHOLOGY. An Elementary
Treatise with Some Practical Applications. By
Josiah Boyce. Ph. D., LL. D.. Professor of His
tory of Philosophy in Harvard University. Oc
tavo, pp. xxvii. 332. The Macmlllan Company.
EXPERIMENTAL. PSYCHOLOGY AND ITS
BEARING UPON CULTURE. By Oeorge Mal
colm Stratton, M A Yale; Ph. IX, Leipsic; As
sociate Professor of Psychology and Director
of the Psychological Laboratory in the Univ^r
pity of California. Octavo, pp. vii. 331. The
Macmillan Company.
These volumes may very well be considered
as complementary to each other. The one de
tails the methods of the new psychology, the
other seeks to apply the results of empirical in
vestigations to everyday life. Not that Profes
sor Stratton confines himself to the discussion
of laboratory work. Part of his general plan is
to show us how experimental psychology has
Increased our knowledge of the human mind.
But. in the main. It may be said that he ad
dresses himself chiefly to such as are already
versed In the Intricacies of mental research.
Professor Royce's volume, on the other hand, is
primarily Intended for those thoughtful persons
who. with little more than a general concep
tion of what psychology represents, desire to
know Just why it is well to study the subject
and the practical deductions to be made from
th* facts of psychology. Necessarily, Professor
Iloyce'a omission of any detailed statement of
laboratory work, while he alludes constantly to
••xperiment as the cornerstone of his psycholog
ical structure, will arouse the interest and curi
osity of his readers, and Impel them to endeavor
to discover Just what is the nature and extent
of psychological experiment. They will find this
adequately told In Professor Stratton's work,
but If they flrst approach it by studying Bald
win end James, two great exponents of latter
day methods, they will be greatly aided in com
prehending the full import of the investigations
Professor Stratton sets forth.
It Is thus obvious, from the standpoint of the
lay reader, that Professor Royce's volume is the
more valuable of the two. Not that Professor
Royce at all times avoids the extreme techni
cality visible throughout Professor Stratton's
work. As a matter of fact, he goes far deeper
than superficial perusal will disclose, and he
will undoubtedly vex many psychologists by his
unique way of approaching and treating his
subject, his daring innovations in terminology,
and. above all. by his original subdivision of the
contents of consciousness. This, however, is no
vital concern of those to whom he chiefly ad
dresses himself— the teachers of our young.
What they are anxious to learn is not, for ex
ample, whether intellect and will should be dif
ferentiated, or the actual dimensions of feeling,
but how best to utilize psychological discoveries
In the classroom. This Indeed is information
which Is obtainable from Professor Royce, who
brings out with clearness and precision the
great educative function of psychology in
moulding educational theory.
Buch a function was not realized by the old
psychology, which too often failed to take into
account the united growth and mutual de
pendence of mind and body, relying upon an in
trospective system of procedure. The divorce
between the old and the new psychology Is thus
emphasized by Professor Royce, and empha
sized, It should be noted, much more forcibly by
him than by Professor Stratton, who, experi
mentalist though he be, Insists upon the neces
sity of making Introspection and experiment
■wcrk hand in hand. Both writers lay great
etrees upon the cervices rendered to psychology
by physiology, since it was physiologists who
first undertook the investigation of the mind by
laboratory methods, and many of the great
psychologists of to-day began by being physiolo
gists. Professor Royce has borrowed largely
from biology,* as well as physiology, In order to
strengthen his psychological theories, and frank
ly acknowledges the debt. Professor Stratton
rests bis contentions on experimentation, which,
he contends. La as much psychological as physi
ological. Of course, he has his own debts to
acknowledge, but they are debts essentially dif
ferent from those Incurred by his speculative
contemporary.
Whatever students may think of the contro
versial side of Professor Royce's volume, the
fact remains that, did it do nothing more than
thow teachers how easily they may err in esti
mating the mental calibre of the various pupils
In their charge, it would render a great service
to the cause of education. But he has gone
further than this; he has supplemented his
warning with instruction, with advice as to the
best means of developing latent capacity, of
aiding the individual to adapt himself to his
environment. His volume thus approaches an
exact statement of the science of pedagogy, and
as such may be studied with profit by all who
Intend to enter the ranks of the teacher. Take,
tor example. Professor Royce's discussion of the
problems of memory, a jdiase of our mental lif«>
which, by the way. is also studied from the edu
cational standpoint by Professor Stratton. The
varlatJens and tricks played us by memory have
been unfolded and analyzed by modern psychol
ogy as never before, and it has been shown th it
unless a certain mental affinity Is brought about
It were useless to attempt to enforce the re
tention of facts by the mind, The defective
memory of a 'backward" child should, therefore.
rot be arbitrarily dismissed by the teacher as
due to Inattention, bur should be carefully
studied until its .secret cause is found, when also
will often be discovered a means of putting th»
mental life of the child In proper touch with i;s
♦vavlronment, and thus effort hie a revolution in
its "memory scope."
As Interesting phase <-.f development upon
'which we are not surprised to find Professor
Royce dwelling is the importance of the cultiva
tion of mental imagery — that is to say, "imagi
nation "in its psychological sense. As he points
out. few teachers remember that 'our more or
ganized series of mental images actually form
part of our conduct," end as a consequence
"suppose that to train the imagination of chil
dren involves something quite different from
training their motor processes." The writer's
contention is that the moat wholesome training
cf the Imagination is properly to be carried out
In connection with the training of conduct.
Further, since '"play activities" are factors in
developing imagination, and hence increasing
mental Initiative, It is not astonishing to find
Professor Royce emphasizing the usefulness of
play and the necessity of giving the young
plenty of opportunity for recreation, of allowing
free vent for the development of any latent tal
ent. As he aptly says:
This Initiative makes of the child very fre
quently a specialist in seme form of childish art
or of amateur collection. And what such initia
tive may accomplish for the organization of the
child's mental life becomes manifest when we
for a moment consider the great variety of arts
and ideas that children teach themselves
through play. The various types of self-con
sciousness, such as appear during the dramatic
Impersonations of early childhood; the various
arts, such as drawing, manual training, sleight
of hand, 6klll with boats, or with other objects
of early play — these, together with a knowledge
of nature, and sometimes a certain literary in
ventiveness, are a few of the mental treasures
that childhood may win from its various games.
It was the recognition of this that started
FrCfcel In the right direction, and later resulted
in the now famous kindergarten system. What
tt» lcmdergartners do Is to direct the play ac
tivities la a way that will lead to concentration
Of thought and the exercise of a stealy volition.
Of coarse there ar» those ho hold that any
"direction" of the play activities can only be
eoffipiratively useful, since the spontaneity
which should accompany play la thus to a
greater or less extent checked, but It would
seem to remain the fact that making any kind
of work appear like play will do more toward
effecting a proper execution of the task in hand
than would be po .ble were the Idea of play
totally eliminated. Hence, though Professor
Royce does not pause to call attention to this,
even the apparently purposeless tendency shown
to-day In removing from our schoolrooms the
barren, workshop aspect which until recent
years they bore Is full of significance from a
psychological standpoint. It helps to put the
child in closer touch with his natural environ
ment, Inducing in the schoolroom the same spon
taneity visible in the schoolyard.
One could write to an unconscionable length
upon this fruitful theme. Such a vast deal is
Involved in the problems of properly educating
children. And there can be no question but that
Professor Royce has made a very Important
contribution to the literature of educational
theories. We are in a progressive age. and, al
though we may agree with Mr. Gradgrlnd that
what we want are fact*, certain it Is that we
cannot deny that the more new light is cast
upon facts the better for all of us and for the
facts themselves, provided the new light be
cast by truly scientific methods. That psycholo
gy Is steadily furthering our pedagogical knowl
edge must be the unbiassed verdict of those who
have watched tbe work of such men as the au
thors of these volumes That psychology has
its limitations none are readier to acknowledge
than these authors themselves, but that it has
as yet come anywhere like approaching these
limits Is impossible to believe.
BOOKS AND AUTHORS.
Current Talk of Things Present and
to Come.
Agnts and Egerton Castle have been spending
a good part of thn summer in Montreux.
Switzerland, working on a now novel. Of their
late book 'The Star Dreamer" Mr. CastJe writes
to a friend in this vein:
"As you know, the book was begun in 1901
during our stay In our 6uminer residence at
Hindhead (In Surrey). There is a wild garden
apart from the pleasure grounds, and much of
the 'Garden of Simples' — for that was then, as
you remember; the title I had chosen — was writ
ten in that fragrant atmosphere. Over the high
est wing of the house I had established my ob
servatory — I have always been a stargazer my
self, partly as a lover of the 'night's splendors
and the music of the vast,* partly as the man
whose earlier studies at Cambridge were all of
natural philosophy. The silence of 'The Star
Dreamer,' the character of Sir David Cheveral,
the wounded dreamer, with his folly of renuncia
tion, and of Kllinor Marvel, impersonation of
beautiful, vigorous, healthy life and love, who is
to 'redeem him from cloudy phantasms' to the
real Joy of the world; even the scenery of Bin
don-Cheveral. with Its legend concerning the
herb garden— all these things had been familiar
to us for a long time before we began the book
in earnest. It was only in the green and blue
surroundings of our Hindhead house that they
began to pulse into life, and nearly the whole of
the first draft was written there in the sum
mer of 1901.''
Among the new editions which are coming
from the Harper presses Is a library edition of
Motley's "Fail of the Dutch Republic," In which
the illustrations are for the most part repro
ductions from paintings by American artists.
"The Flamingo Feather" and "Chrystal Jack
& C 0.," which belong to the Young People Series,
are also appearing in another edition. The pub
lishers report that the demand for these books
of Mr. Kirk Munroe, who Is at present, by the
way, making a tour cf the world, continues
steadily season after season. Another new edi
tion on the came list Is that of James Otis's
boys' book, "Raising the Pearl."
This author, more properly known as James
Otis Kaler, is at present at work upon his nine
ty-fourth book. It will be published by the
J. B. Lippincott Company early in the autumn
season. Before attempting to write books, in
which he has rolled up such a large score, Mr.
Kaler was at work on newspapers In this city
and Boston for something like twenty years.
Such an apprenticeship, he holds, is of the
greatest possible advantage to an author. In
IbSO "Toby Tyler;* was put forth. It was his
first story of any notable length, and since its
appearance he has devoted all his time to such
composition, a fact which the number of his
books still on sale would suggest.
This new story will probably be called "The
Treasure Hunters."
Eustace L. Williams has taken the complica
tions nf a largf boarding school for the matter of
h juvenile which will appear with the imprint of
the Lothrop Publishing Company, with the title
"The Mutineers." The president of one of the
B< bool societies assumes too great an authority
und influence over the affairs of the entire Ftu
opiu body to please the hero. Disgusted v.-itb.
thf* reign of favoritism, this intrepid youngster
Introduces the schism of a rival baseball team,
defeats tn«» regular team, and thus overthrows
the party in power.
Appropriate photographs of Eights In the old
Pennsylvania town Kennett Square are used In
illustration of a new edition of Bayard Taylor's
"The Story of Kennett" which the Putnams are
bringing out. The story was originally rub
lished nearly forty years ago.
A story of love and adventure, set in the time
of Chaucer in England, Is announced by Hough
i-->n. ilirtiin ft Co. in a novel by Florence Con
verse called "Long Will " This will be ready in
October. ' The Little Chevalier." a romance of
the French regime in Xew-Orleans In the early
eighteenth century, written by M. E. M. Davis,
is scheduled for the same time. Two novels and
s bor.k ft stories will appear, however, next
month They are Ruth Hall's "The Pine Grove
House," a picture of life of city people at a small
country hotel; "Good Bye, Proud World." by
Kllen Olney Kirk, a story In which the scene
changes from the bustle of a New-York news
paper office tr, the quiet of a small Connecticut
town, and Guy Wet more Carryl's stories of the
French capital, set forth in a volume called "Zut
and Othf-r Parisians."
"Chiefly of the Lyric Kind" was the descrip
tive Eubtitle to the volume of poems by Watts,
published in 1737, of which we come upon a copy
In tbe current list of books from Frederick
Wheeler, London. An earlier book is a copy of
Quarles poems, printed for Marriott, with ten
title pages, all bearing the date 1638. "Feast
for Wormes," "Pentelogia," "Hadassa," "Job
Militant," "Elegie Upon Dr. Wilson" and the
"Historic of Samson" are among the titles. T.
Moriro puts forth In 17f*0 a book of "Essays on
Various Subjects," which, upon examination, ap
pear to be rather definitely limited to the sub
ject of the position of women in the Greek and
Latin world. Oxberry*s "Dramatic Chronology"
contains the names, dates of birth, first appear
ances and deaths of most of the principal Lon
don actors and actresses up to 1840. The forty
nine numbers of the "Ciir! Whig, or Consistent
Protestant." are listed, collected in the first two
volumes published under the same title In 1739.
The daughters of Dr. Samuel G. Howe. Maude
Howe and Florence Howe Hall, have used his
records and the journals of other teachers of
deaf mutes, a? well as MLss Laura Bridgman's
own Journal, in preparing 1 an account of Dr.
Howe's work and success in her behalf. The sys
tem of education he devised for Miss Bridgman
baa beep, used "with benefit since for a great
number of deaf mutes, notably In Miss H<»len
NEW-YORK DAILY TBIBUNE, SATUBDAY. AUGUST 22. 1002.
Keller's case, and the records he kept were com
plete. It was Dr. Howe's intention in 1846 to
write a detailed account of his experiments with
Miss Bridgman, and later, in 1874. he expressed
a similar determination. But he died about a
year later without accomplishing this purpose.
The bock, which will be published by Little,
Brown & Co. in the autumn, will be called
"Laura Bridgman, Dr. Howe's Famous Pupil,
and What He Taught Her."
Frances Miltoun, in a book which she calls
"Dickens's London," has endeavored to construct
London as it was in the novelist's day for the
use of his readers who visit the city, or who do
not — and most of them do one or the other.
There are over forty illustrations, reproduced
from contemporary prints. L. C. Page & Co. are
the publishers.
The authorship of tbe lines beginning.
Punch, brother, punch with care;
Punch in the presence of the passengalr.
has been called In question by Monsignor Doane
in giving his recollections of Noah Brooks to
"The Newark Daily Advertiser." While Mr.
Brooks was editor of that newspaper, Monsignor
Doane says, he belonged to the Fortnightly
Club, and at one of their meetings, when the
monsignor, in commenting on a paper that had
Just been read, spoke of Mark Twain as the
author of the well known verses. Mr. Brooks
eprang to his feet instantly, saying that not
Mark Twain, but he himself was the author of
the lines. According to the interview in "The
Advertiser" Mr. Brooks acknowledged the as
sistance of the late Isaac H. Bromley, of The
Tribune. As a matter of fact. Mr. Bromley
himself was roFpoiiFihl* for the apparently im
mortal verses, imd comp<*>ed them upon the
suggestion of a colleague In the office.
Some time after they had appeared in The
Tribune and had been quoted all over the coun
try, Mark Twain ust-d them as a text for a tale
he contributed to "Th«» Atlantic Monthly" (Feb
ruary, 1S70). called "A Literary Nightmare."
His readers generally supposed that he was the
author of the verses, and from time to time
they are regularly attributed to him. Follow
ing the appearance of Mark Twain's tale. Mr.
Bromley wrote a letter to "Scribner*s Magazine"
(old eeries, April, 1876), called "The Horse Car
Poetry, A True History," and signed Winkel
reid Wolfgang Brown, in which he apportioned
the credit between Mr. Brooks and two other
members of the 'staff. All that remains to be
done in the matter of the authorship of this
skit is to discover a cipher in it.
The inspiration of the Ones as cited in Mr.
Bromley's letter was a sign in horsecar No. 101,
Fourth Avenue line, which read as follows:
The conductor, when he receives a fare, will
punch, in the presence of the passenger, a blue
trip-slip for an eight cent fare, a buff trip-slip
for a six cent fare, a pink trip-slip for a three
cent fare.
BOOKS OF THE WEEK.
EDUCATIONAL.
THE BRITISH NATION. By George M. Wrong; M.
A. fcvo. pp. xxxli. 616. ID. Appleton & Co.).
In the '-Twentieth Century Text Booka" •erica,
presenting an account of th© salient feature* In ta«
history of Great Britain.
ANIMAL. STUDIES. By David Starr Jordan. Veroon
I. vraan Kellogg and Harold Heath. Bvo. pj». vlll,
•»„:<. (D. Ajjpleton & Co.)
In the "Twentieth Century Text Books" series.
offering a comprehensive treatment of animal life.
Illustra.te.l with reproductions of photographs and
ura wings.
FICTION.
OUT FOR THE COIN. By Hugh McHugh. Illustrated
by Gordon H. Grant. 12mo. pp. 107. (O. W. Dill-
Ingham Company.)
"John Henry's" " experiences In Wall Street Mid at
the races.
UMANOKA. THE ISLAND OF PROGRESS. By God
frey Sweven. 12m», pp. ix. 711. (O. P. Putnam's
Sons.)
An account of tha life of an Idealized oommuntty
on en island in the Southern Pacific, continuing
the narrative related in a previous volume,
"milaro." which described a Darwinian experiment
in artiticial selection on a Southern Pacific archi
pelago.
CIRILLO. By Kffle Douglass Putnam. 12mo. pp. 234.
(Life Publishing: Company.)
The love story of an Italian opera atatrer and an
American heiress.
THE SILVER POPPY. By Arthur Stringer. 12mo.
vi. 281. (D. Appleton & Co.).
THE GENTLEMAN FROM JAY. By George William
Loutritt. Illustrated. 12mo, pp. 236. (O. «,.
DUllngham Company.)
The experiences of a farmer who Is elected to
the State Legislature, and the love story of nts
daughter.
BEARS I HAVE MET— AND WME OTHERS. B*
Mien Kelly. Illustrated. 15mo, rp. -«*• (Phila
delphia: Drexel Biddle.)
\n acount of gome hunting episodes on the Pa
cific Coast, with tales outside the author's actual
experience.
THE MSS. IN A RED BOX. li'mo, pp. x, 329. (John
Lane.)
HISTORY.
STUDIES in NAPOLEONIC STATESMANSHIP. GER
MANY. By Herbert A. L. Fisher, M. . . Svo, pp. x.
W2. (Henry Frowde.)
A HISTORY Of THE PROTESTANT "REFORMATION"
IN ENGT^AND AND IRELAND- By AVtlliam COb
bett. lCmo, re- lv. 300 (Dublin: James ItufTy
& Co.)
MISCELLANEOUS.
ESSAYS A Nr> ADDRESSER. By Jules Cambon. Svo.
•>>. tl ». appleton a- fo.)
POETRY.
VITTORIO EMANVELK PRINT. OF PIEDMONT. By
Jam*? MurniPll. 12mo. pp.' 113. (Philadelphia:
Franklin Prlntlne Company. i
RELIGIOUS.
TEMPORAL DOMINION OF THE POPE IN THE Dl
vine PLAN. By Rev. Francis Dent 12rrv-i. pp. >.
154 ,M A. Butlen.
A sketch ■{ the world' history befor* th» birth of
<~hr!?t is followed by a study of th» mi"! m of
Christ. Peter's place air.ong- th* Apostles. an<l »Ht»-
M»qi]ent occupants of the Papsil chair.
REPRINTS.
THE STORY OF KENNETT. By Bayard Taylor. Illus
trated. I2mo, pp. x. 169 (G. P. Putnam's Sons.i
The "Oedarcroft" edition. Illustrated with repro
ductions of photographs.
MEMORIES OF THE LIFE OF THE LATE JOHN
MYTTON ESQ. By Nimrod. Illustrated by Henry
Alken and T J. Rawllns t2mo. pp. xlv. 206. (D.
Appleton & Co.'
THE TOUR OF DOCTOR SYNTAX IN SEARCH OF THE
PICTURESQUE. A Poem. Illustrated by Thomas
Rowlandson. I2nto. pp. iit>H ID, *ppl«'r>n &• Oo.)
TRAVEL AND TOPOGRAPHY.
TOWARD THE RISING BUN By Sigmund Krausz.
Svo, pp. 302. (Chicago: Laird & Lee. i
A narrative of trawl In the Orient Illustrated
with reproductions of photographs.
BOER BIBLES
The Work of Restoration
From The Pall Mall Gazettp.
Inquiries as to the results which hay» fol
lowed the issue by Lord Roberts some time ago
of a memorandum to the various army centres
concerning the restoration of Boer family Bibles
show that there is every Inclination on the part
of the possessors of th^pe "Booth African war
relics" to give them back to those who prize
them most. Eighty have already been received.
They come from all Quarters, and are likely to
be followed by more. The recipient is W. H. F.
Alexander, at the central offices of the Society
of Friends, whose South African Relief Com
mittee have been the prime movers In the mat
ter.
The Bibles are an interesting and. indeed, in
valuable collection; but the members of the
British aristocracy, the officers, and the sol
diers, or their friends whose libraries they en
riched, have readily parted with them. It may
easily be surmised that to none but the repatri
ated Boers would the big venerable Bibles con
taining family records a hundred and a hundred
and fifty years old be more priceless possessions.
Others were small pocket Bibles; and they, too,
had a sentimental and real value. A few of
them had been given by wives to their husbands,
and many were picked up on the field of battle.
The big family Bibles were in the main
brought away from farms which were deserted.
Three or four of them have been obtained from
persons of title In this country. Many more are
believed to be in the hands of other possessors.
The work of restoration to their original owners
has its difficulty; but the committee are solving
it by keeping up a correspondence with various
people In South Africa in order to ascertain ih»
present whereabouts of these owners
One elgnlflcant feature may be noted in con
nection with the matter. At a time when a pop
ular London auction room was crowded every
fortnight with "South African war relics," from
Krl^r** hat and roat to all sorts of sundrW
Books and Publications.
The love story of a fascinating American and a
gallant Englishman who stoops to conquer.
The Lightning Conductor
NINTH IMPRESSION. $1.50.
"Wholly new and decidedly entertaining." —
Springfield Republic an.
Henry Holt and Company
Rare Books and Prints in Europe.
• ,-r-v mj f_ 15, Piccadli ly
• •■iniTlrr r M London, Dealer in
yUdi iL^n oW Mss> Early
Printed Books and General Literature. Agent
for Learned Societies. "
Pickering , Peeler* la »*re
HiCKCriniT Ancient and Modern
* IWI * VI ■■■& Ensilish Literature.
&C Kn 4"i- /-» I History. Poetry,
, L, II til TO. ' Drama, and Fiction.
60, HAYMAKKhI, Foreign Bookbinding*
LONDON, ENGLAND. > Catalogue* issued.
; Americana' ""S^SK*"
39, Great Russell St., LONDON. ENGLAND.
Dealers in Books. Prints. Maps, 4c, relating to tmerici.
Catalogue! on application. Correspondence solicited.
■""» l_ SOI! & CO. 1 Dealers ta Rare
S^OnSOri & LO. 1 Books. choice
A W *JZ>yJ *» tV V/VT. MSS^ Choice En
23, COVEiNTRY ST., I phs. Sporting Books
_, .... ■ auiuvu J and Prints, 4c
Piccadilly, LONDON. ' CaUlo S iaauc«L
£21 --» l-^s I •-« ( CHOICE ENGRAVINGS
OCI OH 89 (A\ezzotints, Colour
(Frank T I I Prints, Americana, &c).
(hfa __ } FINE AND RARE
,18, Shaftesbury i BOOKS, VALUABLE
Avenue, London, W. I AUTOGRAPHS, &c.
The De I*a More Press
298, Regent St., London.
THE KINGS LIBRARY— FoIio* & Quartos
on hand made paper ■ nd real vellum.
Catalogue with prices post free on application. ■
JAS. RIInELL & SON ) £-j; ™£ £
(Late of 9«. Oxford Street) . I gravlngs, Including Portralta.
53. SHAFTESBURY IVEIUE, I views. Me»otint«, etc
LONDON. I.C. ) E»ttbli*he4 over 50 Yean.
EPAR^?IM<J A 3flN3 *■ *> OLD books.
■ rAROUno o. 0U»d ( f <2> mezzotints, por«
43. BROMPTON ROAD. ' TRAITS OF LADIES AND
LONDON f NOTABLE PERSONS.
(Opposite Tatterxall*\ \ (3) ETCHINGS BT WHIST-
Catalog Post Free. / LER. HADEN. Ac.
Steamboats.
Palatial Steamers "NEW YORK" and "ALBANY" of
the Hudson River Day Line, fastest and finest river boats
In the world.
Leave Brooklyn. Fulton St. (by Annex) 8:00 a, m.
•• Desbrosses St. Pier — _..S:4O "
" West 22d St 8:00 "
" West 129 th St 9:20 "
Landing at Yonkera, West Point. Newburgh, Poughkeep
■le Kingston Point. Catskill. Hudson and Albany. Dally,
except Sunday. Special Trains to Catskill Mtn. resorts
and Saratoga, and easy connection* to all points East,
North and West. Through tickets and baggage checked
at offices of N. Y. Transfer Co. Most delightful one-day
outings to West Point, Newburgh or Poughkeepaia, re
turning F down ur oD<sn t Musia
F»est.aurant oven a.t 7 A.iL MU3IC.
STE^iiE^ MhWt IPOWEILL
on Saturdays and Holidays only, 2.20 P. M. For Highland
Falls West Point, Cornwall. Newburgh. New Hamburg.
Milton Poughkeepsie, Eaopua, Kondout and Kingston.
Famous Mary Powell Orchestra.
rD~>/ir\^Tr'fT?\r?{l and points IN
iDJUIJ^) Li Ul/LMI NEW ENGLAND.
„.,, mvvß LINE for Newport. Fall River. Boston and
ilf^as-ern^nd Northern Points Steamers PRWpLLA
and W'RITAN Orchestra on each. Leave Pier IS*.
N\ R.f, foot^f 'Warrta* St.. week days and Sundays at
PROVIDENCE LINE for Providence. Boston. North and
list PILGRIM and CONNECTICUT. Or
chestra on ea.h. Leave Pier 18. N. R.. foot of Murray
IxbN&OTON L^NE^forS-to'nington. Watch Hill. Nan*.
gaaLett Pier Boston and East. Steamers MAINE and
SEW HAMPSHIRE. Leave Pier 40 N. R.. foot of
NIOR^CN I OR^CH t -Ll'NE fo d r ay New ISoSdoi^lihir-. Island. Block
NORWICH LINE for New London. Fisher's Island. Block
Island Norwich, Worcester. Boston. North and East.
Steamers CITY OF LOWELL and CITY OF WORCES
TER. Leave Pier 40. N. R., foot Clarkson St.. w«ek days
YEW* HAVEN LiNE for New Haven. Hartford, Spring
field and North. Week daya Str. CHESTER W. CHAPIN
leaves Pier 40. N. H.. 2:()O P. M.; foot 31st St.. E. R..
800 P. M. Str. CITY OF LAWRENCE leaves Pier 40.
V R . 12-00 Midnight. Sundays Sir. CHESTER W.
CHAPIN leaves Pier 40. N. R.. 8:30 A. ML; foot 31st St..
E R., 1015 A. M.. returning, due New York. 8:00 P. M.
TICKETS AND STATEROOMS, all Lines, at 167. 261.
«73. 1,165 1 554 Broadway. 3 Park Place. 25 Union Square,
245 Columbus Avenue. 273 W. I^sth Street, 153 E. 125 th
Street. New York: 4 Court, 8(50 Fulton Street, 290 Broad
way, Brooklyn, and at Piers.
ot»jl Erase ins.
For Calskill and CaUHlll Aloui.uiin i'ointa,
Hudson and The Berkattirea, Coxkackui ai.u way
landings. Steamer KAATiii:SK.ILI> or ONTi»KA
every week day from Pier 43. N. 11 . at t' P. M..
and from West 1-Jth St. at 7 P. M.
Extra Bout (ONTEORA). Saturdays. 1:30 P. M. from
Pier 43. 1:50 from West 12»tb St.. for Cat ski 11. Hudson by
annex, and Maiden.
Connections— Catskill Mountain, Boston
& Albany and Albany & Hudson Railroads.
Special trains for Cairo, Palenville, Otis
Summit, Haines Corners and TannersvUla.
Dining Rooms on Main Deck.
Descriptive Folder Mailed Ft—'.
[p[£(D[PQJ£ ? S LDEII
FOR ALBANY.
ADIRONDACK OR DEAN RICHMOND.
Leavpti Pier "2. N. B. . foot Canal St.. at « P. M . week
days, connecting with express trains for SUMMER RE
SORTS North. East and West. Saturday night steamer
connect* with Sunday morning trains for SHARON
SPRINGS. SARATOGA. NORTH CREEK and steamer on
LAKE GEORGE. Summer Lxcursioa book free. Orches
tra on steamers
TTOW iLDssatE.
learner "Saratoga ' Of "City of Troy" leave West Hjtl
Street pier daily 6 P. M., except Saturday.
SUNDAY STEAMERS TOUCH AT ALBANY,
l'lrect railroad connection at Troy for all resorts NortS
and EXCURSION. TROY. J2.50: SARATOGA. $4.50.
EXCURSION: TROY. tS-BO: SARATOGA. $4.80.
DINING-ROOM ON MAIN DECK. SEARCHLIGHT
DISPLAY. SEND rOR BOOKLET EXCTTRSION TOURS.
BLOCK ISLAND, ORIENT. GREEXPOIIT.
SHELTER ISLAM) and SAG HARBOR Boats
leave Pier 13, E. R.. N. V., near Wall St., week days,
except Saturdays, 5:30 P. M , Saturdays : P. M. MON
DAYS. EXTRA TRIP. 8 A. M. FOR GREEXPORT AND
SAG HARBOR. Excursion ticket*, good only to return
same day — boat. 12.00; by rail, $3.00.
On Aug. 20, 22 and 23. the steamer will leave New-
York at 6 P. M.
pirked up in Boer homes, ther» was n*»v»r a
Bibk; in all the heterogeneous lot.
THE ART OF INTERROGATION
From The London Spectator.
What la the -■■■ ret of the art of Interrogation?
Putting aside quirk sympathies which lie at the
root of every social art. we believe the most
essential quality for those who would excel in it
is directness. The art of asking questions so as
to learn, Instruct, pleas;*;" and Influence Is not th*»
art of beating about the bush. The questions
which offend and silence are the questions which
suggest some ulterior motive. It is a foundout
scheme which makes men angry. Anythlnjg of
the nature of a trap keeps us on our g«ard. If
we once fall into one, we resolve it shall be the
last time; suspicion kills confidence. Interroga
tive hints are utterly useless. The avert man
does not dislike to be questioned: he hates to be
startled, crossed, interfered with, reproached,
wearied, or betrayed. He hates the questions
which are not asked with a simple Intention.
Take that question occasionally asked by fa
natics in' the street who desire to be assured of
the salvation of passers by. That is a question
which never fails to Irritate, chiefly because the
ask.:- has no desire for Information, He gen
erally leaves before his startled Interlocutor can
get out the shortest and most succinct reply.
His aim Is to administer a shock, not to learn
something; to give his hearer what we may call
a spiritual "turn," not to enlighten himself.
Again, there are questions which are asked, not
because the asker wants to know, hut because
he intends to tell. Othors, while ostensibly iii
rected to find out a man's opinion, are really in
tended to reflect upon his character. Some men
Inquire as to their neighbors' projects In order
to put difficulties in their way. String! of mean
ingless questions are poured out by those who
desire to tend an interest In sum* subject
which they neither know nor care anything
about.
We believe »h<» conclusion nf rh* tnatt»r to
be this- Th» art of interrogation 15 h parlous
branch of the social arr. Well asked questions
are of the essence of agreeable intercourse, bur
the Interrogative mood will not Justify an Im
pertinence, an Interference, a verbal assault —
nor, for the matter of that. a bore.
Instruction. I Instruction.
H^Tf ■ DRAKE gllT
BUSINESS SCHOOLS^
THE CHEAPEST FIRST-CLASS SCHOOLS.
OPEN THE ENTIRE YEAR— DAY AND NIGHT
TOUCH TYPEWRITING ! FALL TERM - ] BUSINESS ARITHMETIC^
GBEGG SHORTHAND xo.nu xx^wu. BOOKKEEPING
LET'I £IT. WRITING cx-DT Q PENMANSHIP
TELEGRAPHY ar*ri. 0. | ENGLISH. Etc
Drake's * NEW YOBK SCHOOL, H
New 64 page Catalog BROADWAY AND 17TH 3T
N«w 64 page Catalog DOWSTOWN OFFICE.
bent xree. . 12 s tribune buxj.
For Young Toadies— City.
Hamiltonlnstitdte
ttilKLS.i
The Primary nn^l KJnderKarten
DEPARTMENTS and
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
LOS WEST Hint ST.
For farther information adilrria
N. A. SHAW, Jr.. 45 WEST 81ST ST.
Academy Mount St. Ursula
BEDFORD PARK. NEW YORK CITY.
This Academy for young Ladies and little Glrla la di
rected by the Ursullnes. It Is delightfully situated on ths
Harlem Railroad, near St. John's College and opposite
BRONX PARK.
The Course of Studlea Is thorough, embracing all th»
branches requisite for a solid and refined education. Th«
Academy will reopen on Wednesday. Sept. 8. For circular
address MOTHER SUPERIOR.
ST. AGNES SCHOOL,
34th Year. Albany. *. Y.
Miaa Seabnrr. Head of the School.
Rt. Rev. W. C. Doane, L.L. D-.
President of the Trnateea.
Situation high, central, healthful. Large butla-ng re
modelled, single bedrovjins. New chemical and physical
laboratories. Preparation for Radcllffe. Bryn Mawr and
other colleges. Additional year needed for St. Agnes
diploma. Regular exercise uncr carefiu supervision re
quired. Outdoor sports. Catalogue sent If desired.
BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS— R«v.
Dr. and Mis. CHARLES HUNTINiiTON GARDNca*.
Principals. 607 Flf.h Avenue.
D£ LANCET SCHOOL FOB GIRLS.
71 West 85th St., New York.
Thorough and Systematic Instruction. Modern Methods.
Gymnasium. Special and College Preparatory Courses.
Small Classes. Individual Attention. Year book on Ap
plication. Reopens October flrst. Twenty-eecond year.
MRS. LESLID MORGAN'S
BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRL 3.
13 and 15 West S«th Street.
Near Central Parit. New York City.
REOPENS WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER IST.
fpHS MERRILL-VANLASR SCHOOL.
JL Boarding and Day School for Girls,
formerly
THE" PEEBLES AND THOMPSON SCHOOL.
«0. 32 and 34 Eaat 67th Street. New Tork City.
ISS GBRRISH-S COLLEGIATE SCHOOL. S4t> West
End Avenue. New York. Special courses of study.
Fitting for College a specialty.
THE MISSES JATTDON'S
BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
26 EAST 56TH STREET.
CjT. CATHERINE'S ACADEMY. 539 to 543 West 153rt
O St. (Washington Heights*. New York. SiM.-rs of
Mercy; boarding and day s.-hool for young ladies and
children. Address SISTER SUPERIOR.
mH3 MISSES GRAHAM
X (Successora to the Misses Green).
BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
(Established 1816.) Reopens Oct. "th.
176 West 72d St.. Sherman Square.
mHE FTNCH SCHOOL FOR GIRL 3.— 753 Flfth-ave.. cor.
X 38th-st. Poet-Graduate Classes (College Work). 733-
TBS Madleon-ave.. cor. «4th-st.
For Boys and Young Men —
Hamilton
45 AVeat Slat St. (Manhattan Sit. X.)
Preparation for College and University.
Boarding Department <i!O Boys Received*.
Twelfth year beßlna September aoth.
N. ARCHIBALD SHAW. JR.. M. A.. Principal.
The Loyola. School,
OS Eaat 83d St., corner Park Aye.
PREPARATORY COLLEGIATE DAY SCHOOL, under
the direction of Fathers of the Society of Jesus.
REOPENS MONDAY. OCT. 5.
Bach class limited to ten pupils.
N. X. McKIXXOX, S. J.. Principal.
J. P. PAGAN. S. J.. Vice-Principal.
BERKELEY SCHOOL,
No. & West 75th St.
Opening- Day. 24Ui year. Sept. 30.
JOHN STUART WHITE, Ll*. D..
HEAP MASTER.
tunnn'c school .
¥7 UU U O VTH Avl: I ON V*™ ST REST "
BUSINESS AND SHORTHAND.
Known everywhere by every body-
Gets Duster and Better.
Every month shows an Increase; more teachers, more
students and more positions for graduates.
Day and NiKht Session.
Visit the school. To se* It is to appreciate It. It looks
well to us; we are sure it will look well to you.
F. E. WOOD. PRESIDENT.
A catalogue for th« asking.
MOESE AND ROGEKS SCHOOL ™* 9 .
One West 46th. Reopens Sept. US. Primary. Intermediate
and Classical Until Sept. 14 address Cotult. Maas.
i IHAPIN COLLBGIATQ SCHOOL.
\J 24 East GOth St.. New York.
84TTT YVA"R Begins Sept. 30. 1803.
Ol±xa - x r ' n n ' English. Classical and Primary Dept^L
B. LORD BUCKLEY. A. 8.. Principal.
H. B. CHAPIN. D. D.. Principal Emeritus.
IRVING SCHOOL. L. D. RAY. 35 WEST 84TH ST.
REOPENS SEPT 29TH.
Over ninety graduates fitted successfully for college
since IS9O. Primary Department. Year book on request.
PRATT INSTITUTE. BROOKLYN. N. Y.
JL. Fall Term begins September 2Sth.
For Both Sexes— City.
PACKARD COMMERCIAL SCHOOL.
♦th Ay. & 23d St. Day & By's;. 'Phone 101-13.
RKOPENS TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 1.
Office now open for registration of students.
FORTY-SIXTH YEAR
REMOVAL.— MISS ROBERTS'S SCHOOL FOR GIRLS,
with kindergarten and classes for boys, has been
moved from 272 Madison avenue to 7 "West 39th Street.
Reopens October Ist.
rTUIE 3ERLITZ SCHOOL OF iiASGDAGES.
X Madison Square <1123 Broadway*. Brooklyn. 73 Court Sl
New Term begins now — Trial l««*on» frea.
Hoboken
STEVE NS S CHOOL,
THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT OF THE
STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY,
River Street, between sth and 6th Sts.. Hoboken. N. J .
REOPENS SEPT. 14TH. 1S"J8
Registration day for applicants for admission on Sep
tember ST.
Examinations for admission on th« 10th and llta of
September.
Complete courses of study preparatory to all Universi
ties, Colleges Schools of Science, Law and Medicine.
Thn rat« of tuition for all classes Is Sl.Vi per year, or
100 per t<rm.
Th*"s»- terms include all the studies.
For catalogs* apply to the Principal of Stevens School.
For Young Ladles — Covntry.
MISS BUTTS'S SCHOOL FOR GIRLS,
NOAWI.^H. CONNBCTICTrr.
Fort Edward Collegiate Institute.
For young worsen and girls. 46th year. September i'M
For Illustrated catalogue, address
JOS. E. KING. D. D.. Fres.. Fort Edward. New- York.
EMMA ,VIL.T*AKr> SCHOOL*
TROT. NEW YORK. Formerly Troy Femal« Sem
inar). Boarding and Day School for Girls. «•..]>*• Pre
paratory and Uer.eral Courses. Certificate a,lnm» to Van
ear, Wellesley. Smith. Mount Holyoke Colleges. Cornell
University. > >!. , ear opens Sept. lota t'JO3.
MISS ANNA LEACH. A M.. PRINCIPAL.
TNGLESIDE— A SCHOOL. FOR GIRLS.
JL NEW MrLFORD. LITCHFIKLD CO.. CONS.
School year beKins Tit— l« October 4th. IDU3.
MRS. Wll. D. BLACK. Patroness.
MISS DANA'S -Hi ic.|, FOII OTRI*
MORRItrrOWN. N. J. (Suburban to \>w Tork->
Exceptionally broad curriculum. Certificate admits to four
leading college*. Music and Art. Resident pupils. (UulX
Catalogue on request.
MORAVIAN PEMINAIIY FOR GIRLS Bethlehem.
rcnniy!vsDla Founded 174& Address
J. MAX HARK. D. D. Principal.
OssiKixa school for cjinus.
OSSIKTNG-ON-HITDSON. N T.
B'->rh -«• Vi«s CLARA C rin iJ9 Principal
RYE ISEMINART T
For particular* allrvu
Mrs. 6 J ISFE. To* Ml—— STOWE. R>«. New Tork.
rnHE MISSES METCaij»s Boarding and Day School
J. tar Gtrls. Tarrytown JJ. T. Collas* preparation.
Physical Culture. Tennis. Basket-ball. opana 6«pt. 22d.
For Boys and Young Count T7
PENNSYLVANIA MILITARY COLLEGE
Chester. Pa. 42r,d year besrins September 1*»
CIVIL. ENGINEERING. CIiEMIsTUY. ARTS fiji*
PREPARATORY CLASSES. INKAXTRT. AUTILLeSy
CAVALRY. "A thorJUghly military school at I*ll beli
type In every respect. ' — War Department. 1905.
Catalogue of Col. «'ll\ltl.Ks K. HYATT. '"- ii||m L
HUDSON' RIVER MILITARY ACADEMY "
So. Xyack on Hudson, w xnlles frcm Nrw Tor/
Preparatory »chool for your.* n.«n acd bc>s.
Courses: English, Scientific. Classical ar.d Corn«n'«i
Stable of trained hordes anJ ponies fjr in'U'axißZ"
Illustrated cataloifue of as*. J. Wilson, v. S. V x. If
■» TAPLEWOOD. CONCORDVILLE. p'vv — < succ»i«fni
school, one of the best to Inspire wltJi eaerS
to wake up r<.ys to duties of Hf> : able professors- Milan
preparatory and commercial courts; ryroaaslura. aUi'«ti^
Held; former students n.iw sUcc*!«sful business "c- ea*
doctors, lawyers. leicis!ar<-r». etc ; one la v. S. " 3eaaaM
young boys sdmitted. f'-'-^K JOSEPH SHORTLLDO*'
Yal*>. A. M.. Prin. X" tobsurn. *******
N FW Y 0 RK. T ■ ri-y •. o■ ■
Irving Institute, Non-Military.
Fall t»rm. Sept. 23d. I M hi: MAN. \. u_ Prfcelial
mHE HIGHLAND MILITARY AWDEMT Worrit**
A. Mass. 4Sth year. Best sanitation, high schPliiUa
standards. Military training with horr.e rare. V.'«!j ts~
pointed laboratories. Visitor: The Hr. Rev A'ei. tT
Victon D. D. Head Master. JOSEPH ALDES 'aHAW
A. M. ««****.
ST. DAVID'S HALL. — Thorough education- nujabe* el
K5 boys limited: iieal spot; college cr fcusip.e**^
Rev. W. L. EVANS. U. A.. Siarsdale, >• T.
MONTCLAIR MrUTARY >
WAU>EN I : -Tr-LAIR. ». JL
For Both Sexes — Country.
ST. aUatBTS-lIC-THE PINES Mr H;>pe. Westth*et»p
1O CO.. N. Y.— disttrs ct St. Kranots. fnr young lad!»s
and boys under 12 year*. N>w bnlldjasa and iarge grO';aij.
Address SISTER SUPERIOR. Primruse P. 0.. New York,
Laze Schools.
x - nw vniiK \ Sixty-ninth year opens Oct. 1 feML
ww^r TOHK \ Uny t a Me, w(!h g^gioa, j^g,
UNIVERSITY { -i ■••" ta 6 P. M. Kvcaht
. „« . StS t !»■•*■. sessions 8 to 10 P. H.
LAW SCHOOL , Graduate classes lead to LL. M. sad
■«>««^«^^«^~ v^' J. D. Tuition JluO. For circulars
address L. J. TOMPKIN3. Registrar. Wasoisgua &e>.
NEW" VOUK < liny .school. 135 Nassau St..
I^WV SCHOOL ! Kvenluic school. t New York City,
-Uwighl Mrlhoil" of Instruction. LL. B. In twe
year?'. LL. M. in three years. High standards.
Send for catalogue OEOROE CHASO. Dean.
School Agencies.
A JtfERICAN AND FOREIGN TEAOIEKS* AuENCT
AMERICAN AND FOREIGN TEACHERS*
supplies Pri; lessors. Teachers, Tuu>r». 'Jvv'rneaeea,
etc.. to Colleges. Schools and Families. Apply to
Mrs. M J TOITNQ FI'LTON 23 Crlon Square.
S u rroga tes ' Xuticts.
TN PURSUANCE OF AN ORDER OP HON.
Abnv.T C. Thomas, a Surrogate of the County cf New
York, notice is hereby given to all persons haviag claims
against Rosalie Seligman. late of tha County of Now
York deceased to present the same, with vouchers there
of to the subscribers, at their place of transacting busi
ness No. 132 Nassau Street, In The City ct N«* I ash oa
or before the -'Uh day of August next.
Dated New York, the l'Jth day of February. 1908.
SAMUEL STRASBOURGER. CLEMENTINE MSRZ
BACH. ROSALIE EPSTEIN. Executor*.
STRASBOURQER. WEIL. ESCHWEOE A SCIIALLES.
Attys. for Executors. 132 Nassau St.. N. Y. City.
TN PURSUANCE OF AN OUDER OF HON.
Abner C Thomas, a Surrogate of the County of N«w
York, notice Is hereby given to ail persons having claims
against Kate B. Russel. ur Kate Fowler, cr Kate B
Fowler, or Kate Towel!, or Kate .'; TjweJl, or Kat»
Towle late of the County of New York, deceased, to pre
sent the same, with vouchers thereof, to the. subscriber.
at his place of transacting business. Room S3. on Fifth
Floor of No. 120 Broadway. I:, the City of N*w York. «a
or before the twenty-a. .! day of December next.
Dated New York, the ISth day cf June. 1803.
WILLIAM H. RUSSEL. Adr.UaUtrater.
MILLER. MILLER -v STORM. Attorneys tar Adminis
trator. 120 Broadway. New York City
TN PURSUANCE OF AN ORDER OF HON.
Abner C. Thomas, a Surrogate of the County of New
York, notice is hereby given to a.l persons having claim*
against George W. Stephana, :a: < of the County of New
York deceased to pr*sent the same, with vouchers tner«
of. to the subscriber a: her dace of transacting t>'-^=«* ;
the office of her attorn« No. luO WUl!am Street. inThe
Borough of Manhattan. City of New \urlc. oa or before
the 21th day of A,. "g&nm. Exemtrtx
Dated New York, tl.e 24ta day of February. VJOi ,-.
HITfHINGS & PALUSER. Attya. for Executrix, N<n. V»
William Street. New York City. _^_____
pUSHMAN, EPHRAIM HOUIIOpK. -IX
; pursuance of an order of Hon. Frank T. F}t»e^
a Surr<.gat« of the County of New York. notK-e l» hereb/
given to all persons having claims against fc^Uralm Hoi
brook Cushman. Uto of the County of ttvm \crt^de
ceased, to present the same, with vouchers thereof, to tee
subscribe™, at .heir place of transactißg busin " > '-Jli **♦
office of Edward A. Freshman. No. 140 »*«£ S;r^ .to
the City of New York, on tr aaf r» -.9 Ittl *a -f Sep
vember next. _
Dated New York, th* 12U> day of March. 1003 T »w»si
JOSEPH W. CUSHMAN. HOWARD CUaHMAN. JAMES
S. CUSHMAN. Ex-cutors. ,^.
EDWARD A. FRESHMAN. Attorney for Executen. W
Nassau Street. New York City. .
■vrERRIAM. ELLEN M.-IN PURSUANCE
"*■*■ of an order of Hon. Abner C. Thomu a Surrapt.
of the County of New Tort notice Jto h«e»I .v'^T
all persons having claims against Eil-n M. Mirrt».
late of the County of New York. <iece--»*r<i " B^h"»
the same, with vouchers thereof, to the subscrt^r s. 6»
place of transacting business, at th« oatoi or char.eji£
Lattln*. No. 84 Ptr.» Street. City ef S«» J? I*-,,?-
ough of Manhattan, on or I afore tie tWrn«a •"* ■
December next.
Dated. New York. June 27th. 1903. ..^
WALTER B. MERIUAM. .» - - -.'.r-tJ*
CHARLES P. LATTING. Attorney for Aar.^"i;- I .'* > T
Plae Street. New York City. Borough cf "— ~
(CHARLOTTE G. MILLER. —IN PCBS^-
ance of an order of Hon. Frank T. ■ rt "SJe»
Surrosjate of th« County of New Tori BBtfc* >J J^g
given to all persons having claims against Caannja _,
Miller, late of the County of New Yori, "-*Sa«r
present the same, with vouchers thereof, to the if if
at her place of transacting business, at the '" - ca «
attorney. Edward F. Brown. Eso.. No I>> Wail fw.
Borough of Manhattan. City of New York, en or X*z*
the twenty-first day of September next. ._*.
MARY A. BURGOYNE. >.-«»«•
Dated New York, the twelfth day of Mar - iou3- w-
EDWARD F. BPOWX, Attorney for Esecu'.rll. ■■ "•"
Street. Borough cf Manhattan. N- Y. City. ;
'PHOMAS. SAMUEL— IN PURSUANCE OF
an order of Hon. Frank T. rttsv a =urrc?*M of
the County of V- v York, notice Is hereby gives to ■.■'■.
sons having claims against Samuel Thorn.-is. lat» OT _i;\
County of New York, decease-!, to present the »a--*«. "• ,
vouchers thereof, to thr fubsoritaers. at tMtf P-Jf' *
transacting business, at th» c.fSra cf Pc ( k'um. »w .
Ktng. No. $0 Broadway. Borouch of Marh.if.an. •',*>]•
New York, on or bef:>r* the flft^-nth day of <>-:cbe.. ">*»
Dated New York. th>" first day of April l'> ••- „_-..-Mr.
ANN A'.T.rSTA THnMA-i. EUBANOR T^Jggggj
MAN. Executrlc-s. EDWARD P. THOMAS, G-O*'
MACCT'LLOCH MILTER Kx^rurdrs ,_, .-.
PECKHAM. MILLER & KTNT,. Attorneys WJ-^JlteS
(rusta Thomas. Edward R. Thorna*. Gt?lirse _, Mac^"v,*
Miner. so Broadway Borough cf Manhattan. Cl:y a* «
Tot*
JN PURSUANCE OF AN ORDER OF no *
Abner C. Thomas, a Surroeate "f tt* c<lu ;*v-Mr
New V rk. n^tlc*- is hereby riven ta a'.J ;.-:*orv« ."•
claim? a«ain?t Catr:ar:r.<» Aim !ate Of tt« <- ,-'-h«^>
New York. '?-•-,• rreser.t the »arr.*. WOT ' 10 ...,.,»
thereof, to the !■^l^scrt^«'^. at his »l*ea «J*~^Tm3
business, at the offW of Mitch^K & M!-el-.»!l. N* ** £%
4« Wall Street. •■ The Oiv of X.w York, en or ix"**
th* 26th day of Alia "ex:. „„
Dated New York. th» COth day of Fsbrnary. |»» .
FREEMAN BI.»>ODt;OOD. E**^!!^
MITCHELL * MITrUFT.U Atiorafvj f*r "JfrrJJ
KOB). 44 .<• 46 Wall Str^t Borough of Manhattan. *-"*
New York
JN PURSUANCE OF AN ORDER OF HO*
Abnei C. Thomas a PurTCicat* of the Qw«gr_ < £ l
York, notlcs !s h -robv «r:v -n t.> a!! person* hav_< c-«;
aralnst Charles F.n.-I.hard. lat« of Ihe Cmir-.rv «- :±»~tof
York, dwajwi. to preMM H* WV*» wttll vnuc * V*vL *
tr» th» »u!*r:Vr at hi* p!ae« uf transacting dusJ-.«»
the uA • of SaekMl * I_-»n.-. !*• I.* N ■•■■'■•'J >tryv r >Jicr»
ouch of Manhattan. ,n th*- City of New Toifc en tr "•• •
th>- 13th day of September vx:.
Dated New Yi.rk. the ilth d>v of Mar>-h. ""■• . _„—
LEWIS UOPNER. MsWi
SACKETT * I.Wi. AttOTB*Y» for Bsacutor. t» >»■■—
St . Bor. : of Manhattan. N. Y. CUy- —
The Tribune
Uptown Office
Ik now located a*
1,564 Broadway
Between 36th and 37th St*

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